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Written Answers

Volume 474: debated on Wednesday 2 April 2008

Written Answers to Questions

Wednesday 2 April 2008

Public Accounts Commission

National Audit Office: Aviation

To ask the Chairman of the Public Accounts Commission how many tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent were offset by the National Audit Office in 2006-07 for air flights. (198201)

The National Audit Office has a green travel plan which encourages staff to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by considering their travel options and choosing environmentally friendly modes of transport when travelling to clients and to and from work. The Office also uses teleconferencing facilities which further reduce the need for travel.

The office does not currently purchase carbon offsets for its air or other travel and therefore offset no carbon dioxide in 2006-07.

The Office has recently awarded new contracts for the provision of travel services. These arrangements will provide improved data on the level of carbon emissions incurred by the Office and enable exploration of options to reduce emissions.

Culture, Media and Sport

Arts: Expenditure

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what public expenditure on the arts in Wantage constituency in each year since 1997 was. (197898)

The Arts Council has provided £239,633 in lottery funding, as follows:

£

1997-98

25,600

1998-99

1999-2000

29,250

2000-01

41,371

2001-02

106,005

2002-03

2003-04

9,995

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

23,000

2007-08

4,412

Creative Britain Apprenticeships

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what steps he plans to take to ensure the availability of Creative Britain apprenticeships throughout the country. (196758)

My Department is already working with employers, sector skills councils, Trade Associations, the Learning and Skills Council and other Government Departments to ensure the provision of high quality places. For example, Creative and Cultural Skills are currently developing proposals for apprentices in live events and promotion, music business (recording industry), technical theatre (rigging, lighting and sound), costume and wardrobe, cultural and heritage venue operation and community arts.

The provision of apprenticeship places is a devolved matter. However the Sector Skills Councils, who engage with employers, operate within a UK wide context. Creative and Cultural Skills and sector skills councils for example, are in discussions with the Scottish Government to ensure that creative apprenticeships are developed in Scotland, based on employer demand.

Departmental Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what the hourly rates of pay of all non-permanent staff working for his Department and its agencies were in each of the last 12 months; and how many staff were receiving each rate in each of those months. (196453)

The information requested for the Department for Culture, Media and Sport and its agency The Royal Parks, for the past 12 months, is contained in the table.

DCMS

Administrative/secretarial

Junior/middle managers

Senior interim managers

Monthly average number of staff

15

1

7

Average hourly rate (£)

13.28

30

115

Royal Parks

Monthly average number of staff

11

1

0

Average hourly rate (£)

14.06

36.25

0

A more detailed breakdown could be supplied only at disproportionate cost.

National Lottery: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport (1) what proportion of the cost of each national lottery ticket bought online goes towards (a) prize money, (b) good causes, (c) lottery duty, (d) operating costs and (e) profit for the national lottery operator; (198067)

(2) how the money received from national lottery tickets sold online is apportioned into (a) prize money, (b) good causes, (c) lottery duty, (d) operating costs and (e) profit for the national lottery operator.

National lottery ticket sales revenue is liable to lottery duty which is set by HM Treasury, currently at 12 per cent. The terms of the second licence to operate the lottery govern the way in which the remainder of the revenue is apportioned among prize money, good causes, retailer commissions and operator retentions (from which costs and profits are met). The second licence does not provide for this apportionment to be calculated on a game by game or sales channel by sales channel basis (the licence can be viewed on the National Lottery Commission website: www.natlotcomm. gov.uk <http://www.natlotcomm.gov.uk>). In particular, all relevant games are aggregated when calculating the appropriate contributions to the National Lottery Distribution Fund (NLDF) and Olympic Lottery Distribution Fund (OLDF).

Leader of the House

Members: Offices

To ask the Leader of the House pursuant to the answer of 18 December 2007, Official Report, column 1227W, on office facilities, how much was paid in office rent by hon. Members to each registered political party in 2006-07. (198053)

According to the Department for Resources, the figures for 2006-07 are as follows:

Party

Amount paid (£)

Conservative Party

737,995

Democratic Unionist Party

3,375

Labour Party

376,975

Liberal Democrats

186,682

Plaid Cymru

8,440

Scottish National Party

19,941

Total

1,333,408

Northern Ireland

Drugs: Children

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many children under the age of 16 years were arrested for possession of Class (a) A, (b) B and (c) C drugs in each district command unit in each of the last five years. (194752)

The following table details the number of children under the age of 16 years arrested for possession of Class A, B and C drugs, in each district command unit in each of the last five years.

