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Written Answers

Volume 472: debated on Wednesday 5 March 2008

Written Answers to Questions

Tuesday 4 March 2008

Work and Pensions

Cemeteries

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions when the Health and Safety Executive next plans to publish guidance on health and safety in cemeteries. (191600)

The Health and Safety Executive is working with representatives from across the burial industry to agree simple, practical guidance on how to manage the risks associated with unstable memorials. This work is being taken forward through a sub-Group of the Ministry of Justice's Burials and Cemeteries Advisory Group. The intention is to agree this guidance by early summer 2008, for publication soon after.

Departmental Buildings

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what fees were paid to private contractors for the operation and maintenance of his Department's buildings in the last 12 month period for which figures are available. (187594)

The Department pays an all-inclusive unitary charge under the PRIME PFI contract to its private sector partner Land Securities Trillium (LST) for the provision of fully serviced accommodation. This fully inclusive unitary charge provides for payments to private contractors for the operation and maintenance of the buildings we occupy and we are unable to separately identify the costs attributable to this element of the PFI contract.

Departmental Civil Agencies

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the effect on costs to the public purse has been of the operation of agencies within his Department’s responsibilities in the last (a) five and (b) 10 years. (185753)

[holding answer 18 February 2008]: It has not been possible to quantify the effect on costs to the public purse of the operation of agencies. However information relating to DWP costs may be found in the Published Resource Account for DWP 2006/07. This is available using the following link.

http://www.official-documents.gov.uk/document/hc0607/hc08/0875/0875.pdf

Departmental Overseas Workers

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many representatives of his Department were located abroad in each of the last 10 years, broken down by location; and at what cost. (185922)

The Department supports a small number of employees in posts abroad related to DWP business needs. The numbers, costs and locations vary from year to year. However, the details of representatives located abroad are not held centrally and could be provided only by incurring disproportionate costs.

Departmental Telephones

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what (a) 0800, (b) 0845 and (c) 0870 telephone numbers for the public are used by (i) his Department and (ii) agencies which report to his Department. (186180)

We are constantly working to improve our services to customers and that may include periodic changes to the numbers and number ranges we use. We publicise these changes to appropriate customer groups and key stakeholders. Neither my Department nor its agencies use 0870 numbers for customer contact.

Information on the 0800 and 0845 numbers in use has been placed in the Library.

Departmental Temporary Employment

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what average hourly rate his Department paid to employment agencies for agency staff in each year since 1999, broken down by employment agency. (187918)

The information requested is available from June 2006 only.

The average hourly rate paid by the Department to employment agencies for agency staff from June to December 2006 was £11.61. From January to December 2007 it was £12.38.

Employability Skills

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how his Department is monitoring the progress of the Employability Skills programme which his Department announced on 1st August 2007. (185830)

I have been asked to reply.

Progress in implementing the Employability Skills Programme is currently reported into the Department of Innovation Universities and Skills (DIUS), Skills for Life programme Board. This Board will monitor reports from the Learning and Skills Council on progress against success criteria for the programme. Data will be made available on a quarterly basis via the data book.

Development of the programme has been overseen by a Steering Group comprising representatives from DIUS, DWP, LSC and JCP.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how much it has cost to implement the Employability Skills programme which his Department announced on 1 August 2007. (185831)

I have been asked to reply.

The Employability Skills Programme is an LSC funded programme, £23 million is available to support learner's achievements in literacy, language and numeracy qualifications and to get a basic level employability qualification. DWP are further supporting learners with £14 million for Training Allowance.

DIUS has supported development of the programme with £310,000 which has funded:

Develop, set-up and support for 9 Pathfinders trials in each of the Government Office regions.

Develop and delivery of training for JCP advisers and Programme Providers.

Development and dissemination of information and promotional materials for JCP customers, advisers and programme providers.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people his Department estimates have found employment as a consequence of participating in the Employability Skills programme which his Department announced on 1st August 2007. (185832)

I have been asked to reply.

Success in the Employability Skills Programme is measured in a number of ways, including achievement of literacy, language and numeracy qualifications, achievements of an employability certificate in addition to job outcomes.

Provision typically lasts 15 weeks and in that time Training Providers work with local Jobcentre Plus offices to try to identify suitable job opportunities and ideally to find work with training.

We expect the LSC to report on the full range of success criteria including qualifications and job outcomes at quarterly reviews, the first set of data to end of February 2008 will be reported at the quarterly review in April 2008.

Employment: Families

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many families came off jobseeker’s allowance and income support to re-enter full-time employment in each of the last five years. (185311)

European Social Fund

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what disbursements have been made from the European Social Fund in each of the last three years in each (a) constituency and (b) local authority area. (185833)

This information is not available at constituency or local authority level. Most European Social Fund money is allocated at regional level. The following table shows disbursements made from the European Social Fund in England in 2005, 2006 and 2007.

European social fund payments 2005, 2006 and 2007

£

Region

2005

2006

2007

East of England

34,095,608

35,231,647

36,046,301

East Midlands

35,581,610

34,457,285

41,792,971

London

80,650,908

84,921,303

78,798,216

North East

55,543,966

41 ,478,282

41 ,034,653

North West (excluding Merseyside)

52,489,763

35,521,941

30,249,680

North West (Merseyside)

30,772,542

45,050,374

34,226,239

South East

43,553,100

48,381,611

42,416,442

South West (excluding Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly)

28,028,604

33,408,137

20,686,493

South West (Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly)

8,823,512

10,338,543

12,396,687

West Midlands

63,871,760

52,371,892

67,318,184

Yorkshire and the Humber (excluding South Yorkshire)

45,042,213

41,250,461

42,223,750

Yorkshire and the Humber (South Yorkshire)

41,188,272

45,171,016

19,634,521

England national projects

47,740,184

50,329,667

93,006,953

Equal projects

50,701,187

58,677,218

45,903,082

Total

618,083,229

616,589,377

605,734,172

Notes:

1. Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly, Merseyside and South Yorkshire receive ring-fenced funding as Objective 1 areas.

2. The Department for Work and Pensions has responsibility for the European Social Fund in England. The devolved administrations have responsibility for the European Social Fund in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Source:

European Social Fund Projects and Payments Database, February 2008

Housing Benefits: Rented Housing

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) what estimates he has made of the percentage of claimants subject to the local housing allowance who will experience a restriction in their rent as a consequence of the application of the allowance, broken down by local authority; (188062)

(2) what estimates he has made of the percentage of claimants subject to the local housing allowance who will experience a restriction in their rent as a consequence of the application of the allowance, broken down by bedroom entitlement.

No such estimates have been made.

The local housing allowance is being applied to new housing benefit claims in the deregulated private rented sector. Current claimants will not be moved to the new scheme unless they break their claim or change address.

We cannot estimate how many people will experience a restriction in their rent as a consequence of the local housing allowance because we do not know in advance what their accommodation choices and hence their contractual rent will be. Consequently, we do not know how their rent will compare with the local housing allowance rate appropriate for them.

The allowance is a more transparent way to calculate housing benefit entitlement. As a result, claimants should find it easier to shop around to find a property which has a rent set at or below the appropriate local housing allowance rate. The extent to which they do this will determine the proportion of claimants who have their rent restricted. In the Pathfinder areas the percentage of claimants with a shortfall fell from 59 per cent. to 40 per cent.

We will be monitoring the number of cases with excesses and shortfalls as part of the two year review of the national roll-out of the local housing allowance.

Incapacity Benefit

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people claimed incapacity benefit in each year since 1997; and how many claimants (a) reached retirement age and (b) died in each year. (187264)

[holding answer 20 February 2008]: Information for the full year to February 1997 is not available. The available information is in the following table.

Number claiming incapacity benefits and leaving incapacity benefits through death or moving to State Pension

As at February each year

Incapacity benefits commencements

Death

Stops claiming incapacity benefits and starts claiming State Pension

1998

944,400

30,800

69,000

1999

838,000

29,800

80,400

2000

807,300

30,300

91,600

2001

788,900

28,200

43,500

2002

744,600

28,600

42,600

2003

726,600

27,600

49,100

2004

702,200

28,600

43,300

2005

663,000

28,000

63,400

2006

614,800

27,300

58,700

2007

606,800

27,900

63,300

Notes:

1. Terminations figures are produced from 5 per cent sample data.

2. Figures are rounded to the nearest hundred.

3. Totals may not sum due to rounding.

4. Earlier years have been updated to include late notified terminations.

Source:

DWP Information Directorate 5 per cent terminations dataset

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people in each age category are claiming incapacity benefit in (a) England and (b) each local authority area. (189869)

Income Support

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people claiming income support worked for fewer than 16 hours per week in each year since 1997. (186115)

One of the conditions for claiming income support is that claimants must not be working for 16 or more hours a week. Therefore all the people claiming income support worked for fewer than 16 hours per week in each year since 1997.

The information on those income support claimants doing some work, but less than 16 hours, is in the following table.

Number of income support (IS) claimants (excluding minimum income guarantee1) working less than 16 hours a week

Period ending

Number

As percentage of total IS claims

May 1997

80,900

3.6

May 1998

79,700

3.6

May 1999

80,200

3.6

May 2000

73,200

3.3

May 2001

67,000

3.0

May 2002

66,000

3.0

May 2003

64,500

2.9

May 2004

60,200

2.7

May 2005

55,200

2.5

May 2006

53,000

2.5

May 2007

49,300

2.3

Notes:

1. Data exclude minimum income guarantee (MIG) data to provide a consistent time series for income support claimants. In October 2003, pension credit replaced MIG (income support for people aged 60 or over/with partner aged 60 or over).

2. Figures are uprated to Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study totals and rounded to the nearest 100.

Source:

DWP Information Directorate five per cent. sample

Jobcentre Plus: Training

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what training is planned for Jobcentre Plus staff on the implementation of (a) local housing allowance, (b) employment and support allowance, (c) changes in liaison with the Child Support Agency for income support claimants and (d) changes to lone parents’ eligibility for income support; and what additional resources have been allocated for such training. (187026)

The administration of Jobcentre Plus is a matter for the Chief Executive of Jobcentre Plus, Lesley Strathie. I have asked her to provide the hon. Member with the information requested.

Letter from Lesley Strathie, dated 4 March 2008:

The Secretary of State has asked me to reply to your question asking what training is planned for Jobcentre Plus staff on the implementation of (a) local Housing Allowance, (b) Employment and Support Allowance, (c) changes in liaison with the Child Support Agency for Income Support claimants and (d) changes to lone parents’ eligibility for Income Support; and what additional resources have been allocated for training. This is something that falls within the responsibilities delegated to me as Chief Executive of Jobcentre Plus.

Existing learning products are being amended to reflect the introduction of local housing allowance and the consequent changes to our IT systems. In addition communications have been published to increase awareness among Jobcentre Plus staff.

Learning and Development for people in Jobcentre Plus is central to the successful delivery of Employment and Support Allowance (ESA). We are putting in place a comprehensive package of learning and development products to fully equip Jobcentre Plus staff to deliver ESA. Detailed learning routeways are being developed for each of the roles affected. In addition, communications are being planned to ensure all Jobcentre Plus staff are aware of ESA as a new benefit and new regime to assist customers into work.

All Jobcentre Plus staff will receive information to raise awareness of the changes to the child maintenance arrangements being introduced in July 2008 and October 2008. In addition specific learning products are being developed for staff whose roles are being directly impacted by the changes.

A full learning needs analysis is currently being conducted to assess what learning staff need as a result of the forthcoming changes to lone parents’ eligibility for Income Support. All staff are likely to require some communication to raise their awareness. More detailed information will be focused on those whose roles are more directly affected. In particular advisers will be given clear advice on the existing and new flexibilities that are applicable to lone parents claiming Jobseeker’s Allowance.

The development and delivery of the training for staff on local Housing Allowance, child maintenance and lone parents’ eligibility for Income Support are being contained within core Jobcentre Plus Learning and Development resources which exist to support the implementation of change. Detailed planning for the ESA learning and development is currently underway, which will enable an assessment of what can be absorbed within current capacity and whether any additional resource is required.

I hope this is helpful.

Low Incomes

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) how his Department defines a low income household; and whether this definition has changed since 1997; (185938)

(2) how his Department defines a household in poverty; and whether this definition has changed since 1997;

(3) what measures his Department uses for (a) child poverty, (b) working-age poverty and (c) pensioner poverty; and what criteria were taken into account in determining these measures;

(4) whether the way his Department measures (a) child poverty, (b) working-age poverty and (c) pension poverty has changed since 1997.

