Skip to main content

Iraq: Peacekeeping Operations

Volume 473: debated on Thursday 13 March 2008

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many service personnel have served in (a) Iraq and (b) Afghanistan since 2002; and how many have received a medal in recognition of that service. (193517)

The information requested is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

There have been 112,875 campaign medals issued for service on Operation Telic and 49,078 campaign medals issued for service on Operations Veritas and Herrick, since operations began.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many VIPs his Department escorted in (a) Iraq and (b) Afghanistan in each of the last 12 months. (190649)

The following table below shows the number of VIP1 visits arranged under the auspices of the Ministry of Defence to Iraq and Afghanistan in each of the last twelve months for which information is available.

1 On visits to operational theatres, a VIP is defined as either a member of the senior civil service or Crown servant equivalent; a military officer at or above the rank of Commodore RN, Brigadier, or Air Commodore; a Member of the House of Commons or of the House of Lords who is not a Member of the Cabinet; or a civilian of a similar status to the preceding individuals. Members of the Royal Family and Members of the Cabinet, or equivalent, are classified as VVIPs.

Number of VIP visits

Iraq

Afghanistan

February 2007

10

10

March 2007

10

8

April 2007

11

6

May 2007

3

12

June 2007

13

10

July 2007

9

11

August 2007

5

12

September 2007

12

5

October 2007

13

0

November 2007

4

13

December 2007

7

9

January 2008

9

11

This data relates to the number of visits involving VIPs rather than the actual number of VIP visitors: in some cases, any one particular visit may involve more than one VIP.

This data relates solely to those VIP visits organised by the UK Ministry of Defence: UK units in these theatres also receive many VIP visitors from other nations, as well as UK VIPs whose trips are organised separately (including through the NATO system).

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what assessment he has made of the security situation in (a) Basra, (b) Maysan, (c) Dhi Qar and (d) Al Muthanna provinces. (190712)

I have nothing to add to the answer my right hon. Friend, the Defence Secretary gave on 3 March 2008, Official Report, column 1447 to the hon. Member for Harwich (Mr. Carswell).

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what recent assessment he has made of the security situation in Basra City. (190724)

I have nothing to add to the answer I gave on 3 March 2008, Official Report, column 1447, to the hon. Member for Harwich (Mr. Carswell).

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many members of the armed services stationed in Iraq were (a) killed, (b) seriously injured and (c) slightly injured in Iraq in each year since 2003, broken down by (i) sex, (ii) age, (iii) regiment and (iv) service. (190801)

As at 25 February 2008, 173 UK service personnel have died while on deployment, or as a result of injuries sustained in Iraq. Of the 173 service personnel who have died, information for two soldiers have not been publicly released and thus their detailed information has been excluded from the following tables. This is consistent with the order of the coroner. In the event that this order changes, I will inform the House.

Since the start of operations in 2003, six female UK service personnel have died while on deployment, or as a result of injuries sustained in Iraq.

A breakdown of fatalities by age and by year is provided in the following table:

Table 1: Operational fatalities in Iraq: UK armed forces personnel, by age and calendar year, number, 2003-07

All

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

All

173

52

22

23

29

47

<20 years

14

4

2

1

2

5

20-24

50

10

8

5

6

21

25-29

44

12

6

4

12

10

30-34

34

15

6

5

4

4

35-39

20

9

0

5

3

3

40+

9

2

0

3

2

2

Not released

2

0

0

0

0

2

A breakdown of fatalities by corps/unit and by year is provided in the following table:

Table 2: Operational fatalities in Iraq: UK armed forces personnel, by corp1/unit and calendar year, number, 2003-07

