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Written Answers

Volume 468: debated on Thursday 6 December 2007

Written Answers to Questions

Thursday 6 December 2007

Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform

Corporate Hospitality

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform on how many occasions he has accepted corporate hospitality in the last 12 months. (171321)

Chapter 7 of the Ministerial Code sets out the rules on the registration of hospitality.

Engineering: Skilled Workers

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform what assessment he has made of future engineering skills needs. (166294)

I have been asked to reply.

The assessment of future engineering skills needs is led by SEMTA, the Sector Skills Council (SSC) for science, engineering and manufacturing technologies sector. SEMTA has produced sector skills agreements (SSAs) for the aerospace, automotive, electronics and marine sectors in 2005-06. Each SSA identifies current workforce development and skills needs, sets out future skills needs and key skills requirements. SSAs are supported by an action plan which identifies the proposed ways in which the needs will be met. Government are working with the SSC and many other delivery partners to take these actions forward.

Summary documents on the Aerospace, Automotive and Electronics SSA and the Marine SSA have been placed in the Library. Full reports of these can be viewed on the SEMTA website at:

www.semta.org.uk.

Export Credit Guarantees: Iran

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform pursuant to the answer of 14 November 2007, Official Report, column 251W, on Export Credit Guarantees: Iran, what UK policy is on whether UN Security Council Resolution 1747 applies to the provision of export credit guarantees. (167320)

UK policy is that UN Security Council Resolution 1747 does not apply to the provision of export credits. The UK has pressed, both at the UN and the EU, for constraints on the provision of new export credit support for Iran, since multilateral imposition would have the maximum impact. We were unable to secure an explicit reference to export credits in UN Security Council Resolution 1747 and, like other countries, have concluded that export credits are not therefore covered by the Resolution.

We continue to press for multilateral constraints on new export credits to be among the sanctions options that may be included in a further UN Security Council Resolution and EU Common Position. Consistent with this stance, ECGD is reviewing its position on Iran and has stopped processing applications for new cover.

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform pursuant to the answer of 14 November 2007, Official Report, column 251W, on export credit guarantees: Iran, what form the Export Credits Guarantee Department market review of Iran takes; what criteria are being assessed in the review; and when he expects a decision to be made. (167322)

All markets are kept under regular review by ECGD to determine their riskiness.

ECGD’s formal risk assessment criteria for any sovereign risk includes the capacity and willingness of the country in question to meet its debt commitments (i.e. the risk of default) taking account of any uncertainties in its international relations; how long a default might last were it to occur (which informs our judgement on the risk of potential claims); and the likely loss that could be incurred. In addition, for riskier markets, ECGD reviews on an ongoing basis whether cover and premium policies and case handling arrangements remain appropriate.

A decision on risk by ECGD is also subject to wider UK foreign policy objectives.

Information: Fees and Charges

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform which stakeholders the Cambridge university academics commissioned to conduct a study on information pricing by his Department (a) have met and (b) plan to meet. (166008)

The terms of reference produced at the time of the tender process is being placed in the Library of the House. This document has been made freely available to parties that request it.

Post Offices: Closures

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform how many responses have been received to the six-week consultation over proposed post office closures in the Greater Glasgow, Central Scotland, Argyll and Bute Area plan. (172043)

This is an operational matter for Post Office Ltd. (POL). I have therefore asked Alan Cook, Managing Director of POL, to reply direct to the hon. Member. Copies of the letter will be placed in the Libraries of the House.

Children, Schools and Families

Academies: Teachers

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what consideration he has given to requiring academies to operate according to the School Teachers’ Pay and Conditions Document; what recent representations he has received on this matter; and whether he plans to consult on it. (169308)

[holding answer 29 November 2007]: Academies are independent schools. One of their key features is the freedom to be innovative in the way they reward and retain staff. That said, we know that many Academies base their pay and conditions on the School Teachers’ Pay and Conditions Document. We have no plans to make that compulsory and have received few representations on the subject.

Aviation

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much his Department and its predecessor spent on (a) business and (b) first class air travel in the last 12 months. (171254)

The spend on (a) business class flights in the 12 month period October 2006 to September 2007 for the former Department for Education and Skills was £241,936 and (b) first class flights in the 12 month period October 2006 to September 2007 for the former Department for Education and Skills was £24,658.

Care Homes: Children

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what guidance has been issued to (a) local authority children’s services, (b) local authority children's homes and (c) privately run children's homes on their responsibility to provide personal individual support for looked after children exhibiting difficulty at school either in relation to bullying or educational matters. (170111)

Improving the education of children in care is the highest priority for the Government. The Children Act 2004 placed local authorities under a specific duty to promote the educational achievement of all children in their care. In 2005, we issued statutory guidance on the duty on to promote the educational achievement of looked after children, which set out how local authorities should meet this duty. This included guidance on how they should ensure children’s homes support the education of children in care.

The National Minimum Standards (NMS) for children’s homes make it clear that measures must be in place within local authority and privately run children’s homes to address bullying. In particular, there must be a policy on preventing and countering bullying which is known to staff and children. This includes bullying that may occur outside the home.

We recognise that the education of children and young people in care is not good enough. “Care Matters: Time for Change”, published in June 2006, set out a range of measures to improve the attainment of those in care and, in particular, personalise their learning in order to narrow the gap between children in care and all children. This work is underpinned by a public service agreement to narrow the gap in educational achievement between children from low income and disadvantaged backgrounds and their peers, and the provisions in the Children and Young Persons Bill.

Following the passage of the Children and Young Persons Bill we are committed to revising the Children Act 1989 guidance and National Minimum Standards for Children’s Homes. This will include guidance on how local authorities and children’s homes should support the education of children and young people in care and ensure that those experiencing difficulty receive the support that they need.

Children: Databases

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what reviews have been undertaken by external consultants of the security measures proposed for the ContactPoint database; and what recommendations were made in those reviews. (170027)

ContactPoint has been subject to scrutiny at key stages throughout its development. My Department’s own Chief Security Officer—external to and independent from the project, has checked the Security Policy, the security architecture, and our risk assessment, and found them to be appropriate.

The news on 20 November of the loss of large volumes of child benefit data from HMRC has raised questions about the safety of large scale personal data in other Government systems, including ContactPoint. ContactPoint will not contain any financial information (such as bank details) or case information (such as case notes, assessments, medical records, exam results or subjective observations).

On 20 November, the department conducted an assessment of how personal data are stored and protected in the Department. As a result of that assessment, I am confident that we have very robust procedures in place.

On 21 November, the Prime Minister confirmed this approach when he asked all departments to check their procedures for the storage and use of data. In light of the security breach at the HMRC, we are continuing to check our procedures to ensure standards are as high as they can be. To this end, on 20 November, the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families decided to commission an independent assessment of its security procedures. This will be undertaken by Deloitte.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) if he will place in the Library copies of the regulations, guidance and directions, on the operation of databases made under section 9 of the Children Act 2004; (170208)

(2) what the outcome was of the feasibility work undertaken to identify the best source of a unique identifying number in relation to databases established under the Children Act 2004.

In relation to question 170208, The Children Act 2004 Information Database (England) Regulations (SI2007/2182) and the accompanying explanatory memorandum are available from the Office of Public Sector Information (OPSI) website:

http://www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si2007/20072182.htm, and:

http://www.opsi.gov.uk/si/em2007/uksiem 20072182_en.pdf

and can be accessed from the Library.

The Department consulted on draft ContactPoint Guidance between 4 May and 27 July 2007. I am arranging for a copy of the consultation draft of the ContactPoint Guidance to be supplied to the Library. We plan to publish the Guidance in June/July 2008 in advance of deployment to the Early Adopter local authorities in September/October 2008.

Section 12 of the Children Act 2004 provides for the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families to establish and operate a database (to be known as ContactPoint) and to make regulations and issue guidance and directions in relation to its establishment and operation. The Children Act 2004 Information Database (England) Regulations 2007 were approved by affirmative resolution in this House on 23 July 2007, and in another place on 18 July 2007, and have been in force since 1 August 2007. No directions have been issued under Section 12 of the Children Act 2004.

In relation to question 170209, the number to be used for identifying child records on the ContactPoint system will be an entirely new and unique number generated from the child reference number by ‘electronic code book encryption’.

This new number will thus be based on, but entirely different to the child reference number, which underpins the child benefit system, such that the unique link between the two numbers will be securely and separately held. This is the strongest form of such encryption, and no pattern or link can be made between these two numbers.

Children: Day Care

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what recent assessment he has made of the levels of availability of childcare for children aged 12 and upwards. (170676)

Local authorities are required to complete by 31 March 2008 assessments of the sufficiency of child care in their areas in relation to children of all ages, covering supply of places, demand for places and gaps between the two. Their assessments will provide the basis for their duty to secure sufficient child care for all working parents from 1 April 2008.

The Government do not collect this data centrally because child care markets are essentially very local, and local authority level assessments aggregated nationally would be potentially misleading. Sufficiency, of course, is not just about numbers but about a host of criteria including accessibility, flexibility and affordability, as well as quantity.

Secondary schools, as part of the development of extended services, are expected to provide young people access to a varied menu of activities in a safe place to be, before and after school from 8 am to 6 pm and during the school holidays in response to demand. At present, 1,720 secondary schools are providing access to the full core offer of extended services.

The core offer in secondary schools comprises: a varied menu to activities in a safe place to be, parenting support, swift and easy access to a wide range of specialist support services and community access to school facilities.

Children: Speech Therapy

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what assessment his Department has made of the merits of integrating the Communication Trust’s Speech, Language and Communication Framework into the Children’s Workforce Development Council’s Integrated Qualifications Framework. (169781)

The Department has not made an assessment. It is for those awarding bodies developing qualifications for inclusion on the Integrated Qualifications Framework (IQF), in conjunction with sector bodies, such as the Children’s Workforce Development Council (CWDC), to determine what skills and knowledge is covered by qualifications. The Integrated Qualifications Framework (IQF) is currently in its testing phase and will not be fully operational until 2010.

CWDC and the Children’s Workforce Network are working together to consider how best to meet the needs of children and young people with a range of disabilities, including speech, language and communication.

Departmental Consultants

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what contracts his Department has with external consultants; what the total value, including all VAT and disbursements, of these contracts are for the current financial year; how long each contract lasts; and what the forecast total value is of each contract. (163805)

Our records show the total number of live contracts with external consultants as at 1 October 2007 was 256; the estimated value of these contracts for the current financial year is £40.5 million; and the estimated value of these contracts over their contractual period is £89.9 million.

To list these contracts to estimate the forecasted total value for each contract and the duration of each contract would all exceed the disproportionate cost threshold.

Departmental Data Protection

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many breaches of data protection security there were in his Department in each of the last five years; and if he will provide details of each breach; (168831)

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many confirmed data security breaches there have been in his Department in the last 36 months; and what action was taken after each occurrence. (169894)

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families whether he proposes to review how his Department transports data; and whether his Department uses TNT to transport data; (169367)

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) when each electronic database held by his Department containing personal information on members of the general public was first created; (169279)

(2) how many staff in his Department have access to electronic databases which contain personal information on members of the general public, broken down by grade;

(3) how many security breaches regarding access to personal data occurred within his Department in each year since 1997.

I refer the hon. Members to the statement made by my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister on 21 November 2007, Official Report, column 1179. The review by the Cabinet Secretary and security experts is looking at procedures within Departments and agencies for the storage and use of data. A statement on Departments’ procedures will be made on completion of the review.

Departmental Ministerial Policy Advisers

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families if he will list the special advisers employed by his Department, setting out in each case their (a) responsibilities and (b) pay bands. (169835)

The names and pay bands of all special advisers are contained in the Prime Minister’s written statement to the House of 22 November 2007, Official Report, column 148-49WS.