Poverty is a complex and multidimensional issue and, as such, there are many possible measures of poverty.

It is generally accepted that low income is central to any poverty measurement. Definitions of low income households are set out in the annual National Statistics publication Households Below Average Income. This reports numbers of individuals in households below or persistently below 50 per cent., 60 per cent. and 70 per cent. of median household income before and after deducting housing costs.

Statisticians have made a number of methodological improvements since 1997 in line with international best practice, following full consultation with users and National Statistics protocols. Improvements have been explained in the relevant publications. HBAI presents a consistent time series reflecting all changes that have been made.

As no single measure captures all aspects of poverty, the new public service agreement “Tackle poverty and promote greater independence and wellbeing in later life” includes a range of indicators related to low income for pensioners. These are relative low income (below 50 and 60 per cent. contemporary median household income), and absolute low income (below 60 per cent. of 1998-99 median income uprated in line with prices). Further information is given in the Government’s PSA Delivery Agreement 17, which is available in the Library.

The public service agreement (PSA) to halve child poverty sets out indicators of child poverty. These are relative low income (below 60 per cent. of contemporary median household income) absolute low income (below 60 per cent. of 1998-99 median income uprated in line with prices), and combined low income and material deprivation (based on below 70 per cent. of contemporary median household income). The three indicators of child poverty reflect that income is a key aspect of child poverty. The combined low income and material deprivation indicator provides a wider measure of families’ living standards. Further information is given in the conclusions document of the Department’s “Measuring Child Poverty” consultation, which is available in the Library.

National Insurance

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what estimate he has made of the number of individuals who have been issued with (a) two, (b) three and (c) four or more national insurance numbers. (184799)

In 2007, there were 1,517 instances where an individual was found to be using more than one national insurance number (NINO). A further breakdown by number of NINOs used by an individual is not available.

New Deal Schemes: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how much was spent on (a) the new deal and (b) the new deal self-employment option in each year since their establishment; and what the planned budget for each is in each year of the spending review period. (185243)

Self-employment support is available to new deal participants through new deal for young people, new deal 25-plus, new deal for lone parents and new deal for partners. Self-employment support offers an initial awareness session for potential entrepreneurs followed by a period of supported business planning with a business expert and a period of ‘test trading’. During test trading, participants start their business while continuing to receive their benefit, an allowance or working tax credits, depending on their circumstances, to help them over any initial transitional hurdles. This period can last up to a maximum of 26 weeks.

Information on the planned budget for each year of the Spending Review period is not yet available. The forecast figures for 2008-09 will be included in the departmental report 2008 which will be published in May 2008.

New deal spend

£ million

Financial year

Total new deal spend

Of which, on the self-employment option

1997-98

43

0

1998-99

314

0

1999-2000

536

1

2000-01

596

2

2001-02

672

1

2002-03

736

2

2003-04

655

4

2004-05

640

5

2005-06

539

5

2006-07

531

5

2007-08

557

7

Notes:

1. Figures up to and including 2006-07 are confirmed spend.

2. Figures for 2007-08 are planned expenditure.

3. Figures include all new deal programme costs; start-up costs; staff costs, and allowances paid to participants apart from the 50-plus element of the working tax credit, which is the responsibility of HMRC.

4. Figures are rounded to the nearest million and may not sum to spend figures on each individual new deal published in the departmental report due to rounding.

5. Figures include central estimates of administration costs.

Sources:

DWP departmental reports 2005-06

Jobcentre Plus accounts 2006-07

DWP departmental report 2007-08 and DWP finance division.

Occupational Health

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) how much the review of the health of the working age population has cost to date; (185834)

(2) when he expects the report of the review of the health of the working age population to be published.

In March 2007 Dame Carol Black was commissioned to carry out a review of the health of the working age population. The review, which will contain recommendations for Government and stakeholders, will help us to better understand the impact of ill-health in working age people and how best we can tackle this and support people to stay in work. It will help steer the Government’s strategy for the coming years.

To help her in taking forward her review, Dame Carol launched a “Call for Evidence” which ran until 30 November 2007. There has been a significant and very positive response, with over 260 submissions received and a number of very successful stakeholder events held across the country.

Dame Carol and her review team are currently in the latter stages of analysing the evidence gathered and drafting the report. She is currently hoping to submit her report to Ministers in March.

In addition to the salary costs of a small team of civil servants supporting her work, the stakeholder events cost approximately £75,000. The review will also be informed by a number of pieces of external research which Dame Carol has commissioned in partnership with the Government’s Health Work and Well-being Strategy. The cost of this research to date is around £250,000 and is ultimately expected to total around £300,000. As well as informing Dame Carol’s review, this research will be published separately and support the ongoing development of the Health, Work and Well-being Strategy.

Offices: Pension Service

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) what the current office space is of (a) the Pension Service and (b) the Disability and Carers Service; (187708)

(2) where the premises occupied by (a) the Pension Service and (b) the Disability and Carers Service are located.

The current office space occupied by the Pension Service is 119,900 sq m while the disability and carers service occupancy is 99,550 sq m. This includes the local service outlets.

The Pension Service and the disability and carers service are major occupiers of 44 sites nationwide (the Pension Service: 29 and the disability and carers service: 15). In addition, the Pension Service’s current local service outlets and some other disability and carers service functions operate out of approximately a further 200 sites.

A breakdown of these sites by location will be placed in the Library.

Pension, Disability and Carers Service Agency

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how much establishing and developing the new Pension, Disability and Carers Service Agency will cost. (185697)

This is a matter which falls within the responsibility of the acting chief executive of the Disability and Carers Service, Mrs. Vivien Hopkins. She will write to the hon. Member with the information requested.

Letter from Vivien Hopkins, dated 4 March 2008:

You asked the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much building and developing the new Pension, Disability and Carers Service Agency will cost.

The Minister for Disabled People, Anne McGuire MP, promised you a substantive reply from the Acting Chief Executive of the Disability and Carers Service.

I can confirm that the operating and investment budgets of the new Pension, Disability and Carers Service Agency will be the sum of the planned, pre-merger budgets of the current Disability and Carers Service and The Pension Service.

I hope this reply is helpful.

Pensions

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) how many pensioners access their pension through the Post Office; how many and what proportion received their pension (a) on or before 21 December 2007 and (b) on or by 24 December 2007; how many pensioners did not receive or were unable to access their pension on or before 24 December 2007; and if he will make a statement; (185876)

(2) how many and what percentage of pensioners did not (a) receive, (b) pick up and (c) cash their state pension before Christmas 2007.

The vast majority (around 8.6 million) of pensioners have their pension paid by direct payment into a bank account and those who were due a payment at Christmas were able to access their money from cash machines at any time over the holiday period. It is possible to access money in other bank accounts at the Post Office, as well as the Post Office Card Account and cheque payments, but the Department does not hold data on how many pensioners choose to do so.

The arrangements put in place to make sure that everyone received their money before Christmas worked well and around 5.4 million (60 per cent.) pensioners due to be paid over Christmas were able to access their money on Friday 21 December. The remaining around 3.6 million (40 per cent.) were able to access their money on Monday 24 December.

The information about the number of pensioners who did not subsequently collect their state pension before Christmas is not available.

The Department is reviewing its arrangements for payments due over the Christmas period.

Pensions: Females

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many and what proportion of the cohort of women who did not fully benefit from home responsibilities protection, referred to in the May 2006 Pensions White Paper, will be over pension age on 6 April 2010; and what estimate he has made of the cost of extending the reduction from 39 to 30 in the number of qualifying years required to be eligible for a full basic state pension to these women. (185449)

The information requested is not available. The cohort of women described in the 2006 White Paper, who did not fully benefit from Home Responsibilities Protection (HRP), did not do so because HRP was not introduced until 1978. Prior to 1978 periods spent out of the labour market while caring for children did not count towards State Pension entitlement.

Public Sector: Learning Disability

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate he has made of the number of people with learning disabilities employed in (a) the public sector and (b) the NHS. (189969)

Secretaries of State

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will list the Secretaries of State in his Department since 2001, with the dates of service in each case. (187756)

The list of Secretaries of State for Work and Pensions since 2001 with dates of service is in the following table.

Name

Date of appointment

Last day of service

Alistair Darling

27 July 1998

29 May 2002

Andrew Smith

30 May 2002

7 September 2004

Alan Johnson

9 September 2004

6 May 2005

David Blunkett

6 May 2005

2 November 2005

John Hutton

3 November 2005

28 June 2007

Peter Hain

29 June 2007

24 January 2008

James Purnell

24 January 2008

Sick Leave

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to his Department’s press release of 5 September 2007, on advice to patients on sick leave, how successful the online training tool for GPs has been. (185836)

The online training tool is an educational programme developed in partnership with Cardiff university. It has been designed to help GPs develop their skills in handling issues around fitness for work during consultations with patients. 263 GPs completed the programme as part of an independent evaluation during the development process. The results from this evaluation showed that of the GPs that took part, there was a significant change in their attitudes towards dealing with their consultations around fitness for work.

The training tool has also been used as part of a national education programme for GPs which we have been piloting in partnership with the Royal College of General Practitioners. The evaluation of the pilot showed that GPs had an increased level of confidence on dealing with consultations on fitness for work.

Social Rented Housing

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what proportion of households in social housing he estimates were in poverty in (a) England, (b) each region and (c) each London local authority area in (i) 1997 and (ii) 2006-07. (185685)

Specific information regarding low income for the United Kingdom is available in "Households Below Average Income 1994-95, 2005-06 (Revised)". The threshold of below 60 per cent. contemporary median income is the most commonly used in reporting trends in low income.

The available information is shown in the following tables. The data source does not allow us to provide robust numbers for estimates below the level of Government Office Region. Data for 2006-07 are not yet available so statistics for the most recent years are given instead.

Proportion of households in social housing having an income below 60 per cent. of median in England and by region, three-year averages over 1996-97, 1997-98 and 1998-99

Percentage of households

Before housing costs

After housing costs

England

31

55

North East

36

56

North West

34

55

Yorkshire and the Humber

38

55

East Midlands

35

55

West Midlands

33

53

East of England

26

52

London

28

58

South East

21

52

South West

27

57

Proportion of households in social housing having an income below 60 per cent. of median in England and by region, three-year averages over 2003-04, 2004-05 and 2005-06

Percentage of households

Before housing costs

After housing costs

England

30

45

North East

32

42

North West

31

44

Yorkshire and the Humber

32

42

East Midlands

33

45

West Midlands

32

45

East of England

25

41

London

30

52

South East

23

42

South West

27

41

Notes: 1. Three survey year averages are given for each of the regions as robust single year estimates cannot be produced because of the sample sizes for individual regions. 2 The income measures used to derive the estimates shown employ the same methodology as the Department for Work and Pensions publication 'Households Below Average Income' series, which uses disposable household income, adjusted/equivalised for household size and composition, as an income measure as a proxy for standard of living. 3. The figures are based on OECD equivalisation factors. 4. Tables show figure in percentages rounded to the nearest percentage point.

Social Security Benefits

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what estimate he has made of the likely change in the number of postal claims for (a) jobseeker’s allowance, (b) incapacity benefit and (c) income support as a result of closures of jobcentres or Jobcentre Plus offices, in each region. (185873)

The administration of these benefits is a matter for the chief executive of Jobcentre Plus, Lesley Strathie. She will write to the hon. Member.

Letter from Leslie Strathie, dated 4 March 2008:

The Secretary of State has asked me to reply to your question asking what estimate he has made of the increase in postal claims for (a) Jobseeker’s Allowance (b) Incapacity Benefit and (c) Income Support as a result of planned closures of Jobcentres or Jobcentre Plus Offices, broken down by region. This is something which falls within the responsibilities delegated to me as Chief Executive of Jobcentre Plus.

We do not have a postal claim scheme for these three benefits. For the vast majority of claimants, the initial claim to these benefits will be made by a telephone call to a Contact Centre. For those vulnerable customers who are unable to make contact by telephone, the claim will be taken at a face-to-face interview.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people claimed each type of benefit in (a) Cornwall, (b) the South West and (c) England in each year since 1979; and what percentage those people were of the population in each area in each year. (186990)

Information is not available prior to 2002. The available information has been placed in the Library.

