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Written Answers

Volume 474: debated on Tuesday 1 April 2008

Written Answers to Questions

Monday 31 March 2008

Innovation, Universities and Skills

Adult Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many adults completed (a) part-time and (b) full-time level 3 courses in each year since 2001. (195310)

The following table shows the number of full level 3 achievements by adults in Further Education, Work-based Learning and Train to Gain for each year since 2002/03, the earliest year for which information is available. Breakdowns by full- and part-time are not readily available.

2002/03

2003/04

2004/05

2005/06

Further Education

55,400

59,600

67,700

78,100

Work-Based Learning

11,900

12,100

13,200

17,100

Train to Gain

Total

67,300

71,700

80,900

95,200

Source:

Learning and Skills Council

Chevening Scholarship Programme

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what discussions he has held with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on the changes in funding for the Chevening and Commonwealth scholarship programmes. (196622)

I have had no discussions with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on this issue. The FCO will be managing a consultation process with other Government Departments and business to inform the implementation of these changes and DIUS officials will participate in that exercise.

Departmental Domestic Visits

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what visits he made to (a) Harrogate International Centre, (b) International Conference Centre, Birmingham, (c) Manchester Central, (d) Scottish Exhibitional and Conference Centre, Glasgow, (e) Edinburgh International Conference Centre, (f) Bournemouth International Conference Centre, (g) the Brighton Centre, Brighton, (h) the Riviera Centre, Torquay, (i) Queen Elizabeth Centre, London, (j) Excel Conference Centre, Docklands, London, and (k) Business Design Centre, Islington, London, in the period 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2007; and what events he attended at each. (197151)

I have visited the following venues:

Date

Centre

Reason

8 November 2007

Queen Elizabeth Centre, London

To attend the Technology Strategy Board

22 November 2007

International Conference Centre, Birmingham

To attend the Association of Colleagues conference

Departmental Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many (a) men and (b) women of each Civil Service grade are employed by his Department. (172728)

The Department employs 784 staff in a wide variety of roles. It was formed as part of the 28 June 2007 machinery of government changes, taking in staff from the former Department for Education and Skills and Department of Trade and Industry. The following table sets out the numbers and proportions of men and women now employed in each of the general salary bands (percentages are rounded to the nearest whole number):

Grade

(a) men

Proportion men (percentage)

(b) women

Proportion women (percentage)

Total

Administrative Assistant

1

0

0

0

1

Administrative Officer

37

5

44

6

81

Executive Officer (EO) and equivalents

45

6

74

9

119

Higher Executive Officer (HEO) and equivalents

92

12

127

16

219

Senior Executive Officer (SEO) and equivalents

64

8

51

7

115

Grade 7 and equivalents

85

11

75

10

160

Grade 6

24

3

17

2

41

Senior Civil Service (SCS)

33

4

13

2

46

Special Adviser

1

0

1

0

1

DIUS Total

382

49

402

51

784

Education: Prisons

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many and what proportion of the hours of education provided in prisons in 2005-06 were in a structured classroom setting. (196636)

The information requested in not collected centrally. Proposals for developing offender learning delivery arrangements were published in September 2007 in “Developing the Offenders’ Learning and Skills Service: The Prospectus”. The Prospectus described an intention to expand the provision of learning in prison settings outside a traditional classroom environment. In particular, the Prospectus outlined an intention to deliver more learning in production workshops, prison industries and other regime activities such as catering and horticulture where, although learning is not the primary purpose of the activity, it is possible to acquire and put into practise new skills.

English Language: Further Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what proportion of courses for qualifications in English for speakers of other languages were taught in further education colleges in the last 12 months. (195658)

Further Education: Elderly

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what his policy is on the provision of recreational courses for older people in colleges of further education; what funds have been made available (a) nationally and (b) in Gloucestershire, for providing recreational courses for older people at colleges of further education in each of the last five years for which figures are available; and if he will make a statement. (196162)

[holding answer 25 March 2008]: We recognise the many wider benefits of participation in learning and its vital contribution to personal health and wellbeing, community involvement and quality of life as people age. Learning helps older people to fulfil themselves as active citizens and as members of their families and communities. People who keep mentally and physically active not only live longer but live happier and more fulfilled lives and pursuing informal adult learning can play a real part in this. We remain fully committed to ensuring that older learners in every area can benefit from a wide range of informal adult learning opportunities, including learning for its own sake, for personal fulfilment and to sustain an active role in the community, through further education colleges and other learning providers, including the Third Sector. We have also safeguarded funding for learning for personal and community development at £210 million through to 2010/11.

In Gloucestershire, Informal Audit Learning programmes for older people are managed by Gloucestershire county council using funding provided by the Learning and Skills Council (LSC). These programmes are funded from the safeguarded Personal and Community Development Learning (PCDL) budget. It is up to local LSCs and their partners to determine the most appropriate balance and mix of provision for their communities, including opportunities for older learners, in the light of local needs and circumstances and national priorities.

Gloucestershire county council contracts with a range of providers, including FE colleges, private providers and voluntary and community groups, to ensure that county-wide provision across the county meets the needs of older learners in a large rural county. The following table shows total funding and participation figures across all providers for learners aged 51 and over engaged in informal adult learning programmes in Gloucestershire for the three years 2004/05 to 2006/07 for which information is readily available, together with the respective national budgets.

2004/05

2005/06

2006/07

Total number of learners

14,924

11,550

10,573

Number of older learners (51+)

7,163

5,811

4,913

Percentage of older learners

48

50

46

Expenditure on older learners 51+ (£)

1,262,400

1,278,200

1,083,700

National budget1 (£ million)

2234

2232

3210

1 PCDL was developed by restructuring Adult and Community Learning (ACL). The two are not directly comparable.

2 Adult and Community Learning.

3 PCDL.

Overall Government investment in the further education sector has increased by 52 per cent. in real terms between 1997 and 2007. Participate funding for adults will increase to around £3.6 billion in 2010-11, an increase of over 17 per cent. compared with 2007-08. We have continued to realign funding towards basic literacy and numeracy, full level 2 and full level 3 qualifications providing skills for employment and further progression in learning away from, for example, very short or low quality courses. This has enabled us to support significant increases in participation for young people and adults in these key programmes, providing them with the education and skills they need to fully participate in an economically successful and socially cohesive society.

We want to develop a new vision for informal adult learning for the 21st century. In January, my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills, launched a wide ranging consultation, “Informal Adult Learning: Shaping the Way Ahead”, which re-affirms our commitment to this kind of learning and its importance in meeting the basic human need for creativity and stimulation—as well as improving health and well-being in our communities. We want to look at the many different ways in which Government and other organisations support adult learners and to understand what learners from all parts of society actually want. We have been greatly encouraged by the tremendous response of our partners, stakeholders and learners in taking this important consultation forward. I would strongly encourage individuals and organisations, both in Gloucestershire and across the country, to take this opportunity to contribute their views and ideas.

Higher Education: Admissions

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many university students (a) in England and (b) at each university in the North East region were (i) mature students, (ii) part-time students and (iii) part-time students aged over (A) 21 years and (B) 40 years in each academic year from 2001-02 to 2007-08. (191604)

[holding answer 6 March 2008]: The latest available information is given in the following table. Figures for the 2007/08 academic year will be available in January 2009.

Number of higher education enrolments in English and North East higher education institutions, postgraduate and undergraduate students—academic years 2001/02 to 2006/07 Of all enrolments:Mature2Of part-time:Higher Education InstitutionAll enrolments1PGUGPart- timeOver 213Over 403English Higher Education Institutions2001/021,726,840302,395809,540708,725673,830257,3952002/031,807,665315,300850,130735,495699,925267,3252003/041,868,415328,600873,705756,880718,985270,8602004/051,895,825332,675879,695760,045719,225269,1352005/061,936,420338,185885,905762,870719,105268,5802006/071,957,195343,115882,585769,555717,850266,770Of which:University of Durham2001/0214,2302,9652,7602,7102,6759652002/0315,3153,2002,6852,7402,7159002003/0416,1853,3202,6602,8252,8109802004/0516,9803,5652,6703,0553,0251,0102005/0617,3203,3702,9902,9502,9109202006/0717,4103,4853,1252,9102,855915University of Newcastle Upon Tyne2001/0219,3953,8006,0755,5005,3903,1002002/0318,9154,1054,3153,4653,3401,3352003/0418,3353,6803,9902,4002,3506252004/0318,5103,5754,3252,1102,0505052005/0619,1503,6604,3302,0802,0304552006/0719,7003,8104,3602,2952,240515University of Northumbria at Newcastle2001/0222,7753,16511,2257,6907,2702,2902002/0324,2803,47011,8458,1757,7852,5352003/0425,0703,78011,7107,9357,5802,4902004/0525,5353,91011,5157,8957,4452,4652005/0627,2853,98512,5258,6508,1302,7602006/0729,6304,81013,0859,8909,0953,010University of Sunderland2001/0212,6651,4056,1103,8953,6101,2352002/0316,1151,4409,4056,9856,4653,4502003/0417,8451,66010,6608,3407,8104,1152004/0518,6351,76011,4259,7358,9054,3702006/0620,3652,01512,50010,7709,7154,4552006/0720,2152,18512,18510,4009,3654,210University of Teesside2001/0218,1151,53511,54510,0409,0803,5102002/0319,7801,71512,96511,41010,4304,1702003/0421,1451,78014,03011,99511,0804,4852004/0520,4301,87013,19510,97010,0804,0552005/0621,5701,77014,30012,02510,9104,3952006/0723,5352,11515,76513,86012,5404,820 1 Includes both full-time and part-time students from the UK and overseas.2 The definition of mature students differs between levels of study. Postgraduate mature students are aged 25 and over, and undergraduate mature students aged 21 and over. These figures include a small number of students whose age was unknown.3 Contain double counting of students (i.e. figures for students aged over 40 are also included in those for students aged over 21). These figures include a small number of students whose age was unknown.Note:Figures are on a HESA Standard Registration Population basis and have been rounded to the nearest five.Source:Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA)

Higher Education: Enfield

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many people went into higher education from (a) Enfield and (b) Enfield North in each of the last 10 years. (190259)

The latest information is shown in the table. Comparable figures for the 2007/08 academic year will be available in January 2009.

Entrants to undergraduate courses at UK higher education institutions from Enfield local authority and Enfield, North parliamentary constituency—academic years 1997/98 to 2006/07

Academic year

Enfield

Enfield, North

1997/981

2,385

635

1996/99

2,625

720

1999/2000

2,875

750

2000/01

2,990

850

2001/02

3,210

925

2002/03

3,435

1,010

2003/04

3,470

1,070

2004/052

3,695

1,185

2005/06

3,780

1,200

2006/07

3,540

1,125

1 Figures for 1997/98 exclude the Open University because there are no figures available for entrants to undergraduate courses at the Open University by parliamentary constituency or local authority for this year.

2 Figures for the Open University for 2004/05 have been included but these are known to undercount entrants to undergraduate courses at the Open University.

Note:

Figures are on a snapshot basis as at 1 December excluding those writing up, on sabbatical or dormant and are rounded to the nearest five.

Source:

Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

Overall, for all students from England, the UCAS figures show that, compared to 2006, applicants who have been accepted for entry in 2007, rose by 6.1 per cent. to 307,000, the highest ever. Latest figures for students applying for entry in 2008, show that applicants from England are up by 7.1 per cent. compared to 2007.

Overseas Students

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what assessment he has made of the contribution to the UK economy made by students from overseas at educational institutions in the last five years. (195101)

[holding answer 18 March, 2008]: The Department has made no specific assessment of the contribution to the UK economy made by students from overseas at educational institutions. However, global value surveys commissioned by the British Council estimate the total value of international students to the UK economy as nearly £8.5 billion in 2003-04, compared with £7.5 billion in 2002-03 and £6.2 billion in 2001-02. Information on later years is not available.

Particle Accelerators

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what assessment he has made of the effects on university physics departments and the physics community of withdrawal from the International Linear Collider. (193278)

I am informed that the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) expects that it will continue to provide support for generic accelerator R and D at a reduced level. The precise level will be determined once it has completed its current review of its programme priorities.

Qualifications: Prisoners

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many prisoners gained an (a) academic and (b) vocational qualification in each year since 1992. (191211)

Data on qualifications are set out in the following annexes. Data are labelled as academic and vocational, but some data are a mix of the two.

The Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills and its predecessors has been responsible for policy on offender learning and skills since 2001, with responsibility prior to then resting with the Home Office. Since the creation of the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills and the Department for Children, Schools and Families in 2007, responsibility has been split, with this Department taking the lead on offenders aged 18 and over.

In England the Learning and Skills Council has been responsible for planning and funding offender learning through the Offender Learning and Skills Service since August 2005. This was introduced through a phased transition starting in three regions. As the period covered by the question includes the transition to these new arrangements, data collection has been from a variety of sources and therefore taken some time. Further information about the changes to the delivery arrangements is set out in the Annex D.

Annex A

LSC OLASS data

Adult Skills for Life qualifications for the period August 2005 to July 2006: (Offender Learning and Skills Service Development Regions only: south-west, north-west and north-east):

Skills for Life (academic qualifications)

Number

Entry level

1,975

Level 1

8,309

Level 2

1,018

Total

11,302

Adult achievements in ‘All Remaining Provision’ for the period August 2005 to July 2006: (development regions only):

All remaining provision (a mix of academic and vocational qualifications)

Number

Entry and level 1

2,391

Level 2

3,791

Level 3

112

Other

6,703

Adult Skills for Life qualifications for the period August 2006 to July 2007:

Skills for Life (academic qualifications)

Number

Pre-entry level

161

Entry level 1

3,005

Entry level 2

4,376

Entry level 3

7,188

Level 1

17,512

Level 2

10,650

Total

42,892

Adult achievements in ‘All Remaining Provision’ for the period August 2006 to July 2007:

All remaining provision (a mix of academic and vocational qualifications)

Number

Below level 1

10,851

Level 1

55,048

Level 2

28,956

Above level 2

2,848

Other provision not covered in above

9,127

Total

106,830

Through OLASS, (GCSEs are now reported separately and the following have been recorded from 1 April 2007 to 30 September 2007:

GCSE—AS/A-level achievements (academic qualifications)

Maths

English

Other

Total

AS/A level

0

0

18

18

GCSE A*-C

18

29

307

354

GCSE below C

91

56

162

309

Total

109

85

487

681

Annex B

Data from Her Majesty's Prison Service

The Prison Service data on GCSEs and AS/A level achievements by offenders in custody since 1 April 2007 to 30 September 2007 reflects only the GCSEs delivered by the establishments and not those examinations taken by young people in custody, on transfer from schools. In this case the school which has registered the young person will record the qualification.