Their duties are conducted in accordance with the requirements of the Code of Conduct for Special Advisers, a copy of which is in the Library of the House.

English Language

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what assessment his Department has made of the additional demands that children without English as their first language place on primary and secondary schools. (169550)

At January 2007, there were 789,720 children in primary and secondary schools with English as an additional language (EAL): that is 120,240 or some 18 per cent. higher than in 2004. EAL children comprise 12 per cent. of the whole population, up from 9 per cent. in 2004. Schools need to help such children acquire fluency in English as early as possible so that they can access the full curriculum.

The Government provide funding for new arrivals and EAL children in schools through two main routes. The first is an element within the Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG) for primary schools which was some £256 million in 2004-05, rising to £299 million in 2007-08, with a further rise to over £330 million in 2010-11—an 11 per cent. real terms increase on the 2004-05 level. The second is a substantial provision for EAL through the ring fenced Ethnic Minority Achievement Grant (EMAG), which has risen from £162 million in 2004-05 to £179 million in 2007-08 and will rise to £206 million by 2010-11—a 9 per cent. increase on the 2004-05 level. In addition an Exceptional Circumstances Grant (ECG) has been introduced to reflect changes in local authorities’ pupil numbers which occur after the three year indicative allocations of DSG have been announced. It has three elements covering: an increase of more than 2.5 per cent. in overall pupil numbers; an increase of more than 2.5 per cent. in the proportion of children with EAL; and a one-off payment to authorities with EAL proportions below 10 per cent. which experience an increase in their EAL proportion of more than 2.5 per cent.

These increases in funding form part of the substantial overall increase in school funding: over the past 10 years since 1997, overall per pupil revenue funding for schools has increased by 67 per cent. in real terms. We expect local authorities to be able to manage new pressures from within these very substantial increases.

EU Lisbon Strategy

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what steps he is taking to meet the objectives of the EU Lisbon strategy. (170308)

[holding answer 3 December 2007]: The contribution of education and training to the Lisbon agenda is set out in the Education and Training 2010 Work Programme, and this Department plays an active role within the four main strands of the programme: setting priority areas for action; supporting peer learning and exchange of best practice; benchmarking progress; and developing common tools to support EU mobility and transparency of qualifications.

Furthermore, the UK's contribution to the EU Ministerial Education and Youth Councils and the official level working groups is rooted in the Lisbon Strategy, as this is where we see the EU as adding the most value. In particular, we are working to ensure that education and youth policy complements those policies being developed in other Lisbon spheres such as employment, social policy, and economic and financial affairs. This will help member states develop policies which will equip their citizens with the education and skills needed to thrive in a knowledge-based economy.

Free School Meals

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what proportion of students in each London borough were eligible to receive free school meals in the latest period for which figures are available. (169239)

The available information has been placed in the Library. The tables have been taken from the Statistical First Release “Schools and Pupils in England: January 2007 (Final)” which is available at:

http://www.dfes.gov.uk/rsgatewav/DB/SFR/s000744/index.shtml.

Free School Meals: Greater London

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what percentage of children in (a) Uxbridge constituency and (b) each London borough were eligible for free school meals in each year since 1997. (169681)

GCSE

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what assessment he has made of the effects of the introduction of more modular examinations at GCSE and A level on examination results since 1997; and if he will make a statement. (163535)

It is the responsibility of the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) to regulate the public examinations system, and review standards. The QCA seeks views on the effect of modular examinations through consultations with stakeholders and by monitoring standards. However, it is difficult to disentangle the impact of modularisation from that of any other changes to GCSEs and A levels.

QCA has worked to ensure that standards are consistent and results have improved. Anecdotally, at A level the introduction of AS has helped this by engaging more candidates from the outset and, by allowing them to take a wider range of subjects, candidates concentrate on the subjects they are best at for the full A level.

QCA sought views on the effect of modular examinations as part of the consultation on GCSE criteria which was run earlier this year. The results of the consultation will be available on the QCA website, www.qca.org.uk, in mid-December.

Head Teachers: Qualifications

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many teachers have been appointed without the National Professional Qualification for Headship as existing head teachers changing schools, in each year since 2004; and if he will make a statement. (169795)

We do not hold data on how many head teachers have moved to a second or subsequent headship post since 2004 and do not hold the National Professional Qualification for Headship (NPQH), as there is no tracking of teacher movements across the system. It is compulsory for all new heads in maintained schools or non-maintained special schools to have, or be working towards, NPQH if they took up their first headship post in a local authority maintained school or a special school after April 2004. It will be mandatory to hold the qualification (rather than be working towards it) from 1 April 2009. However, it is not a requirement for head teachers who took up their first headship post prior to April 2004 to hold NPQH in their existing post, or if appointed to a second or subsequent headship post.

Higher Education: British Overseas Territories

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many students from British Overseas Territories have obtained places at London universities in each year since 1997; (168430)

(2) how many students from British Crown Dependencies have obtained places at London universities in each year since 1997.

I have been asked to reply.

The latest available information is given in the table. Figures for 2006/07 will be available in January 2008.

Entrants to Higher Education Institutions in London 1 from British Overseas Territories 2 and British Crown Dependencies 3 by Level of Study Academic years 1997/98 to 2005/06Level of studyAcademic yearEntrants from British Overseas TerritoriesEntrants from British Crown DependenciesPostgraduate1997/9815301998/9925301999/200010252000/0120302001/0210352002/0320502003/0420602004/0535502005/063045Undergraduate1997/9810751998/9920801999/2000151152000/01201102001/02151002002/03151352003/04151102004/05201052005/0620120Total1997/98251051998/99451051999/2000251402000/01401402001/02301352002/03351852003/04401702004/05501552005/0650165 1 Includes all Higher Education Institutions in London Government Office Region.2 British Overseas Territories are—Anguilla, Bermuda, British Antarctic Territory, British Indian Ocean Territory, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Falkland Islands, Montserrat, Pitcairn Islands, South Georgia and South Sandwich Isles, St. Helena and its Dependencies, Turks and Caicos Islands. But also Gibraltar and the Sovereign Base Areas of Cyprus, students from which are counted as EU nationals for fee purposes.3 British Crown Dependencies are—Isle of Man Channel Islands: Bailiwick of Jersey, Bailiwick of Guernsey (including Guernsey and its dependencies)Note: Numbers are on a Snapshot basis as at 1 December, and have been rounded to the nearest 5.Source: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

Mathematics: GCSE

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what percentage score was required for a GCSE pass in mathematics at Grade A for each examination board in each year from 1997 to 2007. (163306)

This information is not held centrally. The process awarding bodies go through to ensure that standards are consistent means that there will be variations in terms of raw marks required between different awarding bodies’ qualifications and from year-to-year.

It is for the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) as the qualifications regulator to oversee the awarding process to ensure that standards are comparable both between different qualifications and over time. The Chief Executive of QCA, Dr. Ken Boston, has written to the hon. Member on this issue and a copy of his reply and the report mentioned have been placed in the Library.

Letter from Ken Boston, dated 20 November 2007:

GCSE and A level grades

Thank you for your letter of 30 October following the answer that Jim Knight MP provided in response to your Parliamentary Question.

Although Jim Knight’s response indicated that the QCA is responsible for maintaining standards across qualifications and over time, it also stated that the level of information on grade boundaries that you are asking for is not held centrally. I am afraid that this means that QCA does not hold the information either. It is the awarding bodies that offer GCSE and A level qualifications who are responsible for setting grade boundary marks in each subject for every examination series.

Although I am unable to provide the data you request, I think it would be helpful to explain how the number of marks required to achieve a grade in any particular examination series is determined and which conclusions can be drawn from variations in the number of raw marks required to achieve a particular grade boundary each year.

For each discrete unit within a qualification (for example, there are currently six units in most A level qualifications) the mark required to achieve a particular grade is determined by an awarding body’s awarding committee according to a process that is set out in a code of practice issued by QCA. An awarding committee comprises the most senior examiners for a qualification. They are required to use professional judgment, supported by technical and statistical data, to ensure that standards are carried forward from year to year. In other words, the committee must ensure that the same level of performance will achieve the same grade across different years. However, as different question papers are used in each examination series it is possible that the demand of the question paper might not be identical year-on-year. To take into account unforeseen variances in the demand of question papers between years, the awarding committee may adjust the number of marks required to achieve a particular grade in any given year in order to ensure standards are maintained.

The awarding bodies that offer GCSE and A levels are AQA, Edexcel and OCR in England, WJEC in Wales and CCEA in Northern Ireland: Between them, each of these awarding bodies offers up to 50 different subjects at GCSE and 40 different subjects at A level. Some awarding bodies offer more than one qualification in each subject per qualification type. In addition there are now opportunities to sit GCSE examinations in March, November and June and A level examinations in January and June.

Therefore, answering your question would require the collection of an extremely large amount of data in the form of a list of each grade A and grade C boundary mark for each of the hundreds of GCSE and A level specifications in each of the examination series in each of the 10 years since 1997. The only inference that could realistically be taken from such data would be that mark boundaries have varied and, indeed must vary, in order to maintain standards. Furthermore, raw mark grade boundary data could also be misleading as they would not necessarily indicate where there have been changes in the total number of marks available in a particular examination component.

On previous occasions, QCA has investigated the issue of changes in grade boundaries to look at whether a change in grade boundary marks indicated a change in standards. We looked at a number of grade boundaries in English, English Literature and Mathematics over a number of years. In addition, QCA collected data from a wide range of GCSE and A level examinations in a single year. We concluded that changes in grade boundaries did not indicate a change in standards and that it would not be necessary for us to expand our investigation or collect data from a wider sample. I attach a copy of the report on this work.

However, all of this is in relation to raw mark grade boundaries only. A levels and modular GCSEs allow candidates to sit component parts of the same qualification in different examination series and because papers in different years will be of slightly differing demand a method of scaling is required to ensure that the same level of achievement would receive the same grade across examination series. This scale is the Uniform Mark Scale (UMS) and it enables units for which different amounts of marks are available to be aggregated across or within an examination series to give an overall grade. The percentage of UMS marks required to achieve a given grade does not vary. At GCSE the following percentage of the maximum uniform marks available for a component is required to achieve a particular grade: A* - 90% of the available uniform marks; A - 80%; B - 70%; C - 60%; D - 50%; E - 40%; F - 30%; G - 20%. At A level to following percentage of maximum uniform marks are required to achieve a particular grade: A - 80%; B - 70; C - 60%; D - 50%; E - 40%.

Although QCA is unable to answer your question in the terms in which you asked it, I hope that I have been able to provide you with information that you find to be of use.

Opinion Leader Research

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many contracts were awarded by his Department to Opinion Leader Research in each year since 1997 was; and what was (a) the title and purpose, (b) the cost to the public purse and (c) the dates of (i) tender, (ii) award, (iii) operation and (iv) completion and report to the Department. (165261)

The Department has contracted with Opinion Leader Research through the Central Office of Information (COI) Market Research Framework on 15 occasions since 2001. The details of those contracts are shown in the following table.

In addition, the Department also contracted with Opinion Leader Research through its own tendering processes to deliver, as part of the 10 Year Childcare Strategy, Parents’ Forums aimed to inform the consultation process on the strategy. The cost was £70,172.14. It was tendered in January 2005 and awarded on 25 January 2005. The project was carried out and a report on findings delivered to the Department on 23 March 2005.

Details of contacts with Opinion Leader Research prior to 2001 are not held centrally and to gather that data in order to answer this question would incur disproportionate costs.

