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Higher Education

Volume 474: debated on Wednesday 2 April 2008

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many and what proportion of full-time undergraduates with each number of UCAS tariff points from their A-levels did not complete their degree in each of the last 10 years for which data are available. (196659)

The available information on the proportion of UK-domiciled starters to full-time first degree courses who are projected to neither obtain an award nor transfer to another institution is shown in table 1. Comparable figures for the 2005/06 academic year will become available in June this year. Information on the actual number of students who are projected to neither obtain an award nor transfer to another institution has not been published. These figures cannot be broken down by UCAS tariff points on entry.

Table 1: Proportion of full-time first degree starters at English and UK higher education institutions, who were projected to neither gain an award nor transfer to another institution, academic year 1997/98 to 2004/05

Percentage

Academic year

1997/98

1998/99

1999/2000

2000/01

2001/02

2002/03

2003/04

2004/05

England

15.8

15.9

15.8

15.0

13.8

13.9

14.4

13.8

UK

15.7

15.8

15.8

15.0

14.1

14.4

14.9

14.2

Note:

Figures from the 1996/97 academic year have been excluded due to a change in methodology between 1996/97 and 1997/98. Figures for years earlier than 1996/97 are not available.

Source:

Performance Indicators in Higher Education, published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

HESA also publishes non-continuation indicators, which show the proportion of entrants to full-time first degree courses not continuing in higher education after their first year, and which can be broken down by entry qualification. Table 2 contains the available information for non-continuation indicators broken down by entry qualification.

Table 2: Proportion of UK-domiciled young1 entrants to full-time first degree courses at UK higher education institutions not continuing in higher education after their first year, academic year 2002/03 to 2004/05

Entry qualification categories

Tariff points

2002/03

2003/04

2004/05

A-levels or highers

Unknown

11.3

12.6

13.9

Up to 200

11.7

11.9

11.2

201 to 290

7.9

8.1

7.7

291 to 380

4.9

5.3

4.9

Above 380

2.6

2.8

2.6

Other qualifications

11.4

11.6

11.2

All qualifications

7.8

7.7

7.2

1 Young refers to entrants who are under 21 years of age.

Note:

Figures for years earlier than 2002/03 are not available.

Source:

Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE).

Student retention rates in this country compare very well internationally. The UK ranks fifth in the OECD for first degree completion rates, out of 23 countries who report data in this area. A university education is now open to more students than ever before and the higher education sector has made significant achievements in maintaining, and in some areas slightly improving, retention rates for its students.

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many and what proportion of full-time undergraduates from each socio-economic group did not complete their degree in each of the last 10 years for which data are available. (196660)

The available information on the proportion of UK-domiciled starters to full-time first degree courses who are projected to neither obtain an award nor transfer to another institution is shown in Table 1. Comparable figures for the 2005-06 academic year will become available in June this year. Information on the actual number of students who are projected to neither obtain an award nor transfer to another institution has not been published.

Table 1: Proportion of full-time first degree starters at English and UK higher education institutions, who were projected to neither gain an award nor transfer to another institution

Percentage

England

UK

1997-98

15.8

15.7

1998-99

15.9

15.8

1999-2000

15.8

15.8

2000-2001

15.0

15.0

2001-02

13.8

14.1

2002-03

13.9

14.4

2003-04

14.4

14.9

2004-05

13.8

14.2

Notes: Figures from the 1996-97 academic year have been excluded due to a change in methodology between 1996-7 and 1997-98. Figures for years earlier than 1996-97 are not available. Source: Performance Indicators in Higher Education, published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

HESA also publishes non-continuation indicators, which show the proportion of entrants to full-time first degree courses not continuing in higher education after their first year. It is possible to break these down by NS-SEC. Table 2 contains the available information for non-continuation indicators broken down by socio-economic group. Information on the actual numbers from each socio-economic group has not been published.

Table 2: Proportion of UK-domiciled young1 entrants to full-time first degree courses at UK higher education institutions not continuing in higher education after their first year

NS-SEC Classification

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

Groups 1-3

6.3

6.0

5.6

Groups 4-7

8.1

8.2

7.6

Unknown

10.6

12.5

11.8

All classifications

7.8

7.7

7.2

1 Young refers to entrants who are under 21 years of age. Note: Figures for years earlier than the 2002-03 academic year are not available: this is the earliest academic year for which socio-economic classification information is available for higher education students. Source: Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE).

Student retention rates in this country compare very well internationally. The UK rank fifth in the OECD for first degree completion rates, out of 23 countries who report data in this area. A university education is now open to more students than ever before and the Government are totally committed to providing opportunities for all people to achieve their potential and to maximise their talent.