The Prison Service estate reported 118 GCSEs and one AS/A level achievements by offenders in custody since 1 April 2007 to 30 September 2007.

Prior to OLASS, Her Majesty's Prison Service annual reports and the Prison Service Information for Managers Online (PSIMOn) data collection system recorded the following number of achievements:

Basic skills (academic qualifications)

April to March

Entry level

Level 1

Level 2

Total

2000-01

12,764

12,764

2001-02

16,133

16,133

2002-03

9,179

16,989

15,145

41,313

2003-04

12,529

17,864

13,338

43,731

2004-05

20,372

23,816

14,759

58,947

2005-061

15,808

20,090

12,381

48,279

2006-072

5,355

6,724

4,233

16,312

1 The figures in 2005-06 are for public prisons only, excluding those who transferred to the LSC as part of the implementation of GLASS In August 2005 (north-east, north-west, south-west, Frankland and Manchester— completions for these prisons are included April to July 2005).

2 The figures for 2006-07 are for all public prisons April to July 06, excluding those who transferred to the LSC as part of the OLASS pilot activity in August 2005. Thereafter, the totals include Welsh public prisons only due to the full transfer of responsibility to the LSC.

Work skills (vocational qualifications)

April to March

Total

2000-01

2001-02

56,320

2002-03

89,201

2003-04

103,583

2004-05

162,966

2005-061

146,053

2006-071

48,198

1 The figures in 2005-06 are for public prisons only, excluding those who transferred to the LSC as part of the implementation of GLASS In August 2005 (north-east, north-west, south-west, Frankland and Manchester—completions for these prisons are included April to July 2005).

2 The figures for 2006-07 are for all public prisons April to July 06, excluding those who transferred to the LSC as part of the OLASS pilot activity in August 2005. Thereafter, the totals include Welsh public prisons only due to the full transfer of responsibility to the LSC.

Contracted Prisons

Basic skills (academic qualifications)

April to March

Entry level

Level 1

Level 2

Total

2006-07

2,024

2,404

1,544

5,972

2005-06

1,895

2,123

1,553

5,571

2004-05

1,977

1,570

1,169

4,716

2003-04

971

1,047

895

2,913

Work skills (vocational qualifications)

April to March

Total

2006-07

16,572

2005-06

10,131

2004-05

7,674

2003-04

5,654

Annex C

Data from the Open University

Open University (OU) courses open to prisoners are agreed by the Offenders Learning and Skills Unit (OLSU) working in collaboration with the OU and the Prison Service. Where a prisoner does not have sufficient funds to meet their own learning costs, the OLSU will fund an openings course and/or a first course for a prisoner accepted onto a programme of study leading to an undergraduate qualification. OLSU delivers this funding though an administrative arrangement operated on its behalf by the Prisoners Education Trust. The OLSU also meets the additional tutorial costs the OU incurs in delivering local support to prisoners. This latter support, unlike course fee support, can continue into second and subsequent courses leading to a qualification at undergraduate level.

Latest data available from the Open University show the following awards to offenders in custody, in England only:

Open University

Award level

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

Certificate

15

31

34

73

118

134

121

Degree with honours

4

12

13

8

12

16

14

Degree without honours

1

2

4

2

12

11

7

Diploma

17

12

28

18

20

32

20

Masters

1

0

1

1

2

0

1

Grand total

38

57

80

102

164

193

163

Annex D

It may be helpful to provide some additional background to contextualise the information presented in annexes A to C.

Transfer of responsibility for planning and funding offender learning provision to the Learning and Skills Council (LSC) from HM Prison Service was carried out in two stages. The LSC took responsibility for delivery in three development regions from July 2005, with HM Prison Service retaining responsibility in the remaining regions. Having trialled the new delivery arrangement in those three regions, the new service was implemented across England as a whole on 31 July 2006.

The following illustrates the changes and their timing:

Responsibility

2005-06

HMPS managed

Development regions1

2006-07

Development regions

LSC managed

2007-08

(OLASS)

1 Development regions—north-east, north-west, south-west

Students: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what the variable threshold bands are for EU graduates who move abroad and who owe money to the Student Loans Company. (191164)

We have put in place variable threshold bands to provide a fair system to enable graduates who move abroad to contribute to the costs of their education. The bands are dependent on where the borrower lives and take account of differences in living costs.

The following table shows what the thresholds are for 2008-09 in other European countries as well as some other common destinations after graduation. The thresholds are updated each year to take account of price changes. This table is reproduced in the annual ‘Student Loans: A Guide to Terms and Conditions’ booklet and full details can be found at:

http://www.slc.co.uk/thresholds/index.html

Band

Price level index (UK=100)

Repayment threshold (UK=£15,000)

Countries using the latest available price level index figures

A

Less than 30

3,000

Currently does not apply to any countries but may change depending on price changes compared to the UK

B

More then 30 but less than 50

6,000

Bulgaria, Macedonia, Romania, Lithuania, Latvia

C

More than 50 but less than 70

9,000

Poland, Slovakia, Turkey, Czech Republic, Estonia, Croatia, Hungary, Malta, Slovenia

D

More than 70 but less than 90

12,000

Portugal .Greece, Spain, Cyprus, USA

E

More than 90 but less than110

15,000

Italy, Belgium, Austria, Germany, Netherlands, France, Luxemburg, Finland, Sweden, Japan

F

More than 110 but less than 130

18,000

Ireland, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland

G

130 or more

21,000

Currently does not apply to any countries but may change depending on price changes compared to the UK

Students: Identity Cards

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills (1) whether Scottish-domiciled higher education students will have to be in possession of an identity card in order to access student loans or other state or Institution-determined support related to their studies at English higher education institutions in 2009-10 or in any subsequent years; (195301)

(2) whether Welsh-domiciled higher education students will have to be in possession of an identity card in order to access student loans or other state or Institution-determined support related to their studies at English higher education institutions in 2009-10 or in any subsequent years.

There are no plans to require students to have an ID card to apply for a student loan or any other form of student support.

Students: Loans

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what notification is required to be given to recipients of student loans on changes in the interest rates charged on such loans. (190343)

In accordance with the requirements of the Consumer Credit Act 1974 the Student Loans Company (SLC) publishes details of the forthcoming change in the interest rate payable for Mortgage Style (MS) Student Loans before the new rate takes effect on 1 September each year. There is no similar requirement for advance notification for Income Contingent Repayment (ICR) Student Loans which have exemption from arrangements governing consumer credit agreements.

However, the SLC publishes notices of the change of interest rates affecting all student loan borrowers in national newspapers before 1 September each year. The change is also published on the SLC's and Government websites.

Borrowers with MS loans are individually informed of the change by the SLC and private sector debt owners before 1 September. This is important as a change in interest rate for these borrowers changes the payments they are required to make. Borrowers with ICR loans receive notification of the change with their annual statements. For the majority these are issued between September and December.

While any change in the interest rate applied adds to the overall balance of the outstanding loan it does not alter the income-related repayments of these borrowers.

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills if he will make an estimate of the cost to the public purse of introducing thresholds and rates of student loan repayments of (a) 0 per cent. on incomes below £20,000, (b) 5 per cent. on incomes of £20,000 to £29,999, (c) 7.5 per cent. on incomes of £30,000 to £41,225 and (d) 12 per cent. on incomes over £41,225; and if he will make a statement. (196030)

[holding answer 20 March 2008]: Introducing repayment thresholds of £20,000, £30,000 and £41,225 with corresponding repayment rates of 5 per cent. 7.5 per cent. and 12 per cent. would have an estimated one-off resource cost of £2 billion (for existing loans) and on ongoing resource cost of £700 million per year (for new loans).

The income threshold is one of the main features of the income contingent loan scheme. This protects borrowers when they need it as they only pay their loan back once they earn over the threshold. Borrowers currently repay nothing until they earn over £15,000. This strikes the right balance, making payments affordable to the individual and student loans affordable to the public purse. We are committed to maintaining the repayment threshold at £15,000 until 2010 when we will review it.

Home Department

Airguns: Injuries

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many injuries caused by firearms in each of the last five years were caused by airguns or airsoft guns. (193955)

Available information relates to offences in which Air weapons and BB guns/Soft air weapons caused injury by being fired or used as a blunt instrument in crimes recorded in England and Wales.

Air weapon injuries from 2002-03 up to and including 2006-07 are given in the following table. Separate BB guns/Soft air weapons data are not available centrally for 2002-03 and 2003-04. Data for these weapons are only given from 2004-05 to 2006-07.

Injuries due to Air weapons and BB guns/Soft air weapons in crimes recorded by the police, England and Wales 2002-03 to 2006-07

Air weapons

BB guns/Soft air weapons

2002-031

2,377

2

2003-04

2,395

2

2004-053

1,498

1,844

2005-06

1,182

1,534

2006-07

1,054

1,013

1 The National Crime Recording Standard was introduced on 1 April 2002.Figures for some crime categories may have been inflated by this.

2 These data are not available centrally. BB guns/Soft air weapons were separately collected from 1 April 2004. Figures prior to this date were included within ‘imitation firearms’.

3 More explicit guidelines for the classification of weapons introduced on 1 April 2004 may have increased the recording of firearm offences .particularly those committed by imitation weapons.

Asylum

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether guidance has been issued to safer neighbourhood police panels on the role of councillors on such panels. (192319)

The Metropolitan Police Service has issued a guidance document titled ‘Guidance on Setting Up and Maintaining Neighbourhood Panels’ which also contains advice on the role of councillors on such panels.

Asylum: Repatriation

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much has been spent on the voluntary assisted return and reintegration programme. (195546)

The Voluntary Assisted Return and Reintegration Programme (VARRP) commenced in 2002 as a development from the Voluntary Assisted Return Programme (VARP). The total cost of VARRP to 31 July 2007 is £37,803,669.80.

VARRP is co-funded with the European Refugee Fund. These figures include both Home Office and ERF funding.

As the VARRP 2007 is currently ongoing, the overall cost of this programme is not yet available.

British Crime Survey

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether there are plans to transfer responsibility for the British Crime Survey to the Office for National Statistics, as recommended by the Statistics Commission. (193578)

There are currently no plans to transfer responsibility for the British Crime Survey to the Office for National Statistics.

The Statistics Commission recommendation was part of a package of proposals to increase public trust in Home Office crime statistics and address any perception that there was a lack of independence in their production. The same issues were considered by the independent Smith review which included cross-party nominees. The Smith review concluded the Home Office should retain responsibility for the survey but recommended some changes to the governance of crime statistics.

Since the recommendation by the Statistics Commission was made, more fundamental changes to the governance of official statistics are taking place. The Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007, which comes into effect on 1 April 2008, provides a new statutory framework to ensure the independence of National Statistics of which the British Crime Survey is a part.

To further strengthen these arrangements, on the same date within the Home Office, responsibility for the production of statistics from the British Crime Survey and other statistics will transfer to the Chief Statistician who has direct professional accountability to the National Statistician for the political independence of such statistics.

Bureaucracy

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department who the winners of the Reducing Bureaucracy Awards Scheme were in each month since its inception. (176056)

The Reducing Bureaucracy Awards Scheme was launched in 2003. The awards were held annually and were presented at the Police Federation annual conference. The winners and runners-up for each year are listed as follows:

2004

1st—Inspector John Clucas, Lancashire Constabulary

2nd—DC Andrew Tomlinson, Metropolitan Police Service, and Sgt Ian Robertson, Metropolitan Police Service, (joint 2nd prize)

3rd—DS John McKee, Thames Valley Police.

2005

1st—Chief Inspector Steve Radcliffe, Gloucestershire Constabulary

2nd—Inspector John Clucas, Lancashire Constabulary

3rd—David Kerr, Greater Manchester Police.

2006

1st—Michael Lombardelli, Metropolitan Police Service

2nd—Inspector John Clucas, Lancashire Constabulary

3rd—Mark Crampton, Hertfordshire Constabulary

Special Award: Dorset Police.

Departmental Accountancy

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to her answer of 18 March 2008, Official Report, column 930W, on accountancy, how many distinct budget lines relating to her Department’s expenditure and forecasts were reported to the Treasury in each month of 2007-08. (196890)

[holding answer 26 March 2008]: The following table provides the number of data lines the Home Office uploaded on to HM Treasury’s Combined On-line Information System (COINS), per month, for financial year 2007-08.

The change in the number of data lines from June to July is a result of a machinery of government change, the transfer of the National Offender Management Service and the Office of Criminal Justice Reform from the Home Office to the Ministry of Justice.

The data on COINS is the source of the numbers found in the tables that are published in both the departmental report and the supply estimates.

Number

April

591

May

600

June

610

July

370

August

372

September

385

October

385

November

385

December

385

January

385

Departmental Advertising

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department which of her Department's initiatives have been advertised to the public in each of the last 10 years; and what the cost of each such campaign was. (192231)

The following table outlines Home Office advertising spend over the last five years, broken down by year and by policy area.

Campaign

Total media (£)

2002-03

Child Protection on the Internet

705,194

Drug Misuse

19,878

Firearms Amnesty

506,283

Police Recruitment

4,222,741

Tackling Drug Abuse

38,014

Vehicle Crime Reduction

4,362,887

2003-04

Child Protection on the Internet

736,878

Domestic Violence

805,140

Drugs (Including FRANK campaign)

2,184,499

Police Recruitment

400,608

Vehicle Crime Reduction

4,296,931

Youth Offenders On Line

38,014

2004-05

Acquisitive Crime Reduction

6,100,808

Antisocial Behaviour

366,553

Child Protection on the Internet

290,225

Clean Up Campaign 2005-06

25,722

Domestic Violence

432,263

Drugs (Including FRANK campaign)

2,049,593

Gun Crime

162,042

Police Specials Recruitment

1,885,559

2005-06

Acquisitive Crime Reduction

4,123,311

Alcohol Misuse Enforcement Campaign

92,204

Antisocial Behaviour

396,475

Child Protection on the Internet

862,229

Clean Up Campaign

39,819

Crime Stoppers

82,182

Domestic Violence

534,587

Drugs (Including FRANK campaign)

1,524,701

Park Mark Car Parks

94,260

Police Specials Recruitment

1,389,166

Rape

66,153

2006-07

Acquisitive Crime Reduction

3,266,192

Alcohol Binge drinking

1,975,005

Alcohol Misuse Enforcement Campaign

231,713

Child Protection on the Internet

46,824

Domestic Violence

800,384

Drugs (Including FRANK campaign)

3,467,021

Immigration

790,860

Knife Amnesty

137,083

PCSO Recruitment

1,748,743

Rape

280,022

Single Non Emergency Number

780,325

Stop and Search

134.501

Departmental Consultants

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) consultants and (b) agency staff were employed by her Department at the end of (i) 2004-05, (ii) 2005-06 and (iii) 2006-07 financial year. (192504)

The Department does not hold a central record of the number of (a) consultants and (b) agency staff deployed, and to assemble the requested details from individual contract records would incur disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much her Department spent on (a) consultants and (b) agency staff in the financial years (i) 2004-05, (ii) 2005-06 and (iii) 2006-07. (192620)

The Home Department engages consultancy firms to support and augment civil servants in the delivery of a specific range of work, including large IT development programmes and, where more cost effective, longer term service delivery programmes.