Title and purpose of the project

Cost (£)

Date to tender

Date of award

Date carried out

Date completed/findings put to Department

Student Funding

Strategic qualitative research, as part of a review of student funding in England, to understand fully how the current system is perceived and to pre test a number of alternative approaches

41,300.00

Direct Selection (option available for Framework Agreements)

September 2001

October- November 2001

November 2001

HE Positioning Research

Research as part of the review of student fees and loans to assess attitudes to the current arrangements and how best to communicate with key stakeholders

102,050.00

Direct Selection because it was a continuation of work they had completed in this area

August 2002

September to October 2002

October 2002

Secondary School Positioning W1

Consultation to establish how key audiences perceive future changes to secondary education

53,800.00

December 2002 Mini tendered to three organisations on the framework

December 2002

January to February 2003

February 2003

Supermarket research

Consultation exercise to test parents reactions to the concept and to some communications ideas

19,960.00

December 2003 Mini tendered to three organisations on the framework

December 2003

January 2004

February 2004

Supermarket research follow up

Research to assess the success of the pilot of the Parent Know How stand in 15 ASDA stores around London

59,950.00

July 2004 Mini tendered to three organisations on the framework

August 2004

September 2004

November 2004

Supermarket pilot pre-test

Creative development research to pre-test the look and feel of two design routes being used for a pilot for distributing information about education and related issues to parents via supermarkets

10,750.00

Direct select linked to previous project work

July 2004

July 2004

July 2004

Supermarket pilot research pre-test

Exit interviews on parent information booklet stands in supermarkets

18,500.00

Direct select—Continuation of Pilot evaluation from last year

July 2005

August 2005

September 2005

Supermarket research

Pilot campaign evaluation for the Parent Know How stand in 40 ASDA stores

113,900.00

Not tendered—Second part of ongoing research

August 2005

September- October 2005

November 2005

Supermarkets qualitative Booklets Research

Qualitative research to understand the overall appeal of the full range Parent Know How leaflets in terms of look, layout and content

17,040.00

Not tendered— Part of the Supermarket Research run by OLR

October 2005

September -October 2005

October 2005

London Challenge

Qualitative research to explore parents views of London schools and to generate and explore initial ideas for a communications campaign on behalf of London schools

12,000.00

Direct select OLR already working on a linked project

October 2005

October 2005

October 2005

Supermarkets Follow up phase 2

Consultation to assess the success of the pilot of the Parent Know How stand in 40 ASDA stores throughout the country

14,500.00

Direct selection Continuation of an ongoing project

March 2006

March 2006

March 2006

Every Child Matters

Creative Development research to test messaging alternatives relating to its Every Child Matters campaign

48,372.50

Direct selection

March 2006

April to May 2006

May 2006

Skills Challenge Public Debate

Deliberative event to start a process of engagement leading to the Governments response to the Leitch Review later in the year

130,625.00

January 2007 Mini tendered to three organisations on the framework

February 2007

February 2007

February 2007

Parental engagement with local authorities

Research to explore good practice in parental engagement, both for the specific local authorities who are taking part in the research and to disseminate to local authorities in general

89,933.00

June 2007 Mini tendered to three organisations on the framework

June 2007

July 2007

August 2007

Children’s Plan deliberative consultation

Deliberative events across England and wider community consultation, to inform the development of the Children’s Plan

318,401.00

August 2007 Mini tendered to three organisations on the framework

September 2007

October to November 2007

November 2007

Postal Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many items of post sent by his Department and its predecessor were reported missing by the intended recipient in each year since 1997. (171295)

The Department for Children, Schools and Families (and its predecessor), does not maintain historical records of items of post reported missing by the intended recipient. Any such mail reported missing to the Department’s mail rooms are dealt with on a case by case basis until an outcome can be determined and a resolution reached.

Primary Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the levels of numeracy and literacy were among primary school leavers in each London borough on the latest date for which figures are available. (169230)

Levels of literacy and numeracy in primary school leavers are most commonly measured by the proportions of children gaining National Curriculum level 4 and above in English and mathematics, since these represent the expected national standard. The information in the table gives the percentages of 11-year-olds achieving these levels in 2007 based on provisional data. The figures for 1998 and the national averages are also shown for comparison. Inner and Outer London boroughs are listed separately.

Percentage of pupils achieving Level 4 or above in the Key Stage 2 tests by local authority (LA), in the London Government office region (GOR)

1998

2007 (Provisional)

English

Mathematics

English

Mathematics

London GOR

64

56

79

76

City of London

89

85

96

96

Inner London boroughs

57

50

77

73

Camden

62

58

78

76

Hackney

52

47

73

66

Hammersmith and Fulham

61

54

81

77

Haringey

56

49

75

72

Islington

58

51

76

74

Kensington and Chelsea

69

58

86

82

Lambeth

56

48

77

71

Lewisham

59

52

76

73

Newham

51

45

74

72

Southwark

54

46

76

71

Tower Hamlets

51

45

79

77

Wandsworth

64

56

79

77

Westminster

69

62

81

76

Outer London boroughs

67

60

80

77

Barking and Dagenham

60

54

77

76

Barnet

73

66

84

81

Bexley

68

59

84

78

Brent

64

60

78

74

Bromley

73

66

84

78

Croydon

66

57

80

74

Ealing

66

57

78

76

Enfield

66

56

77

74

Greenwich

52

48

72

71

Harrow

74

65

80

77

Havering

71

65

84

81

Hillingdon

68

64

81

77

Hounslow

63

57

78

76

Kingston upon Thames

73

67

83

81

Merton

66

53

79

77

Redbridge

70

61

83

80

Richmond upon Thames

79

74

88

84

Sutton

68

61

84

82

Waltham Forest

60

51

75

74

England (maintained schools)

64

58

80

77

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families if he will make a statement on the implementation of the Rose Review recommendations in primary schools. (169933)

We have accepted all of the Rose Review's recommendations and have paid particular attention to the recommendation that phonics should be taught as the prime approach to learning to read. We have renewed the primary framework for teaching literacy to reflect this. To further support teachers and practitioners in implementing this key change, and in line with the Review's recommendations, we have worked with Jim Rose to produce a high quality phonics teaching programme, Letters and Sounds. As an alternative for schools that instead wish to use a commercial phonics programme, we have published guidance on a set of criteria which define the key features of an effective phonics teaching programme and which build directly on the Review's recommendations.

We have taken steps to ensure that local authorities have the capacity and expertise to support schools in developing effective phonics teaching. The Communication, Language and Literacy Development (CLLD) programme, specifically developed to implement the Review's recommendations, builds greater quality and capacity in the teaching of early literacy through developing work on speaking and listening; strengthening leadership and management of early literacy; and supporting all schools with phonics and early reading. The CLLD programme has provided training in early reading for every local authority and has funded additional consultants to lead this work in 50 targeted authorities.

We are also working with local authorities and the Training and Development Agency to ensure that newly qualified practitioners are equipped with the necessary skills to implement the Rose Review recommendations.

Primary Education: Teachers

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what steps he is taking to increase the number of people training to be primary school teachers; and if he will make a statement. (169802)

We will be increasing significantly the number of places available for initial teacher training in the primary phase from 2008/09 onwards. This is in response to population census information showing that the number of primary age children will rise in the next few years. Details of the number of places will be available shortly.

Pupils: Assessments

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families in which month secondary schools receive key stage 2 test results data for pupils entering the school in year 7. (165765)

The results of National Curriculum Key Stage 2 tests are included in the head teacher's annual report which forms part of the common transfer file of information which must be transferred between schools when pupils change schools. The Education (Pupil Information) (England) Regulations 2005 require that when a pupil changes schools, this file is sent to the receiving school no later than 15 school days after the day on which the pupil ceases to be registered at the old school. For most pupils entering secondary school, this will mean that the results will be transferred in September.

Pupils: Per Capita Costs

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what average Government spending was per child in (a) Uxbridge constituency, (b) each London borough and (c) England in (i) primary schools and (ii) secondary schools in each year since 1997. (169682)

The Department allocates education funding to local authorities so the requested information for Uxbridge constituency is not available. The figures for Hillingdon local authority are included in the breakdown by London boroughs.

The revenue funding figures per pupil for primary schools (pupils aged three to 10), secondary schools (pupils aged 11 to 15) and all pupils (aged three to 19) for England and for each local authority in Greater London for years 1997-98 to 2005-06 are as follows:

Primary (pupils aged three to 10)

1997-98

1998-99

1999-2000

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

England

2,560

2,660

2,830

3,070

3,260

3,340

3,550

3,660

3,870

Barking and Dagenham

2,690

2,940

3,100

3,320

3,520

3,700

4,030

4,170

4,350

Barnet

2,770

2,850

3,020

3,190

3,460

3,540

3,840

3,970

4,260

Bexley

2,610

2,720

2,840

3,010

3,180

3,280

3,510

3,610

3,770

Brent

3,170

3,280

3,490

3,680

3,940

4,130

4,400

4,570

4,860

Bromley

2,630

2,750

2,910

3,110

3,280

3,340

3,480

3,600

3,790

Camden

3,820

3,780

4,080

4,410

4,720

4,890

5,300

5,540

5,750

Croydon

2,890

2,930

3,120

3,310

3,510

3,620

3,770

3,920

4,100

Ealing

2,840

3,040

3,250

3,500

3,750

3,860

4,220

4,390

4,700

Enfield

2,860

2,970

3,190

3,390

3,610

3,780

3,990

4,140

4,310

Greenwich

3,360

3,440

3,730

4,080

4,310

4,460

4,760

4,920

5,240

Hackney

3,970

3,990

4,340

4,650

4,890

5,110

5,450

5,610

5,980

Hammersmith and Fulham

3,730

3,750

4,020

4,370

4,650

4,930

5,190

5,390

5,570

Haringey

3,290

3,390

3,670

3,960

4,260

4,410

4,620

4,820

4,980

Harrow

2,750

2,820

2,990

3,220

3,400

3,490

3,830

3,990

4,250

Havering

2,600

2,710

2,830

3,020

3,220

3,290

3,460

3,560

3,750

Hillingdon

2,770

2,860

3,040

3,230

3,350

3,430

3,740

3,890

4,140

Hounslow

2,850

2,960

3,180

3,410

3,610

3,800

4,160

4,290

4,570

Islington

3,620

3,760

4,040

4,460

4,780

4,940

5,240

5,440

5,760

Kensington and Chelsea

3,640

3,710

4,110

4,490

4,860

5,190

5,400

5,600

5,750

Kingston upon Thames

2,560

2,650

2,820

3,060

3,290

3,330

3,510

3,630

3,890

Lambeth

3,990

4,020

4,300

4,610

4,820

5,040

5,310

5,520

5,760

Lewisham

3,650

3,710

3,950

4,220

4,480

4,670

4,940

5,050

5,380

Merton

2,780

2,820

3,010

3,270

3,530

3,520

3,830

3,980

4,240

Newham

3,380

3,490

3,670

3,890

4,170

4,330

4,600

4,760

5,010

Redbridge

2,860

2,910

3,060

3,220

3,390

3,460

3,700

3,840

4,050

Richmond upon Thames

2,710

2,690

2,840

3,070

3,260

3,300

3,470

3,610

3,830

Southwark

3,680

3,770

4,050

4,340

4,600

4,780

5,000

5,130

5,530

Sutton

2,800

2,820

2,970

3,160

3,340

3,400

3,570

3,700

3,860

Tower Hamlets

3,800

3,960

4,370

4,650

4,970

5,190

5,620

5,780

6,190

Waltham Forest

3,180

3,230

3,420

3,660

3,920

4,070

4,230

4,410

4,570

Wandsworth

3,380

3,430

3,670

3,940

4,180

4,260

4,640

4,750

5,080

Westminster

3,650

3,640

3,980

4,260

4,530

4,760

5,120

5,260

5,490

Secondary (aged 11 to 15)