Service

Corps/unit

All

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

All

173

52

22

23

29

47

Naval Service2

1 Assault Group

2

2

0

0

0

0

3 Commando Brigade

9

7

0

0

2

0

847 Naval Air Squadron

2

0

0

0

2

0

849 Naval Air Squadron

6

6

0

0

0

0

Army

Army Air Corps

1

0

0

0

1

0

Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

5

1

3

0

0

1

Corps of Royal Engineers

3

2

1

0

0

0

Corps of Royal Military Police

12

9

1

1

0

1

Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment

9

1

0

0

2

6

Foot Guards

8

2

1

2

0

3

Household Cavalry

3

3

0

0

0

0

Intelligence Corps

2

0

0

1

1

0

Mercian Regiment

5

0

1

3

0

1

Parachute Regiment

6

1

0

0

3

2

Princess of Wales Royal Regiment

2

0

2

0

0

0

Royal Anglian Regiment

2

0

0

0

2

0

Royal Armoured Corps

14

3

0

1

5

5

Royal Army Medical Corps

3

0

0

0

1

2

Royal Corps of Signals

5

1

0

2

1

1

Royal Logistic Corps

5

2

0

0

0

3

Royal Regiment of Artillery

8

3

1

0

4

0

Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

5

1

0

4

0

0

Royal Regiment of Scotland

14

3

8

0

1

2

The Rifles

13

0

2

0

2

9

The Royal Welsh

5

1

1

0

0

3

Yorkshire Regiment

1

0

0

0

0

1

RAF

1 Squadron RAF Regiment

3

0

0

0

0

3

16 Squadron

1

1

0

0

0

0

230 Squadron

1

0

0

0

0

1

28 Army Co-operation Squadron

2

0

0

0

2

0

33 Squadron

1

0

1

0

0

0

47 Squadron

5

0

0

5

0

0

504 Squadron Royal Auxiliary Air Force

1

0

0

0

0

1

Engineering Wing, RAF Lyneham

3

0

0

3

0

0

HQ STC Air Staff

1

0

0

1

0

0

IX (B) Squadron

2

2

0

0

0

0

RAF Police

1

1

0

0

0

0

Information not released

2

0

0

0

0

2

1 The breakdown for Army Corps is presented for the current Army structure (following the merger of many regiments over the last few years).

2 Naval Service includes Royal Navy and Royal Marines.

A breakdown of fatalities by service and by year is provided in the following table:

Table 3: Operational fatalities in Iraq: UK armed forces personnel, by service and calendar year, numbers, 2003-07

All

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

All

173

52

22

23

29

47

Naval Service1

19

15

0

0

4

0

Army

131

33

21

14

23

40

RAF

21

4

1

9

2

5

Not released

2

0

0

0

0

2

1 Naval service includes Royal Navy and Royal Marines.

As at 31 December 2007, 212 UK Service personnel have been very seriously or seriously injured while on deployment in Iraq. Details which can be released without potential disclosure of individual identities include:

Since the start of operations in 2003, six female UK service personnel have been very seriously or seriously injured while on deployment in Iraq.

A breakdown of very seriously and seriously injured personnel by age and by year is provided in the following table:

Table 4: Operational very serious and seriously injured1 personnel in Iraq: UK armed forces personnel, by age and calendar year, number, 2003-07

All

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

All

212

46

45

20

32

69

<20 years

39

8

10

2

7

12

20-24

71

14

17

10

12

18

25-29

44

11

8

3

8

14

30-34

26

7

5

2

3

9

35-39

24

4

4

2

2

12

40+

8

2

1

1

0

4

1 Excluding natural causes.

Information on the breakdown of very seriously and seriously injured by regiment (or other service equivalent) cannot be released without disclosing individual identities.

A breakdown of very seriously and seriously injured personnel by service and by year is provided in the following table:

Table 5: Operational very serious and seriously injured1 personnel in Iraq: UK armed forces personnel, by service and calendar year, number, 2003-07

All

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

All

212

46

45

20

32

69

Naval Service2

6

2

0

0

3

1

Army

189

40

42

19

28

60

RAF

17

4

3

1

1

8

1 Excluding natural causes.

2 Naval service includes Royal Navy and Royal Marines.

Information on slight injuries is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 4 March 2008, Official Report, column 2349W, on Iraq peacekeeping operations, what methodology was used to formulate his answer on 7 February 2006, Official Report, column 1084, on Iraq; and why the information requested in the question on Iraq peacekeeping operations is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost. (193161)

Exact figures on how many non-infantry personnel have served in an infantry role in Iraq and Afghanistan since 2003 are not held centrally as currently this information is not required for management purposes. The methodology used in the answer on 7 February 2006, Official Report, column 1084W, took the average number of non-infantry sub-units serving in an infantry role per deployment and multiplied this by both the number of deployments and the strength of a typical sub unit; this enabled a rough estimate figure to be provided. Adopting the same approach produces figures of approximately 7,260 and 330 for Iraq and Afghanistan respectively since 2003.

It is not unusual for non-infantry personnel to deploy in an infantry role as every soldier in the Army is trained in the infantry role first, and as a specialist second. When such individuals or units do deploy in an infantry role, they will also undertake similar pre-deployment training as their infantry counterparts.