The Department’s expenditure on these services is allocated across a wide range of firms, from small, specialist companies with niche expertise and few employees, to global multinational organizations offering a broad spectrum and substantial depth of consultancy expertise.

The Department awards contracts in competition according to the EU Procurement Directives based on value for money. The Department uses OGC framework agreements where appropriate. The use of external consultants provides the Department with specialist knowledge, skill, capacity and technical expertise that would not otherwise be available. Some expenditure is on consultants to whom we have outsourced services, such as IT.

Expenditure on (a) consultants in the financial years (i) 2004-05, (ii) 2005-06 and (iii) 2006-07 is as follows:

£

Financial year

HO headquarters

IPS

CRB

Total spend

2004-05

55,991,869

4,486,183

729,000

61 ,207,052

2005-06

128,000,000

10,912,741

50,462

138,963,203

2006-07

118,000,000

29,870,522

144,235

148,014,757

The Home Department uses a variety of externally resourced staff to fill roles in the Department that cannot readily be filled by permanent staff. The figures given are drawn from our financial reporting systems and represent various categories of agency and other externally resourced staff, but exclude consultancy services.

Expenditure on (b) agency staff in the financial years (i) 2004-05, (ii) 2005-06 and (iii) 2006-07 is as follows:

£

Financial year

HO headquarters

IPS

CRB

Total spend

2004-05

37,000,000

5,626,207

703,756

43,329,963

2005-06

38,000,000

7,746,589

354,756

46,101,345

2006-07

40,000,000

26,612,732

301 ,998

66,914,730

Departmental Information Officers

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) press and (b) communications officers her Department employed in each of the last 10 years. (182518)

Press and Communications Officers in the Home Office are employed at the Information and Senior Information Officer grades. The following table provides information on the numbers of staff employed or managed by the Communication Directorate during the past 10 years. Data on staff numbers in earlier years and the rest of the department are not held centrally and could be collected only at disproportionate cost.

Press Officers

Communication Officers

Total

1999

13

12

25

2000

16

15

31

20011

31

19

50

2002

35

24

59

2003

39

18

57

2004

43

27

70

2005

38

20

58

20062

34

23

57

2007

35

21

54

20083

32

23

56

1 Prison Service and Core Home Office Press Office merged.

2 The total number of Press officers for 2006 onwards includes two part timers, who are employed as a job share.

3 Machinery of Government changes May 2007, 11 Press Officer posts transferred to the Ministry of Justice. The total also includes 5 Borders and Immigration Agency Regional Press Officers, whose posts were created in 2007.

Departmental Official Cars

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what make and model of car (a) she and (b) each Minister in her Department selected as their official ministerial car; and what criteria were applied when making the decision in each case. (192380)

I refer my hon. Friend to the reply my hon. Friend the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Transport my hon. Friend the Member for Poplar and Canning Town (Jim Fitzpatrick) gave to him on 10 March 2008, Official Report, column 8W.

Departmental Parliamentary Questions

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many staff work in her Department’s parliamentary branch; and what proportion of their time is spent on dealing with (a) Parliamentary Questions and (b) correspondence from hon. Members and Peers. (174965)

There are seven staff in the Parliamentary Team, three of whom deal exclusively with parliamentary questions, two other post holders deal with parliamentary questions as part of their duties equating to approximately one post. Staff in the Parliamentary Team do not deal with Members or Peers correspondence.

Departmental Written Questions

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether it is her Department’s practice to attach to Written Answers hard copies of earlier replies cited in such Answers where these were previously given to hon. Members other than the hon. Member to whom the Answer is addressed. (167791)

[holding answer 26 November 2007]: It is now the practice of the Department to provide hon. Members with hard copies of earlier replies referred to in answers where that reply was sent to another Member.

Deportation: Zimbabwe

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many Zimbabwean nationals in detention pending deportation were detained because they were found to be working illegally; (196538)

(2) how many Zimbabwean nationals were in detention centres pending deportation at the most recent date for which figures are available.

National statistics on persons detained solely under Immigration Act powers as at the last Saturday of each quarter are available from the Library of the House and the Home Office's Research, Development and Statistics website at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/immigration1.html

The decision to detain is made on a case by case basis and may be appropriate in one or more of the follow circumstances: to effect removal; to establish a person's identity and claim; where a person presents a risk of abscond or where the application is capable of being considered quickly.

Information specifically on the number of those who are detained for the purpose of removal from the UK is not centrally collated and could be obtained through examination of individual records only at disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she expects to be able to deport Zimbabwean nationals in detention centres pending deportation. (196537)

On 29 November 2007 the Asylum and Immigration Tribunal (AIT) promulgated the determination that Zimbabweans who have claimed asylum in the United Kingdom (UK) and who return to Zimbabwe, voluntarily or otherwise, are not at risk of mistreatment just because they have claimed asylum in the UK or otherwise been in the UK for an extended period. The Border and Immigration Agency will continue to defer enforced returns until the application for permission to appeal the AIT's determination is disposed of.

Domestic Violence: Ethnic Groups

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she plans to publish the step-by-step guide for women in black and minority ethnic communities who are victims of domestic violence. (196765)

[holding answer 25 March 2008]: The step-by-step guide for women in black and minority ethnic (BME) communities who are victims of domestic violence, which will provide practical advice on steps which victims can take to protect themselves and their children, will be published in spring this year and made accessible to local agencies and community groups.

We recognise that more work needs to be done, and are currently developing a national BME Working Group of Government, statutory agencies and the third sector which will promote a partnership approach to issues such as domestic and sexual violence, forced marriage, so called ‘honour’ crimes and female genital mutilation. The group will identify and develop actions and practical tools to assist victims and potential victims.

Drinking Water

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much her Department spent on bottled water in the latest year for which figures are available. (189807)

There are no central records of spend on bottled water held by the Home Department. However our facilities supplier estimates that the cost of bottled water included in official hospitality supplied by them at the Home Office HQ in 2 Marsham Street was £16,125 during 2006-07.

Genetics: Databases

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether people who voluntarily present themselves at police stations routinely have their details added to the national DNA database. (192073)

[holding answer 6 March 2008]: The police may, as part of their investigation of a crime, ask a participant in an intelligence-led screen, a victim, a witness, or some other person who has had legitimate access to a crime scene, to give a DNA sample voluntarily so that their DNA profile can be eliminated from those profiles found at the crime scene. Whether a person presenting themselves voluntarily at a police station is asked for a volunteer DNA sample will depend on the circumstances of the case.

Identity Cards

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the findings of the Crosby Review of identity assurance in respect of the Government’s identity card proposals; and what further consideration she has given to the Government’s policy on identity cards in the light of the Review. (193699)

[holding answer 13 March 2008]: On 6 March I published the National Identity Scheme Delivery Plan 2008. This reflects the priorities I have set out—national security, public protection; convenience for the individual and cost-effectiveness.

In developing this plan the Government have benefited greatly from Sir James Crosby’s review.

Sir James Crosby strongly supports a universal identity scheme, including a role for identity cards, and makes a strong case for speedy and consumer-led introduction. He also argues that wherever possible the Government should use the market to deliver aspects of the scheme and this is reflected in our delivery plan.

Government will need to retain control of the overall quality and security of the scheme, as well as the ultimate decision on whether or not to issue an official identity document to any given individual.

But the private sector will be better placed to provide services relating to enrolment, such as fingerprint biometrics and digitized photographs, and the distribution of completed identity documents.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department with reference to Table 4 in the Identity Cards Scheme Cost report published in November 2007, (1) if she will provide a break down, by main budget heading of the costs which make up the £2,964 million in spending common to passports and ID cards; (182358)

(2) if she will provide a breakdown by main budget heading of the costs which make up the £1,005 million in spending specific to identity cards;

(3) if she will provide a breakdown by main budget headings of the costs which make up the £1,461 million in spending specific to passports.

Providing a further breakdown of common, passport specific and identity card specific cost estimates set out in the Cost Report is commercially sensitive information.

The Identity and Passport Service is currently engaging in discussions with suppliers for the procurement of services required to operate the National Identity Scheme. Many of these services are aligned to the same level of cost information that would need to be provided to answer these questions.

Illegal Immigrants: Compensation

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many claims for compensation were made by illegal immigrants held in immigration removal centres in England and Wales in each year between 2000 and 2007; and how much compensation was paid. (195545)

The information requested is not collected centrally and could be obtained through examination of individual records only at disproportionate cost.

Immigration

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many asylum seekers were recorded as having made a claim for asylum to a police constable in each of the last five years, broken down by police area. (196675)

The information requested is not collated centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what her latest estimate is of the number of failed asylum seekers who are resident in the UK. (196698)

No Government have ever been able to produce an accurate figure for the number of people who are in the country illegally and this includes failed asylum seekers. By its very nature it is impossible to quantify accurately and that remains the case.

Exit controls were phased out from 1994. As part of the Government’s 10-point plan for delivery, by Christmas 2008 the majority of foreign nationals will be counted in and out of the country. This will build on the successes of our early testing of the e-Borders programme (Project Semaphore) which already covers over 30 million passenger movements and has led to 18,000 alerts and more than 1,500 arrests.

This is part of a sweeping programme of border protection which also includes the global roll-out of fingerprint visas, compulsory watch-list checks for all travellers from high-risk countries before they land in Britain and ID cards for foreign nationals.

Immigration Controls: Working Holidays

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the number of people holding working holiday visas who wish to continue their current employment under the proposed points-based system. (196676)

Details on the number of working holiday makers granted leave to enter the UK are published annually within the Control of Immigration statistics. No record is kept of the employment of WHM during their stay nor their future employment intentions. Copies of the Immigration statistics are in the Library of both houses and can also be found at:

www.official-documents.gov.uk/document/cm71/7197/7197.pdf

Any person wishing to transfer from the Working Holiday Scheme into the Points Based System will be expected to return home to make their application.

Immigration: Biometrics

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) when foreign nationals issued with biometric immigration documents will have their details entered on to the National Identity Register; (182354)

(2) whether foreign nationals already in possession of a biometric visa will be required to apply for an identity card.

The Border and Immigration Agency will begin issuing identity cards in the form of biometric immigration documents to foreign nationals subject to immigration control later this year and this could include foreign nationals who already have had fingerprints recorded for the issue of a visa.

Foreign nationals details will not be recorded on the National Identity Register until biometric immigration documents are designated under the ID Cards Act 2006. This will take place when the National Identity Register is established.

Immigration: Children

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the number of children under 16 years of age who have been brought to the UK by parents on a visitor’s visa from (a) Pakistan and (b) elsewhere and left with relatives settled in the UK while the parents returned home since 1978; and if she will make a statement. (196225)

Immigration: Gurkhas

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether Ministers in her Department have had meetings with (a) Gurkha and (b) other ex-servicemen’s organisations on the immigration status of Gurkhas and their right to apply for British citizenship. (197020)

There have been no recent meetings between Home Office Ministers and Gurkha and other ex-servicemen’s organisations on the immigration status of Gurkhas and their right to apply for British citizenship.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many Gurkhas who served in the Brigade of Gurkhas before 1997 have been granted UK (a) residency and (b) citizenship; (197021)

(2) how many Gurkhas who retired from the Brigade of Gurkhas since 1997 have been granted UK (a) residency and (b) citizenship; and what percentage of eligible persons this represents.

I refer the hon. Member to my right hon. Friend’s reply of 18 March 2008, Official Report, columns 935-36W.

Immigration: Housing

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 17 March 2008, Official Report, column 806W, on immigration: housing, how many individual agreements have been reached with local authorities; what the cost of such agreements has been; how many schemes to prevent homelessness have been included in the reimbursement package; what the cost of such schemes has been; how many units of social housing have been occupied by households moving from asylum support as a result of the legacy exercise, broken down by housing sector; and what estimate she has made of the cost to the public purse of the measures outlined in the answer. (196267)

[holding answer 25 March 2008]: In recent months the Border and Immigration Agency has worked with the Local Government Association, Council of Scottish Local Authorities and Welsh Local Government Association, as well as individually with relevant local authorities to agree an approach to the family cases we have recently prioritised who have been allowed to remain in the UK.

The agreements themselves do not hold a particular cost. A 'transitional costs fund' has been made available where unavoidable, additional expenses have occurred. Local authorities need to submit claims to this fund. Claims will then be assessed on an individual basis and local authorities will be reimbursed appropriately. As yet, this work is not complete.

Ipsos MORI

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what payments (a) her Department and (b) its agencies have made to Ipsos MORI in the last 24 months; and for what purposes. (193962)

Information on the Home Department and its agencies payments to Ipsos Mori in the last 24 months is as follows:

Department/Agency

Total payment in last 24 months (£)

Home Department

1,453,199

Identity and Passport Service (IPS)

13,659

Criminal Records Bureau (CRB)

110,000

Ipsos MORI has provided a wide variety of services to the Home Department in the last 24 months. They include Quarterly Opinion Polling on Crime and Immigration, Telephone Survey, facilitation of Young Witness Workshop, Local Victim and Witness Satisfaction Survey, Survey with Focus Group on Home Office Priorities, Arrestee Survey Review, EEA Nationals Survey and Multivariate Analysis of British Crime Survey (BCS) dataset.

The Identity and Passport Service (IPS) used Ipsos MORI for the 2006 staff survey and subsequent report.

Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) used Ipsos MORI for both staff surveys and customer surveys.

Last Resort Fund

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what funding was allocated to the Last Resort Fund to assist women who have experienced domestic violence in 2007-08; and how much is to be allocated in 2008-09. (196724)

[holding answer 25 March 2008]: As a short-term remedy for victims of domestic violence who have no recourse to public funds, the Government made special provision over 2004-05 and 2005-06, with grants of £145,000 to Women's Aid to bolster their 'Last Resort Fund'.

However, the Government want to see sustainable local solutions for those in need and, in February 2006, circulated a letter to local authorities alerting them to the key issues experienced by these women and how they can be helped.

Soon we will be announcing details of a new scheme where victims of domestic violence who have no recourse to public funds may be able to have their housing and living costs met. This will be linked to indefinite leave to remain criteria.

Local Government Services: South West

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what the terms of the agreement between Southwest One and Avon and Somerset police are; and if she will make a statement; (194157)

(2) what discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government on the outsourcing of local services in the South West to a joint venture partnership; and if she will make a statement.

