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Quality Improvement Agency: Standards

Volume 472: debated on Tuesday 4 March 2008

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills by what mechanism improvements are monitored and measured in the work of the Quality Improvement Agency. (181703)

There are three principal elements against which QIA progress is measured and monitored:

the success of QIA’s own programmes and services

the implementation of the National Improvement Strategy

the overall effectiveness of QIA.

These three elements are inter-related and are measured and reported on separately as:

programme level indicators

the Improvement Strategy Balanced Scorecard

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for QIA.

Table 1 following shows the relationships between the three elements and how they are monitored.

Table 1: the three evaluation strands and their content

Strand of evaluation

Content

Programme level indicators

Information on reach, impact and satisfaction from individual support programmes and services and their evaluations

Improvement strategy balanced scorecard

A summation of programme level indicators

Indicators for the work of QIA’s partners in the improvement strategy

Assessments of contributions to global success measures

Indicators of effective partnership working

KPIs for QIA

Reach into the sector

Contribution to success rates and reducing unsatisfactory provision

Overall effectiveness of QIA programmes

Satisfaction with QIA services

Co-ordination and monitoring of the IS

Organisational effectiveness

QIA has agreed with DIUS an evaluation framework based on four main headings which is otherwise known as the RISE framework:

1. Extent of ‘reach’ or engagement with the sector (‘Reach’)

2. Impact of the programme/activity (‘Impact’)

3. Satisfaction/Awareness with QIA’s programmes and services (‘Satisfaction/Awareness’)

4. Organisational effectiveness (‘Effectiveness’)

The programme level indicators, the Improvement Strategy balanced scorecard and the KPIs for QIA are all mapped to the RISE framework.

QIA commenced using the RISE framework for its programmes from 1 April 2007, and commissioned a ‘Summative Evaluation’ to bring together the evidence gathered at that time from the evaluations of individual programmes and activities, data generated by the external contractors delivering these programmes and activities, and various other sources.

Further information on QIA progress and achievements is available on the QIA website via this link:

http://www.qia.org.uk/annualreview/assets/QIA_Summative_Evaluation.pdf