1997-98

1998-99

1999-2000

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

England

3,490

3,580

3,710

4,020

4,230

4,330

4,410

4,600

4,770

Barking and Dagenham

4,070

4,180

4,290

4,690

5,030

5,100

5,070

5,270

5,370

Barnet

3,720

3,790

3,930

4,140

4,490

4,640

4,700

4,930

5,230

Bexley

3,610

3,700

3,780

4,010

4,250

4,360

4,380

4,570

4,710

Brent

4,480

4,520

4,700

5,000

5,420

5,550

5,670

5,940

6,170

Bromley

3,540

3,610

3,720

3,950

4,200

4,310

4,440

4,670

4,820

Camden

4,710

4,850

5,200

5,700

6,040

6,190

6,550

6,850

6,920

Croydon

3,910

4,020

4,180

4,430

4,730

4,880

4,950

5,150

5,320

Ealing

4,180

4,280

4,420

4,800

5,210

5,230

5,370

5,670

5,950

Enfield

3,930

3,980

4,090

4,330

4,740

4,880

4,940

5,150

5,280

Greenwich

4,620

4,730

5,030

5,600

5,900

5,990

6,110

6,300

6,610

Hackney

5,440

5,590

5,970

6,440

6,800

6,980

7,370

7,720

7,980

Hammersmith and Fulham

4,800

4,990

5,280

5,730

6,070

6,360

6,590

6,890

6,970

Haringey

4,680

4,730

5,020

5,410

5,800

5,890

6,220

6,490

6,530

Harrow

3,750

3,840

3,960

4,180

4,510

4,690

4,840

5,050

5,210

Havering

3,570

3,660

3,740

3,970

4,240

4,350

4,410

4,620

4,780

Hillingdon

3,710

3,790

3,950

4,190

4,440

4,580

4,630

4,880

5,150

Hounslow

3,960

4,050

4,190

4,450

4,820

4,960

5,120

5,330

5,560

Islington

5,050

5,170

5,500

6,090

6,580

6,760

6,860

7,110

7,420

Kensington and Chelsea

4,570

4,820

5,170

5,640

6,010

6,450

7,000

7,280

7,310

Kingston upon Thames

3,530

3,610

3,720

3,950

4,240

4,380

4,450

4,650

4,890

Lambeth

5,520

5,720

6,120

6,660

6,970

7,170

7,120

7,560

7,760

Lewisham

4,870

4,990

5,270

5,710

6,080

6,290

6,540

6,780

7,120

Merton

3,800

3,890

4,020

4,270

4,640

4,710

4,840

5,080

5,350

Newham

4,550

4,690

4,880

5,300

5,680

5,760

5,700

5,910

6,100

Redbridge

3,820

3,900

3,990

4,260

4,560

4,670

4,530

4,730

4,890

Richmond upon Thames

3,420

3,510

3,620

3,870

4,140

4,290

4,460

4,690

4,870

Southwark

5,060

5,140

5,440

5,920

6,280

6,470

6,670

7,270

7,470

Sutton

3,580

3,650

3,740

3,940

4,190

4,300

4,440

4,650

4,770

Tower Hamlets

5,350

5,420

5,850

6,360

6,770

6,920

6,970

7,250

7,520

Waltham Forest

4,260

4,310

4,540

4,900

5,290

5,410

5,500

5,690

5,790

Wandsworth

4,610

4,650

4,950

5,370

5,670

5,710

6,110

6,320

6,520

Westminster

4,490

4.590

4,930

5.370

5,650

5,880

6,340

6,520

6,620

Total (pupils aged three to 19)

1997-98

1998-99

1999-2000

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

England

3,120

3,180

3,320

3,580

3,760

3,870

4,000

4,150

4,350

Barking and Dagenham

3,410

3,570

3,690

3,960

4,190

4,360

4,530

4,720

4,880

Barnet

3,410

3,450

3,580

3,760

4,040

4,190

4,360

4,510

4,800

Bexley

3,190

3,260

3,350

3,540

3,730

3,860

3,990

4,120

4,310

Brent

3,950

4,000

4,160

4,360

4,640

4,840

5,050

5,240

5,500

Bromley

3,210

3,270

3,390

3,590

3,780

3,900

4,030

4,200

4,380

Camden

4,660

4,640

4,890

5,260

5,510

5,720

5,920

6,180

6,340

Croydon

3,460

3,510

3,660

3,870

4,080

4,210

4,290

4,480

4,660

Ealing

3,580

3,710

3,860

4,150

4,420

4,530

4,770

4,980

5,270

Enfield

3,520

3,570

3,720

3,930

4,190

4,380

4,490

4,670

4,830

Greenwich

4,120

4,170

4,430

4,850

5,080

5,300

5,440

5,610

5,920

Hackney

4,820

4,830

5,140

5,500

5,720

5,930

6,180

6,390

6,730

Hammersmith and Fulham

4,580

4,620

4,840

5,210

5,450

5,760

5,880

6,120

6,260

Haringey

4,060

4,100

4,350

4,660

4,950

5,080

5,280

5,510

5,640

Harrow

3,330

3,380

3,510

3,740

3,950

4,070

4,280

4,470

4,690

Havering

3,170

3,240

3,330

3,530

3,740

3,840

3,950

4,100

4,280

Hillingdon

3,370

3,420

3,560

3,770

3,900

4,040

4,220

4,430

4,690

Hounslow

3,560

3,630

3,790

4,030

4,260

4,470

4,700

4,860

5,120

Islington

4,460

4,550

4,790

5,280

5,610

5,760

5,920

6,160

6,490

Kensington and Chelsea

4,550

4,620

4,940

5,320

5,590

5,940

6,070

6,320

6,450

Kingston upon Thames

3,180

3,230

3,360

3,580

3,810

3,930

4,070

4,260

4,500

Lambeth

4,890

4,930

5,160

5,510

5,710

5,920

5,980

6,230

6,490

Lewisham

4,400

4,440

4,640

4,960

5,220

5,410

5,610

5,780

6,090

Merton

3,380

3,420

3,570

3,820

4,100

4,120

4,320

4,500

4,770

Newham

4,050

4,150

4,310

4,580

4,880

5,010

5,120

5,300

5,530

Redbridge

3,500

3,520

3,610

3,800

3,990

4,130

4,180

4,360

4,540

Richmond upon Thames

3,190

3,190

3,310

3,540

3,730

3,790

3,890

4,060

4,260

Southwark

4,440

4,490

4,730

5,060

5,320

5,500

5,650

5,900

6,260

Sutton

3,360

3,360

3,470

3,650

3,840

3,990

4,120

4,300

4,460

Tower Hamlets

4,670

4,780

5,180

5,550

5,870

6,070

6,280

6,470

6,820

Waltham Forest

3,830

3,850

4,020

4,290

4,570

4,720

4,820

5,030

5,180

Wandsworth

4,200

4,200

4,390

4,690

4,900

4,980

5,300

5,470

5,780

Westminster

4,500

4,490

4,770

5,100

5,290

5,520

5,770

5,950

6,100

Notes:

1. Price Base: Real terms at 2006-07 prices, based on GDP deflators as at 26.09.07.

2. Figures reflect relevant sub-blocks of standard spending assessment/education formula spending (EFS) settlements and exclude the pensions transfer to EFS and LSC.

3. Total funding also includes all revenue grants in DfES departmental expenditure limits relevant to pupils aged three to 19 and exclude education maintenance allowances (EMAs) and grants not allocated at LEA level. For those authorities in receipt of advance of grant under the transitional support arrangements for 2004-05, advance grant funding is included in the year of payment (2004-05). There will be a consequential reduction in DfES grant for these LEAs in future years (either 2006-07 and 2007-08 or 2006-7 to 2008-9, depending on the terms on which the advance was given to the LEA). The pupil numbers used to convert £ million figures to per pupil are those underlying the SSA/EFS settlement calculations plus PLASC three-year-old maintained pupils and estimated three to four-year-olds funded through state support in maintained and other educational institutions where these are not included in the SSA pupil numbers.

4. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.

5. Some of the grant allocations have not been finalised. If these do change, the effect on the funding figures is expected to be minimal.

6. 1997-98 figures for authorities subject to local government reorganisation in that year have been estimated, pro-rata to their post LGR figures.

The revenue per pupil figures shown in the following table are taken from the dedicated schools grant (DSG) which was introduced in April 2006. They are not comparable with those for the years 1997-98 to 2005-06 because the introduction of the DSG in 2006-07 fundamentally changed how local authorities are funded.

The 1997-98 to 2005-06 figures are based on education formula spending (EFS) which formed the education part of the local government finance settlement, plus various grants. The DSG is based on planned spend. In addition, the DSG has a different coverage to EFS, which comprises a schools block and an LEA block (to cover LEA central functions) whereas DSG only covers the schools block. LEA block items are still funded through DCLG's local government finance settlement but education items cannot be separately identified. Consequently, there is a break in the Department's time series as the two sets of data are not comparable.

The per pupil revenue funding figures for years 2006-07 to 2007-08 for England and for each local authority in Greater London are provided in the following table. The DSG is distributed through a single guaranteed unit of funding per pupil so a split between primary and secondary funding is not available.

DSG plus grants 2006-07

DSG plus grants 2007-08

England

4,240

4,410

Barking and Dagenham

4,700

4,980

Barnet

4,730

4,880

Bexley

4,280

4,430

Brent

5,070

5,320

Bromley

4,130

4,290

Camden

6,350

6,560

Croydon

4,410

4,610

Ealing

5,070

5,260

Enfield

4,660

4,820

Greenwich

5,620

5,830

Hackney

6,560

6,720

Hammersmith and Fulham

6,010

6,220

Haringey

5,350

5,560

Harrow

4,550

4,720

Havering

4,220

4,370

Hillingdon

4,550

4,690

Hounslow

4,920

5,080

Islington

6,100

6,370

Kensington and Chelsea

6,150

6,280

Kingston upon Thames

4,430

4,550

Lambeth

6,070

6,290

Lewisham

5,820

5,990

Merton

4,570

4,720

Newham

5,350

5,580

Redbridge

4,340

4,530

Richmond upon Thames

4,320

4,450

Southwark

6,110

6,310

Sutton

4,350

4,510

Tower Hamlets

6,650

6,920

Waltham Forest

4,910

5,070

Wandsworth

5,360

5,590

Westminster

5,730

6,000

Notes:

1. The revenue funding per pupil figures only run to 2005-06 because we cannot provide a consistent time series beyond that year as the introduction of the dedicated schools grant (DSG) in 2006-07 fundamentally changed how local authorities are funded. The 1998-99 to 2005-06 figures are based on education formula spending (EFS) which formed the education part of the local government finance settlement, plus various grants. This was an assessment of what local authorities needed to fund education rather than what they spent. In 2006-07 funding for schools changed with the introduction of the DSG which is based largely on an authority's previous spending.

2. In addition, DSG has a different coverage to EFS: EFS comprised a schools block and an LEA block (to cover LEA central functions) whereas DSG only covers the school block. LEA block items are still funded through DCLG's local government finance settlement but education items cannot be separately identified. This means we have a break in our time series as the two sets of data are not comparable.

3. Price Base: Real terms at 2006-07 prices, based on GDP deflators as at 26 September 2007.

4. This covers funding through the dedicated schools grant, school standards grant, school standards grant (personalisation) and standards fund; it excludes grants not allocated at LEA level.