There has been no discussion between my right hon. Friends, the Home Secretary and the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government on the outsourcing of local services in the south west. The terms of any agreement between Avon and Somerset police authority and Southwest One are a matter for the authority.

It is important that police forces and authorities identify and implement ways to increase value for money. To assist them in this, we have recently agreed with the Association of Police Authorities and the Association of Chief Police Officers a new efficiency and productivity strategy for the police service. In pursuit of this strategy it is appropriate for forces and authorities to seek ways to improve the delivery of corporate service functions. This may include implementing internal improvements, exploring outsourcing, or collaborating with other forces and authorities, or with other organisations.

Migrant Workers: EC Enlargement

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what estimate she has made of the number of self-employed workers from (a) Romania and (b) Bulgaria who arrived in Britain in 2007; (191194)

(2) how many seasonal agricultural workers' cards were issued to workers from (a) Romania and (b) Bulgaria in 2007;

(3) how many workers from (a) Romania and (b) Bulgaria were issued with a registration certificate in 2007.

The Government publish quarterly figures on applications under the Accession (Immigration and Worker Authorisation) Regulations 2006 from Bulgarian and Romanian nationals. The publications provide a breakdown of the various schemes operating under the regulations.

The most recent publications, relating to the last quarter of 2007, were published on 26 February 2008. Each of the quarterly reports from 2007 are available on the Border and Immigration website:

http://www.bia.homeoffice.gov.uk/aboutus/reports/

Copies are available in the House Library.

Drinking Water

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many litres of bottled water were purchased by her Department in each of the last three years; and if she will make a statement. (191257)

There are no central records of what volumes of bottled water are purchased by the Home Department. However our 2 Marsham Street HQ building purchased 7,500 litres during the 2006-07 financial year.

Offensive Weapons

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) warnings, (b) cautions and (c) charges have been brought against persons for possession of knives in each of the last 10 years. (194275)

The number of persons given a final warning, caution, or 'proceeded against' at magistrates courts for offences involving the possession of knives in England and Wales for the years 1997 to 2006 is shown in the following table. Court proceedings data for 2007 will not be available until the autumn of 2008. Charging data is not held centrally, so information on the number of individuals proceeded against has been provided in lieu of charging data.

Number of persons given a final warning, caution, and proceeded against at magistrates courts for offences involving the possession of knives in England and Wales for the years 1997 to 20061, 2, 3

Final warning

Caution

Proceeded against

19974

n/a

1,629

4,888

19984

n/a

1,976

4,566

1999

28

1,618

4,566

20005

375

1,222

4,625

2001

519

883

5,823

2002

453

1,131

6,963

2003

433

1,070

6,928

2004

578

1,441

7,352

2005

736

2,094

7,319

2006

777

2,300

7,699

n/a = not applicable. 1 These data are on the principal offence basis. 2 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts, other agencies, and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. 3 Data include the following statutes and corresponding offence descriptions: Criminal Justice Act 1988 s.139(1) and (6): Have blade/article which was sharply pointed in public place. Criminal Justice Act 1988 s.139A(1): Having an article with a blade or point on school premises. 4 The scheme of reprimands and warnings under the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 was piloted for 18 months from 30 September 1998 in a few selected areas. The scheme was rolled out nationally and replaced police cautions for juveniles from June 2000. Data for juvenile reprimands and final warnings are included in the ‘total cautioned’ figures presented in the table. 5 Staffordshire police force were able to submit sample data only for persons proceeded against and convicted in the magistrates courts for the year 2000. These data are therefore excluded from the table. Source: Court proceedings data held by RDS—Office for Criminal Justice Reform—Ministry of Justice. Our ref: IOS 165-08 (Table) [Contribution for PQ 194275].

Police

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what definition is used of (a) operational and (b) policy issues in relation to the police service and its accountability to local communities, with reference to Sir Ron Flanagan's review of policing. (174225)

Day to day operational policing issues in forces are the responsibility of each Chief Constable, who is in turn responsible to that force's police authority for their conduct. The Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO), which represents Chief Officers, has defined best practice in areas such as recruitment practices and the conduct of certain kinds of operations. Policy on policing more generally is decided by the tripartite—the Home Secretary, Chief Officers and Police Authorities—in consultation. The final report of Sir Ronnie Flanagan's independent Review of Policing in England and Wales reinforced the importance of this distinction.

Police: Complaints

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proportion of complaints against the police were (a) upheld, (b) dismissed and (c) dropped by the complainant in each year since 1997. (195699)

The responsibility for the collation and publication of complaints against the police rests with the Independent Police Complaints Commission.

Police: Crime Prevention

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department which (a) police forces and (b) other agencies will receive the portable knife arches and search wands referred to in her Department's Action Plan for Tackling Violence 2008-11. (194276)

Search arches and wands are currently being supplied to the police in the Tackling Gangs Action Programme areas (London, Manchester, Birmingham and Liverpool) to supplement existing provision. We have committed to provide further search equipment to police and delivery partners across England and Wales over the next three years and arrangements for this are currently being finalised.

Police: Discipline

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what progress she has made in implementing the Taylor review on police force discipline; and if she will make a statement. (195686)

Much progress has been made and the new arrangements were recently approved by the Police Advisory Board for England and Wales. The new arrangements are designed to modernise the procedures for dealing with issues of misconduct and unsatisfactory performance in a proportionate and timely manner. The procedures are based on the ACAS principles for good employment practice. Provisions to enable the introduction of the new misconduct and unsatisfactory performance arrangements for all police officers in England and Wales are included in the Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill currently before Parliament. Once the Bill receives Royal Assent, the new Police (Conduct) Regulations 2008 and Police (Performance) Regulations 2008 that set out the detailed arrangements will be laid before Parliament to enable implementation of the new arrangements. Work is at an advanced stage with the National Police Improvement Agency to provide training to support the new arrangements.

Police: Pensions

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent discussions she has had on the reform of police pensions; and if she will make a statement. (195688)

Police pensions policy is kept under regular review, and has only recently been subject to major changes. We have introduced the New Police Pension Scheme which applies to new entrants joining on or after 6 April 2006. We have also reformed the way police pensions are financed by introducing on 1 April 2006 a system based on employer contributions which takes away from police authorities the financial burden of meeting the cost of pensions in payment. There have been no specific discussions regarding reform beyond these developments.

Police: Vacancies

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police officer vacancies of all ranks there were within (a) the Metropolitan Police Force and (b) other constabularies in each year since 1997. (195618)

This information has not been collected since 1995 following the introduction of the Police and Magistrates Courts Act 1994 which abolished Home Office authorised establishments. It is a matter for the police authority and Chief Officer of Police to determine the number of police officers that each force has.

Racial Hatred: Internet

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prosecutions have been brought under section 21 of the Public Order Act 1986 for using the internet to distribute or play threatening, abusive or insulting images for the purposes of inciting racial hatred in each of the last five years. (195544)

The Government take the view that the courts should prosecute the offence, and not the medium through which it is committed. Therefore no separate statistics are kept for offences committed over the internet. Since the Public Order Act 1986 was introduced, there have been a total of 86 prosecutions under the offence of racial hatred, resulting in 60 convictions.

Rape: Prosecutions

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what mechanisms the Rape Performance Group will use to monitor local performance in relation to rape prosecutions. (194278)

The Rape Performance Group uses a range of indicators spanning the criminal justice process. These are:

The rate of recorded rape offences per 1,000 of the population (a low rate of offences per 1,000 in a force may indicate a low level of reporting);

The proportion of offences that are categorised as ‘no crime’;

The proportion of recorded offences that result in a sanction detection;

The proportion of charged cases that are subsequently discontinued by the CPS; and

The proportion of cases going to trial that result in a conviction.

Its focus is on the system as a whole, with an assumption of shared police and CPS responsibility for the delivery of outcomes. Where the data suggests that the performance of a particular area differs significantly from the national and peer-group averages, the Rape Performance Group will raise this with the relevant chief constable and chief Crown prosecutor to seek further information on the approach to the investigation and prosecution of rape in that area and to offer support, where appropriate, in addressing any performance issues. These performance monitoring arrangements are complemented by the support functions of the joint ACPO/Home Office operational support team and CPS Rape Prosecutions Delivery Unit.

Serious Crime Prevention Orders

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she plans to bring serious crime prevention orders into effect. (196839)

The Serious Crime Act 2007 (Commencement No. 2 and Transitional and Transitory Provisions and Savings) Order 2008, which was made on 17 March, will bring the serious crime prevention order provisions of the Act into force on 6 April 2008.

Sexual Offences

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many registered sex offenders there were in each police authority area in each year since 2004; and how many offenders were (a) cautioned and (b) charged for failing to comply with the notification requirements of the Sexual Offenders Act 2003 in that period. (195016)

Table 1 gives the number of registered sex offenders in each police authority area for every year since 2003-04.

The Government do not routinely collect data on the number of sex offenders cautioned for failing to comply with their notification requirements. However, the Government do collect data on the number of sex offenders who were:

charged with a serious further offence;

found in breach of their licence conditions; and

found in breach of a Sexual Offence Prevention Order.

Tables 2 to 4 give these figures (in relation to sexual offenders managed at MAPPA levels 2 and 3) for each of the aforementioned categories, by area, for every year since 2003-04.

Table 1: Registered sex offenders by area

Area

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

Avon and Somerset

671

674

787

809

Bedfordshire

270

335

394

323

Cambridgeshire

322

353

387

407

Cheshire

429

474

537

577

County Durham

265

306

327

348

Cumbria

231

253

260

280

Derbyshire

479

554

628

609

Devon and Cornwall

725

808

879

920

Dorset

333

352

379

415

Dyfed-Powys

232

275

308

299

Essex

542

680

802

735

Gloucestershire

231

284

311

311

Gwent

319

365

391

406

Hampshire

999

1,035

1,118

1,190

Hertfordshire

280

328

428

400

Humberside

584

645

715

653

Kent

780

954

941

983

Lancashire

726

980

941

998

Leicestershire

484

508

543

534

Lincolnshire

328

380

401

414

London

2,272

2,657

3,113

3,151

Greater Manchester

1,388

1,800

1,643

1,722

Merseyside

791

941

970

975

Norfolk

484

547

637

546

North Wales

308

389

395

405

North Yorkshire

283

315

338

359

Northamptonshire

246

310

344

355

Northumbria

750

851

898

870

Nottinghamshire

651

708

712

747

South Wales

606

765

680

695

South Yorkshire

682

911

791

830

Staffordshire

458

538

627

676

Suffolk

309

368

393

413

Surrey

371

371

390

426

Sussex

581

752

804

789

Teesside

339

393

354

357

Thames Valley

763

822

936

982

Warwickshire

183

231

232

259

West Mercia

565

689

635

655

West Midlands

1,647

2,158

1,925

1,850

West Yorkshire

1,431

1,669

1,373

1,387

Wiltshire

234

266

316

356

Total

24,572

28,994

29,983

30,416

Table 2: Sex offenders charged with a serious further offence (SFO)

Area

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

Avon and Somerset

0

0

0

0

Bedfordshire

0

0

0

1

Cambridgeshire

0

0

0

0

Cheshire

0

0

0

0

County Durham

0

0

0

0

Cumbria

2

0

0

0

Derbyshire

2

3

2

0

Devon and Cornwall

1

0

0

1

Dorset

0

1

1

1

Dyfed-Powys

1

0

0

0

Essex

0

0

0

1

Gloucestershire

0

0

0

0

Gwent

0

0

0

0

Hampshire

0

0

1

0

Hertfordshire

3

4

0

0

Humberside

0

0

0

0

Kent

1

1

0

3

Lancashire

1

0

0

0

Leicestershire

1

0

0

0

Lincolnshire

0

0

0

0

London

0

0

0

0

Greater Manchester

2

6

2

0

Merseyside

2

1

0

1

Norfolk

0

0

0

0

North Wales

0

0

1

0

North Yorkshire

0

0

0

1

Northamptonshire

0

0

0

0

Northumbria

0

1

0

0

Nottinghamshire

0

0

2

0

South Wales

1

2

1

2

South Yorkshire

1

4

0

1

Staffordshire

0

0

0

0

Suffolk

0

0

0

0

Surrey

1

0

0

0

Sussex

0

4

0

0

Teesside

2

0

1

0

Thames Valley

0

0

0

0

Warwickshire

0

0

0

0

West Mercia

2

4

0

0

West Midlands

2

1

1

0

West Yorkshire

1

0

0

1

Wiltshire

0

0

0

0

Total

26

32

12

13

Table 3: Sex offenders found in breach of licence by area

Area

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

Avon and Somerset

1

0

3

4

Bedfordshire

1

3

6

4

Cambridgeshire

1

1

0

1

Cheshire

6

5

5

2

County Durham

1

2

2

0

Cumbria

5

0

1

1

Derbyshire

5

4

4

7

Devon and Cornwall

9

11

7

5

Dorset

2

4

1

6

Dyfed-Powys

3

1

4

4

Essex

2

2

2

5

Gloucestershire

2

4

2

1

Gwent

6

0

2

5

Hampshire

2

8

6

7

Hertfordshire

0

2

1

2

Humberside

0

2

10

3

Kent

9

6

11

7

Lancashire

5

2

6

3

Leicestershire

5

10

14

7

Lincolnshire

5

6

5

8

London

4

8

2

4

Greater Manchester

30

38

26

34

Merseyside

6

11

7

12

Norfolk

14

1

3

5

North Wales

2

5

6

4

North Yorkshire

3

2

4

4

Northamptonshire

7

6

6

0

Northumbria

7

7

13

14

Nottinghamshire

2

3

5

2

South Wales

0

11

12

8

South Yorkshire

12

16

1

6

Staffordshire

2

4

2

9

Suffolk

3

1

2

2

Surrey

3

0

0

0

Sussex

16

8

6

9

Teesside

4

2

2

3

Thames Valley

9

6

5

2

Warwickshire

1

1

4

1

West Mercia

8

3

7

8

West Midlands

32

12

6

7

West Yorkshire

33

3

14

2

Wiltshire

1

1

1

0

Total

269

222

226

218

Table 4: Sex offenders found in breach of SOPO by area

Area

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

Avon and Somerset

1

0

0

0

Bedfordshire

0

0

0

0

Cambridgeshire

0

0

0

0

Cheshire

0

0

0

0

County Durham

0

0

0

0

Cumbria

0

0

0

0

Derbyshire

0

0

1

0

Devon and Cornwall

0

2

1

1

Dorset

1

0

0

0

Dyfed-Powys

1

0

1

0

Essex

0

0

0

0

Gloucestershire

0

0

1

0

Gwent

0

0

0

0

Hampshire

1

0

3

1

Hertfordshire

0

0

0

0

Humberside

0

0

0

0

Kent

0

2

1

1

Lancashire

4

0

1

1

Leicestershire

0

0

0

1

Lincolnshire

0

0

0

1

London

0

1

0

0

Greater Manchester

1

1

8

0

Merseyside

1

0

0

0

Norfolk

1

0

0

0

North Wales

0

0

0

0

North Yorkshire

2

1

1

0

Northamptonshire

0

0

0

0

Northumbria

0

2

0

2

Nottinghamshire

4

2

1

1

South Wales

0

0

0

3

South Yorkshire

0

0

1

2

Staffordshire

0

0

1

0

Suffolk

0

0

0

0

Surrey

0

0

0

0

Sussex

0

0

0

0

Teesside

0

0

0

0

Thames Valley

2

1

0

0

Warwickshire

0

0

0

1

West Mercia

0

1

0

0

West Midlands

5

1

0

2

West Yorkshire

1

1

0

0

Wiltshire

1

0

0

0

Total

26

15

21

17

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many registered sex offenders in each police authority area (a) failed to comply with the notification requirements of the Sexual Offences Act 2003 and (b) were found not to be residing at their registered address in each year since 2004. (195019)

Data on the number of offenders convicted of a failure to comply with the notification requirements is not collated by police force area. Data on the number of offenders not residing at their permanent address is not collated centrally.

