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Anti-Terrorism Control Orders

Volume 467: debated on Tuesday 13 November 2007

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how frequently control orders are subject to review; and what form such review takes. (162207)

Each non-derogating control order is valid for 12 months and will be automatically subject to a judicial review before the High Court.

The controlled person may also appeal a dispute relating to any modification of the control order with any such appeal also being heard at the High Court.

In addition, the Home Office has established a review group, with representation from law enforcement and intelligence agencies, to keep the obligations in every control order under regular (quarterly), formal and audited review.

Lord Carlile, the Independent Reviewer of the Prevention of Terrorism Act 2005, reviews the operation of the Act on an annual basis.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment her Department has made of the effectiveness of control orders. (162209)

The Home Office keeps the effectiveness of control orders under review. We continue to assess that control orders are an essential tool to protect the public from terrorism.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many control orders are active. (162211)

I would refer the hon. Member to my written ministerial statement published on 17 September 2007, Official Report, columns 126-28WS.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many individuals currently subjected to control orders have previous convictions for terrorism-related offences. (162212)

None of the individuals currently subject to control orders have previous convictions for terrorism-related offences.

One individual has been convicted of breaching his control order and sentenced to five months' imprisonment.