Social Security Benefits: Applications

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many households have made both continuous claims for housing benefit and council tax and repeated claims for jobseeker’s allowance since 1997. (186112)

Social Security Benefits: Cost of Living

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions whether his Department has conducted research into the merits of reflecting varying living costs in different regions in benefit levels. (187454)

Social Security Benefits: Fraud

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) what estimate he has made of the risk of fraud in claims for (a) incapacity benefit and (b) income support in cases where (i) the claimant attends the local jobcentre and (ii) the claim is maintained by post; (185872)

(2) what estimate he has made of the risk of fraud in claims for jobseekers allowance (a) where the claimant attends the local jobcentre once a fortnight and (b) where the claim is maintained by post.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what research his Department has carried out into the effectiveness of the benefits campaign Targeting benefit thieves. (185918)

The Targeting Benefit Thieves campaign was launched in October 2006. The Department has carried out regular quantitative tracking research, supported by qualitative research, to monitor the effectiveness of the campaign.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will place a copy of the findings of the research into benefit fraud commissioned by his Department and undertaken by GfK NOP in the Library. (185921)

Research commissioned by the Department for Work and Pensions to evaluate communications activity is available through the Department's publication scheme. Further information about the publication scheme is available on our website at:

www.dwp.gov.uk

It is not standard practice to place communications research in the Library.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how old the (a) youngest and (b) oldest person convicted of benefit fraud was in the latest period for which figures are available. (186123)

The information is not centrally collated and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Social Security Benefits: Publicity

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what steps his Department is taking to make families aware of their benefits entitlements. (187311)

This Department does all it can, through its information providing services, to ensure that people are aware of the benefits to which they are entitled and how to claim them. Leaflets are available at benefits offices, Citizen's Advice Bureaux, and from welfare rights organisations and other advice giving agencies. Information is also available on our website at:

www.dwp.gov.uk

From time to time, the Department for Work and Pensions and its Agencies run targeted take-up campaigns for specific benefits. For example, the Pension Service is currently actively targeting those potential claimants who have been identified as the most likely still to be missing out.

Telephone Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what guidance the Department issues to staff in (a) Jobcentre Plus offices, (b) the Pension Service, (c) the Disability and Carer's Service and (d) Benefit Delivery centres on how to respond when clients ask to be called back. (187713)

Department for Work and Pensions does not issue guidance to its agencies on such operational matters, as these are the responsibility of the agencies' chief executives.

All three agencies require staff to call back customers on the telephone when the customer requests that they do so. If appropriate the call-back will be immediate. However, in many cases arrangements will be made to call the customer back at a mutually convenient time. This allows an appropriate official to provide the best possible service by having the necessary information to hand.

Unemployment Benefits

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people applying for out-of-work benefits were assessed as functionally illiterate in each year since 1997. (185942)

The information is not available in the format requested.

The Skills for Life survey, which was conducted in 2002-03, estimated that 38 per cent. of benefit claimants were below Level 1 in literacy.

Winter Fuel Payments

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many and what percentage of pensioners did not receive their winter fuel payment before Christmas 2007. (185874)

The Winter Fuel Payment is to help with fuel bills rather than to pay for Christmas but the Pension Service aims to pay 99 per cent. of all Winter Fuel Payments before Christmas. This Winter The Pension Service exceeded this target paying 99.98 per cent. of all cases by Christmas. Of the 12,360,293 customers eligible for an automatic Winter Fuel Payment, which should have been paid prior to Christmas, 2,352 customers (0.019 per cent.) did not receive their payment before Christmas.

Innovation, Universities and Skills

Aimhigher Initiative: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how much his Department expects to spend on the Aim Higher Initiative in (a) 2009, (b) 2010 and (c) 2011; and if he will make a statement. (186614)

In our January 2008 Grant Letter to the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), we confirmed annual funding of £47.9 million for the Aimhigher Programme for each of the 2008-09, 2009-10 and 2010-11 financial years. Traditionally, HEFCE have supplemented this funding. In addition there is a health care strand which at £1.8 million per annum is jointly funded with the Department of Health. This means that, for the 2008/09 academic year, the total funding allocated to Aimhigher will be £78.0 million. Figures for 2009/10 and 2010/11 are still to be finalised.

The Aimhigher programme brings together universities, colleges and schools in partnership to raise the attainment levels of young people and their aspirations towards higher education. The programme provides opportunities and experiences for learners which helps to widen their horizons, develop talents, increase motivation and maximise potential.

HEFCE guidance on targeting disadvantaged learners, published in 2007, defined priority groups for Aimhigher to ensure utmost effectiveness. These groups are people from lower socio-economic groups; people from disadvantaged socio-economic backgrounds who live in areas of relative deprivation where participation in HE is low; ‘looked after’ children in the care system; and people with a disability or a specific learning difficulty.

In this next phase of the programme, HEFCE is working with Aimhigher partnerships further to develop targeting of those with the talent and ability who might not consider that higher education is for them and provide a sequenced and challenging range of learning opportunities linked to a future in higher education.

Community Relations

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills which further education colleges worked with his Department to prepare the consultation document, The Role of Further Education Providers in Promoting Community Cohesion, Fostering Shared Values and Preventing Violent Extremism; and how those colleges were selected. (190145)

We worked with a number of colleges during the preparation of the consultation document The Role of Further Education Providers in Promoting Community Cohesion, Fostering Shared Values and Preventing Violent Extremism. These were:

Barking College

Blackburn College

Bradford College

College of North East London

Grimsby Institute of Further and Higher Education

Luton Sixth Form College

Oaklands College

Oldham Sixth Form College.

Stockton Riverside College

Waltham Forest College

These were identified by the Association of Colleges (AOC) as colleges with experience in promoting community cohesion.

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many (a) principals and (b) chief executives of further education colleges have been sent a copy of the consultation document, The Role of Further Education Providers in Promoting Community Cohesion, Fostering Shared Values and Preventing Violent Extremism. (190180)

The consultation is primarily web-based. The consultation document is available on the DIUS website and we have also set up an e-consultation facility to enable people to respond on-line via the DCSF website.

Principals and chief executives of colleges were informed of the consultation through communications including:

Association of Colleges, Association of Learning Providers and National Council for Faiths and Beliefs in Further Education all informed their members of this consultation via their regular electronic mailings;

The monthly DIUS Further Education Newsletter that is sent to all principals and other training providers.

Further to this, we are holding a series of consultation workshops around the country to discuss the proposals.

Community Relations: Religion

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how his Department plans to work with key national student/learner organisations in order to raise awareness of risks including violent extremism; and if he will make a statement. (190146)

We have provided guidance to further and higher education institutions to raise their awareness of risks and to help them promote good relations and prevent extremism.

Universities and colleges need to promote and reinforce shared values and create the space for free and open debate in which all can join. It is important that institutions break down segregation among different student communities, including by supporting inter-faith and inter-cultural dialogue. They must also ensure student safety and institutions that are free from bullying, harassment and intimidation. They need to provide support and appropriate sources of advice and guidance for students who may be at risk and they need to ensure staff and students are aware of their roles in preventing violent extremism.

In that overall context, we are working with the NUS and student faith groups to explore what further help they need to raise awareness of potential risks and to provide support for students. We will develop our plans for students/learners in the FE sector through dialogue with the National Learner Panel, the NUS and organisations that support student faith societies as part of the consultation.

In addition, we are working with the NUS and other sectoral organisations to take forward the next stage of the debate that the Prime Minister called for in November on

“how to protect and maintain academic freedom while ensuring that extremists can never stifle debate or impose their views”.

Council of Ministers: Meetings

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills if he will make it his policy to make a statement on the agenda of each Council of Ministers meeting he attends before so doing. (181824)

There are already arrangements in place for the provision of information to Parliament on Council of Ministers meetings. A written ministerial statement is made in both Houses before and after each Council meeting. During recesses, ministerial letters are sent to the chairman of the European Scrutiny Committees and copied to the Libraries of both Houses.

Counselling: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills if he will exempt those training to work as counsellors for Relate from the withdrawal of funding for equivalent or lower qualifications; and if he will make a statement. (178973)

No students currently studying equivalent or lower qualifications (ELQs) will be affected by these changes. In future, our policy of redistributing grant will widen participation and mean that more of the million people of working age who do not have a first higher-level qualification, especially those from non-traditional backgrounds, will be able to benefit from participating in higher education. However, in finalising our proposals in the light of consultation we have decided to make a number of adjustments. In particular, there will be a review mechanism each year starting in December 2008 to look at individual subjects of particular economic or social importance. We are sure it would be wrong for us to rush into making special arrangements for any subjects, other than those which had already been identified, before any changes to ELQs, as requiring support in the public interest (such as medicine, initial teacher training teaching, science, technology, engineering and maths subjects, area-based studies, and modern foreign languages). But we are asking the Funding Council each year to look at levels of demand both for exempt or protected subjects and at any other subjects which might in future be regarded as key because of their economic or social significance, and in cases where there is evidence of a fall in demand advise us on the best way forward. That will provide an opportunity to consider the issue raised by the hon. Member.

Departmental Parliamentary Questions

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what the (a) cost and (b) average response time for answering parliamentary questions was for his Department in the last parliamentary session. (172072)

Drafting replies to parliamentary questions is an integral part of the jobs of a significant proportion of the Department's staff and therefore to respond to this question would incur disproportionate cost. The Department's PQ Tracking System is currently unable to break down the average response time in answering parliamentary questions. The PQ tracking IT system is being upgraded and is close to implementation. It will produce accurate statistics and a wider range of management information making it possible to manage and monitor PQs more closely.

Departmental Reorganisation

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills which departments, agencies and sections of the Department for Education and Skills and the Department of Trade and Industry were incorporated into his Department during the recent departmental reorganisation; how many employees there were in those departments, agencies and sections in (a) 2006 and (b) 2007 to date; in which buildings these employees (i) were based in 2006 and (ii) are based; and how much floor space (A) they occupied in 2006 and (B) they occupy. (166876)

The following Departments, agencies and sections of the Department for Education and Skills and the Department of Trade and Industry were incorporated into his Department during the recent departmental reorganisation:

Ex DfES

Headcount

DfES Directorate

2006

2007

2008

Higher Education

166

169

161

Lifelong Learning and Skills

562

483

343

Total

728

652

504

Buildings Occupied

Sanctuary Buildings, Great Smith street, London SW1

Caxton House, Tothill street, London SW1

Moorfoot, Sheffield, S Yorkshire

Castle View House, East Lane, Runcorn, Cheshire

Mowden Hall, Staindrop Road, Darlington, Co. Durham

DCSF continues to operate from all four sites.

ExDTI

Headcount

DTI Directorate/NDPB

2006

2007

2008

Go Science

76.4

73.8

76.8

Science and Innovation Group

268.8

249.6

127.7

UKIPO

887.6

931.6

961.5

National Weights and Measures Laboratory

46

47

50

Buildings Occupied

Go Science and Science and Innovation

151 Buckingham Palace road, London

1 Victoria street, London.

All staff are now based in Kingsgate House, Victoria street, London.

UK IPO

Concept House, Newport, South Wales

Nine Mile Point, Newport, South Wales

Harmsworth House, London

NWML

Purpose built building in Teddington

The balance of information requested could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Education: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what cost-benefit analysis has been made of the decision to reduce funding to equivalent or lower qualification students. (175714)

We are not cutting funding to higher education. There is no cost to the Exchequer because we are redistributing funding away from students doing equivalent or lower level qualifications in order to fund more new entrants to higher education than would otherwise be possible. First and foremost, we took this decision as a matter of fairness and social justice, but it also has an economic rationale. The additional lifetime earnings “premium” associated with getting a first degree in this country remains comfortably over £100,000 in today’s prices which makes it among the highest in the developed world. Given that, it is clear that enabling 20,000 more new students (or students progressing to a higher level) to enter higher education will bring considerable long-term benefit to both individuals and the economy, through having a larger number of more highly qualified, more productive workers than would otherwise be the case.

EU Budget

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what lines in the European Union budget are available to fund projects initiated by his Department. (184066)

The UK's allocation of budget line 15 02 of the European Union budget is made available by the European Commission directly to the UK National Agencies for the Lifelong Learning Programme to provide funding to successful applicants for projects under that programme. Projects are initiated under this funding line by a wide variety of local, regional and national organisations.