Figures by area for breaches of licence requirements, sexual offence prevention orders (SOPOs) and for those charged with a serious further offence (SFO) are provided in the following tables in relation to sexual offenders managed at MAPPA levels 2 and 3.

Sex offenders found in breach of SOPO by area

Area

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

Avon and Somerset

0

0

0

Bedfordshire

0

0

0

Cambridgeshire

0

0

0

Cheshire

0

0

0

County Durham

0

0

0

Cumbria

0

0

0

Derbyshire

0

1

0

Devon and Cornwall

2

1

1

Dorset

0

0

0

Dyfed-Powys

0

1

0

Essex

0

0

0

Gloucestershire

0

1

0

Gwent

0

0

0

Hampshire

0

3

1

Hertfordshire

0

0

0

Humberside

0

0

0

Kent

2

1

1

Lancashire

0

1

1

Leicestershire

0

0

1

Lincolnshire

0

0

1

London

1

0

0

Greater Manchester

1

8

0

Merseyside

0

0

0

Norfolk

0

0

0

North Wales

0

0

0

North Yorkshire

1

1

0

Northamptonshire

0

0

0

Northumbria

2

0

2

Nottinghamshire

2

1

1

South Wales

0

0

3

South Yorkshire

0

1

2

Staffordshire

0

1

0

Suffolk

0

0

0

Surrey

0

0

0

Sussex

0

0

0

Teesside

0

0

0

Thames Valley

1

0

0

Warwickshire

0

0

1

West Mercia

1

0

0

West Midlands

1

0

2

West Yorkshire

1

0

0

Wiltshire

0

0

0

Total

15

21

17

Sex offenders found in breach of licence by area

Area

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

Avon and Somerset

0

3

4

Bedfordshire

3

6

4

Cambridgeshire

1

0

1

Cheshire

5

5

2

County Durham

2

2

0

Cumbria

0

1

1

Derbyshire

4

4

7

Devon and Cornwall

11

7

5

Dorset

4

1

6

Dyfed-Powys

1

4

4

Essex

2

2

5

Gloucestershire

4

2

1

Gwent

0

2

5

Hampshire

8

6

7

Hertfordshire

2

1

2

Humberside

2

10

3

Kent

6

11

7

Lancashire

2

6

3

Leicestershire

10

14

7

Lincolnshire

6

5

8

London

8

2

4

Greater Manchester

38

26

34

Merseyside

11

7

12

Norfolk

1

3

5

North Wales

5

6

4

North Yorkshire

2

4

4

Northamptonshire

6

6

0

Northumbria

7

13

14

Nottinghamshire

3

5

2

South Wales

11

12

8

South Yorkshire

16

1

6

Staffordshire

.4

2

9

Suffolk

1

2

2

Surrey

0

0

0

Sussex

8

6

9

Teesside

2

2

3

Thames Valley

6

5

2

Warwickshire

1

4

1

West Mercia

3

7

8

West Midlands

12

6

7

West Yorkshire

3

14

2

Wiltshire

1

1

0

Total

222

226

218

Sex offenders charged with a serious further offence (SFO)

Area

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

Avon and Somerset

0

0

0

Bedfordshire

0

0

1

Cambridgeshire

0

0

0

Cheshire

0

0

0

County Durham

0

0

0

Cumbria

0

0

0

Derbyshire

3

2

0

Devon and Cornwall

0

0

1

Dorset

1

1

1

Dyfed-Powys

0

0

0

Essex

0

0

1

Gloucestershire

0

0

0

Gwent

0

0

0

Hampshire

0

1

0

Hertfordshire

4

0

0

Humberside

0

0

0

Kent

1

0

3

Lancashire

0

0

0

Leicestershire

0

0

0

Lincolnshire

0

0

0

London

0

0

0

Greater Manchester

6

2

0

Merseyside

1

0

1

Norfolk

0

0

0

North Wales

0

1

0

North Yorkshire

0

0

1

Northamptonshire

0

0

0

Northumbria

1

0

0

Nottinghamshire

0

2

0

South Wales

2

1

2

South Yorkshire

4

0

1

Staffordshire

0

0

0

Suffolk

0

0

0

Surrey

0

0

0

Sussex

4

0

0

Teesside

0

1

0

Thames Valley

0

0

0

Warwickshire

0

0

0

West Mercia

4

0

0

West Midlands

1

1

0

West Yorkshire

0

0

1

Wiltshire

0

0

0

Total

32

12

13

Statistics

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proportion of written answers by her Department were later found to contain erroneous statistics in the latest period for which figures are available. (163171)

Records from the start of the current Parliamentary Session show that three parliamentary questions answered by the Department contained erroneous errors in respect of statistics which have since been corrected in the Official Report. This represents 0.1 per cent. of the 2,892 parliamentary questions tabled to the Department as of 17 March 2008.

Written Questions: Government Responses

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she will answer question 182622 on the national DNA database, tabled on 24 January 2008 by the hon. Member for Cardiff, Central; and if she will make a statement. (192955)

Treasury

Alcoholic Drinks: Prices

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what assessment he has made of the demand elasticity with respect to the price of (a) wine, (b) spirits, (c) strong beer, lager and cider, (d) normal strength beer, lager and cider, (e) fortified wine and (f) alcopops as defined by the Office for National Statistics; and if he will make a statement. (197608)

Demand elasticities with respect to the price of alcoholic beverages are based on research published in a Government Economic Service (GES) Working Paper (no. 140) in May 2003, available at:

http://www.customs.hmrc.gov.uk/channelsPortalWebApp/downloadFile?contentID=HMCE_PROD_008459

Bank of England: Banking Supervision

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will re-instate to the Bank of England responsibility for banking supervision. (196518)

[holding answer 25 March 2008]: The Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 established the Financial Services Authority as the UK's sole financial regulator and supervisor. The Act introduced a risk-based regulatory regime based on statutory independence, transparency, proportionality and rigorous assessment of cost and benefits, replacing the fragmented, overlapping and burdensome self-regulatory system that had previously governed the financial services sector.

The Tripartite authorities are, in the light of recent instability in financial markets, consulting on reforms to banking supervision and depositor protection. However, the Government and other authorities remain firmly committed to the existing regulatory framework.

Bowel Cancer: Death

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what the survival rate for persons diagnosed with bowel cancer is; and what information he holds on survival rates in (a) Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries, (b) EU member states and (c) other countries. (197632)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 31 March 2008:

As National Statistician I have been asked to reply to your recent parliamentary question asking what the survival rate for persons diagnosed with bowel cancer is; and what information he holds on survival rates in (a) Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries, (b) EU member states arid (c) other countries. [197632]

'Bowel cancer' usually refers to the large bowel (colon and rectum) rather than the small bowel (small intestine). Bowel cancer survival is usually reported separately for the colon and rectum.

The latest available survival figures for 21 common cancers among adult patients in England diagnosed during 1999-2003 and followed up to the end of 2004 are available on the National Statistics website at:

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/StatBase/Product.asp?vlnk=14007&Pos=1&ColRank=1 &Rank=192

One and five-year survival for colon and rectum cancer for England is tabulated in the following table.

One and five-year agestandardised1 relative survival (percentage) for adult patients2 diagnosed with colon and rectum cancer during 1999-2003 (England), by sex

Cancer3

Patients diagnosed during; 1999-2003, England

One-year relative survival (percentage)

Five-year relative survival (percentage)

Colon

Men

69

50

Women

69

51

Rectum

Men

76

52

Women

77

55

1 As cancer survival varies with age at diagnosis, the relative survival figures for all ages (15-99) have been age-standardised to control for changes in the age profile of cancer patients over time, thus making them comparable with previously published figures. 2 Aged 15-99 years. 3 Cancers registered in 1999-2003 are defined by codes in the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). Colon cancer is defined by code C18 and rectum cancer by codes C19 - C21. Source: Office for National Statistics.

Information on five-year survival for colorectal cancer in (a) Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries is published in COECD Health Data 2007: Statistics and Indicators for 30 Countries' and available online at:

http://www.caliban.sourceoecd.org/vl=3345605/cl=36/nw=1/rpsv/health2007/6-3.htm

Information on cancer survival in (b) 17 EU member states (including the UK) and three other European countries is provided by the EUROCARE-4 study. The published data cover each of the four constituent countries of the UK. The most recently published results from this study provide information on survival up to five years after diagnosis for patients diagnosed with cancer during 1995-99 and followed up to the end of 2003. These results were published in:

Berrino F, De Angelis R, Sant M, Rosso S, Lasota M B, Coebergh J W and Santaquilani M. Survival for eight major cancers and all cancers combined for European adults diagnosed in 1995-99: results of the EUROCARE-4 study. Lancet Oncology 2007; 8: 773-783.

In addition, period analyses to predict cancer survival up to 10 years for patients diagnosed as recently as 2002 were published in:

Verdecchi A, Francisci S, Brenner H7 Gatta G, Micheli A, Mangone L, Kunkler I. Recent cancer survival in Europe: a 2000-02 period, analysis of EUROCARE-4 data. Lancet Oncology 2007; 8: 784-796.

Information on survival for cancer in (c) other countries is currently being produced by the CONCORD project. This will compare survival among over two million patients diagnosed with cancer of the breast, bowel or prostate during 1990-94 and followed up to 1999 in 31 countries OB five continents. Results from the CONCORD project will be published later in 2008.

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer how many people died from bowel cancer in each year since 1997. (197635)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 31 March 2008:

As National Statistician I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking how many-people died from bowel cancer in each year since 1997. (197635)

The numbers of deaths where bowel cancer was the underlying cause in England and Wales from 1997 to 2006, the latest year for which data are available, are included in the following table.

Deaths from bowel cancer1 England and Wales, 1997-20062

Number of deaths

1997

15,226

1998

14,980

1999

14,564

2000

14,230

2001

14,163

2002

14,289

2003

14,087

2004

14,163

2005

14,115

2006

14.022

1 Underlying cause of death selected using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes 153-154 for the years 1997 to 2000, and Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes C18-G21 for the years 2001 to 2006. The introduction of ICD-10 for coding cause of death in 2001 means that figures are not comparable with data for years before this date. Comparisons between the data before and after 2001 should therefore be interpreted with caution. An article examining the effects of the change in classification for cancer trends was published in Health Statistics Quarterly 23.* This estimated that the introduction of ICD-10 resulted in an increase in bowel cancer deaths of 1.5 per cent. when compared to ICD-9. *Brock A, Griffiths C, Rooney G (2004) The effect of the introduction of ICD-10 on cancer mortality trends in England and Wales. Health Statistics Quarterly 23, 7-17. 2 Deaths registered in each calendar year.

Civil Servants: Location

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether the proposed relocation of civil servants as recommended by the Gershon review is progressing according to plan; and if he will make a statement. (197384)

As reported by the Chancellor on 12 March, 15,710 civil service posts have been relocated so far against the Government's commitment to relocate 20,000 posts by end March 2010. This represents strong progress by Departments and demonstrates that the initiative is being delivered according to plan.

Construction: Recruitment

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) how many people were recruited into the construction industry in each year since 1997; (197444)

(2) how many people were employed in the construction industry in each year since 1997.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician, who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Jil Matheson, dated 31 March 2008:

The National Statistician has been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Questions asking how many people have been recruited into the construction industry in each year since 1997 and how many people were employed in the construction industry in each year since 1997. I am replying in her absence. (197444, 197445).

The definitive source for the number of people employed is normally the Labour Force Survey (LFS). However, the Workforce Jobs Survey is preferred for industry breakdowns of employment and has been used in the attached Table.

While estimates of the number of recruitments are not available explicitly, figures from surveys enable comparisons to be made of net changes in jobs from year to year.

Table 1, attached, provides an estimate of jobs in Construction (Standard Industrial Classification (1992) section F) in the United Kingdom for the month of June for each year from 1997 and the net change on the previous year.

Workforce Job statistics are published as part of the Labour Market Statistics First Release and can be obtained on the National Statistics website at:

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/statbase/product.asp?vlnk=8286

As with any survey, results from the Workforce Jobs Surveys are subject to a margin of uncertainty.

Table 1: Workforce jobs in construction industries1, United Kingdom, seasonally adjusted

Thousand

Level

Net change on previous year

June 1997

1,780

June 1998

1,835

55

June 1999

1,854

19

June 2000

1,900

46

June 2001

1,917

17

June 2002

1,948

31

June 2003

1,997

49

June 2004

2,069

72

June 2005

2,119

50

June 2006

2,165

46

June 2007

2,230

65

1 Standard Industrial Classification (1992) section F

Notes:

1. Workforce Jobs figures are a measure of jobs rather than people. For example, if a person holds two jobs, each job will be counted in the Workforce Jobs total.

2. Workforce Jobs figures come from a variety of sources, and where possible, from the employer rather than the individual. Employee Jobs (which is the largest component of Workforce Jobs) come from quarterly surveys of employers carried out by ONS.

3. Other data sources are as follows:

Self-employment Jobs are provided by the Labour Force Survey.

HM Forces figures are provided by the Ministry of Defence (MOD).

Government-supported trainees are provided from Administrative Sources.