As one person can be arrested for multiple offences, adding together the total number of persons arrested under each category does not equal the total number of persons arrested.

Cannabis was reclassified from Class B to Class C on 29 January 2004, hence the decrease of Class B and the increase of Class C arrests for the period 2004-07.

2002-032003-042004-052005-062006-07

A

B

C

A

B

C

A

B

C

A

B

C

A

B

C

Antrim

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

3

0

0

0

1

0

0

Ards

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

2

0

0

1

0

0

0

East Belfast

0

2

0

0

7

0

0

0

3

0

0

1

0

0

1

North Belfast

1

4

0

0

1

0

0

0

3

0

0

1

0

0

2

South Belfast

0

11

0

0

6

0

0

0

3

0

0

5

0

0

3

West Belfast

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

1

Carrickfergus

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

Castlereagh

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Larne

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Lisburn

1

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

2

0

2

Newtownabbey

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

North Down

1

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

0

0

2

Urban

4

24

0

0

17

1

0

0

15

0

0

19

3

0

11

Armagh

0

1

0

2

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Banbridge

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Ballymena

0

2

0

0

5

0

0

0

5

0

0

2

2

0

3

Ballymoney

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Coleraine

0

1

0

1

4

1

1

0

2

0

0

1

0

0

1

Cookstown

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

2

1

0

1

1

0

1

Craigavon

0

3

0

1

2

3

1

0

0

0

0

6

3

0

1

Dungannon and South Tyrone

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

Down

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

Fermanagh

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

2

0

0

0

Foyle

0

2

0

0

2

0

0

0

1

0

0

2

0

0

1

Limavady

1

0

0

0

3

0

0

0

2

0

0

2

1

0

5

Magherafelt

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

Moyle

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Newry and Mourne

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

Omagh

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

6

0

0

0

Strabane

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Rural

1

14

1

4

21

5

3

0

19

1

0

23

7

0

13

Drugs: Crime

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many persons were arrested for dealing in Class (a) A, (b) B and (c) C drugs in each district command unit in each of the last five years. (194753)

The following table sets out the number of persons arrested for dealing in Class A, B and C drugs in each district command unit in each of the last five years.

As one person can be arrested for multiple offences, adding together the total number of persons arrested under each category does not equal the total number of persons arrested.

Cannabis was reclassified from Class B to Class C on 29 January 2004, hence the decrease of Class B and the increase of Class C arrests for the period 2004-07.

