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Immigration

Volume 468: debated on Thursday 6 December 2007

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department with reference to the oral answer of 15 October 2007, Official Report, column 548, on inward migration, how many and what percentage of migrants to the UK were (a) EEA nationals, (b) non-EEA nationals, (c) dependents and (d) students in each of the last five years. (163940)

I have been asked to reply.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician, who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 6 December 2007:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question with reference to the Oral Answer of 15th October 2007, Official Report Column 548, on inward migration, how many and what percentage of migrants to the UK were (a) EEA nationals, (b) non-EEA nationals, (c) dependents, and (d) students in each of the last five years.

The requested figures are presented in the attached tables. Table 1 shows UK immigration for calendar years 2002-2006 separated into EEA and non-EEA nationals. UK nationals have been excluded from the EEA group and are shown separately. Table 2 shows UK immigration 2002-2006 for those ‘accompanying or joining a family member’ and for those immigrating for ‘formal study’ shown separately.

Both sets of figures are based on Total International Migration (TIM). This is the most comprehensive and only official estimate of long-term civilian migration covering both flows to and from the UK.

Total International Migration1: time series, 2002 to 2006— inflows by citizenship, United Kingdom

Thousand

All citizenships

British

Percentage of citizenships

EEA2

Percentage of all citizenships

Non-EEA3

Percentage of all citizenships

2002

513

97

19

61

12

355

69

2003

508

99

20

66

13

342

67

2004

586

88

15

129

22

368

63

2005

563

96

17

151

27

315

56

2006

591

81

14

167

28

342

58

1 Based mainly on data from the International Passenger Survey. Includes adjustments for (1) those whose intended length of stay changes so that their migrant status changes; (2) asylum seekers and their dependants not identified by the IPS; and (3) flows between the UK and the Republic of Ireland.

2 EEA grouping excludes British citizens. Up to and including 2003, EEA is defined as Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and the EU15 (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, the Irish Republic, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and Sweden). From 2004 onwards, the estimates also include the A8 (the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia) plus Malta and Cyprus. British citizens are excluded from all groupings .and shown separately.

3 For 2004 onwards, the Non-EEA grouping excludes Malta and Cyprus plus the eight Central and Eastern European member states that joined the EU in May 2004.

Notes:

1. These are revised data following changes to the methodology for estimating Total International Migration (TIM). This was first introduced in the 2006 mid-year estimates released in August 2007 and in the annual TIM estimates released November 2007. Therefore they may not agree with previous estimates produced by ONS.

2. Figures have been rounded independently and may not add to totals.

© Crown copyright 2007

Total International Migration1: time series 2002 to 2006—inflows by main reason for migration, United Kingdom

Thousand

All reasons

Accompany/join

Percentage of all reasons

Formal study

Percentage of all reasons

Other reasons2

Percentage of all reasons

2002

513

65

13

122

24

326

64

2003

508

77

15

137

27

295

58

2004

586

102

17

148

25

336

57

2005

563

84

15

139

25

340

60

2006

591

104

18

157

27

330

56

1 Based mainly on data from the International Passenger Survey. Includes adjustments for (1) those whose intended length of stay changes so that their migrant status changes; (2) asylum seekers and their dependants not identified by the IPS; and (3) flows between the UK and the Republic of Ireland.

2 Other reasons includes work related reasons.

Notes:

1. These data have been revised following changes to the TIM methodology. Therefore they may not agree with estimates that have been published previously.

2. Figures have been rounded independently and may not add to totals.

© Crown copyright 2007