Debts

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what estimate he has made of the average debt (a) excluding and (b) including mortgages of (i) women and (ii) men aged between 22 and 29 years in each income decile. (196641)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician, who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 31 March 2008:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question on what estimate has been made of the average debt (a) excluding and (b) including mortgages of (i) women and (ii) men aged between 22 and 29 years in each income decile. (196641)

Although the UK National Accounts include balance sheet estimates of total financial liabilities of the household and non profit institutions serving households (NPISH) sectors, it is not possible to separate these two sectors. Examples of institutions included within the NPISH sector are: charities; trade unions; universities; churches and political parties.

It is possible to identify loans secured on dwellings by banks, building societies and other types of financial institutions, but it is not possible to break this down by gender, age or income decile.

The estimates in the following table show total debt including and excluding loans on dwellings and averages using total population estimates. The balance sheet estimates are available up to 2007 and are consistent with data published on the 28th March 2008. Population estimates for 2007 are as yet not available so average debt is shown up to 2006.

Year

Total population (thousand)

Total financial liabilities(£ million)

Average financial liabilities (£000)

Loans on dwellings by banks(£ million)

Loans on dwellings by building societies(£ million)

Loans on dwellings by other financial institutions(£ million)

Total financial liabilities less loans on dwellings(£ million)

Average financial liabilities less loans on dwellings (£000)

1987

56,804

270,000

4.75

35,950

131,556

15,305

87,189

1.53

1988

56,916

323,144

5.68

45,335

155,276

22,178

100,355

1.76

1989

57,076

372,302

6.52

79,192

152,558

24,922

115,630

2.03

1990

57,237

418,581

7.31

85,677

176,661

31,071

125,172

2.19

1991

57,439

450,412

7.84

90,372

197,228

32,057

130,755

2.28

1992

57,585

466,498

8.10

96,470

211,351

30,384

128,293

2.23

1993

57,714

482,432

8.36

108,554

219,556

28,380

125,942

2.18

1994

57,862

504,695

8.72

115,929

231,170

27,957

129,639

2.24

1995

58,025

528,927

9.12

139,900

223,237

26,557

139,233

2.40

1996

58,164

550,108

9.46

158,209

223,905

26,195

141,799

2.44

1997

58,314

586,659

10.06

305,687

97,578

26,414

156,980

2.69

1998

58,475

625,134

10.69

320,564

106,331

29,006

169,233

2.89

1999

58,684

675,599

11.51

345,031

113,497

34,326

182,745

3.11

2000

58,886

734,790

12.48

386,334

106,990

41,742

199,724

3.39

2001

59,113

810,665

13.71

418,644

113,413

58,181

220,427

3.73

2002

59,323

923,144

15.56

467,601

123,638

78,151

253,754

4.28

2003

59,557

1,046,913

17.58

511,049

142,312

119,570

273,982

4.60

2004

59,846

1,172,032

19.58

543,063

160,116

172,673

296,180

4.95

2005

60,238

1,249,393

20.74

558,615

167,041

212,670

311,067

5.16

2006

60,587

1,406,464

23.21

586,644

182,367

277,274

360,179

5.94

2007

1,532,445

604,662

194,277

347,860

385,646

Source:

United Kingdom Economic Accounts 2007 quarter 4

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/statbase/Product.asp?vlnk=1904

Departmental Alcoholic Drinks

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer at how many events held by his Department (a) wine and (b) Fairtrade wine were served in the last three years; and what assessment his Department has made of the merits of serving Fairtrade wine at future events. (196948)

HM Treasury have held 147 events from January 2005 to December 2007 at which wine supplied by the PFI provider has been served. No Fair Trade wines were served at any of these events.

Fair Trade wine can be ordered on request by the event organiser. The Treasury encourages the PFI provider to make Fair Trade products available.

Departmental Conflict of Interests

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many officials notified his Department that they intended to work for (a) British Aerospace, (b) British Airways, (c) BP, (d) Shell, (e) Rolls Royce, (f) HSBC, (g) Standard Chartered, (h) RBS (i) HBOS, (j) Barclays and (k) another company on leaving his Department in each of the last five years. (195562)

Information on the future employer of officials is not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Departmental Official Hospitality

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how much was spent by his Department and its agencies on (a) alcohol and (b) entertaining in the last 12 months. (187954)

The Treasury and its agencies do not separately record amounts spent on alcohol within official entertainment or hospitality spending and the information could be provided only at disproportionate cost. The amounts spent on official entertainment and hospitality in 2006-07 were as follows: HM Treasury (inc. OGC) £193,000; DMO £4,000; ONS £208,000; VOA £48,000; Royal Mint £323,000; GAD £4,000; NS and I £424,000; and OGCbuying.solutions £34,000. All spending on official entertainment is made in accordance with published departmental guidance on financial procedures and propriety, based on principles set out in “Managing Public Money”.

Departmental Official Visits

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what the cost was of overnight accommodation for (a) civil servants, (b) special advisers and (c) Ministers in his Department staying overnight in (i) mainland Great Britain, (ii) Northern Ireland, (iii) the Republic of Ireland and (iv) other countries in the last 12 months. (193538)

The latest audited data available on overnight accommodation was set out in the answer I gave the hon. Member on 11 July 2007, Official Report, columns 1485-86W.

Since 1999, the Government have published on an annual basis a list of all overseas visits by Cabinet Ministers costing in excess of £500, as well as the total cost of all ministerial travel overseas. Copies of the lists are available in the Libraries of the House. All travel is undertaken in accordance with the “Civil Service Management Code” and the “Ministerial Code”.

Departmental Pay

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what the hourly rates of pay of all non-permanent staff working for his Department and its agencies were in each of the last 12 months; and how many staff were receiving each rate in each of those months. (196459)

Data are not held in such a way to allow access to hourly rates of all non-permanent staff. To attempt to gather these data would represent a disproportionate cost.

Departmental Training

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how much was spent on speech coaching and related consultancy for Ministers in his Department in each of the last 24 months. (197473)

Speech coaching is not recorded as a separate category of expenditure within the Treasury's accounting system, so the information on spending, if any, is not held.

Emigration

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many people emigrated from (a) the UK and (b) Merseyside between 2001 and 2007. (196924)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician, who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Jil Matheson, dated 31 March 2008:

The National Statistician has been asked to reply to your question about how many people emigrated from (a) the UK and (b) Merseyside between 2001 and 2007. I am replying in her absence. (196924)

The latest available estimates of Total International Migration (TIM) are for the calendar year 2006. In the six-year period, 2001 to 2006, emigration of UK residents from the UK for at least a year is estimated to have totalled 2,127,000.

TIM estimates are not available on this basis for geographical areas below the level of Government Office Region. However figures on international migration, used to calculate the annual mid-year population estimates, are available for local areas. These cover the period from one mid-year to the next. Between mid-2001 and mid-2006, emigration of UK residents from Merseyside for at least a year is estimated to have totalled 30,000 (compared to 1,768,000 from the UK as whole in this five-year period).

Employment Agencies

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer pursuant to the Answer of 7 February 2008, Official Report, column 1365W, on Employment Agencies, what recruitment agencies his Department has used in each of the last 10 years. (189367)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to him on 18 June 2007, Official Report, column 1496W by the then Financial Secretary my hon. Friend the Member for Wentworth (Mr. Healey).

Employment: Wales

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many people were in employment in Vale of Clwyd constituency in each of the last 11 years. (196176)

[holding answer 25 March 2008]: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Jil Matheson, dated 31 March 2008:

The National Statistician has been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking how many people were in employment in Vale of Clwyd constituency in each of the last 11 years. I am replying in her absence. (196176)

The Office for National Statistics compiles employment statistics for local areas from the Annual Population Survey (APS) and its predecessor the annual Labour Force Survey (LFS) following International Labour Organisation definitions.

Table 1, attached, shows the number of people aged 16 and over, resident in the Vale of Clwyd constituency, who were in employment in each of the last 11 years. Estimates are obtained from the annual LFS for each 12 month period from 1997 to 2004. For time series comparisons, the APS estimates from 2005 to 2007 are provided covering the 12 month periods ending in March, but the most recently released estimate is also included, which covers the 12 month period ending in June 2007.

As these estimates are for a subset of the population in a small geographical area, they are based on small sample sizes, and are therefore subject to large margins of uncertainty.

In order to produce estimates for small geographical areas, APS and annual LFS estimates are provided based on survey microdata. These are consistent with the UK population estimates published in February and March 2003, whereas the regional and national estimates published in the Labour Market Statistics First Release are based on more up-to-date population figures, so the two are not directly comparable.

Table 1: People of 16+ in employment in Vale of Clwyd constituency for the past 11 years

Thousand

12 months ending

In employment

February 19971

23

February 19981

24

February 19991

25

February 20001

27

February 20011

29

February 20021

28

February 20031

27

February 20041

29

March 20052

30

March 20062

31

March 20072

30

June 20072

30

1 Labour Force Survey data. 2 Annual Population Survey data.

Employment: York

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many (a) full and (b) part-time jobs there were in the City of York in each year since 1997. (197132)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Jil Matheson, dated 31 March 2008:

The National Statistician has been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question on how many (a) full and (b) part-time jobs there were in the City of York in each year since 1997.1 am replying in her absence. (197132).

The Office for National Statistics compiles employment statistics for local areas from the Annual Population Survey (APS) and its predecessor the annual Labour Force Survey (LFS) following International Labour Organisation definitions. This is the preferred source for estimates at the detailed level requested. Employment estimates are distinct from the number of jobs, which come from the Annual Business Inquiry.

Table 1 attached provides estimates based on people aged 16 and over, in full and part-time employment, resident in the City of York.

Estimates based on the most recent parliamentary constituency boundaries are only available from 2001. Figures for 2001-2004 are for the twelve months ending February that year. Figures for 2005-2007 are for the twelve months ending March the same year.

As these estimates are for a subset of the population in a small geographical area, they are based on small sample sizes, and are therefore subject to large margins of uncertainty.

In order to produce estimates for small geographical areas, APS and annual LFS estimates are provided based on survey microdata. These are consistent with the UK population estimates published in February and March 2003, whereas the regional and national estimates published in the Labour Market Statistics First Release are based on more up-to-date population figures, so the two are not directly comparable.

Table 1: Full-time1 and part-time2 employment for people aged 16 and over, resident in the City of York3

Thousand

12 months ending

Full-time

Part-time

Total

February 20014

36

15

51

February 20024

36

15

51

February 20034

37

16

54

February 20044

37

16

53

March 20055

35

14

48

March 20065

37

15

52

March 20075

37

16

53

1, 2 Includes those full-time and part-time on New Deal. 3 2005 parliamentary constituency boundary revision. 4 Based on annual Labour Force Survey (LFS). 5 Based on Annual Population Survey (APS). Notes: 1. In order to produce estimates for small geographical areas, APS and annual LFS estimates are provided based on survey microdata. These are consistent with the UK population estimates published in February and March 2003, whereas the regional and national estimates published in the Labour Market Statistics First Release are based on more up-to-date population figures, so the two are not directly comparable. 2. As these estimates are for a subset of the population in a small geographical area, they are based on small sample sizes, and are therefore subject to large margins of uncertainty. 3. Due to rounding the totals may not sum. Source: Annual Population Survey and annual Labour Force Survey.

Excise Duties: Motor Vehicles

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will estimate the annual cost to the Exchequer of resuming the rolling exemption from vehicle excise duty for historic vehicles over 35 years of age in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11 and (c) 2011-12. (197404)

I refer the hon. Gentleman to the answer I gave on 30 January 2008, Official Report, column 403W. Licensing data does not completely disaggregate by applicable vehicle excise duty rate the population of vehicles manufactured prior to 1974, 1975 and 1976. It is therefore not possible to determine the cost to the Exchequer of extending the exemption on a rolling 35-year basis.

Food: Expenditure

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what percentage of the average annual salary was spent on food at the most recent date for which figures are available. (196200)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Jil Matheson, dated 31 March 2008:

The National Statistician has been asked to reply to your recent question asking what percentage of the average annual salary was spent on food at the most recent date for which figures are available. I am replying in her absence. (196200)

Figures on the percentage of the annual average salary spent on food are not available. However, information on household income and expenditure is available. In 2005/06 the average United Kingdom household spent 9 per cent of their disposable income on food and non-alcoholic drinks.

This estimate is based on data collected through the Expenditure and Food Survey, which is a sample survey covering approximately 7,000 households in the UK. Spending on food and non-alcoholic drinks excludes expenditure on take-away meals and snacks, and meals purchased in restaurants. Disposable income includes income from all sources including salaries, self-employment income, benefits, and pensions after the deduction of income tax, council tax and employees’ national insurance contributions.

Foreign Workers: Enfield

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what his most recent estimate is of the number of migrant workers in Enfield North constituency in each of the last 10 years. (196799)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician, who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Jil Matheson dated 31 March 2008:

The National Statistician has been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question on what the most recent estimate is of the number of migrant workers in Enfield, North in each of the last ten years. I am replying in her absence. (196799)

The Office for National Statistics compiles statistics on migrant workers for local areas from the Annual Population survey (APS) and its predecessor the annual Labour Force Survey (LFS). The National Statistics method for estimating the number of migrant workers employed in the UK is routinely based on the number of people at a given time who were born abroad, are of working age (16-64 for men, 16-59 for women), and in employment. This question has been answered on this basis. It means, for example, that some people who are UK nationals will be included in the total of “foreign born” and that people who are working but are above state pension age are not included.

The table attached shows the numbers of people of working age in employment who were not born in the UK and were resident in Enfield, North Parliamentary Constituency. Estimates are obtained from the annual LFS for each 12 months period ending in February from 1998 to 2004. For time series comparisons, the APS estimates from 2005 to 2007 are provided covering the 12 month periods ending in March, but the most recently released estimate is also included, which covers the 12 month period ending in September 2007.

When interpreting these figures, it is important to bear in mind that the APS is not designed to cover everyone who is present in the UK. The survey may undercount the numbers of people who were born overseas. The reasons are set out in the table footnote.

As these estimates are for a subset of the population in small geographical areas they are based on small sample sizes, and are therefore subject to large margins of uncertainty.

In order to produce estimates for small geographical areas, APS and annual LFS estimates are provided based on survey microdata. These are consistent with the UK population estimates published in February and March 2003, whereas the regional and national estimates published in the Labour Market Statistics First Release are based on more up-to-date population figures, so the two are not directly comparable.

Number of migrant workers1 in employment resident in Enfield, North constituency in the last ten years

Thousand

12 months ending

Migrant workers1

February 1998

2

February 1999

5

February 2000

7

February 2001

7

February 2002

10

February 2003

11

February 2004

10

March 2005

8

March 2006

7

March 2007

13

September 2007

14

1 Includes males aged 16-64 and females aged 16-59 born outside the UK. Does not include respondents who did not answer the question on country of birth.

2 Data on migrant workers not available for this period

As with any sample survey, estimates from the APS are subject to margin of uncertainty.