2002-032003-042004-052005-062006-07

A

B

C

A

B

C

A

B

C

A

B

C

A

B

C

Antrim

6

2

0

7

8

2

4

0

2

4

3

8

10

6

9

Ards

3

5

2

3

14

0

0

2

1

2

1

5

5

0

7

East Belfast

5

5

2

3

15

2

3

0

8

8

0

5

5

1

24

North Belfast

7

12

0

11

9

3

2

1

13

11

0

14

25

1

31

South Belfast

1

12

0

10

17

1

10

1

19

17

0

14

26

1

20

West Belfast

3

4

0

1

1

1

2

0

7

2

2

9

14

1

16

Carrickfergus

0

1

0

5

10

1

2

2

5

1

1

2

1

0

1

Castlereagh

2

5

7

3

20

2

1

1

6

2

0

6

5

1

6

Larne

2

1

0

2

7

0

0

0

1

3

0

1

1

0

2

Lisburn

4

11

2

6

15

4

12

0

36

10

0

17

12

1

14

Newtownabbey

1

3

0

6

9

0

0

0

3

1

1

11

4

0

6

North Down

2

6

0

5

9

2

6

1

18

6

0

10

5

0

3

Urban

36

67

13

62

134

18

42

8

119

67

8

102

113

12

139

Armagh

1

3

0

9

2

1

1

0

4

5

3

15

1

0

1

Banbridge

2

4

0

4

7

5

0

0

3

1

0

2

2

0

2

Ballymena

4

9

0

4

4

1

13

9

10

8

3

7

11

0

8

Ballymoney

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

3

Coleraine

15

13

0

9

23

3

17

1

6

18

0

7

28

2

19

Cookstown

1

2

0

9

5

4

1

0

0

2

2

1

7

1

9

Craigavon

3

4

2

12

9

1

8

0

9

5

0

9

5

2

5

Dungannon and S Tyrone

0

2

0

4

3

1

1

0

4

6

0

2

12

0

6

Down

0

6

0

2

4

0

4

1

4

1

0

10

2

2

3

Fermanagh

2

1

0

1

5

4

3

2

9

4

0

4

3

0

1

Foyle

2

2

0

8

14

0

12

5

15

11

2

12

14

2

9

Limavady

3

7

1

2

3

2

1

0

4

1

3

12

0

5

17

Magherafelt

1

5

1

2

4

3

3

1

12

1

1

3

1

2

2

Moyle

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

2

1

Newry and Mourne

0

3

1

1

5

5

0

1

3

3

0

2

8

0

5

Omagh

2

2

0

1

6

1

12

0

12

2

2

6

6

2

9

Strabane

0

1

0

3

4

6

3

0

1

3

0

6

2

0

5

Rural

36

64

5

71

98

37

79

20

97

71

16

100

102

20

111

Repossession Orders

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many homes were repossessed in Northern Ireland in each of the last five years. (197278)

I have been asked to reply.

Repossessions following a court order are dealt with by the Enforcement of Judgments Office (EJO) of the Northern Ireland Court Service.

The following table sets out the number of repossession applications lodged with EJO and the number which have been resolved by way of eviction over the last five years.

Repossession applications lodged with EJO

Repossession applications finalised by way of eviction

2003

914

152

2004

945

200

2005

972

188

2006

1,002

184

2007

923

128

Total

4,756

852

In addition to those cases in which the EJO repossess the property and give vacant possession to the applicant, a larger number of cases are resolved by agreement reached between the parties or where the occupant vacates the property voluntarily.

Wales

National Assembly

8. To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what recent discussions he has had with the First Minister on bringing forward legislative proposals to increase the number of Members of the National Assembly for Wales. (197232)

Economic Inactivity

9. To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what recent discussions he has had with the First Minister on economic inactivity in Wales. (197233)

The Secretary of State has regular discussions with the First Minister on all issues affecting Wales, including the economy and employment.

Child Poverty

10. To ask the Secretary of State for Wales if he will make a statement on measures in Budget 2008 designed to address child poverty in Wales. (197234)

The excellent measures announced by the Chancellor in his Budget will underpin our commitment to halve child poverty by 2010 and totally eradicate child poverty by 2020.

Flood Defences

11. To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what discussions he has had with the First Minister on the condition of flood defences in Wales. (197235)

Regular discussions take place with the First Minister on such matters. The Welsh Assembly Government, local authorities and the Environment Agency are actively involved in flood defence planning within Wales.

Research Funding

12. To ask the Secretary of State for Wales if he will hold discussions with the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills on UK Government funding for research in Wales. (197236)

I have regular discussions with ministerial colleagues at the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills to discuss a variety of issues affecting Wales.

Welsh universities have a vital role to play in meeting the challenges of the future, not only in increasing the knowledge economy of the region but also in encouraging entrepreneurship and innovation.

Cross-border Health Services

13. To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what recent discussions he has had with the Welsh Assembly Government on consultation on cross-border health service issues. (197237)

My right hon. Friend and I have regular discussions with the Welsh Assembly Government on these matters. These discussions include the protocol currently in place to underpin cross-border health delivery arrangements.

Offender Management

14. To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Justice on offender management in Wales. (197238)

The Government remain committed to ensuring efficient offender management. We have committed a further £40 million towards more effective community sentences; are providing increased prison capacity with an extra £1.2 billion to deliver a further and extended building programme that will create 15,000 places in England and Wales by 2014, 330 of which will be at Parc Prison in Bridgend by 2011.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Agriculture: Co-operatives

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what response he plans to make to the French proposal to strengthen agricultural sectors by promoting co-operative organisations. (198108)

The French proposals were discussed under any other business at the EU Agriculture and Fisheries Council meeting on 17 March. I expressed interest in exploring ideas about how farmers could be competitive in global markets through greater collaboration, but did not share the French conclusions about the need for new EU measures.