Further Education: Crimes of Violence

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how he plans to ensure that further education colleges have in place plans to respond to incidents of violent extremism. (190147)

We are consulting on the best way to support colleges in their role in promoting community cohesion, fostering shared values and preventing violent extremism. Given that we believe a differentiated approach is needed so that colleges can develop plans appropriate to their circumstances, we are not proposing to impose an additional monitoring requirement to ensure all have plans for responding to incidents of violent extremism.

We will review the consultation responses and determine what further steps, if any, are needed in this regard.

Our view is that further education colleges’ response to this issue will be best managed by colleges identifying and implementing solutions that work in their particular circumstances, supported by the relevant agencies and by good practice from around the network.

Further Education: Islam

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills when the research undertaken by the Learning and Skills Council on issues faced in engaging young Muslims in further education, referred to in the consultation document, The Role of Further Education Providers in Promoting Community Cohesion, Fostering Shared Values and Preventing Violent Extremism, will be published. (190179)

A report on the first phase of this research was published by the Learning and Skills Council (LSC) in November 2007 and is available on their website at:

http://readingroom.lsc.gov.uk/lsc/National/nat-engaging-young-muslims-in-learning.pdf

A second phase which is working with student groups to develop resources and more in-depth understanding of the issues faced by Muslim students will be published in summer 2008.

Higher Education: Admissions

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many (a) full-time and (b) part-time (i) students aged 17 to 21 years and (ii) mature students enrolled on higher education courses in each year since 2001. (186610)

The latest available outturn information from HESA is shown in the following table.

Comparable outturn figures for 2007/08 will not be available until January 2009, but the latest data from UCAS show record levels of applicants and acceptances for entry to full-time undergraduate courses in 2007 and a further 7 per cent. increase for entry to such courses in 2008 at this stage in the admissions cycle—clear evidence that our policies to increase HE participation are working.

Entrants to higher education courses by mode of study and age1 , postgraduate and undergraduate entrants, UK and overseas domiciles, English higher education institutions2 : Academic years 2001/02 to 2006/07

Full-time

Part-time

Academic year

17 to 21

Over 21

17 to 21

Over 21

2001/02

266,565

164,890

17,360

262,570

2002/03

276,915

184,260

17,525

270,320

2003/04

280,175

195,895

17,765

273,115

2004/05

284,680

196,835

20,055

272,425

2005/06

301,745

199,850

21,045

273,720

2006/07

295,695

196,695

25,920

263,210

1 Excludes a small number of students with an unknown age or an age less than 17, (This was less than 0.6 per cent. in 2006/07).

2 Excludes the Open University.

Note:

Figures are on a HESA standard registration population basis and are rounded to the nearest 5.

Source:

Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

Higher Education: Applications

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what criteria his Department uses to define a university applicant as a home or international student; and what account is taken as to whether they have indefinite leave to remain as opposed to exceptional leave to remain. (189267)

For student support purposes, a “home” student is a person who can demonstrate a specified connection with the UK and satisfy the other eligibility criteria. The specified connection consists of a combination of residence, immigration and in some cases nationality requirements.

Categories of student who may be eligible include those who on the first day of the first academic year of the course are:

settled in the UK within the meaning of the Immigration Act of 1971 (which includes those with indefinite leave to remain) and

persons awarded leave to enter or remain following a failed asylum application (Exceptional Leave to Enter or Remain, Humanitarian Protection or Discretionary Leave) and their family members.

Both categories are required to have been ordinarily resident in the UK and Islands for the three years prior to the start of their course.

Other categories of students may qualify for tuition fee support or full student support provided they satisfy specific EEA/EC legislation requirements or have been awarded refugee status.

Higher Education: Community Relations

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills when his Department plans to make available the audio-visual material to fight Al-Qa'ida and violent extremism referred to in the consultation document The Role of Further Education Providers in Promoting Community Cohesion, Fostering Shared Values and Preventing Violent Extremism. (190412)

Some audio materials are already available. Looking forward, the Department will review the need for further materials following the report of the consultation, working with colleges to make sure support materials in any medium meet their needs.

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills when the Quality and Improvement Agency plans to publish on its Excellence Gateway website the coherent package of support for staff at further education colleges referred to in the consultation document The Role of Further Education Providers in Promoting Community Cohesion, Fostering Shared Values and Preventing Violent Extremism. (190413)

The Quality Improvement Agency (QIA) already commissions programmes such as Skills for Life (to improve basic skills levels) and the Post-16 Citizenship Support Programme (to improve quality in the teaching and learning of citizenship that involves national events, networks and teaching materials) to support community cohesion.

QIA is already working to identify appropriate materials from existing support programmes to help providers in work on community cohesion and the final package of materials will reflect the outcomes of the consultation on this, once known.

The consultation closes on 6 May 2008 and once the responses have been analysed, work will begin on pulling together the most appropriate packages of support as defined by sector respondents themselves, for inclusion on the Excellence Gateway.

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what role the Quality and Improvement Agency will play in helping further education colleges to build capacity in developing the risk assessments referred to in the consultation document The Role of Further Education Providers in Promoting Community Cohesion, Fostering Shared Values and Preventing Violent Extremism. (190414)

The new FE improvement body to be established following the merger of the Quality Improvement Agency and the Centre of Excellence in Leadership will provide a single point of access for existing and future support materials via the Excellence Gateway to underpin the role that FE providers are being asked to take in promoting community cohesion, fostering shared values and preventing violent extremism.

The new body’s remit will bring together the functions of CEL and QIA, with a strong focus on it being a strategic commissioning body to support organisational development and improve standards of teaching and learning for the benefit of learners, employers and the wider community.

QIA is already working to identify appropriate materials from existing support programmes to help providers in work on community cohesion and the final package of materials will reflect the outcomes of the consultation on this, once known.

Higher Education: Student Wastage

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many undergraduates have failed to complete their course in each of the last 10 years. (189382)

The latest available non-completion rates are given in the following table:

Table 1: Proportion of full-time first degree starters who are projected to neither obtain an award nor transfer to another institution

Proportion (percentage)

1997-98

15.8

1998-99

15.9

1999-00

15.8

2000-01

15.0

2001-02

13.8

2002-03

13.9

2003-04

14.4

2004-05

13.8

Source:

Performance Indicators in Higher Education, published by HESA.

Notes:

1. Figures from the 1996-97 academic year have been excluded due to a change in methodology between 1996-97 and 1997-98.

2. Figures for years earlier than 1996-97 are not available.

Figures for the 2005-06 academic year will be available later this year. According to the figures published by the OECD, the overall completion rate for Type A (first degree equivalent) courses in UK universities and colleges of higher education is amongst the highest in the OECD countries (the UK ranks 5th out of 23 countries who report data in this area).

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills which 10 graduate courses have the highest non-completion rate from highest to lowest in each of the last 10 years. (189384)

Non-completion rates are not broken down by degree subject. However a sector-wide non-continuation rate is provided for each year, which is broken down by subject of study. The non-continuation rate is the proportion of entrants to full-time first degree courses who are no longer in higher education after one year of study. The rates for young entrants are shown in the table.

Proportion of young entrants to full-time first degree courses who are no longer in higher education after one year of study

Percentage

Degree subject

1999/2000

2000/01

2001/02

2002/03

2003/04

2004/05

Medicine, dentistry and veterinary science

2.0

2.0

2.4

1.8

2.0

1.9

Subjects allied to medicine

6.3

6.0

5.9

6.4

7.7

6.8

Biological sciences1

16.9

16.0

16.1

17.1

7.3

6.8

Physical sciences1

1

1

1

1

6.1

6.0

Agriculture and related subjects

6.8

7.0

11.4

7.5

8.3

8.0

Mathematical sciences2

29.8

28.0

28.4

29.4

5.5

5.3

Computer sciences2

2

2

2

2

10.3

10.3

Engineering and technology

10.1

9.0

8.9

10.0

10.1

9.1

Architecture, building, planning

9.6

8.0

10.2

11.1

10.0

8.3

Social studies3

36.9

36.0

36.4

37.0

7.2

6.9

Law3

3

3

3

3

6.2

5.5

Librarianship, information sciences4

46.9

48.0

48.2

n/a

n/a

n/a

Business and administrative studies4, 5

4

4

4

58.8

8.8

8.2

Mass communications and documentation5

n/a

n/a

n/a

5

8.5

8.6

Humanities6

65.9

65.0

65.7

n/a

n/a

n/a

Languages6, 7

6

6

6

76.3

6.3

5.7

Historical and philosophical studies7

n/a

n/a

n/a

7

5.9

5.0

Creative arts and design

8.7

8.0

8.3

8.2

8.4

8.1

Education

8.6

8.0

8.1

8.0

7.5

7.6

Combined subjects

8.8

8.0

8.2

14.3

13.5

14.3

All subjects

7.8

7.0

7.3

7.8

7.7

7.2

n/a = Not applicable.

1 One figure was provided for Biological and Physical Sciences until 2003/04.

2 One figure was provided for Mathematical and Computer Sciences until 2003/04.

3 One figure was provided for Social Studies and Law until 2003/04.

4 One figure was provided for Librarianship, information sciences and Business & administrative studies until 2002/03.

5 One figure was provided for Business & administrative studies and Mass communications & documentation in 2002/03.

6 One figure was provided for Languages and Humanities until 2002/03.

7 One figure was provided for Languages and Historical & Philosophical Studies in 2002/03.

Note:

1. Figures for 2000/01 are only available to the nearest integer.

2. There is a break in the time series between academic years 2001/02 and 2002/03 because the subjects’ JACS coding was changed in 2002/03.

Source:

Performance Indicators In Higher Education, published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA)

Subject rankings for non-continuation rates change over the years. However, medicine, dentistry and veterinary science consistently have the lowest non-continuation rates over the time series.

According to the figures published by the OECD, the overall completion rate for Type A (first degree equivalent) courses in UK universities and colleges of higher education is among the highest in the OECD countries (the UK ranks 5th out of 23 countries who report data in this area).

Industrial Training: Bureaucracy

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what proportion of public expenditure on training was spent on courses primarily designed to improve regulatory compliance in the latest period for which figures are available. (190175)

We do not hold information on courses specifically designed to improve regulatory compliance.

Priorities for Success published in 2005 established the principle that employers should bear the full cost of specific stand alone training for staff to meet their statutory or other obligations. Therefore, from 2006-07 we ceased to fund courses such as stand alone first aid and health and safety as well as stand alone training required by staff to update qualifications in order to comply with health and safety regulations.

The reprioritisation of public funding has enabled the Government to support basic literacy and numeracy, full level two and full level three qualifications for adults providing them with the education and skills they need to fully participate in an economically successful and socially cohesive society.

Music: Internet

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what steps he plans to take to combat the illegal downloading of music from the internet; what recent representations he has received on this issue; and if he will make a statement. (190855)

On 22 February the Government published its strategy—'Creative Britain: New Talents for the New Economy'. This strategy made 26 key commitments for Government and industry across every stage of the creative process. It included a commitment

“... to consult on legislation that would require internet service providers (ISPs) and rights holders to co-operate in taking action on illegal file sharing—with a view to implementing legislation by April 2009.”

However the document made clear that the Government's preferred solution was the adoption of voluntary or commercial agreements between the ISPs and right holders.

Overseas Students: Loans

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what mechanisms are in place to ensure repayment of student loans provided by the Student Loans Company by European Union nationals living outside the UK. (187649)

[holding answer 3 March 2008]: The Student Loans Company has established payment arrangements for borrowers from other European Union countries who dropped out of their studies and became due to make repayment in April 2007, or who have graduated and become eligible to repay from April 2008. These existing arrangements will continue to apply when the first full cohort of borrowers from EU countries enters into repayment in April 2010.

The SLC has written to all EU borrowers due to start repayment and asked them to confirm the address where they expect to reside after graduation. If they are staying in the UK they will be expected to obtain a national insurance number and make repayments through the UK tax system. If they are going abroad they will be asked to supply an address and complete an overseas assessment form to allow repayments to be scheduled. These borrowers have been made aware of the variety of methods of repayment available to them.

So that all who can pay contribute to the costs of their education we have put in place variable threshold bands which are dependent on where the borrower lives. Effective collection across the EU is underpinned by EC regulation 44/2001, which allows the SLC to obtain judgments in UK courts, which can be enforced by courts in other EU countries.