5. Some of the grant allocations have not been finalised. If these do change, the effect on the funding figures is expected to be minimal.

6. Figures are in real terms.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the average Government spending per child in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in West Chelmsford Parliamentary constituency was in (i) the latest year for which figures are available and (ii) 2001. (169765)

The Department allocates education funding to local authorities so the requested information for West Chelmsford constituency is not available. The revenue funding figures per pupil for 2001-02 and 2005-06 for Essex local authority are shown in the following table.

2001-02 (£)

2005-06 (£)

Primary (pupils aged 3-10)

3,210

3,720

Secondary (pupils aged 11-15)

4,130

4,610

Total (pupils aged 3-19)

3,690

4,190

Notes:

1. Price Base: Real terms at 2006-07 prices, based on GDP deflators as at 26 September 2007.

2. Figures reflect relevant sub-blocks of Standard Spending Assessment/Education Formula Spending (EPS) settlements and exclude the pensions transfer to EFS and LSC.

3. Total funding also includes all revenue grants in DfES Departmental Expenditure Limits relevant to pupils aged 3-19 and exclude Education Maintenance Allowances (EMAs) and grants not allocated at LEA level. For those authorities in receipt of advance of grant under the transitional support arrangements for 2004-05, advance grant funding is included in the year of payment (2004-05). There will be a consequential reduction in DfES grant for these LEAs in future years (either 2006-07 and 2007-08 or 2006-07 to 2008-09, depending on the terms on which the advance was given to the LEA).

The pupil numbers used to convert £ million figures to £ per pupil are those underlying the SSA/EFS settlement calculations plus PLASC 3-year-old maintained pupils and estimated 3 to 4-year-olds funded through state support in maintained and other educational institutions where these are not included in the SSA pupil numbers.

4. Rounding: Figures are rounded to the nearest £10.

5. Some of the grant allocations have not been finalised. If these do change, the effect on the funding figures is expected to be minimal.

6. The figures are in real terms

The latest year for which comparable figures are available is 2005-06 and these have been given in the table. The latest revenue per pupil figures available are for 2007-08 and are taken from the Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG) which was introduced in April 2006. They are not comparable with those for 2001-02 and 2005-06 because the introduction of the DSG in 2006-07 fundamentally changed how local authorities are funded.

The 2001-02 and 2005-06 figures are based on Education Formula Spending (EPS) which formed the education part of the Local Government Finance Settlement, plus various grants. The DSG is based on planned spend. In addition, the DSG has a different coverage to EFS, which comprises a schools block and an LEA block (to cover LEA central functions) whereas DSG only covers the schools block. LEA block items are still funded through DCLG’s Local Government Finance Settlement but education items cannot be separately identified. Consequently, there is a break in the Department’s time series as the two sets of data are not comparable.

The per pupil revenue funding figure based on DSG plus grants for 2007-08 for Essex was £4,180.

The DSG is distributed through a single guaranteed unit of funding per pupil so a split between primary and secondary funding is not available. This figure is for all funded pupils aged 3-15 and is in real terms.

Notes:

1. The revenue funding per pupil figures only run to 2005-06 because we cannot provide a consistent time series beyond that year as the introduction of the Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG) in 2006-07 fundamentally changed how local authorities are funded. The 1998-99 to 2005-06 figures are based on Education Formula Spending (EFS) which formed the education part of the Local Government Finance Settlement, plus various grants. This was an assessment of what local authorities needed to fund education rather than what they spent. In 2006-07, funding for schools changed with the introduction of the DSG which is based largely on an authority’s previous spending.

2. In addition, DSG has a different coverage to EPS: EPS comprised a schools block and an LEA block (to cover LEA central functions) whereas DSG only covers the school block. LEA block items are still funded through DCLG’s Local Government Finance Settlement but education items cannot be separately identified. This means we have a break in our time series as the two sets of data are not comparable.

3. Price Base: Real terms at 2006-07 prices, based on GDP deflators as at 26 September 2007.

4. This covers funding through the Dedicated Schools Grant, School Standards Grant, School Standards Grant (Personalisation) and Standards Fund; it excludes grants not allocated at LEA level.

5. Some of the grant allocations have not been finalised. If these do change, the effect on the funding figures is expected to be minimal.

School Leaving

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how his Department plans to assess the four building blocks he has set out for raising the participation age. (169158)

In his speech to the Fabian Society on 5 November, my right hon. Friend described four building blocks that must be in place before we can successfully raise the participation age. These are: curriculum and qualifications reform; advice and guidance to help all young people make the right choices; financial support; and employer engagement to provide the right training and apprenticeships. We have set out our plans to implement these reforms and will keep them under review in the run up to the increase in the participation age in 2013.

Schools: Catering

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families which (a) schools and (b) sixth form colleges have been supplied meat by McLaren Foods in the last 12 months. (170443)

The information requested is not collected by this Department. Local authorities and schools must put in place their own arrangements for procuring ingredients for school food.

Science: Teaching Methods

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families if he will take steps to support Wizz Bang multi-media science and technology presentations to encourage the take up of science and related subjects in schools. (169773)

The Government are already doing much to encourage young people to take up science and related subjects in schools. This includes the Science and Engineering Ambassadors scheme whereby practising scientists and engineers go into schools to support teachers and engage and enthuse pupils to continue studying science. We are also in the process of commissioning a programme of careers support and guidance, and a communications campaign both with the aim informing young people more about the varied and exciting opportunities that exist in science in pre and post-16 education and beyond.

The Government have no plans to support Wizz Bang multi-media science and technology presentations. It is for schools to decide whether they engage with this type of initiative as they are best placed to know the specific needs of their pupils.

Secondary Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the average Government spending was in the latest period for which figures are available per child in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in each London borough. (169237)

The revenue per pupil figures shown in the following table are taken from the Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG) which was introduced in April 2006. The DSG is distributed through a single guaranteed unit of funding per pupil so a split between primary and secondary funding is not available. The figures are for all funded pupils aged 3-15.

DSG plus grants 2007-08 (£)Barking and Dagenham5,119Barnet5,009Bexley4,551Brent5,463Bromley4,403Camden6,733Croydon4,738Ealing5,403Enfield4,951Greenwich5,987Hackney6,902Hammersmith and Fulham6,388Haringey5,710Harrow4,847Havering4,492Hillingdon4,815Hounslow5,212Islington6,547Kensington and Chelsea6,452Kingston upon Thames4,676Lambeth6,462Lewisham6,152Merton4,849Newham5,726Redbridge4,653Richmond upon Thames4,574Southwark6,484Sutton4,629Tower Hamlets7,107Waltham Forest5,206Wandsworth5,736 Westminster6,164Notes:1. This covers funding through the Dedicated Schools Grant, School Standards Grant, School Standards Grant (Personalisation) and Standards Fund; it excludes grants not allocated at LEA level.2. Some of the grant allocations have not been finalised. If these do change, the effect on the funding figures is expected to be minimal.3. The figures are in cash terms.

Secondary Education: School Meals

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families by what means he expects secondary schools to conduct school nutrient analysis. (170031)

The School Food Trust (SFT) will shortly publish ‘A guide to introducing the Government’s food-based and nutrient-based standards for school lunches’. It will be on the SFT website in early December, and hard copies will be distributed to stakeholders including schools, local authorities and catering providers. The guide will explain the standards, give advice on implementing and monitoring them, and explain how to carry out nutrient analysis of school lunch provision.

The SFT has also published independent reviews of menu planning and nutrient analysis software, giving information on the types of packages available and their costs. The reviews are available on their website at:

http://www.schoolfoodtrust.org.uk/content.asp?Contentid=487

The School Lunch Grant, paid to local authorities from 2008/09 to 2010/11, can be used to meet the costs of the nutrient and menu checking software needed to ensure that school lunches are meeting the nutrient-based standards, and the expertise to use it.

The SFT is currently running pilots in 12 secondary schools to provide tested examples of nutrient standard compliant school lunch provision acceptable to secondary school pupils. The results of these pilots will be published next year.

Special Educational Needs

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families whether he plans to introduce a fast-track statementing process for children with very high needs. (169840)

There are no plans to specify different timescales for the statementing of children with different levels or types of special educational needs (SEN). A significant part of the statementing process is a thorough assessment of the child's needs, in order to determine the appropriate provision to meet those needs. The Government's response to the July 2006 Education and Skills Select Committee report on SEN announced that Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Schools will review progress in the current system in 2009-10. We will then consider, in the light of HMCI's advice, whether changes are needed to the current framework.

Specialist Schools Status

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) what his estimate is of the annual cost of increasing the funding of all maintained secondary schools to at least the level obtained by those schools granted specialist status; and if he will make a statement; (169798)

(2) how many maintained secondary schools have not yet attained specialist status; how many of these have failed to meet the required minimum standards for specialist school application; and if he will make a statement.

The estimate of the annual cost of increasing the funding of all maintained secondary schools to at least the level obtained by those schools granted specialist status is around £39 million.

There are 408 maintained secondary schools outside the programme. Since 2003, of those schools, 153 have applied but not met the standard for specialist school status.

Supply Teachers: Yorkshire and the Humber

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what percentage of secondary school lessons in Yorkshire and the Humber were taught by a supply teacher in each of the last five years, broken down by local authority area; and if he will make a statement. (169737)

Teachers: Training

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many (a) mathematics, (b) science, (c) history and (d) English graduates entered teacher training to qualify as secondary school teachers in each year since 2001-02. (169135)

The following table shows the number of graduate trainees entering postgraduate initial teacher training (ITT) courses to qualify as a secondary school teacher in the subject for which they hold a first degree, through mainstream ITT and employment-based routes (EBR), between 2002/03 and 2005/06 for:

(a) Mathematics;

(b) Science;

(c) History and

(d) English.

Number of graduates entering postgraduate initial teacher training to qualify as secondary school teachers in the subject for which they hold a first degree

Number of graduates entering initial teacher training courses

2002/03

2003/04

2004/05

2005/06

Subject of secondary ITT

Mainstream

EBR

Mainstream

EBR

Mainstream

EBR

Mainstream

EBR

Mathematics

620

100

790

190

810

230

800

250

Science

710

170

780

200

740

40

730

140

History

650

40

530

70

510

100

510

90

English

1,230

260

1,190

310

1,060

480

990

580

Notes:

1. Mainstream includes universities and other higher education institutions, SCITT and OU, but excludes employment-based routes.

2. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.

3. The method of classifying degree subjects changed as a result of the introduction of the JACS coding structure in 2002/03. Data collected prior to this date under the HESA coding system cannot be directly compared using the direct match alone.

4. Performance profiles data is collected at the end of a trainees first year, therefore 2006/07 data is collected in autumn 2007 and will be published in July 2008.

5. The table only covers those who hold a first degree in the subject of their ITT training course, it does not cover those who have a first degree (in Mathematics, Science, History or English) but are entering an ITT course which is in a different subject to their first degree.

Source:

TDA’s Performance Profiles.

Truancy

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the truancy rate was in (a) secondary and (b) primary schools in (i) Uxbridge constituency, (ii) each London borough and (iii) England in each year since 1997. (169680)

The Department collects data on unauthorised absences from schools, only some of which are truancy.

The two tables containing the figures for the proportion of half days missed due to unauthorised absence (of which truancy forms a part) have been placed in the House of Commons Library.

Unauthorised absence is absence without leave from a teacher or other authorised representative of the school. This includes all unexplained or unjustified absences, such as lateness, holidays during term time not authorised by the school, absence where reason is not yet established, other absence not authorised by the school and truancy.