Animal Welfare

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on what codes of practice outlined in the Animal Welfare Act 2006 his Department is working; and when they are expected to be published. (197846)

The information requested is not yet available as the departmental business planning process for the forthcoming financial year has still to be finalised.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the size was of the Departmental team dealing with codes of practice relevant to the Animal Welfare Act 2006 in (a) 2004, (b) 2005, (c) 2006 and (d) 2007; and what the size of the team is now. (197847)

Precise figures for the number of staff working on codes of practice are difficult to estimate as this work does not require full-time input from staff. However, work on an individual code of practice under the Animal Welfare Act typically involves the input of one veterinary adviser and one higher executive officer plus administrative support.

Animals: Disease Control

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what arrangements there are to deal with circumstances where a devolved Administration disagrees with his Department’s policy or actions in the event of an animal disease outbreak. (197428)

Disease control functions are a devolved matter, but DEFRA and the devolved Administrations all work to EU rules. This aligns our policies and minimises any serious differences. During an animal disease outbreak, consultations and discussions take place at all levels to ensure that coherent and effective measures operate across the UK.

Bees

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of the number of queen bees which have been imported in each of the last three years; and if he will make a statement. (197462)

[holding answer 1 April 2008]: Importers of queen bees from third countries are required to notify DEFRA about the intended import and then must send the cages and accompanying worker bees to the National Bee Unit for analysis. In the last three calendar years DEFRA was notified of the following imports of queens:

Number

2005

2,385

2006

2,435

2007

3,097

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate he has made of the UK bee population (a) in each year since 1997 and (b) in each of the next 10 years; and if he will make a statement. (197595)

On the basis of the number of colonies estimated by ADAS in their 2001 survey, there are around 273,000 managed honey bee colonies in the UK. In population terms, there are approximately 5 billion honey bees in winter (20,000 per colony), rising to some 16 billion in the summer (60,000 per colony). Numbers of colonies may have declined in recent years. The numbers in each of the next 10 years will depend on the number of beekeepers and their stockmanship and colony husbandry skills, including effective pest and disease management. No estimate has been made of the numbers of bumble bees or solitary bees etc.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether he has received a research plan from Rothamstead and Warwick Horticulture Research International on bee health; and if he will make a statement. (197672)

DEFRA has not received any such research plan. Short descriptions of two research projects proposed by the two organisations were included in a “Beekeeping Research” paper produced by the British Beekeepers' Association.

Bees: Conservation

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether he expects the small hive beetle to become a threat to UK beehives; what measures he is taking to prevent the small hive beetle entering the UK; and if he will make a statement. (197591)

The possibility of the small hive beetle arriving in the UK is a recognised threat to the health of honey bees. To help mitigate this threat, DEFRA has developed a contingency plan in consultation with stakeholders. Additionally, DEFRA is funding research into a “lure and kill” monitoring system for rapid deployment should the beetle be detected. To promote early detection, publicity material has been distributed to help raise individual beekeepers’ awareness of the risk. Plant health import inspectors and horticultural marketing inspectors have also been alerted, as one possible entry pathway is imported fruit. DEFRA is also pressing the European Commission to introduce tighter contingency arrangements to reduce the risk of spread should the beetle be introduced into another member state.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of threats to the UK bee population; and if he will make a statement. (197596)

The importance of the contribution of honey bees to sustainable agriculture is well recognised. For this reason, DEFRA continues to fund a programme of controls and education for beekeepers through the National Bee Unit and the Bee Inspectorate. To further this, work DEFRA will shortly be consulting on a draft Bee Health strategy. The main aim of the strategy will be to focus future action by both DEFRA and other key stakeholders, especially individual beekeepers, on the main threats facing our honey bees.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many beehives were damaged by the varroa mite in each year since 1997; and if he will make a statement. (197598)

By 1995 virtually all apiaries in England had some degree of varroa infestation. While there may be colonies in isolated areas, which have yet to be infested by varroa, the pest is virtually ubiquitous. Every colony is damaged by varroa to varying degrees once it becomes infested. Uncontrolled it will kill colonies and that is why it is important for beekeepers to understand the biology of the mite, know the levels of varroa populations and how to treat their colonies to keep the mite below damage thresholds.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps he is taking to prevent the spread of the varroa mite; and if he will make a statement. (197599)

Despite the implementation of an extensive control programme, varroa is now endemic and is no longer notifiable under EC law. However, while it cannot be completely eradicated, beekeepers can keep productive bees despite its presence, providing they operate effective controls The best way of tackling varroa is by means of a careful programme of integrated pest management and DEFRA has published detailed advice for beekeepers on this. Experience has shown that it is effective.