In support of the EU repayment process the SLC is developing an enforcement strategy for borrowers who move abroad but who do not provide income details. This work is focussing on the collection of penalties, arrears and the movement of borrowers into litigation where this is appropriate. The SLC is piloting work in these areas and expects to have final arrangements in place by April 2009.

Qualifications: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what qualifications are included in the £3.7 million figure in paragraph D4.9 in the 2007 pre-Budget report/comprehensive spending review. (173160)

Paragraph D4.9 refers to the number of adult qualifications the Government are expected to support over the comprehensive spending review (CSR) period. The subsequent joint grant letter to the Learning and Skills Council from my Department and the Department for Children, Schools and Families published on 16 November set out in detail the number and type of achievements this would include specifically those which contribute to our public service’ agreement targets.

These qualifications are basic literacy and numeracy, full level 2, full level 3 and apprenticeships all of which provide adults with the education and skills, they need to fully participate in an economically successful and socially cohesive society. In order to support the achievement of these qualifications, my Department will also be investing in programmes below level 2 through the foundation learning tier (FLT). The FLT will provide a coherent framework of units and qualifications at entry and level 1 level that can be combined to form progression pathways. This will enable adults to engage in learning and progress through to level 2.

Research: Renewable Energy

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what his Department’s budget was for research and development for each type of renewable energy technology in each of the last 10 years. (166873)

I refer my hon. Member to the reply I gave to the hon. Member for East Devon (Mr. Swire) on 20 November 2007, Official Report, column 664W.

Retirement

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many and what percentage of employees in (a) his Department and (b) each (i) executive agency and (ii) non-departmental public body funded by his Department were above state retirement age at the latest date for which figures are available. (166874)

In the Department there were 12 employees over state retirement age as at 31 January 2008. This represents 1.58 per cent. of a total 756 staff.

In UK IPO there are 19 employees over state retirement age as at 25 February 2008. This represents 1.87 per cent. of a total 1,015 staff.

In NWML there are no employees over state retirement age as at 26 February 2008.

Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Network

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what the cost to his Department is of changing the Science and Engineering Network to the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Network; and if he will make a statement. (190262)

The total cost, to the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Network (STEMNET), of the rebranding exercise was £25,148. The network undertook this exercise as a result of feedback from stakeholders, in particular the mathematics community, who felt the name change was necessary to reflect the activities of the network.

Science: Research

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many investigations into misconduct in science research by (a) universities and higher education establishments, (b) research councils and (c) other Government-funded research institutions have been carried out since 2001; and if he will make a statement. (173860)

This information is not held centrally by the Department. All Research Councils are committed to promoting good research conduct, take seriously any allegations of research misconduct and are currently working to develop RCUK policy on good research conduct. Research organisations (as the employers of researchers), rather than Research Councils, would normally be responsible for investigating any alleged misconduct in research by their own employees. However, there have been 10 instances since 2001 in which Research Councils have investigated allegations of misconduct, whether in universities, other HEIs, Research Council Institutes or independent research organisations.

Students: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills (1) what the (a) course fee per annum paid by and (b) unit of public funding paid for the teaching of a full-time undergraduate student studying for an equal or lower qualification was in 2007-08; (175785)

(2) pursuant to his request to the Higher Education Funding Council for England of 7 September on funding for equivalent and lower qualifications (ELQs) as additional degrees, what forecasts he has made of fees to be charged to non-exempt full-time undergraduate ELQ students;

(3) further to his request to the Higher Education Funding Council for England of 7 September on funding for equivalent and lower qualifications as additional degrees, which professional higher level qualifications will no longer receive funding;

(4) whether he consulted (a) the Confederation of British Industry and (b) professional bodies before making his request to the Higher Education Funding Council for England on 7 September on funding for equivalent and lower qualifications as additional degrees.

We took this decision first and foremost as a matter of principle on grounds of fairness and social justice. But it will also benefit employers and professional bodies by expanding the supply, to a greater degree than would otherwise be possible, of highly skilled, more productive workers with higher level qualifications. We consulted on the details and no-one has seriously challenged the priority of putting first-time students first. All professional higher level qualifications will continue to attract institutional funding as now when studied by students either entering HE for the first time or progressing to a higher level qualification to ones already obtained.

The level of institutional grant paid by HEFCE in 2007-08 to teach full-time undergraduate students, whether studying for equivalent or lower level qualifications or not, varies according to the cost of teaching different subjects. Funding ranges from over £14,000 for medicine and dentistry, which are exempt subjects under the ELQ policy, to around £2,600 for the least costly subjects to teach. However, there is no necessary connection between these figures and fee levels. Tuition fees for students studying equivalent and lower level qualifications are already and will continue to be unregulated, subject only to the forces of supply and demand. Each HE provider will need to continue to set tuition fees at a level which remains competitive in a system in which there are over 250 HE providers.

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what activities were recently undertaken as part of Student Finance week; and what the cost was of each. (186612)

The information is as follows:

Student Finance Week 2007/08 was a week long programme of PR activity.

The aim of the activity was to make the target audience aware of and direct them to view the new Student Finance DVD. The DVD contains detailed information on the package of financial support available for students entering higher education from September 2008.

The activity was aimed at young people aged 16-19 and their parents.

The breakdown of activity for Student Finance Week 2008 is set out in the following table

£

Coverage in national and regional press to announce the launch of the campaign

1,455

Coverage in The Sun newspaper featuring an exclusive giveaway of the DVD

1,100

Coverage in the regional press featuring exclusive DVD giveaways

1,340

Radio morning with Bill Rammell

5,010

Nick Grimshaw vodcast placed on a variety of youth websites

14,450

Martin Lewis ‘Cash Classroom’ vodcast placed on a variety of websites

2,220

Coverage in personal finance pages of national titles

4,205

Coverage of celebrity graduate champions

2,940

Coverage featuring Ed Byrnes (one of the stars of the DVD) on various websites

1,205

The total cost of activity

33,925

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what proportion of undergraduates enrolling on a higher education course received a bursary in (a) 2006-07 and (b) 2007-08; and if he will make a statement. (188036)

It is not possible to say what proportion of students overall received a bursary. However, we know that the Student Loans made 81,000 payments in 2006-07 via the Higher Education Bursary Scholarship System (HEBSS) that they manage. HEBSS allows students to apply for a bursary via the Local Authority at the same time as they apply for financial support. It is also important to note that 38 out of 125 institutions do not use this system, so we do not hold data on the number of payments they made. Nevertheless, OFFA report that no student who was eligible and applied for bursaries failed to receive one.

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how much the average bursary awarded to an undergraduate student was in (a) 2006-07 and (b) 2007-08; and if he will make a statement. (188037)

The data held indicates that a typical bursary for a student on full state support for 2006-07 and 2007-08 is around £1,000, although the exact sum each student receives will vary according to the institution's access agreement. It is not possible to create a meaningful overall average bursary because of the variance in institution's threshold above the full state support threshold.

Students: Public Participation

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what estimate he has made of the cost of his Department’s student juries. (190234)

Costs for the five student juries, held between November 2007 and February 2008, totalled just over £30,600. The student juries were an important preliminary to the work of the National Student Forum, which will have its first meeting on 28 February 2008.

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what the budget for the National Student Forum is for 2008-09; and if he will make a statement. (190261)

A budget of £51,700 has been allocated for the core activity of the National Student Forum this academic year. Up to £70,000 for additional activity, such as the development of a website, is also available as necessary. The forum’s chair will be paid an honorarium of £5,000 per annum. In addition, we will pay reasonable travel, access and subsistence expenses for the forum members and chair.

The Department will consider requests from the forum, to be agreed through the chair, for independent research up to the sum of £50,000 annually. The funding will be held by the Department and can only be used in compliance with the Department’s procurement procedures and Government Accounting rules.

The National Student Forum will have its first meeting on Thursday 28 February. The forum is a demonstration of our commitment to amplifying the student voice in government.

Children, Schools and Families

Academies: Expenditure

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the total capital spend was on the school academy programme in England in each year since 2003-04; and what percentage that total represented of all new secondary school building capital expenditure in England in each year. (189199)

The following table details the capital provision for academies as a proportion of the corresponding figure for all schools.

The Department does not keep a record of the capital funding split between primary and secondary schools. This is because local authorities’ formulaic funding is not ring-fenced, and the split of expenditure between primary and secondary schools is decided at local authority level.

The figures for academies, similarly, will include any contributions that the Department has made towards the primary element of academy school buildings.

All schools (£ million)

Academies (£ million)

Academies as a proportion of all schools (percentage)

2003-04

14,144.0

1130.3

3.1

2004-05

14,861.0

1222.1

4.6

2005-06

15,262.0

1251.7

4.8

2006-07

24,984.0

1385.7

7.7

2007-08

36,320.0

2425.0

6.7

1 Actual outturn

2 Estimated outturn

3 Planned

Assessments: Standards

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many schools have requested a re-mark of a whole year group’s (a) key stage 2 and (b) key stage 3 examination papers in (i) English, (ii) mathematics and (iii) science in each year since 2001; and if he will make a statement; (188982)

(2) how many (a) Key Stage 2 and (b) Key Stage 3 examination papers in (i) English, (ii) mathematics and (iii) science were re-marked following a request from schools in each year since 2001; and if he will make a statement.

The following Tables 1 and 2 show how many schools, since 2004, requested a group re-mark in the Key Stage 2 and Key Stage 3 English, mathematics and science tests, and how many scripts were re-marked following a request from schools.

Data for the period 2001 to 2003 is not available in the format requested.

The figures in the tables were provided by the National Assessment Agency (NAA), which is responsible for the administration of National Curriculum tests including the external marking and group reviews service to schools.

Table 1

Number of schools requesting reviews of whole year group

Number of scripts re-marked as a result of a school’s request

Key Stage 2

English

Maths

Science

English

Maths

Science

2007

82

0

0

3,784

0

0

2006

184

1

1

9,957

67

27

2005

89

0

0

4,561

0

0

2004

307

0

0

n/a

0

0

Table 2

Number of schools requesting reviews of whole year group

Number of scripts re-marked as a result of a school’s request

Key Stage 3

English

Maths

Science

English

Maths

Science

2007

116

0

3

25,549

0

825

2006

669

1

2

75,133

230

426

2005

117

0

4

20,544

0

870

2004

646

*n/a

*n/a

*n/a

*n/a

*n/a

1 Group reviews in mathematics and science were not conducted until 2005.

Children: Obesity

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many children in the age groups (a) 5 to 8, (b) 9 to 11, (c) 12 to 13 and (d) 14 to 16 years were classed as obese in each school in Easington constituency in the latest period for which figures are available. (186210)

I have been asked to reply.

The best available data on prevalence of child obesity in the North East region are available through the “Health Survey for England (HSE) and the National Child Measurement Programme” (NCMP).

The HSE 2006, published in January 2008, showed that in the North East for children aged 2-15 years, 20 per cent. of boys and 15 per cent. of girls were obese.

The NCMP weighs and measures children aged 4-5 years and 10-11 years. The Report published on February 21, 2008 showed that for the North East Strategic Health Authority, 10.9 per cent. of children aged 4-5 years, and 19.9 per cent. of children aged 10-11 years, were obese.

Obesity prevalence is available by primary care trust and local authority in the NCMP report, which is available on the Department of Health website at:

www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publichealth/Healthimprovement/Healthyliving/DH_083093.

School-level results are not available from the HSE, because a sampling method is used and, due to the small numbers involved, results are not reliable below regional level.

School-level results have not been published at a national level for the NCMP. However, the dataset has now been shared with Public Health Observatories to allow them to undertake their own analysis, including analysis at school level, according to regional and local needs.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many children aged (a) five to eight, (b) nine to 11, (c) 12 to 13 and (d) 14 to 16 years were classed as obese in each school in Tamworth constituency in the latest period for which figures are available. (187723)

I have been asked to reply.

The best available data on prevalence of child obesity in the West Midlands region are available through the “Health Survey for England” (HSE) and the “National Child Measurement Programme” (NCMP).

The HSE 2006, published in January 2008, showed that in the West Midlands for children aged 2-15 years, 19 per cent. of boys and 18 per cent. of girls were obese.

The NCMP weighs and measures children aged 4-5 years and 10-11 years. The report published on February 21, 2008 showed that for the East Midlands Strategic Health Authority, 9.8 per cent. of children aged 4-5 years, and 16.6 per cent. of children aged 10-11 years, were obese.