It should also be noted that the country of birth question in the APS may undercount the numbers of people who were born overseas

It excludes certain people who have been resident in the UK for less than six months.

It excludes students in halls who do not have a UK resident parent.

It excludes people in most other types of communal establishments (eg hotels, boarding houses, hostels, mobile home sites, etc.)

It is grossed to population estimates which exclude migrants staying for less than 12 months.

Source:

Annual Labour Force Survey/Annual Population Survey

HM Revenue and Customs: Bonuses

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer pursuant to the answer of 13 March 2008, Official Report, column 537W, on HM Revenue and Customs: bonuses, how many HM Revenue and Customs staff received (a) zero, (b) minimum (£3,000), (c) medium (9 per cent. of base salary) and (d) high (15 per cent. of base salary) bonuses in each of the last five years. (196644)

These categories of bonus apply to the SCS grades in HMRC and data is available for the last three performance years.

Performance year

Zero

Minimum

Medium

High

2004-05

102

49

153

109

2005-06

149

19

124

82

2006-07

126

56

127

82

HM Revenue and Customs: Fraud

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer pursuant to his Answer of 22 February 2008, Official Report, column 1117W, on fraud in HM Revenue and Customs, what his estimate is of the cost to the public purse of the 35 investigations into suspected fraudulent activity by staff which have taken place since 1 April 2007. (193314)

Immigration

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what the level of migration (a) into and (b) out of Britain by (i) British citizens, (ii) non-British EU citizens and (iii) non-EU citizens in each age cohort was in each of the last 10 years. (196652)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician, who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Jil Matheson, dated 31 March 2008:

The National Statistician has been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking what the level of migration (a) into and (b) out of Britain by (i) British citizens (ii) non-British EU citizens and (iii) non-EU citizens was in each age cohort in each of the last 10 years. I am replying in her absence. (196652)

The most recent figures on levels of migration by citizenship and age are for 2006. Figures in the attached table are for the ten years 1997 to 2006 and are based on data from the International Passenger Survey (IPS).

The IPS has been used to provide information requested by citizenship and age because detailed cross tabulations such as these are not available using Total International Migration (TIM), the most comprehensive measure of long-term international migration into and out of the UK. This is due to the nature of the different data sources used to compile TIM estimates.

International migration, estimates from International Passenger Survey: time series, 1997 to 2006, citizenship by age, Great Britain

Thousand

Estimate

Direction

Age

All citizenships

British

Non-British

European Union1

Non-European Union

Inflow

1997

All ages

270

89

181

62

119

Under 15

38

17

21

6

15

15-24

111

19

92

40

52

25-44

99

40

60

15

45

45-59/64

17

10

7

1

5

60/65 and over

5

3

2

1

2

1998

All ages

317

103

214

70

144

Under 15

32

13

19

6

12

15-24

110

23

87

28

59

25-44

155

54

101

34

67

45-59/64

14

7

7

1

6

60/65 and over

6

6

2

2

2

1999

All ages

351

112

239

59

180

Under 15

32

15

17

3

14

15-24

125

21

104

27

77

25-44

171

61

109

28

81

45-59/64

18

11

7

2

7

60/65 and over

5

4

1

2

1

2000

All ages

355

99

256

58

199

Under 15

25

7

18

1

16

15-24

124

25

99

27

72

25-44

176

48

128

28

100

45-59/64

26

16

10

1

9

60/65 and over

5

4

2

2

2

2001

All ages

368

106

262

53

208

Under 15

32

12

20

2

18

15-24

122

19

102

25

78

25-44

183

59

125

24

101

45-59/64

25

11

14

3

11

60/65 and over

6

5

2

2

2

2002

All ages

382

97

285

55

229

Under 15

26

10

16

2

14

15-24

136

30

105

17

89

25-44

192

44

148

34

114

45-59/64

19

7

12

2

10

60/65 and over

9

6

3

2

3

2003

All ages

423

97

326

61

265

Under 15

32

8

24

4

20

15-24

173

20

154

36

117

25-44

179

46

134

20

114

45-59/64

31

18

13

1

12

60/65 and over

8

5

3

2

3

2004

All ages

515

84

431

105

326

Under 15

31

12

19

3

16

15-24

195

15

180

42

138

25-44

248

40

209

54

154

45-59/64

30

12

18

6

12

60/65 and over

11

5

6

2

6

2005

All ages

491

90

401

118

283

Under 15

20

6

15

1

14

15-24

195

21

174

49

125

25-44

244

45

199

67

132

45-59/64

27

13

13

2

11

60/65 and over

5

5

1

2

1

2006

All ages

521

76

445

132

313

Under 15

41

18

22

5

17

15-24

191

11

180

51

129

25-44

254

34

220

68

152

45-59/64

30

9

21

7

14

60/65 and over

5

4

1

2

1

Outflow

1997

All ages

229

133

96

31

65

Under 15

24

15

9

2

7

15-24

68

35

33

12

21

25-44

115

68

48

15

32

45-59/64

16

10

6

2

4

60/65 and over

6

5

1

2

1

1998

All ages

202

112

90

26

65

Under 15

20

12

8

1

7

15-24

53

20

33

11

22

25-44

106

63

43

13

30

45-59/64

17

10

6

1

6

60/65 and over

6

6

2

2

2

1999

All ages

243

113

130

47

83

Under 15

23

13

10

1

10

15-24

66

24

42

15

27

25-44

125

57

68

27

41

45-59/64

23

16

7

2

5

60/65 and over

6

4

2

1

1

2000

All ages

274

138

136

46

91

Under 15

22

15

7

2

7

15-24

65

25

40

16

24

25-44

155

71

83

28

55

45-59/64

28

22

6

2

5

60/65 and over

4

4

2

2

2

2001

All ages

248

131

117

40

77

Under 15

22

14

7

2

6

15-24

58

24

34

15

19

25-44

128

59

70

22

48

45-59/64

32

27

5

1

3

60/65 and over

7

6

1

2

1

2002

All ages

304

163

141

42

99

Under 15

20

14

6

1

5

15-24

74

33

41

14

27

25-44

160

77

83

24

59

45-59/64

41

31

10

4

6

60/65 and over

9

7

1

2

1

2003

All ages

309

166

143

41

101

Under 15

29

18

11

3

8

15-24

67

26

41

11

30

25-44

164

79

84

27

57

45-59/64

41

35

5

2

5

60/65 and over

8

7

1

2

1

2004

All ages

308

182

126

34

92

Under 15

24

16

8

1

6

15-24

69

29

40

13

27

25-44

156

82

73

19

55

45-59/64

49

46

3

2

3

60/65 and over

11

9

2

1

1

2005

All ages

327

173

154

47

107

Under 15

24

20

4

2

4

15-24

72

22

50

18

32

25-44

174

90

85

25

60

45-59/64

36

25

11

1

10

60/65 and over

20

16

4

3

2

2006

All ages

368

196

172

59

113

Under 15

26

18

8

2

6

15-24

77

25

52

22

30

25-44

199

98

101

34

67

45-59/64

40

32

8

2

8

60/65 and over

25

22

2

2

2

1 Up to and including 2003, estimates are shown for the EU15 (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, the Irish Republic, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and Sweden). From 2004 onwards, the estimates are for the EU25 (EU15 plus the 10 countries of Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia). These countries are included in the definition for the whole of 2004. These data have been revised following changes to the TIM methodology. Therefore they may not agree with estimates that have been published previously.

2 No data (or less than half the final digit shown).

Income

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what the average earnings were for each income decile of (a) men and (b) women aged between 22 and 29 years in each region in the latest five years for which figures are available. (196639)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician, who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Jill Matheson, dated 31 March 2008:

The National Statistician has been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking what the average earnings were for each income decile of (a) men and (b) women aged between 22 and 29 years in each region in the latest five years for which figures are available. I am replying in her absence. (196639)

Average levels of earnings are estimated from the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE), and are provided for all employees on adult rates of pay whose pay for the survey period was not affected by absence.

I attach a table showing the mean, deciles and quartiles for gross weekly earnings for (a) men and (b) women aged between 22 and 29 years, for those working full time in each government office region, for the years 2003 - 2007.

The ASHE, carried out in April each year, is the most comprehensive source of earnings information in the United Kingdom. It is a sample of all employees who are members of pay-as-you-earn (PAYE) schemes.

Weekly pay—gross (£)—for male full-time employee jobs by age 22 to 29a: United Kingdom

2003

Percentiles

Description

Number of jobs (thousand)

Median

Mean

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

North East

58

313

357

205

231

245

259

283

350

389

406

441

x

North West

154

336

400

218

248

261

276

306

374

413

434

470

569

Yorkshire and the Humber

126

344

378

223

258

270

286

312

379

423

445

474

571

East Midlands

100

364

392

224

262

275

289

324

398

434

462

484

571

West Midlands

135

346

385

225

257

269

288

314

377

414

442

480

580

East

131

375

474

233

267

288

305

335

417

463

491

528

647

London

282

480

542

270

330

357

380

427

528

592

633

674

876

South East

217

403

436

250

293

308

326

365

441

484

509

556

666

South West

113

333

374

220

250

266

278

305

367

414

438

466

576

Wales

66

328

369

213

242

253

268

296

374

413

443

469

x

Scotland

116

338

379

206

244

259

274

307

371

413

439

467

578

2004b

Percentiles

Description

Number of jobs (thousand)

Median

Mean

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

North East

56

340

365

204

237

254

266

301

383

411

431

459

x

North West

149

350

437

221

260

278

289

318

390

434

465

485

576

Yorkshire and the Humber

125

361

392

227

261

278

295

326

393

428

456

484

582

East Midlands

97

364

394

226

265

279

297

330

395

435

457

486

576

West Midlands

127

356

394

231

264

276

290

323

395

431

461

493

576

East

127

378

477

231

275

288

306

341

416

461

483

518

624

London

267

480

542

276

336

357

386

433

537

595

633

690

875

South East

210

409

445

257

303

320

336

372

449

494

519

558

672

South West

115

353

394

227

265

280

297

325

393

430

461

481

566

Wales

63

344

388

230

255

269

285

314

384

427

453

477

x

Scotland

119

354

393

220

255

276

290

321

387

427

457

481

616

2004c

Percentiles

Description

Number of jobs (thousand)

Median

Mean

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

North East

57

328

358

203

232

244

257

288

367

403

423

454

x

North West

154

347

419

216

250

269

282

311

384

432

462

487

582

Yorkshire and the Humber

128

355

381

225

257

272

288

319

390

423

450

476

573

East Midlands

101

358

382

221

258

273

288

317

386

429

449

473

566

West Midlands

131

351

388

226

259

272

285

319

394

429

460

486

576

East

131

365

460

229

272

286

300

333

410

454

475

506

617

London

273

471

532

270

326

350

380

424

528

584

626

674

864

South East

213

402

438

254

298

315

329

365

443

482

510

551

654

South West

116

351

392

226

260

275

289

320

392

436

461

481

575

Wales

65

336

382

226

245

263

276

305

378

418

444

476

x

Scotland

121

350

388

215

252

268

287

317

381

423

456

480

597

2005

Percentiles

Description

Number of jobs (thousand)

Median

Mean

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

North East

59

326

361

218

248

261

268

294

359

407

430

444

x

North West

166

355

415

220

255

272

286

317

395

448

478

503

610

Yorkshire and the Humber

134

353

381

225

253

270

284

319

385

427

445

477

571

East Midlands

108

362

395

229

261

280

299

324

399

433

463

498

594

West Midlands

139

356

419

230

264

277

291

321

392

441

468

493

597

East

145

374

415

242

275

291

307

336

408

460

490

514

625

London

286

489

560

286

343

367

389

441

552

625

671

728

920

South East

226

407

445

255

300

317

335

371

451

490

524

557

671

South West

126

364

407

240

269

286

300

332

396

442

463

494

575

Wales

67

325

368

220

249

260

272

292

358

420

451

475

x

Scotland

128

351

391

220

255

270

283

314

383

430

460

491

595

2006d

Percentiles

Description

Number of jobs (thousand)

Median

Mean

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

North East

57

335

390

239

265

275

288

311

382

437

459

495

x

North West

168

366

409

230

265

283

300

330

403

455

479

514

621

Yorkshire and the Humber

129

362

396

237

266

282

297

332

399

443

469

495

586

East Midlands

103

364

402

234

267

285

296

330

403

445

475

502

599

West Midlands

136

365

419

233

267

280

297

333

400

445

471

495

591

East

143

396

437

248

288

302

321

357

433

483

509

548

653

London

296

494

563

283

345

377

403

448

556

624

671

728

935

South East

219

412

454

258

300

318

337

374

455

500

526

568

692

South West

127

383

409

248

282

299

314

347

414

454

479

509

586

Wales

65

337

385

234

263

279

288

314

374

428

453

485

x

Scotland

124

367

406

226

260

278

292

334

412

462

490

522

613

2006e

Percentiles

Description

Number of jobs (thousand)

Median

Mean

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

North East

58

335

388

239

265

274

288

309

381

435

454

492

X

North West

169

366

407

230

266

284

300

329

401

452

477

511

618

Yorkshire and the Humber

131

361

395

238

266

283

297

328

397

441

466

492

588

East Midlands

103

363

399

235

268

285

296

326

402

440

471

498

594

West Midlands

136

365

419

234

267

280

297

333

400

445

471

495

589

East

143

393

433

249

288

300

319

355

430

479

507

545

650

London

296

493

561

282

345

376

402

447

555

620

670

724

932

South East

220

412

453

258

300

318

337

373

454

498

525

565

690

South West

127

383

407

247

281

299

313

345

412

453

479

508

586

Wales

66

336

384

234

263

279

288

313

373

427

448

485

x

Scotland

124

365

403

226

260

277

291

332

408

460

486

520

612

2007

Percentiles

Description

Number of jobs (thousand)

Median

Mean

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

North East

63

357

401

242

268

280

293

328

406

436

457

485

X

North West

172

379

414

237

272

288

305

345

412

459

494

519

623

Yorkshire and the Humber

133

384

424

247

287

299

313

353

427

479

504

528

624

East Midlands

104

383

414

250

289

303

316

352

419

457

477

502

598

West Midlands

141

374

407

244

276

288

301

333

408

450

479

506

606

East

148

398

437

255

290

305

323

356

440

493

517

556

656

London

307

502

574

294

357

383

410

458

556

632

671

732

930

South East

233

420

470

262

307

326

343

383

468

518

549

590

736

South West

127

384

414

253

288

304

323

352

423

461

488

521

601

Wales

70

345

390

240

271

281

294

312

380

431

454

479

x

Scotland

130

382

423

246

280

292

310

346

424

473

507

533

633

x = Unreliable.

a Employees on adult rates whose pay for the survey pay-period was not affected by absence.