Communities and Local Government

Home Information Packs

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many (a) domestic energy assessors and (b) home inspectors she estimates will be required for full implementation of the home information pack (HIP) policy; how this estimate was calculated; and what (i) evidence and (ii) criteria are being used to determine the market impact of HIPs. (166956)

[holding answer 22 November 2007]: I refer my hon. Friend to the written ministerial statement ‘Home Information Packs’ made on 22 November 2007, Official Report, columns 140-42WS.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what proportion of home information pack searches have been undertaken via local authorities. (168929)

The information requested is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government whether information on radon risks (a) can and (b) must form part of home information packs. (171516)

Information on radon risk is required in the Home Information Pack as part of the local inquiries.

Home Information Packs: Peterborough

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what assessment she has made of the impact of the introduction of home information packs on the residential housing market in the Peterborough City Council area; and if she will make a statement. (163179)

I refer the hon. Member to the written ministerial statement ‘Home Information Packs’ made on 22 November 2007, Official Report, columns 140-42WS.

Housing: Carbon Emissions

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what definition she uses of eco-home. (164666)

The Government do not define or set criteria for an ‘eco-home’ as such. The Code for Sustainable Homes (the Code) sets standards for housing.

The Code is a set of sustainable design principles covering performance of new homes in nine key areas, including energy and CO2 emissions, water, materials, surface water run-off, waste, pollution, health and well-being, management and ecology.

New homes that are assessed against the Code receive a 1-6 star rating. A 1 star home is built to higher sustainability standards that those set out in building regulations while a 6 star home is a truly sustainable—zero carbon—home. The criteria on how to achieve each star rating is set out in detail in “Code for Sustainable Homes: Technical guide”, available on the Communities and Local Government’s website:

www.communities.gov.uk/thecode

The Code is based on the Building Research Establishment’s Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM) for homes ‘EcoHomes’, which it replaced for new homes in England from April 2007. The Code is more robust than ‘EcoHomes’ as it sets minimum standards for Energy/CO2, water, materials, surface water run-off and waste.

Housing: Inspections

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many qualified domestic energy assessors and home inspectors there are in (a) Eccles constituency, (b) Greater Manchester and (c) the North West. (162708)

The most recent data as at 5 November provide the following information on the number of accredited home inspectors and domestic energy assessors in Eccles constituency, Greater Manchester and the North West.

Home inspectors

Domestic energy assessors

Eccles

15

Greater Manchester

37

218

North West

93

595

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many (a) domestic energy assessors and (b) home information pack inspectors have had to retake their exams in the last 12 months. (165776)

The information requested is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government when the Government plans to extend the home information pack scheme to one and two bedroomed properties; and if she will make a statement. (165780)

I refer the hon. Member to the written ministerial statement ‘Home Information Packs’ made on 22 November 2007, Official Report, columns 140-42WS.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many qualified domestic energy assessors there are in (a) North West Leicestershire, (b) Leicestershire and (c) the East Midlands. (166769)

[holding answer 21 November 2007]: The most recent data as of 15 November provide the following information on the number of accredited domestic energy assessors in North West Leicestershire, Leicestershire and the East Midlands.

Domestic energy assessors

North West Leicestershire

9

Leicestershire

80

East Midlands

421

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what estimate she has made of the number of domestic energy assessors required to administer the home information pack scheme in (a) North West Leicestershire, (b) Leicestershire and (c) the East Midlands once the scheme is implemented across the housing market; and how that estimate is calculated. (166770)

[holding answer 21 November 2007]: We set out the criteria for roll out of home information packs (HIPs) to Parliament on 22 May, explaining that we would extend the requirement for HIPs when sufficient energy inspectors were in place nationally and regionally to meet market demand as well as taking into account lessons learnt from the operation of the scheme.

It was estimated that 303 domestic energy assessors would be required to produce energy performance certificates for the implementation of home information packs for all properties in the East Midlands. This was based on the estimated number of properties marketed for sale in the region and working practices of assessors.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many qualified home inspectors and domestic energy assessors there are in Bassetlaw; and how many houses were sold in Bassetlaw in the last 12 month period for which figures are available. (167138)

[holding answer 22 November 2007]: As of 15 November, in total there were six accredited home inspectors and domestic energy assessors in Bassetlaw.

According to HM Land Registry data there were 2,573 residential property sales in Bassetlaw during 2006.

Housing: Leeds

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what assessment she has made of the impact of the introduction of home information packs on the residential housing market in Leeds West constituency; and if she will make a statement. (166276)

I refer my right hon. Friend to the written ministerial statement ‘Home Information Packs’ made on 22 November 2007, Official Report, column 140-42WS.

Housing: Low Incomes

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what assessment she has made of the likely effect on provision of low-cost residential housing in Peterborough constituency of the introduction of home information packs for one and two-bedroomed homes; and if she will make a statement. (169540)

I refer the hon. Member to the written ministerial statement ‘Home Information Packs’ made on 22 November 2007, Official Report, columns 140-42WS.

Land

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what funding has been allocated to support community land trusts in 2007-08; and from what budgets such funding will be drawn. (171562)

The Housing Corporation is working with Salford university to assist with the development of 14 pilot Community Land Trusts, seven in urban areas and seven in rural areas.

Community Land Trusts were invited to bid for Housing Corporation funds through the Corporation's National Affordable Housing Programme 2008 to 2011.

Local Government Finance: Terrorism

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what steps she is taking to ensure that the spending of Preventing Violent Extremism programme funding by local authorities is audited. (171943)

The £6 million Preventing Extremism Pathfinder Fund was paid as part of eligible local authorities’ Local Area Agreement grants. Eligible expenditure is audited in line with the terms and conditions set in their grant determination for LAA grant. Performance against outcomes is reviewed by the local authority with partners and the Government office on a six monthly basis.

Planning Permission

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government whether live/work units are classified as sui generis. (171940)

Live/work units, if they are such that they provide the opportunity for living and working within a single self-contained unit and neither the residential nor the business use is ancillary to the other, would be classified as a sui generis use in the context of the Town and Country Planning (Use Classes Order) 1987, as amended.

Where a single dwelling is used for both living and working, but the primary use remains as a dwelling and the business use is ancillary, this use would fall within the “C3: Dwelling Houses” class of the Town and Country Planning (Use Classes Order) 1987, as amended.

It is for local planning authorities to determine, taking into account individual characteristics, as to which class or otherwise a particular premises belongs.

Terrorism: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what safeguards she has put in place to ensure that funding provided to organisations by local authorities under the Preventing Violent Extremism programme is used for the purposes for which the programme is intended. (171941)

The £6 million Preventing Extremism Pathfinder Fund was paid as part of eligible local authorities’ Local Area Agreement grants.

It is the responsibility of the accountable body of a grant to ensure that expenditure is in line with the terms and conditions of the grant determination.

For the LAA Grant, expenditure must contribute to achieving or exceeding the outcomes, targets, and indicators, of their LAA. Local authorities work closely with a range of partners in developing programmes to prevent violent extremism, including the police.

Urban Areas: Carbon Emissions

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what funding the Government are going to make available to create eco-towns; and how such funding is going to be distributed. (166299)

CSR07 allocated £1.7 billion of targeted funding over the CSR07 period for infrastructure in Growth Areas, the Thames Gateway, New Growth Points and eco-towns, including £300 million to continue the Community Infrastructure Fund. Decisions on the split and distribution of growth funding will be announced in due course.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what guidance her Department has given to local authorities on eco-town proposals. (166300)

In July we published the Housing Green Paper and as part of this the Eco-towns Prospectus. The Prospectus sets out the vision and outline criteria for eco-towns, and how the Government can support projects. In August my officials also wrote to the chief executives of local authorities in the English regions, to stakeholders and other interested parties setting out how we would invite proposals for additional new growth points and eco-towns.

Urban Areas: Sustainable Development

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what mechanisms will be put in place to monitor delivery of the exceptional levels of infrastructure and community facility investment announced as part of the eco-towns initiative; and if she will make a statement. (171216)

We indicated in the Ecotowns Prospectus, published alongside the Housing Green Paper that we would expect eco-town proposals to include options for a dedicated delivery body which will plan, oversee and develop (with partners) the major infrastructure needed to establish the town, such as a local trust or local authority partnership or in some instances this could be a body such as a new town development corporation. Further advice on community investment and facilities will be included in the Town and Country Planning Association guide to the practical application of the key sustainability and development criteria for eco-towns which is currently being developed.

Selected eco-town proposals, which we expect to announce in February, will be invited to produce a programme of development to setting out the delivery and funding requirements of their proposal, and this will include local infrastructure and community investment.

Culture, Media and Sport

Departmental Data Protection

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport whether he proposes to review how his Department transports data; and whether his Department uses TNT to transport data. (169213)

I refer the hon. Member to the statement made by my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister on 21 November 2007, Official Report, column 1179. The review by the Cabinet Secretary and security experts is looking at procedures within Departments and agencies for the storage and use of data. A statement on Departments' procedures will be made on completion of the review.

Football: Schools

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what estimate he has made of the number of (a) primary and (b) secondary schools with (i) a boys' football team and (ii) a girls' football team that meets Football Association standards. (170110)

The Football Association (FA) advises that there are nearly 5,500 FA charter standard schools. Schools are required to provide football for boys and girls both in the curriculum and out of school hours as part of the qualifying criteria to be an FA charter standard school. Exact numbers of teams in primary and secondary education by gender are not available.

The 2006-07 school sport survey found that 98 per cent. of primary and secondary schools offered football during the last academic year and that 78 per cent. of primary and secondary schools have a link with a local football club.

Olympic Games 2012

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what financial information he supplies on a regular basis on the progress of arrangements for hosting the 2012 Olympic games to (a) Government departments and (b) Cabinet Committee MISC25; and with what frequency in each case. (165181)

[holding answer 19 November 2007]: I have been asked to reply as Minister for the Olympics.

(a) Financial information about costs, funding and projects is shared with relevant Government departments through the appropriate mechanisms including the Funders’ Group, the Olympic Projects Review Group, and the Olympic Board Steering Group.

(b) ED (OPG) is the Cabinet sub committee responsible for issues relating to Economic Development of the London Olympic and Paralympic games. As is the case with information relating to the proceedings of Cabinet and all Cabinet committees, including the number of meetings held and topics discussed, details about ED (OPG) meetings are generally not disclosed.

Radio: Commercial Broadcasting

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many commercial radio licences were granted by Ofcom in each of the last five years. (171652)

The number of commercial radio licences awarded by Ofcom in each of the last five years is set out in the following table:

Licences awarded

2003

11

2004

2

2005

16

2006

15

2007

112

1 To date

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what recent assessment his Department has made of the size of the commercial radio sector in the UK. (171653)

No such assessment has been made. However, figures published by the independent regulator, Ofcom, show that in 2006, the estimated total of commercial radio revenue was £512 million1.