Obesity prevalence is available by primary care trust and local authority in the NCMP report, which is available on the Department’s website at:

www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publichealth/Healthimprovement/Healthyliving/DH_083093.

School-level results are not available from the HSE, because a sampling method is used and, due to the small numbers involved, results are not reliable below regional level.

School-level results have not been published at a national level for the NCMP. However, the dataset has now been shared with Public Health Observatories to allow them to undertake their own analysis, including analysis at school level, according to regional and local needs.

Children: Protection

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families if he will make a statement on the final outcome of his Department’s review of the 210 cases identified on List 99 who were subject to only a partial bar on working with children. (189067)

In the written parliamentary statement of 28 February 2007 the then Secretary of State for Education and Skills reported on progress on the review of those cases where individuals were placed on List 99, but subject to a partial bar. The Secretary of State intends to make a further statement to the House in due course.

Classroom Assistants: Enfield

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many teaching assistants were employed in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in Enfield North in each of the last 10 years. (190257)

The following table shows the number of full-time equivalent teaching assistants employed in local authority maintained primary and secondary schools in Enfield North constituency, in each January from 1998 to 2007.

Full-time equivalent teaching assistants1 employed in local authority maintained primary and secondary schools in Enfield North constituency, in each January from 1998 to 2007

Teaching assistants1

Primary

Secondary

1998

70

10

1999

80

10

2000

130

20

2001

170

20

2002

220

30

2003

230

40

2004

260

40

2005

280

50

2006

300

60

2007

330

80

1 Includes teaching assistants, special needs support staff and minority ethnic pupil support staff.

Note:

Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.

Source:

School Census

Departmental Data Protection

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many meetings his Department’s chief information officer had with officials in other Government Departments and agencies as part of Government-wide initiatives on data security in the last 12 months. (190744)

In the last 12 months, the Department for Children, Schools and Families’ chief information officer has had seven meetings with officials in other Government Departments and agencies as part of Government-wide initiatives on data security.

Departmental Disciplinary Proceedings

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many of his Department's civil servants were (a) suspended and (b) dismissed for accessing (i) obscene and (ii) other prohibited material on work computers in each of the last five years. (188791)

No civil servants in the Department have been suspended or dismissed over the last five years for accessing obscene or other prohibited websites on their work computers.

Departmental Official Hospitality

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much was spent by his Department and its agencies on (a) alcohol and (b) entertaining in the last 12 months. (187785)

Details of expenditure on personal entertainment recorded by the Department over the last 12 months are as follows:

January 2007 to January 2008, £11,555.59.

The figure excludes costs incurred as part of official events or formal meetings held to further departmental business. DCSF is unable to separately identify the costs of alcohol from those of general entertainment; as such expenditure is claimed and recorded under the general heading of Personal Entertainment.

The basic rules governing hospitality are set by HM Treasury.

(a) The following guidance is issued by my Department to staff on the provision of alcohol.

There is a general principle that alcohol should not be provided at public expense and never when only civil servants are present.

Moderate amounts of alcohol can be provided at public expense when entertaining non-civil servants if not providing alcohol might be regarded as unusual or cause embarrassment. Examples of such events are hospitality from Ministers, at publicity events such as launches or the rare occasions when senior staff judge that official business can best be transacted by hosting a meeting over lunch or dinner.

(b) Hospitality expenditure is limited to occasions when official business can best be transacted in that way. Personal entertainment is usually restricted to where senior managers (Deputy Director or above) are acting as a host and expenditure must be approved in advance by a Director or Executive Board member.

The Department for Children, Schools and Families was created on 28 June 2007 as a result of a machinery of Government change and the expenditure recorded above includes that of its predecessor department, the Department for Education and Skills. The expenditure will also include any costs incurred by the newly created Department for Universities, Innovation and Skills, where these costs relate to areas formerly the responsibility of the Department for Education and Skills.

The Department does not have any executive agencies.

Departmental Official Residences

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many ministerial residences were available to his Department’s Ministers and those of its predecessors in each of the last 10 years. (183187)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by my hon. Friend, the Parliamentary Secretary for the Cabinet Office (Mr. Watson) on 19 February 2008, Official Report, column 688W.

Departmental Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what proportion of his Department’s staff are employed within each salary band; what the title and role of each position within each salary band is; and for each salary band what the (a) bonus structure, (b) retirement provision, (c) expenses provision, (d) total expenses incurred in each of the last 10 years, (e) average age of employee, (f) number of (i) women and (ii) men and (g) ethnic composition is. (171412)

The Department employs 2,875 staff in a wide variety of roles. It was formed as part of the 28 June 2007 machinery of government changes, taking in staff from the former Department for Education and Skills and the Home Office. The following table sets out the number and proportion of men and women employed in each of the general salary bands.

Grade

(a) men

Proportion men (Percentage)

(b) women

Proportion women (Percentage)

Total

Administrative Assistant

39

1.4

20

0.7

59

Administrative Officer

99

3.4

289

10.1

388

Executive Officer (EO) and equivalents

209

7.3

400

13.9

609

Higher Executive Officer (HEO) and equivalents

286

9.9

358

12.5

644

Senior Executive Officer (SEO) and equivalents

202

7

242

8.4

444

Grade 7 and equivalents

226

7.9

240

8.3

466

Grade 6

75

2.6

77

2.7

152

Senior Civil Service (SCS)

59

2

50

1.7

109

Special Adviser

2

0.1

2

0.1

4

DCSF Total

1,197

41.6

1,678

58.4

2,875

Staff undertake a wide variety of duties in support of my Department’s objectives, including some specialist roles. Titles and roles of each position and other individual information requested could be provided only at disproportionate cost, but I can add the following further information on the work force: the average age of employees across the Department is 43. 442 employees (15.4 per cent.) have identified themselves as Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) staff. Additionally, 585 (20.3 per cent.) have said that they prefer not to say or have not yet declared an ethnicity.

For staff at grade 6 and below, there is a non-consolidated bonus structure that varies according to pay agreements but is negotiated annually with the trade unions and follows Cabinet Office central guidance. For all SCS staff, the bonus arrangements are determined centrally by Cabinet Office. Staff in the Department for Children, Schools and Families participate in the general Principal Civil Service Pension Scheme (PCSPS) determined by Cabinet Office. The PCSPS is an unfunded multi-employer defined benefit scheme. Expenses are claimed according to central and departmental guidance available to all staff. Information on individual expenses claimed in each of the last 10 years could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Departmental Public Expenditure

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families pursuant to the Winter Supplementary Estimates (HC 29), if he will break down his Department’s (a) main estimate and (b) winter supplementary estimate provision by subhead in (i) near cash and (ii) non-cash terms. (174995)

Near-cash and non-cash are essentially used as departmental expenditure limit (DEL) budgetary control concepts and are not specifically identified with voted resources in estimates. However, we have been able to break down net total resources for each section in the “Part II: Subhead” detail table of our main and winter supplementary estimate as follows. The significant change between the main and winter supplementary figures is the result of the machinery of government changes announced on 28 June 2007. The resources voted for Department for Education and Skills in the main estimate were divided between the Department for Children Schools and Families and the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills.

Subhead Detail

£000

Main

Winter supplementary

RfR1:

Spending in departmental expenditure limits (DEL)

Central Government spending

A

Activities to Support All Functions

297,628

237,499

B

Support for Schools and Teachers not through Local Education Authorities

1,016,355

1,017,805

C

Support for Children and Families not paid through Local Authorities

871,426

871,286

D

Higher Education

193,036

E

Higher Education Receipts from the Department of Trade and Industry

-363,676

F

Further Education, Adult Learning and Skills for Lifelong Learning and International Programmes

784,167

5,760,703

G

Support for Students in Higher Education

2,342,283

H

Compensation to Former College of Education Staff

11,870

11,813

I

Current Grants for Local Area Agreements to Support Children and Families

328,691

343,404

Support for Local Authorities

J

Current Grants for Local Education Authorities to Support Schools and Teachers

4,427,268

4,429,668

K

Capital Grants for Local Education Authorities to Support Schools

3,444,169

3,447,150

L

Higher Education Fees and Awards through Local Education Authorities

1,000

M

Current Grants to Local Authorities to Support Children and Families

57,200

57,200

N

Capital Grants to Local Authorities to Support Children and Families

55,228

55,228

O

Dedicated Schools Grants

28,286,881

28,286,881

Spending in Annually Managed Expenditure (AME)

Central Government spending

P

Loans to Students

-515,000

Non-Budget

Q

Grant in Aid to NDPBs supporting Children and Families

739,295

741,795

R

Loans to Students and Grant in Aid to NDPBs supporting Higher Education

99,480

99,480

S

Loans to Students and Grant in Aid to NDPBs supporting Higher Education

7,276,930

T

Grant in Aid to NDPBs supporting Further Education, Adult Education and Skills and Lifelong Learning

11,277,720

91,057

Spending in Departmental Expenditure Limits (DEL)

Support for Local Authorities

U

Further Education supporting sixth Forms

2,022,881

RFR2:

Spending in Departmental Expenditure Limits (DEL)

Central Government spending

A

Sure Start Current grants not through Local Authorities

93,712

88,812

B

Sure Start Schools Current grants not through Local Authorities

43,340

43,340

C

Sure Start Current Grants for Local Area Agreements

1

1

Support for Local Authorities

D

LA Current Grants

1,099,301

1,099,301

E

LA Capital Grants

523,025

523,025

RfR3:

Spending in Departmental Expenditure Limits (DEL)

Central Government spending

A

Children’s Fund

40,000

40,000

Support for Local Authorities

B

LA Current Grants

150,100

150,100

Total Net Resource

62,581,430

49,418,429

Departmental Written Questions

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what proportion of parliamentary questions from hon. Members for answer on a named day to his Department and its predecessor received a (a) holding and (b) substantive answer on the named day in each year since 2001. (190291)

Domestic Violence

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what (a) guidance and (b) support his Department gives to children's centres, nurseries and other forms of early years providers in respect of (i) domestic violence and (ii) forced marriage. (189910)

‘Working Together to Safeguard Children’, the main interagency guide to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children, contains information for practitioners about domestic violence and forced marriage. It makes clear that those who work with children should know how to recognise and respond to the possible abuse or neglect of a child. This will include childminders and everyone working in early years provision. ‘Working Together’ advises that if anyone has concerns that a child is in danger of a forced marriage, they should contact the Forced Marriage Unit. The guidance also asks Local Safeguarding Children Boards to involve children’s centres in their work to safeguard and promote the welfare of children in their local areas. The Government have also published a shorter guidance document, ‘What To Do If You’re Worried A Child Is Being Abused’, which is used widely by those who work with children and which provides an accessible guide to the steps to take when someone has concerns about a child.

The Sure Start Children’s Centres Practice Guidance highlights families experiencing domestic violence among those groups of families that find it hardest to access the services they need. It encourages children’s centres to ensure that parents or other family members have access to appropriate support. The statutory framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage, which will be statutory from September 2008, makes clear that all practitioners should have an up-to-date understanding of safeguarding children issues and be able to implement the safeguarding children policy and procedure appropriately. Policies should be in line with LSCB local guidance and procedures.

Faith Schools: Liverpool

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families when he expects work to begin on the new faith primary school in Liverpool; and if he will make a statement. (184460)

[holding answer 4 February 2008]: This Department has fully supported the plans for the proposed new faith school in Liverpool, and have worked closely with the local authority and the Archdiocese of Liverpool to move the project forward. The delays are due to issues surrounding local organisation. The local authority has just confirmed that it will now carry out a rationalisation review in the area and will be able to advise us, by September 2008, whether they wish to proceed with plans to build the new faith school.

Family Intervention Projects

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what funds have been allocated to family intervention projects for each of the next three financial years. (191386)

The Secretary of State announced on 5 October 2007 that the Department for Children, Schools and Families would provide on-going funding of up to £18 million over the next three years to sustain the recently established network of 53 Family Intervention Projects. Projects will get ongoing tapered funding over 2008-11 based on current allocations. Evaluation evidence from the 53 projects shows that families who in the past may have been written off by agencies are now being offered the right help and incentives to become decent members of their community and provide their children with life chances.

Nursery Schools: East of England

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many free early years education places have been available in (a) Suffolk, (b) Norfolk, (c) Essex and (d) Cambridgeshire in each year since 1997. (169962)

The available information on the number of part-time funded places filled by three and four-year-olds in Suffolk, Norfolk, Essex and Cambridgeshire local authority areas is shown in the tables.