There are two discontinuities in the ASHE results introduced by changes to the ASHE methodology. In 2004 supplementary information was included to improve coverage and in 2006 changes to the sample design were made to improve the quality of the estimates, (for more information see National Statistics website www.statistics.gov.uk).

b 2004 results (consistent with 2003 results).

c 2004 results (consistent with 2005 results).

d 2006 results (consistent with 2005 results).

e 2006 results (consistent with 2007 results).

Source:

Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, Office for National Statistics. 1997-2007

Weekly pay—gross (£)—for female full-time employee jobs by age 22 to 29a: United Kingdom

2003

Percentiles

Description

Number of jobs (thousand)

Median

Mean

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

North East

46

287

309

185

223

234

247

263

315

341

357

380

x

North West

131

299

331

194

224

235

250

275

338

375

395

421

492

Yorkshire and the Humber

104

304

332

202

230

244

253

276

346

379

397

421

482

East Midlands

84

300

332

199

225

235

249

269

341

380

398

422

495

West Midlands

108

293

333

193

221

235

248

273

325

375

397

422

500

East

105

323

351

204

237

251

267

296

357

389

408

444

535

London

257

423

462

258

307

326

346

389

463

504

533

559

670

South East

174

349

378

221

260

277

288

324

376

415

442

472

550

South West

89

299

328

204

230

240

252

273

330

373

386

406

468

Wales

48

293

324

198

219

229

241

262

319

369

390

405

x

Scotland

120

307

338

198

231

247

259

282

338

378

405

426

491

2004b

Percentiles

Description

Number of jobs (thousand)

Median

Mean

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

North East

50

296

325

198

225

237

255

273

332

364

384

403

x

North West

131

312

342

201

234

248

259

282

350

385

414

439

504

Yorkshire and the Humber

99

317

347

207

238

250

263

288

356

393

415

440

505

East Midlands

82

325

353

207

240

251

262

295

356

384

406

430

504

West Midlands

105

327

359

207

238

252

267

298

363

400

425

448

543

East

103

340

372

212

249

265

278

310

370

406

427

452

548

London

243

439

477

276

328

346

365

401

478

518

541

572

681

South East

161

366

397

231

269

285

302

336

399

438

456

486

580

South West

90

317

353

216

244

255

267

293

347

384

409

430

498

Wales

49

302

331

206

234

241

254

272

339

382

409

436

x

Scotland

121

326

359

213

241

256

269

293

369

414

439

458

522

2004c

Percentiles

Description

Number of jobs (thousand)

Median

Mean

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

North East

50

294

322

197

225

238

252

272

326

364

384

401

x

North West

136

309

337

201

234

246

259

282

342

384

412

430

494

Yorkshire and the Humber

102

316

346

205

233

249

259

288

356

393

415

440

506

East Midlands

83

313

340

205

236

246

257

284

348

376

395

422

x

West Midlands

108

325

356

202

235

250

265

291

356

394

425

448

543

East

105

333

362

210

244

260

275

306

364

400

425

449

530

London

258

432

467

270

320

342

356

393

470

509

537

563

672

South East

169

362

387

229

263

278

295

328

393

429

447

474

577

South West

94

314

346

210

238

250

263

288

340

379

395

422

494

Wales

52

293

328

207

231

239

250

267

322

378

396

428

x

Scotland

121

322

355

209

239

251

267

288

363

411

430

454

518

2005

Percentiles

Description

Number of jobs (thousand)

Median

Mean

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

North East

53

316

347

222

249

256

270

295

355

386

404

432

x

North West

147

326

364

218

245

259

269

299

369

418

436

464

544

Yorkshire and the Humber

111

316

350

208

238

252

263

288

355

399

421

449

527

East Midlands

85

327

357

222

249

261

276

296

363

398

423

453

521

West Midlands

115

328

361

211

242

255

269

293

365

402

427

458

526

East

114

340

373

220

247

255

272

307

374

422

446

479

564

London

295

441

473

267

316

338

358

395

479

529

556

585

689

South East

181

370

395

230

271

285

301

335

401

437

458

487

572

South West

107

323

355

217

250

258

270

297

357

393

412

441

523

Wales

55

291

327

213

237

249

258

274

326

367

398

422

499

Scotland

132

324

368

218

244

258

272

297

367

427

457

477

539

2006d

Percentiles

Description

Number of jobs (thousand)

Median

Mean

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

North East

55

317

352

224

255

268

274

295

348

394

423

453

518

North West

151

335

368

218

247

261

274

304

375

416

440

466

548

Yorkshire and the Humber

104

327

358

219

247

258

269

295

374

413

437

461

533

East Midlands

88

325

360

217

247

262

271

297

364

401

428

450

510

West Midlands

120

344

374

219

251

266

276

307

382

426

451

481

564

East

123

355

380

230

262

276

290

321

385

428

450

469

563

London

297

455

487

280

327

347

371

407

495

548

573

604

718

South East

188

374

399

240

275

290

307

341

403

454

475

498

576

South West

105

335

364

223

259

268

281

307

372

404

423

446

524

Wales

57

319

347

221

245

260

273

294

345

384

399

433

514

Scotland

122

346

387

226

255

269

284

312

386

447

473

500

584

2006e

Percentiles

Description

Number of jobs (thousand)

Median

Mean

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

North East

56

314

350

224

253

268

273

293

345

392

417

446

518

North West

150

333

367

219

247

260

273

303

369

414

438

463

546

Yorkshire and the Humber

105

326

357

219

247

257

269

293

367

408

436

461

529

East Midlands

88

326

360

218

247

263

273

299

365

401

428

450

510

West Midlands

121

340

372

219

251

266

277

307

380

422

444

476

557

East

123

354

378

230

263

276

290

321

384

426

449

469

562

London

296

454

486

280

328

347

371

406

493

547

573

600

717

South East

187

374

399

240

276

291

308

340

402

451

474

497

576

South West

106

334

362

223

259

268

280

306

367

403

419

442

524

Wales

58

319

347

221

245

260

273

294

345

383

399

430

513

Scotland

121

345

384

226

254

268

282

310

383

444

466

500

577

2007

Percentile

Description

Number of jobs (thousand)

Median

Mean

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

North East

50

326

357

230

257

269

279

298

359

386

406

436

x

North West

156

345

383

228

260

272

285

311

383

430

452

481

573

Yorkshire and the Humber

113

333

366

228

256

268

277

300

379

422

447

473

529

East Midlands

93

334

368

222

255

268

280

307

379

410

439

468

550

West Midlands

117

346

382

233

267

278

289

315

386

430

454

492

570

East

127

359

385

235

270

285

297

326

393

430

446

479

567

London

299

472

508

288

344

369

393

433

511

556

581

613

747

South East

189

384

409

242

285

300

316

348

412

457

483

510

596

South West

108

350

382

237

270

285

296

322

381

420

442

472

559

Wales

60

328

359

223

254

268

280

306

357

384

413

448

x

Scotland

124

349

382

227

259

274

288

318

382

434

457

484

576

x = Unreliable.

a Employees on adult rates whose pay for the survey pay-period was not affected by absence.

There are two discontinuities in the ASHE results introduced by changes to the ASHE methodology. In 2004 supplementary information was included to improve coverage and in 2006 changes to the sample design were made to improve the quality of the estimates, (for more information see National Statistics website www.statistics.gov.uk).

b 2004 results (consistent with 2003 results).

c 2004 results (consistent with 2005 results).

d 2006 results (consistent with 2005 results).

e 2006 results (consistent with 2007 results).

Source:

Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, Office for National Statistics. 1997-2007

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many people had annual employment incomes of (a) below £10,000, (b) between 10,000 and £30,000, broken down by £1,000 intervals, (c) between £31,000 and £100,000, broken down by £5,000 intervals, (d) between £100,000 and £500,000, broken down by £50,000 interval and (e) above £500,000 in the latest period for which figures are available. (196711)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician, who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Jil Matheson, dated 31 March 2008:

The National Statistician has been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking how many people had annual employment incomes of (a) below £10,000, (b) between £10,000 and £30,000 broken down by £1,000 intervals, (c) between £31,000 and £100,000, broken down by £5,000 intervals, (d) between £100,000 and £500,000, broken down by £50,000 interval and (e) above £500,000 in the latest period for which figures are available. I am replying in her absence. (196711)

Annual average levels of earnings are estimated from the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE), and are provided for all employees on adult rates of pay who have been in the same job for more than 12 months. ASHE methodology cannot be used to provide estimates of the numbers of employees whose earnings are less than a specific amount, but can be used to provide estimates of percentages of employees in relevant categories. Estimates are for single jobs and not for total employment income.

I attach a table for 2007, showing the percentage of UK employees in the ranges stated.

The ASHE, carried out in April each year, is the most comprehensive source of earnings information in the United Kingdom. It is a sample of all employees who are members of pay- as-you-earn (PAYE) schemes.

Proportions of all employees1 average annual earnings in the UK for 2007

Percentage

<£10,000

18.9

£10,000 <£11,000

2.7

£11,000 <£12,000

2.9

£12,000 <£13,000

3.1

£13,000 <£14,000

3.0

£14,000 <£15,000

3.4

£15,000 <£16,000

3.4

£16,000 <£17,000

3.3

£17,000 <£18,000

3.2

£18,000 <£19,000

3.2

£19,000 <£20,000

3.0

£20,000 <£21,000

3.0

£21,000 <£22,000

2.7

£22,000 <£23,000

2.8

£23,000 <£24,000

2.5

£24,000 <£25,000

2.5

£25,000 <£26,000

2.4

£26,000 <£27,000

2.2

£27,000 <£28,000

2.1

£28,000 <£29,000

2.0

£29,000 <£30,000

1.9

£30,000 <£35,000

8.0

£35,000 <£40,000

5.6

£40,000 <£45,000

3.3

£45,000 <£50,000

2.1

£50,000 <£55,000

1.5

£55,000 <£60,000

1.0

£60,000 <£65,000

0.8

£65,000 <£70,000

**0.5

£70,000 <£75,000

**0.4

£75,000 <£80,000

**0.4

£80,000 <£85,000

**0.3

£85,000 <£90,000

**0.2

£90,000 <£95,000

**0.2

£95,000 <£100,000

**0.2

£100,000 <£150,000

0.8

£150,000 <£200,000

*0.2

£200,000 <£250,000

**0.1

£250,000 <£300,000

x

£300,000 <£350,000

x

£350,000 <£400,000

x

£400,000 <£450,000

x

£450,000 <£500,000

x

£500,000 +

**0.1

Summary table

Percentage

<£10,000

18.9

£10,000 <£30,000

55.3

£30,000 <£100,000

24.5

£100,000 +

1.3

1 Both full-time and part-time employees on adult rates who have been in the same job for more than one year.

* Coefficient of variation is >5% and <=10%

** Coefficient of variation is >10% and <=20%

x Coefficient of variation is >20%

Guide to quality:

The Coefficient of Variation (CV) indicates the quality of a figure, the smaller the CV value, the higher the quality.

The true value is likely to lie within +/- twice the CV, for example, for an average of 200 with a CV of 5%, we would expect the population average to be within the range 180 to 220.

Source:

Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, Office for National Statistics, 2007.

Income Tax

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what estimate he has made of the net effect on income tax receipts of imposing a 50 per cent. rate on those earning £100,000 and over per annum and raising the lower threshold for payment of income tax and national insurance contributions to £12,000 per annum. (196529)

[holding answer 25 March 2008]: The net effect of introducing a new higher rate band at 50 per cent. for incomes above £100,000 and raising the personal allowance to £12,000 would be a cost of around £65 billion for 2008-09. This figure excludes any estimate of behavioural response to the changes which could be significant given the scale of the changes, and which might eliminate a large proportion of the yield from any new higher rate band.

The estimates cover both income tax and national insurance contributions but assume the higher dividend rate remains at 32.5 per cent. and that the basic rate limit is unchanged.

The income tax information is based upon the 2005-06 Survey of Personal Incomes and 2008 Budget assumptions.

Income: Greater London

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what the decile boundary earnings were for (a) London and (b) each London borough in the latest 12 month period for which figures are available, broken down by age cohort. (196517)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician, who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Jil Matheson, dated 31 March 2008:

The National Statistician has been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking what the decile boundary earnings were for (a) London and (b) each London borough in the latest 12 month period for which figures are available, broken down by age cohort. I am replying in her absence. (196517)

Levels of earnings including medians, deciles and quartiles, are estimated from the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE), and are provided for employees on adult rates of pay, whose pay for the survey period was not affected by absence. The ASHE, carried out in April each year, is the most comprehensive source of earnings information in the United Kingdom.

I attach a table showing the mean, deciles and quartiles for gross weekly earnings for full time employees in London by age for 2007. Figures for each London borough broken down by age group are not available. However, aggregate results for London boroughs can be obtained on the National Statistics website at:

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/ashe

Weekly pay—gross (£)—for full-time employee jobs1: United Kingdom, 2007

Percentiles

Description

Number of jobs(thousand)

Median

Mean

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

London

2,661

581

731

309

383

419

451

513

667

767

838

935

1,275.0

London, age 18-21

78

305

331

203

231

245

256

278

328

356

374

388

2

London, age 22-29

607

481

541

290

350

376

401

445

533

586

623

671

856.9

London, age 30-39

773

651

783

344

436

474

508

576

730

843

924

1,020

1,375.5

London, age 40-49

684

674

869

345

437

479

513

591

759

885

977

1,116

1,631.2

London, age 50-59

410

606

779

329

396

431

462

533

700

807

876

984

1,313.8

London, age 60+

106

523

679

289

345

372

399

466

597

687

767

847

2

1 Employees on adult rates whose pay for the survey pay-period was not affected by absence.

2 Estimate unreliable.

Source:

Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, Office for National Statistics. 1997-2007

Infant Mortality

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer with reference to the answer of 20 December 2005, Official Report, column 2799W, on infant mortality, what the infant mortality rate was in each year since 2004 in each primary care trust area in England. (196383)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Jil Matheson, dated 31 March 2008:

The National Statistician has been asked to reply to your recent question with reference to the Answer of 20th December 2005, Official Report, column 2799W, on infant mortality, what the infant mortality rate was in each year since 2004 in each primary care trust area in England. I am replying in her absence. (196383)

The most recent year for which figures are available is 2006; figures requested for the years 2004 - 2006 are given in the attached table.

Infant deaths: numbers and rates by primary care organisation1 in England, 2004 to 2006

Infant deaths

Numbers

Rate per 1,000 live births2

Area of residence

2004

2005

2006

2004

2005

2006

England

3,068

3,078

3,192

5.1

5.0

5.0

North East GOR

County Durham

24

31

33

4.5

6.0

6.1