1 Source:

The UK Communications Market 2007, Ofcom, August 2007

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many commercial radio licences have been returned to Ofcom in each of the last five years. (171656)

The number of commercial radio licences returned to Ofcom in each of the last five years is set out in the following table:

Licences returned

2003

0

2004

0

2005

0

2006

1

2007

12

1 To date

Tourism

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what recent estimate his Department has made of the UK's market share of the international tourism industry in each of the last 10 years. (171676)

[holding answer 5 December 2007]: The most recent available figures for national shares of the world tourism market are for 2006. The UK's percentage markets shares, in terms of both visitor numbers and spending, for the 10 years to 2006 were as follows:

Inbound visitors to UK(million)

Percentage of world total

Inbound visitor spending in UK(£ million)

Percentage of world total

1997

25.5

3.9

12.2

4.4

1998

25.7

3.9

12.7

4.7

1999

25.3

3.7

12.5

4.4

2000

25.2

3.4

12.8

4.0

2001

22.8

3.1

11.3

3.5

2002

24.2

3.2

11.7

3.7

2003

24.7

3.3

11.9

3.7

2004

25.7

3.4

13.1

3.8

2005

30.0

3.5

14.2

3.8

2006

32.2

3.6

15.4

4.0

Defence

Afghanistan: Peacekeeping Operations

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what units form the UK’s commitment to the Allied Rapid Reaction Corps. (170827)

Only those units which are integral to HQ Allied Rapid Reaction Corps (ARRC) or under operational command of Commander ARRC on a peace-time basis are actually committed to it. Most UK formations and units on which HQ ARRC might draw for operations are affiliated for training, doctrine development, communication and other purposes, but not permanently assigned to, or commanded by, HQ ARRC. The integral and affiliated HQ ARRC units are listed as follows.

Unit name

HQ ARRC Group

1 (UK) Signals Brigade (includes the ARRC Support Battalion)

12 (UK) Signals Group

Postal and Courier Support (99 Postal and Courier Squadron Royal Logistic Corps)

Operational Intelligence Support Group/UK National Intelligence Cell/12 Military Intelligence Company

Command and Liaison Flight (12 Fleet Army Air Corps)

Geographic Section (14 Geographic Squadron Royal Engineers)

(B) Affiliated To HO ARRC

ARRC Combat Support

1(UK) Artillery Brigade

16 Air Assault Brigade

Multinational Engineer Brigade (based on 8 (UK) Force Engineer Brigade)

Engineer Battalion (2) (Not identified—would be identified through force generation if/when required)

Electronic Warfare Battalion (14 Signal Regt)

Special Operations Forces

Joint Helicopter Force

Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Regiment (Joint CBRN Regiment)

Electronic Warfare Coordination Cell (from 14 Signal Regiment)

Engineer Works Team

Combat Service Support

Port Regiment (17 Port and Maritime Regiment Royal Logistic Corps)

Movement Control Company Battalion (162 Movement Control Regiment Royal Logistic Corps)

Transport and Support Group (based on HQ 2 Multinational Logistic Support Group)

Medical Group (based on 2(UK) Medical Brigade)

ARRC Multinational Military Police Battalion (based on Royal Military Police Battalion HQ)

Recovery Company (Not identified—would be identified through force generation if/when required)

ARRC Combat Affiliations

1(UK) Armoured Division (Includes 4 (UK) Mechanised Brigade, 7 (UK) Armoured Brigade, 20 (UK) Armoured Brigade)

3 (UK) Mechanised Division (Includes 1 (UK) Mechanised Brigade, 12 (UK) Mechanised Brigade, 19 (UK) Light Brigade

Rear Area Security Force

Rear Area Security Brigade HQ

Mechanised Battalions (2) (Not identified—would be identified through force generation if/when required)

Reconnaissance Company (Not identified—would be identified through force generation if/when required)

Artillery Battalion (Not identified—would be identified through force generation if/when required)

Engineer Battalion (Not identified—would be identified through force generation if/when required)

Afghanistan: Roads

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many miles of the Afghanistan Ring road run through the British Area of Operations (AO) in Regional Command South; what assessment he has made of the security of the Ring Road in Britain’s AO; what percentage of the Ring Road in Britain’s AO is paved; and if he will make a statement. (170826)

A total of 86 miles of the Afghan ring road lies within the British Area of Operations in Helmand Province. The entire road within Helmand is paved. Security along the route is kept under constant review. There have been a small number of isolated attacks carried out on vehicles using the ring road by insurgents and criminal elements, but it remains an effective communication route.

Armoured Fighting Vehicles

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what factors were taken into account in deciding the production and delivery timetable of (a) future rapid effects system utility and (b) reconnaissance vehicles; and if he will make a statement. (170022)

Our planning work has been and will continue to be driven by operational priorities, taking account of the experience of current operation, and planned future operations. The Department's first priority remains the delivery of the utility vehicle family. After that, the procurement of a successor reconnaissance vehicle is particularly important.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what conflict scenario the future rapid effects system has been designed for. (170117)

FRES will provide a rapid intervention capability and will also have wide utility across the spectrum of conflict, supporting three main types of operation:

Rapid intervention;

Peacekeeping and peace enforcement operations;

High intensity war-fighting operations.

Armoured Fighting Vehicles: Afghanistan

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 29 October 2007, Official Report, column 953W, on Armoured Fighting Vehicles: Afghanistan, what other new protected vehicles are required to make up the total number of Mastiff vehicles to 400. (170018)

As I explained in my answer of 29 October 2007, Official Report, column 953W, we plan to procure some 280 Mastiff vehicles. In addition, we are planning to procure over 170 Vector vehicles, bringing the overall total of new protected patrol vehicles to over 400.

Armoured Fighting Vehicles: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the allocation of funding is for each future rapid effects system utility vehicle. (170118)

Army: Standards

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence for what reason there are no Army figures for 1 July 2007 published on the Defence Analytical Services Agency TSP 09. (170019)

Army personnel figures at 1 July 2007 were not published on 3 September due to ongoing data validation from the new Joint Personnel Administration (JPA) system. This is necessary to ensure the statistics are of the quality required of a National Statistics output, and do not mislead the public.

Figures for the rank structure of the Army at 1 October 2007 were published in Tri-Service Publication (TSP) 9: UK Regular Forces Rank Structure, on 3 December 2007. A revised 1 July 2007 version, which will include Army figures, was also be published on 3 December 2007.

Astute Class Submarines

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether the BAE Systems Barrow-in-Furness yard has the capacity to build eight Astute class submarines on time for the programme for building successor submarines to those carrying the nuclear deterrent. (165172)

[holding answer 19 November 2007]: We are working closely with industry to deliver a sustainable UK submarine programme. The Barrow-in-Furness yard remains the centre of excellence for submarine construction in the UK, however the production capacity at the facility is a matter for BAES.

In respect of the Successor programme, as was stated in December 2006 in “The Future of the United Kingdom’s Nuclear Deterrent” (Cm 6994), it would be our intention to build the new SSBNs in the UK. This will be dependent on proposals from industry that provide the right capability, at the right time and offer value for money.

Astute Class Submarines: Repairs and Maintenance

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what estimate he has made of the cost of repairing the Astute submarine damaged during routine tests. (170413)

[holding answer 3 December 2007]: Work is ongoing to identify the full extent of damage. The repair cost will be agreed when the scope of the recovery programme has been determined.

Baha Mousa

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make a public apology for the death of Baha Mousa in British custody in Iraq; and what related remedial steps he has taken since the completion of court proceedings on the case. (170012)

The death of Mr. Baha Mousa is a matter of deep regret to the Ministry of Defence. I will make a statement in the new year, after taking account of representations from the lawyers representing Mr. Mousa’s family about the nature of any further inquiries that would be necessary to ensure relevant lessons are learned. It would therefore be inappropriate for me to make any further comment at this stage.

In February 2005, the then Chief of the General Staff announced that he had appointed a senior Army officer, Brigadier Aitken, to assess what lessons the Army needed to learn in light of deliberate abuse against Iraqi civilians. My predecessor, my right hon. Friend the Member for Ashfield (Mr. Hoon), gave an undertaking that the findings of the resulting report would be made public. I expect to announce the publication of those findings in due course.

Balkans Operational Reserve Force

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what assessment he has made of the state of readiness of NATO’s Balkans Operational Reserve Force; and if he will make a statement. (171232)

[holding answer 4 December 2007]: The NATO pan-Balkans Operational Reserve Force, currently made up of a battalion from the UK, Germany and Italy, continues to provide the necessary stand-by capability to reinforce both KFOR in Kosovo (in support of the NATO-led Operation Joint Enterprise) and EUFOR in Bosnia and Herzegovina (in support of the EU-led Operation Althea). The UK continues to work with our EU and NATO partners to deliver peaceful progress in the Balkan region. However, if force commanders judge military reinforcements are required, the UK is prepared to meet its responsibilities as the provider of the highest readiness (four days notice to move) reserve battalion from 1 January 2008.

Defence Estates: Charities

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what role the Land Management Services Budget Manager of Defence Estates Operation South has in reviewing procedures for waiving liability charges for charities holding events on his Department’s property. (170848)

The Land Management Services Budget Manager of Defence Estates Operation South does not have a role in reviewing procedures for waiving liability charges for charities holding events on Ministry of Defence property.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much his Department has charged charitable organisations for events held on departmental property in each of the last 10 years for which figures are available. (171347)

Defence: European Union

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what plans his Department has to discuss a European defence capabilities charter with his EU counterparts. (170010)

Our objective is to enhance the separate defence capabilities of European nations, so that Europe can play a more effective role in reducing conflict and reinforcing peace. We are therefore encouraging partners rapidly to develop the more effective, deployable, interoperable and sustainable forces required for current and likely future operations. These capabilities would be available for, and enhance, multilateral crisis interventions, including those delivered through the NATO and the UN.

Departmental Buildings

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the estimated budget is for his Department’s headquarters refurbishment project for each of the next 10 years. (170813)

The estimated budget for the provision of fully serviced office accommodation in the Ministry of Defence’s main building and old War Office building is set out in the following table.

£ million

2008-09

94.9

2009-10

93.3

2010-11

93.3

2011-12

95.4

2012-13

96.8

2013-14

98.0

2014-15

98.7

2015-16

98.3

2016-17

100.3

2017-18

107.7

These figures (VAT inclusive) cover the costs for the major redevelopment of the main building, as well as for the ongoing provision of services. The planned closure of the old War Office building will be fully reflected in future budgets.

Departmental Climate Change

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what steps his Department (a) has taken and (b) plans to take by (i) 2012 and (ii) 2020 to adapt to the effects of climate change as they affect his Departmental responsibilities; and if he will make a statement. (165258)

MOD is working with other Government Departments on the security implications of climate change. Underpinning this work is climate modelling by the Hadley Centre in the Met Office, a MOD Trading Fund, to predict future climates and assess their defence implications in strategically important regions.

The implications of climate change will be factored into the Department’s acquisition planning and future operating procedures to ensure that the armed forces can continue to perform effectively.

Climate change will also have consequences for the management of defence in the UK with some low lying sites vulnerable to rising sea levels and flooding. Adaptation to climate change has therefore been embedded in the appraisal methodology and tools used on all estate-related plans, programmes, projects and activities.

The Department is not just preparing to adapt; we also recognise that we have an important role in mitigating climate change. Improvements in energy management and energy efficiency have delivered reductions in estate carbon dioxide emissions. We are on track to meet cross-Government targets for reducing these emissions by 12.5 per cent. by 2010-11 and by 30 per cent. by 2020 in line with our commitments under the Sustainable Operations on the Government Estate.

Departmental Data Protection

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what procedures are in place in his Department to ensure that personal information relating to members of the public is (a) stored and (b) transported securely. (168478)

I refer my right hon. Friend to the statement made by my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister on 21 November 2007, Official Report, column 1179. The review by the Cabinet Secretary and security experts is looking at procedures within Departments and agencies for the storage and use of data. A statement on Departments’ procedures will be made on completion of the review.

EU Defence Policy

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many UK services personnel wear EU insignia; and where those personnel are based. (170594)

Any UK military personnel seconded to the EU Military Staff or deployed on EU military missions may be required to wear EU insignia during the course of their duties.