Since April 2004 all three and four-year-olds have been entitled to a free part-time early education place for 12.5 hours per week for 38 weeks of the year. From 2010, this offer will be extended from 12.5 to 15 hours per week for 38 weeks of the year.

Number of part time funded places1,2 filled by three and four-year-olds—local authority: Suffolk

Position in January each year

Part-time funded places filled by three-year-olds

Part-time funded places filled by four-year-olds

Maintained nursery and primary schools3

Other maintained and private, voluntary and independent providers

Total three-year-olds

Maintained nursery and primary schools4

Other maintained and private, voluntary and independent providers

Total four-year-olds

1997

610

n/a

610

n/a

n/a

57,400

1998

560

n/a

560

n/a

n/a

57,600

1999

720

n/a

720

n/a

n/a

58,000

2000

630

60

630

n/a

n/a

58,000

2001

860

6480

1,300

n/a

n/a

57,600

2002

1,000

63,200

4,200

6,300

51,600

7,900

2003

1,100

63,300

4,400

6,100

71,700

7,800

2004

1,300

84,300

5,600

5,800

91,600

7,300

2005

1,300

84,400

5,700

5,800

91,500

7,300

2006

1,300

84,400

5,700

5,500

91,500

7,000

2007

1,400

84,800

6,200

5,600

91,400

7,000

n/a = Not available.

1 A place is equal to five or more sessions and can be filled by more than one child.

2 Figures are rounded to the nearest 100 if they exceed 1000 and to the nearest 10 otherwise.

3 Headcount of children aged three at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the School Census.

4 Headcount of children aged four at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the School Census.

5 Part-time equivalent number of children aged four at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the Nursery Education Grant data collection exercise.

6 Part-time equivalent number of children aged three at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the Nursery Education Grant data collection exercise.

7 Part-time equivalent number of children aged four at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the Early Years Census supplementary data collection exercise and the School Census,

8 Part-time equivalent number of children aged three at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the Early Years Census and the School Census.

9 Part-time equivalent number of children aged four at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the Early Years Census and the School Census.

Number of part time funded places1,2 filled by three and four-year-olds—local authority: Norfolk

Position in January each year

Part-time funded places filled by three-year-olds

Part-time funded places filled by four-year-olds

Maintained nursery and primary schools3

Other maintained and private voluntary and independent providers

Total three-year-olds

Maintained nursery and primary schools4

Other maintained and private, voluntary and independent providers

Total four-year-olds

1997

1,500

n/a

1,500

n/a

n/a

58,200

1998

1,800

n/a

1,800

n/a

n/a

58,400

1999

1,900

n/a

1,900

n/a

n/a

58,500

2000

1,900

60

1,900

n/a

n/a

58,900

2001

1,900

6130

2,100

n/a

n/a

58,400

2002

1,800

63,000

4,700

6,600

51,900

8,400

2003

1,800

64,300

6,200

6,500

71,900

8,400

2004

2,100

84,400

6,500

6,300

91,800

8,200

2005

2,000

84,100

6,100

6,200

91,700

7,900

2006

2,200

84,700

6,900

5,900

91,800

7,700

2007

2,100

84,900

7,100

5,900

91,800

7,700

n/a = Not available.

1 A place is equal to five or more sessions and can be filled by more than one child.

2 Figures are rounded to the nearest 100 if they exceed 1,000 and to the nearest 10 otherwise.

3 Headcount of children aged three at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the School Census.

4 Headcount of children aged four at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the School Census.

5 Part-time equivalent number of children aged four at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the Nursery Education Grant data collection exercise.

6 Part-time equivalent number of children aged three at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the Nursery Education Grant data collection exercise.

7 Part-time equivalent number of children aged four at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the Early Years Census supplementary data collection exercise and the School Census.

8 Part-time equivalent number of children aged three at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the Early Years Census and the School Census.

9 Part-time equivalent number of children aged four at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the Early Years Census and the School Census.

Number of part time funded places1,2 filled by three and four-year-olds—local authority: Essex

Position in January each year

Part-time funded places filled by three-year-olds

Part-time funded places filled by four-year-olds

Maintained nursery and primary schools3

Other maintained and private, voluntary and independent providers

Total three-year-olds

Maintained nursery and primary schools4

Other maintained and private voluntary and independent providers

Total four-year-olds

1997

1,600

n/a

1,600

n/a

n/a

514,000

1998

1,900

n/a

1,600

n/a

n/a

515,000

1999

2,000

n/a

2,000

n/a

n/a

515,200

2000

2,000

60

2,000

n/a

n/a

515,100

2001

2,000

6220

2,220

n/a

n/a

515,100

2002

2,000

66,700

8,700

10,400

54,700

15,100

2003

2,000

9,500

11,500

10,400

74,600

15,000

2004

2,000

99,700

11,700

10,500

94,500

15,000

2005

1,900

810,000

11,900

9,900

94,500

14,400

2006

2,000

89,900

11,900

9,900

94,200

14,100

2007

1,900

810,400

12,300

9,700

94,400

14,100

n/a = Not available.

1 A place is equal to five or more sessions and can be filled by more than one child.

2 Figures are rounded to the nearest 100 if they exceed 1,000 and to the nearest 10 otherwise.

3 Headcount of children aged three at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the School Census.

4 Headcount of children aged four at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the School Census.

5 Part-time equivalent number of children aged four at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the Nursery Education Grant data collection exercise.

6 Part-time equivalent number of children aged three at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the Nursery Education Grant data collection exercise.

7 Part-time equivalent number of children aged four at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the Early Years Census supplementary data collection exercise and the School Census.

8 Part-time equivalent number of children aged three at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the Early Years Census and the School Census.

9 Part-time equivalent number of children aged four at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the Early Years Census and the School Census.

Number of part time funded places1,2 filled by three and four year olds—local authority: Cambridgeshire

Position in January each year

Part-time funded places filled by three-year-olds

Part-time funded places filled by four-year-olds

Maintained nursery and primary schools3

Other maintained and private, voluntary and independent providers

Total three-year-olds

Maintained nursery and primary schools4

Other maintained and private, voluntary and independent providers

Total four-year-olds

1997

1,100

n/a

1,100

n/a

n/a

55,800

1998

1,100

n/a

1,100

n/a

n/a

56,500

1999

1,200

n/a

1,200

n/a

n/a

56,300

2000

1,100

60

1,100

n/a

n/a

56,400

2001

1,200

6870

2,000

n/a

n/a

55,900

2002

1,200

61,500

2,700

4,700

51,600

6,200

2003

1,100

62,700

3,800

4,600

71,600

6,200

2004

1,000

82,800

3,800

4,500

91,600

6,100

2005

980

84,000

4,900

4,400

91,300

5,700

2006

1,100

84,000

5,100

4,500

91,500

6,000

2007

1,100

84,300

5,400

4,400

91,600

6,000

n/a = Not available.

1 A place is equal to five or more sessions and can be filled by more than one child.

2 Figures are rounded to the nearest 100 if they exceed 1,000 and to the nearest 10 otherwise.

3. Headcount of children aged three at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the School Census.

4 Headcount of children aged four at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the School Census.

5 Part-time equivalent number of children aged four at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the Nursery Education Grant data collection exercise.

6 Part-time equivalent number of children aged three at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the Nursery Education Grant data collection exercise.

7 Part-time equivalent number of children aged four at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the Early Years Census supplementary data collection exercise and the School Census.

8 Part-time equivalent number of children aged three at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the Early Years Census and the School Census.

9 Part-time equivalent number of children aged four at 31 December in the previous calendar year from the Early Years Census and the School Census.

The latest figures on early education places for three and four-year-olds in England were published in Statistical First Release 19/2007 “Provision for children under five years of age in England—January 2007” in May, which is available on my Department’s website

www.dfes.gov.uk/rsgateway/

Physical Education: Teachers

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many hours of physical education training the Youth Sport Trust recommends during initial teacher training to meet the Government's school sport public service agreement target. (189591)

[holding answer 26 February 2008]: I am not aware of any recommendation the Youth Sport Trust has made about primary initial teacher training. In any event, neither this Department nor the Training and Development Agency for Schools prescribe the content for courses of initial teacher training or the time that should be spent on particular components of it. Training providers have discretion over this, but the outcome of their course must be that trainees are, on completion, able to demonstrate the various standards the Secretary of State has set out for awarding of Qualified Teacher Status.

Pupils: Per Capita Costs

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how much has been allocated per pupil for the 2008-09 school year, broken down by county; (189455)

(2) what the average funding per pupil is in England for the 2008-09 school year.

The Dedicated Schools Grant guaranteed per pupil units of funding for 2008-09 are provided in the following tables for local authorities grouped by type: London, metropolitan, unitary and upper tier. Guaranteed units of funding are not calculated at a county level. The average figure for England is £4,066 per pupil. This covers all funded pupils aged three to 15. Figures are in cash terms. In addition to the Dedicated Schools Grant there are other grants that support the schools budget whose allocations have not yet been finalised.

London authorities

2008-09 guaranteed per pupil unit of funding (£)

Barking and Dagenham

4,563

Barnet

4,559

Bexley

4,151

Brent

4,894

Bromley

3,966

Camden

6,161

City of London

7,362

Croydon

4,267

Ealing

4,832

Enfield

4,437

Greenwich

5,361

Hackney

6,170

Hammersmith and Fulham

5,635

Haringey

4,987

Harrow

4,507

Havering

4,137

Hillingdon

4,361

Hounslow

4,651

Islington

5,812

Kensington and Chelsea

5,757

Kingston upon Thames

4,256

Lambeth

5,848

Lewisham

5,556

Merton

4,452

Newham

5,071

Redbridge

4,214

Richmond upon Thames

4,311

Southwark

5,756

Sutton

4,253

Tower Hamlets

6,289

Waltham Forest

4,584

Wandsworth

5,146

Westminster

5,439

Metropolitan authorities

2008-09 guaranteed per pupil unit of funding (£)

Barnsley

3,848

Birmingham

4,448

Bolton

3,978

Bradford

4,107

Bury

3,926

Calderdale

3,912

Coventry

4,110

Doncaster

3,941

Dudley

3,949

Gateshead

3,986

Kirklees

3,947

Knowsley

4,236

Leeds

3,926

Liverpool

4,320

Manchester

4,571

Newcastle upon Tyne

4,096

North Tyneside

3,836

Oldham

4,118

Rochdale

4,171

Rotherham

4,045

Salford

4,309

Sandwell

4,214

Sefton

3,917

Sheffield

3,947

Solihull

3,750

South Tyneside

4,092

St. Helens

3,977

Stockport

3,902

Sunderland

3,990

Tameside

3,983

Trafford

3,852

Wakefield

3,881

Walsall

4,023

Wigan

3,948

Wirral

3,937

Wolverhampton

4,145

Unitary authorities

2008-09 guaranteed per pupil unit of funding (£)

Bath and North East Somerset

3,891

Blackburn with Darwen

4,254

Blackpool

3,982

Bournemouth

3,825

Bracknell Forest

4,017

Brighton and Hove

4,103

Bristol, City of

4,366

Darlington

3,944

Derby

3,978

East Riding of Yorkshire

3,715

Halton

4,226

Hartlepool

4,029

Herefordshire

3,687

Isle of Wight

4,051

Kingston upon Hull, City of

4,168

Leicester

4,151

Luton

4,251

Medway

4,034

Middlesbrough

4,182

Milton Keynes

4,080

North East Lincolnshire

4,134

North Lincolnshire

3,822

North Somerset

3,757

Nottingham

4,500

Peterborough

4,098

Plymouth

3,889

Poole

3,724

Portsmouth

4,061

Reading

4,260

Redcar and Cleveland

3,990

Rutland

3,898

Slough

4,404

South Gloucestershire

3,647

Southampton

4,117

Southend-on-Sea

4,026

Stockton-on-Tees

3,960

Stoke-on-Trent

4,070

Swindon

3,775

Telford and Wrekin

3,911

Thurrock

4,141

Torbay

3,922

Warrington

3,819

West Berkshire

3,984

Windsor and Maidenhead

4,040

Wokingham

3,844

York

3,801

Upper tier authorities

2008-09 guaranteed per pupil unit of funding (£)

Bedfordshire

3,817

Buckinghamshire

3,899

Cambridgeshire

3,787

Cheshire

3,880

Cornwall

3,742

Cumbria

3,831

Derbyshire

3,825

Devon

3,707

Dorset

3,799

Durham

3,982

East Sussex

3,997

Essex

3,924

Gloucestershire

3,744

Hampshire

3,824

Hertfordshire

3,896

Kent

3,938

Lancashire

3,927

Leicestershire

3,596

Lincolnshire

3,795

Norfolk

3,807

North Yorkshire

3,854

Northamptonshire

3,785

Northumberland

3,711

Nottinghamshire

3,842

Oxfordshire

3,870

Shropshire

3,715

Somerset

3,752

Staffordshire

3,776

Suffolk

3,763

Surrey

3,976

Warwickshire

3,789

West Sussex

3,877

Wiltshire

3,713

Worcestershire

3,729

Notes:

1. This covers funding through the Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG).

2. This figure does not represent the totality of ‘education’ funding allocated in that year.

Schools

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what studies his Department has (a) conducted and (b) reviewed on the ideal size of state schools in urban and rural areas; and if he will make a statement. (190657)

[holding answer 3 March 2008]: The Department commissioned an international research review in 2004 on the impact of secondary school size on student, teacher and school outcomes. The research was conducted by the Evidence for Policy and Practice Information and Co-ordinating (EPPI) Centre at the Institute of Education, University of London on behalf of the Department. The research found no consistent relationship between the size of the school and pupil outcomes and was based mainly on studies from the US. The Department has not commissioned research to investigate the question of ideal school size in urban or rural areas, or on ideal primary school size.

