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Olympic Games 2012: Construction

Volume 474: debated on Tuesday 1 April 2008

To ask the Minister for the Olympics with reference to the answer of 25 July 2006, Official Report, columns 1630-31W, on the London Olympics, whether the detailed plan being developed by Constructing London 2012 to deliver locally available construction skills to build the Olympic and Paralympic infrastructure has been published. (197411)

ConstructionSkills will be publishing its Greater London Strategy later this year, which will include skills and employment programmes for the 2012 games and other major construction projects scheduled for the capital in the next five years.

In the meantime, ConstructionSkills is part of the partnership which is delivering the Employment and Skills Strategy launched by the Olympic Delivery Authority in February. The strategy sets out how the ODA will work with a range of public and private sector partners to help its contractors recruit the 9,000-10,000 construction workers that will be needed at peak in 2009-10 while at the same time helping people develop sustainable skills and a long term career path after the games.

To ask the Minister for the Olympics what steps she has taken to provide to the local workforce training in the specialist skills required to fill the 33,500 additional jobs identified by Construction Skills as necessary to complete preparations for the London 2012 Olympics. (197443)

The London Development Agency, which leads on maximising the employment and skills benefits of the games in London, forecasts the demands for jobs on site. It also provides important recommendations about workforce training requirements, directly informing the joint construction training programme, as set out in the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA's) Employment and Skills Strategy. The strategy sets out how the ODA will work with a range of public and private sector partners to help its contractors recruit the 9,000-10,000 construction workers that will be needed at peak in 2009-10, and helps local employees develop their skills.

The Olympic site becoming a National Skills Academy for Construction (NSAfC) is a critical part of this. The NSAfC co-ordinates training provision to meet the identified needs of the project, bringing together contractors and their supply chains, colleges and private providers, funding bodies and other agencies. Detailed plans are currently being prepared, which are expected to include targets for training local people.