18 UK military personnel are currently seconded to the EU Military Staff in Brussels. A further 19 military personnel are currently deployed on EU military missions: 13 in Bosnia Herzegovina; two in Sudan; and four in Paris as part of the proposed ESDP mission to Chad/Central African Republic, two of whom would deploy to Chad/Central African Republic as part of the Force Headquarters.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the role of the Head of the EU Command Element, Naples is; and to whom he reports. (170602)

The role of the Head of the EU Command Element in Naples is to work closely with NATO staffs based at the Naples NATO Joint Force Command on co-ordinating and deconflicting EU/NATO military issues in the Balkans, including the availability to the EU of NATO common assets and capabilities in support of the EU-led Operation ALTHEA in Bosnia-Herzegovina under the “Berlin Plus” arrangements. He reports to NATO’s Deputy Supreme Allied Command Europe in the latter’s capacity as Operation Commander for Operation ALTHEA.

European Fighter Aircraft

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what he estimates the lifetime cost of Typhoon will be if the Government (a) complete the order for Tranche 3 and (b) cancels Tranche 3. (170641)

The UK has undertaken, through international MOU arrangements, to procure 232 Typhoon aircraft in three tranches. So far, the UK has contracted for the delivery of two tranches, comprising 144 aircraft. Decisions on Tranche 3 will be taken in due course, in conjunction with our partner nations, once we have analysed and considered the relevant information. The estimated cost of the Eurofighter Typhoon programme is commercially sensitive information which is protected in order to maintain our negotiating position for future acquisitions on the Typhoon programme. It is therefore inappropriate to speculate on the lifetime cost for either of the options outlined.

Future Large Aircraft

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the cost of the 25 airlift A400M aircraft is; and whether the order is on a fixed value contract. (170021)

The current forecast cost of the UK A400M programme is £2,629 million. The contract is Fixed Price with the reference price expressed in 1998 Economic Conditions and subject to a Price Revision Formula based on the Eurostat Gross Domestic Product index.

Helicopters

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence on which occasions his Department leased helicopters from commercial contractors in each year since 2003; and what the cost was in each year. (169345)

Details of helicopters leased from commercial contractors since 2003 are given in the following table. All costs are exclusive of VAT.

Total costs in each financial year only have been included. I am withholding information about individual contract value as its release would or would be likely to prejudice commercial interests.

Total(£ million)

2003-04

FB Heliservices Ltd. Training task (Bell 212HP).

2004-05

FB Heliservices Ltd. Training task (Bell 212HP).

Aviation support to UK interests in the Far East (Bell 212AH Mkl).

Total

5.3

2005-06

FB Heliservices Ltd. Training task (Bell212HP).

Aviation support to UK interests in the Far East (Bell 212AH Mkl).

Total

5.3

2006-07

FB Heliservices Ltd. Training task (Bell212HP).

Aviation support to UK interests in the Far East (Bell 212AH Mkl).

Air crew training. (Bell 212)

British International T/A Veritair Ltd. Logistics support and supply to Falkland Island units (Sikorsky S61N)

Westland Helicopters Ltd. Training and VIP short haul AgustaA109E)

Total

11

2007-08

FB Heliservices Ltd. Training task (Bell212HP).

Aviation support to UK interests in the Far East (Bell 212AH Mkl).

Air crew training (Bell 2 12)

British International T/A Veritair Ltd. Logistics support and supply to Falkland Island units (Sikorsky S61N)

Westland Helicopters Ltd. Training and VIP short haul (AgustaA109E)

Total

11

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the age is of the oldest (a) Puma and (b) Chinook helicopters in operational military service. (171066)

[holding answer 4 December 2007]: The oldest Puma helicopters in operational military service are XW198 and XW199, both having entered service in January 1971; they are 36 years old.

The oldest Chinook helicopter in operational military service is ZA670, having entered service in September 1980; it is 27 years old.

Hydrographic Office

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what percentage of the UK Hydrographic Office’s budget was spent on (a) travel expenses and (b) marketing events and publications in 2006-07. (170842)

During financial year 2006-07, the percentage of the total gross operating costs, excluding interest, of the UK Hydrographic Office trading fund (i.e. excluding its non-public sector subsidiaries), was:

2.49 per cent. for travel and subsistence expenses;

and

1.26 per cent. on marketing events and publications.

For the purpose of this reply it has been assumed that publications relate to promotional materials, as opposed to the cost of navigational publications produced by the UK Hydrographic Office for sale.

Iraq

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the Prime Minister's statement of 8 October 2007, Official Report, columns 21-25, on Iraq, whether service personnel relocated from Iraq to Kuwait will receive the (a) Operation Telic medal and (b) operational allowance. (169577)

The MOD is at an advanced stage in its arrangements concerning a regional support facility to support UK armed forces in south east Iraq but has yet formally to conclude the negotiation process. On eligibility for the operational allowance, I have nothing further to add to the response I gave to the hon. Gentleman during the defence policy debate on 16 October 2007, Official Report, column 720. The military chain of command is currently considering appropriate arrangements to recognise operational deployments to the region following the planned transfer of security responsibility for Basra to Provincial Iraqi control.

Kosovo: Peacekeeping Operations

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many (a) C-17 Globemaster, (b) C-130K Hercules, (c) C-130J Hercules, (d) Tristar and (e) VC-10 aircraft sorties were flown in support of the 2004 Spearhead Land Element’s deployment to Kosovo in March 2004. (170805)

[holding answer 4 December 2007]: The number of sorties flown in support of the 2004 Spearhead Land Element’s deployment to Kosovo in March 2004 is as follows:

Aircraft

Number of sorties

C-17 Globemaster

5

C-130K Hercules

15

C-130J Hercules

15

Tristar

1

VC-10

6

Radioactive Materials

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will provide examples of the nuclear materials for which his Department makes special handling arrangements. (171104)

Examples include plutonium 239, uranium enriched in the isotope 235, and any material containing either of these materials.

RFAS IPT Category Management

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many contracts his Department has signed with RFAS IPT Category Management since 2003; and what the value was of each. (169883)

[holding answer 3 December 2007]: The Category Management procurement process was introduced into the Royal Fleet Auxiliary Support Integrated Project Team in 2004 and the first contract to incorporate this process was placed in 2005. To date, 13 such contracts have been placed, as detailed in the following table:

Contract

Value (£ million)

Financial year 2005-06

RFA Argus

12.0

RFA Wave Ruler

2.9

RFA Oakleaf

4.2

RFA Sir Bedivere

3.6

RFA Gold Rover

8.6

RFA Sir Galahad

2.6

Financial year 2006-07

RFA Sir Bedivere

2.2

RFA Bayleaf

5.0

RFAs Fort George and Orangeleaf

8.0

Financial year 2007-08

RFA Diligence

12.7

RFA Wave Knight

4.7

RFA Black Rover

4.2

RFA Fort Austin

12.0

Total

82.7

Royal Fleet Auxiliary

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what external consultancy costs have been incurred by the Royal Fleet Auxiliary Support Integrated Project Team since 2002. (168759)

Since 2005, £1.09 million has been spent on a range of external consultancies for the Royal Fleet Auxiliary Support Integrated Project Team. Information prior to 2005 is not available as electronic information management systems do not separately identify external consultancy costs and manual records are no longer available.

Submarines

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many months each Royal Navy attack submarine in service spent (a) on operations and (b) in maintenance in each year since 1997. (165880)

Following the definitions of operations and maintenance I set out in my letter to the hon. Member on 5 November, the number of months each Royal Navy attack submarine spent on both in each year since 1997 were as follows:

FY 1997-98FY 1998-99FY 1999-2000

Vessel

Op time

Maintenance

Op time

Maintenance

Op time

Maintenance

Splendid

4

7

4

3

5

2

Spartan

6

3

6

4

0

12

Sovereign

0

12

3

6

6

6

Superb

0

12

3

5

6

6

Sceptre

1

11

0

12

0

12

Trafalgar

8

2

4

6

5

7

Turbulent

1

9

4

6

10

1

Tireless

0

12

0

11

6

5

Torbay

6

4

0

12

11

1

Trenchant

5

6

1

8

0

12

Talent

2

6

3

6

3

8

Triumph

8

2

5

4

4

6

FY 2000-01FY 2001-02FY 2002-03

Vessel

Op time

Maintenance

Op time

Maintenance

Op time

Maintenance

Splendid

3

7

4

8

8

2

Spartan

0

12

0

12

0

11

Sovereign

3

9

0

12

0

11

Superb

3

9

5

5

0

11

Sceptre

0

12

0

11

0

10

Trafalgar

0

9

8

4

2

10

Turbulent

2

10

0

9

11

1

Tireless

2

10

2

8

8

3

Torbay

0

12

0

4

4

4

Trenchant

0

12

0

12

0

12

Talent

0

12

3

6

2

8

Triumph

8

4

7

2

0

8

FY 2003-04FY 2004-05FY 2005-06

Vessel

Op time

Maintenance

Op time

Maintenance

Op time

Maintenance

Splendid

4

8

1

1

1

1

Spartan

0

4

4

5

7

2

Sovereign

2

6

1

11

2

6

Superb

0

12

0

12

0

11

Sceptre

1

3

9

2

4

8

Trafalgar

0

12

2

3

6

3

Turbulent

6

2

4

8

5

3

Tireless

6

5

5

5

0

12

Torbay

8

3

0

12

3

4

Trenchant

0

8

5

2

6

4

Talent

0

12

0

12

0

12

Triumph

8

1

0

12

0

12

FY 2006-07

Vessel

Op time

Maintenance

Spartan

1

1

Sovereign

1

1

Superb

5

6

Sceptre

4

8

Trafalgar

5

7

Turbulent

7

3

Tireless

0

11

Torbay

7

3

Trenchant

0

11

Talent

0

8

Triumph

0

12

1 Decommissioned

The figures given have been rounded to whole months.

The tables do not include leave, trials and work-up periods.

Submarines: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the estimated cost to his Department is of extending the out-of-service date of the existing fleet of submarines until the in-service date of the Astute class submarines is reached. (169620)

The out of service dates of the Swiftsure and Trafalgar class submarines were adjusted during the Department's 2004 planning round to reflect the planned in-service dates of the Astute class submarines and the decision, announced in the July 2004 White Paper Delivering Security in a Changing World-Future Capabilities (Cmd 6269), to reduce the size of the submarine fleet. As a consequence, some submarines had their service lives extended, and others had theirs reduced. No estimate has been made of whether any associated costs are specifically attributable to adjustments to the out of service date of the existing fleet to meet the in-service dates of the Astute class.

Travel

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) how much his Department spent on (a) business and (b) first class air travel in the last 12 months; (171246)

(2) how much was spent by his Department on first class train tickets in the last 12 months.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave the hon. Member for Fareham (Mr. Hoban) on 3 September 2007, Official Report, column 1620W.

Warships

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many Royal Navy ships are (a) operational, (b) in reserve, (c) available for sale to a foreign navy and (d) waiting to be scrapped. (171118)

The Royal Navy has a total of 75 surface vessels available for operations at various states of readiness ranging from those that are available immediately to those that may require 365 days or more notice to deploy. I am withholding information about the readiness states of most Royal Navy vessels as its release would, or would be likely to, prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of our armed forces. The exceptions are for those in refit and the aircraft carrier HMS Invincible. Three vessels are currently in refit and at Low or Very Low Readiness (typically between 91 and 365 days notice). HMS Invincible is at a lower readiness state than any other RN vessel and although she is capable of being returned to active duty in the Fleet (at about 18 months notice), there are no plans or requirement at this time to do so.

In addition to the 75 surface vessels available for operations, four vessels are currently available for Government to Government sale; two of these have recently been sold for recycling and three are awaiting sale for recycling.

Work Sharing

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what steps his Department has taken to promote job-sharing among its employees; and how many people in his Department job-share. (169393)