The Secretary of State will not be making a statement on this issue.

Schools: Health Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what proportion of schools in each local authority have achieved healthy school status; and if he will make a statement. (188984)

The numbers and proportions of schools who have achieved National Healthy School Status for each local authority as at 21 February 2008, are shown on the following table.

The National Healthy Schools Programme (NHSP) promotes a whole school approach to health. Nationally, over 57 per cent. (12,484) of schools are now Healthy Schools which means the programme is on track to meet its published target of 75 per cent. of schools achieving National Healthy School Status by the end of December 2009.

National healthy schools programme 21 February 2008

Number of schools with national healthy schools status

Percentage of eligible schools with national healthy schools status

East Midlands

City of Derby

51

53

City of Nottingham

69

60

Derbyshire

186

44

Leicester City

59

54

Leicestershire

180

63

Lincolnshire

207

55

Northamptonshire

139

43

Nottinghamshire

194

55

Rutland

9

43

East of England

Bedfordshire

113

53

Cambridgeshire

118

49

City of Peterborough

56

78

Essex

231

40

Hertfordshire

343

66

Luton

40

56

Norfolk

138

32

Southend-on-Sea

25

45

Suffolk

96

26

Thurrock

22

39

London

Barking and Dagenham

34

57

Barnet

55

48

Bexley

82

100

Brent

29

36

Bromley

57

59

Camden

42

70

Corporation of London

0

0

Croydon

60

48

Ealing

47

55

Enfield

75

82

Greenwich

57

69

Hackney

39

54

Hammersmith and Fulham

40

80

Haringey

51

64

Harrow

15

22

Havering

57

65

Hillingdon

36

40

Hounslow

41

51

Islington

41

67

Kensington and Chelsea

21

64

Kingston-Upon-Thames

28

56

Lambeth

47

57

Lewisham

47

53

Merton

29

54

Newham

46

54

Redbridge

28

37

Richmond-Upon-Thames

35

67

Southwark

63

65

Sutton

42

70

Tower Hamlets

57

62

Waltham Forest

48

62

Wandsworth

25

32

Westminster

25

49

North East

Darlington

8

21

Durham

123

44

Gateshead

47

55

Hartlepool

25

64

Middlesbrough

40

67

Newcastle Upon Tyne

62

65

North Tyneside

33

41

Northumberland

98

48

Redcar and Cleveland

35

58

South Tyneside

27

40

Stockton on Tees

60

75

Sunderland

13

12

North West

Blackburn with Darwen

47

66

Blackpool

21

51

Bolton

50

39

Bury

51

61

Cheshire

185

57

Cumbria

192

58

Halton

58

88

Knowsley

44

60

Lancashire

547

89

Liverpool

98

54

Manchester

83

48

Oldham

63

57

Rochdale

60

67

Salford

67

66

Sefton

64

61

St. Helens

47

68

Stockport

65

57

Tameside

53

53

Trafford

60

64

Warrington

51

59

Wigan

102

76

Wirral

75

57

South East

Bracknell Forest

27

71

Brighton and Hove

51

72

Buckinghamshire

82

35

East Sussex

139

71

Hampshire

310

58

Isle of Wight

29

41

Kent

369

62

Medway Towns

63

57

Milton Keynes

64

57

Oxfordshire

191

68

Portsmouth

42

63

Reading

23

48

Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead

39

64

Slough

24

59

Southampton

45

54

Surrey

241

59

West Berkshire

36

44

West Sussex

121

41

Wokingham

40

63

South West

Bath and North East Somerset

49

62

Bournemouth

26

65

City of Bristol

105

73

City of Plymouth

62

61

Cornwall

175

63

Devon

242

66

Dorset

118

66

Gloucestershire

240

78

Isles of Scilly

1

100

North Somerset

41

49

Poole

28

68

Somerset

171

62

South Gloucestershire

94

82

Swindon

59

73

Torbay

24

55

Wiltshire

133

56

West Midlands

Birmingham

190

46

Coventry

76

64

Dudley

82

74

Herefordshire

73

72

Sandwell

69

57

Shropshire

127

77

Solihull

20

23

Staffordshire

185

47

Stoke on Trent

56

58

Telford and Wrekin

26

35

Walsall

64

56

Warwickshire

94

39

Wolverhampton

52

49

Worcestershire

163

66

Yorkshire and Humber

Barnsley

45

46

Bradford

120

59

Calderdale

60

57

City of York

53

78

Doncaster

79

60

East Riding of Yorkshire

79

52

Kingston Upon Hull

43

44

Kirklees

112

59

Leeds

172

63

North East Lincs

39

58

North Lines

52

63

North Yorkshire

234

61

Rotherham

97

77

Sheffield

102

57

Wakefield

104

70

Schools: Public Private Partnerships

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what plans he has to approve further public-private partnership projects to fund the building and refurbishing of schools in England. (190045)

DCSF has been allocated £1.320 billion PFI credits in each financial year of the comprehensive spending period 2008 to 2011. Public Private Partnership projects, including PFI continue to form a significant part of the Department’s capital programme.

PFI is used in capital procurement where it demonstratively provides the public sector with better value for money in procuring modern, high quality services from the private sector. Typically, PFI offers better value for money than conventional design and build procurement methods for schools which are almost wholly new build.

Schools: Sports

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many (a) females and (b) males play competitive sport in schools in (i) Staffordshire and (ii) England. (173256)

These data have not been collected centrally. The annual School Sport Survey collects data relating to PE and School Sport at a school, rather than pupil level.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what assessment he has made of the implications of the recent data published by the NHS Information Centre on childhood obesity for the assessment of performance against the Government's relevant targets; and what impact these data have had on the strategy for school sport. (190434)

[holding answer 29 February 2008]: The NHS Information Centre recently published the results of the National Child Measurement Programme for the 2006-07 school year. The main purpose of the programme is to inform trend analysis and the effective development, planning and delivery of children's services at national and local levels. The NCMP data also underpin the local indicators in both the national indicator set for local authorities and the vital signs indicators for primary care trusts. Guidance has been issued to local areas on how they can use NCMP data to inform goal setting for these child obesity indicators. The national PSA target will be monitored through the Health Survey for England.

The NCMP is one of the largest collections of child height and weight data in the world and we are keen to ensure effective use of the data gathered, while ensuring the confidentiality of individual children who participated, including to inform the strategy for school sport. Within this constraint, the national anonymised dataset has already been made available to public health observatories to enable more detailed regional and local data analysis, including at school level.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many children meeting the Government’s two hours of high quality sport and physical education targets are (a) overweight and (b) obese; (190435)

(2) how the Government (a) monitors and (b) measures performance against the two hours of high quality sport and physical education public service agreement target; and who is responsible for (i) collecting and (ii) interpreting data;

(3) if he will place in the Library a copy of each document relating to the (a) monitoring and (b) measurement of performance against the two hours of high quality sport or PE public service agreement target.

[holding answer 29 February 2008]: The annual school sport survey collects data relating to the percentage of 5 to16-year-olds who take part in at least two hours high quality PE and sport in a typical week. The survey is carried out on behalf of the Department by TNS, an independent research company who were awarded the contract to run the survey after a competitive procurement exercise.

The survey does not collect data on take up of two hours PE and sport by overweight or obese children.

Copies of the results of the latest survey have been placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Secondary Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families which secondary schools in England achieved above average key stage 2 to 4 results in 2007. (169335)

The performance of each school is published in the achievement and attainment tables. These can be found in the House of Commons Library. The median Key Stage 2 to Key Stage 4 CVA score for maintained mainstream schools (including CTCs and academies) is 1000.7.

Teachers: Early Retirement

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many teachers took early retirement in (a) Suffolk, (b) Norfolk, (c) Essex, (d) Cambridgeshire, (e) Bedfordshire, (f) Hertfordshire and (g) England in each year since 1997, broken down by type of institution. (187609)

The following table provides the number of teachers awarded early retirement benefits whose last recorded service was in Suffolk, Norfolk, Essex, Cambridgeshire, Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire local authorities and for England by phase of education, in each year from 1997/98 to 2006/07.

Premature retirements1 from local authority maintained schools, 1997/98 to 2006/07

Bedfordshire

Cambridgeshire2

Essex2

Hertfordshire

Norfolk

England

Nursery/Primary

1997/983

60

50

100

110

40

5,130

1998/99

10

10

20

10

20

980

1999/2000

10

10

20

20

20

1,080

2000/01

10

20

30

30

30

1,490

2001/02

10

10

50

40

30

1,520

2002/03

10

20

50

40

30

1,810

2003/04

10

30

50

30

60

2,160

2004/05 4

20

20

50

40

60

2,640

2005/06 4

10

30

60

60

50

2,810

2006/07 4

20

20

70

60

60

3,150

Secondary

1997/983

80

70

150

130

70

5,750

1998/99

20

10

40

30

30

1,290

1999/2000

20

20

50

20

20

1,470

2000/01

20

20

20

40

20

1,520

2001/02

20

10

40

50

30

1,760

2002/03

30

10

40

40

40

1,970

2003/04

50

20

50

30

40

2,570

2004/05 4

20

30

80

50

60

3,170

2005/06 4

30

30

70

50

70

3,550

2006/07 4

20

30

80

80

60

4,000

Special and PRUs

1997/983

10

20

10

470

1998/99

100

1999/2000

100

2000/01

150

2001/02

200

2002/03

190

2003/04

10

10

210

2004/05 4

240

2005/06 4

10

10

290

2006/07 4

10

10

320

Total

1997/983

150

120

270

250

110

11,370

1998/99

30

20

60

40

50

2,370

1999/2000

20

30

70

40

50

2,650

2000/01

30

40

50

70

50

3,160

2001/02

30

20

90

80

60

3,470

2002/03

40

30

90

80

70

3,960

2003/04

60

50

100

60

100

4,930

2004/05 4

40

50

130

90

120

6,060

2005/06 4

40

60

130

120

120

6,640

2006/07 4

40

50

150

150

120

7,460

1 Premature retirements include actuarially reduced benefit awards from 2000/01.

2 Cambridgeshire and Essex local authorities were re-organised on 1 April 1998 and therefore the figures for 1997/98 are for the former local authority areas including Peterborough (Cambridgeshire) and Southend and Thurrock (Essex).

3. The effect of the change in the Teachers’ Pension Scheme as from 31 August 1997 was that many more teachers took early retirement in 1997/98 than in other years.

4 Provisional estimates. All years may be subject to slight revision due to the addition of retrospective awards and suspension of pension benefits where teachers return to service.

Source:

Database of Teacher Records (DTR) and Pensioner Statistical System Penstats.

Teachers: Labour Turnover

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many teachers in Yorkshire and the Humber have left the profession within (a) one year, (b) five years and (c) 10 years of completing their qualified teacher status induction period since its inception; and if he will make a statement. (190805)

Teaching Methods: Finance