A comprehensive advisory leaflet is available from the National Bee Unit.

The Bee Health Strategy, which will shortly be published for consultation, will address the issue of varroa and whether control should have greater priority compared, for example, to threats for exotic pests.

Bees: Diseases

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) if he will make a statement on bee colony collapse; (197593)

(2) what recent research he has commissioned into colony collapse disease affecting bees; and if he will make a statement.

DEFRA is aware of the press reports last year about the serious situation in the USA in respect of cases of abnormally high levels of colony loss, described as Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). While some common factors have been identified, such as high levels of Israeli Paralysis Virus, the cause of colony collapse has yet to be identified.

Scientists and inspectors at DEFRA’s National Bee Unit (NBU) are continuing to monitor the situation in the USA. To date, we do not have evidence to suggest that there is something similar happening in the UK.

The limited cases of high losses which occur here, for which there is no ready explanation such as poor management or failure to control the varroa mite, are investigated in depth as part of the NBU’s horizon-scanning work.

National Bee Unit: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much funding he proposes to provide to the National Bee Unit in each of the next five years; and if he will make a statement. (197597)

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what allocations were made to future funding for bee health in the Comprehensive Spending Review. (197461)

[holding answer 1 April 2008]: Detailed allocations have still to be finalised. The expectation is that funding for DEFRA’s ongoing programme of support for bee health will be around the same level as previously. In the event of a need to respond to new serious threats, there are contingency arrangements in place for additional funding to be made available.

Bluetongue Disease

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) what assessment he has made of the likelihood of cases of bluetongue arising in 2008 and subsequent years; (197992)

(2) what assessment he has made of the likelihood of bluetongue overwintering in the UK.

Bluetongue disease is spread from animal to animal by midges. During the winter, midge activity is at its lowest, and low temperatures mean that the virus is unlikely to replicate in the midges. As temperatures increase and midges become more active, it is likely that disease will re-emerge this year.

Experiences in northern Europe in 2007 showed that the virus reappeared in spring, with clinical cases being observed in June/July. Given our similar climate, we are preparing on the basis of a similar scenario in the UK this year.

The implementation of a vaccination programme could significantly reduce bluetongue virus circulation and limit its geographical distribution, contributing to its control and potential eradication at some point in the future. However, the future is uncertain and it is acknowledged that the UK may have to live with the threat of bluetongue for some time to come.

Further information about our control and vaccination strategy is available on the DEFRA website.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs when he expects a bluetongue vaccination programme to begin. (197996)

DEFRA placed an order with pharmaceutical company Intervet to supply 22.5 million doses of BTV-8 vaccine for use in England and Wales. Intervet has indicated that the first batches of vaccine are expected for delivery in May 2008.

Bovine Tuberculosis: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent discussions he has had with (a) the Chancellor of the Exchequer, (b) other Treasury Ministers and (c) Treasury civil servants on funding for tackling bovine tuberculosis. (197904)

There have been no recent discussions with my right hon. Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer, other Treasury Ministers or officials on funding for tackling bovine TB.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) if he will make a cost-benefit assessment of the cattle-based control options recommended by the Independent Scientific Group on bovine tuberculosis; (197905)

(2) when he will make a substantive response to the recent Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee Report on the final report of the Independent Scientific Group on bovine tuberculosis.

We are grateful to both the Independent Scientific Group on Cattle TB (ISG) and the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee for their respective reports on bovine TB.

We are committed to making decisions on bovine TB control policies for the future which are based on the evidence available. There is a great deal to consider in the ISG and Select Committee's reports concerning both cattle-based TB control measures and the potential role of badger culling in controlling TB in cattle.

Once we have made a decision on the way forward we will respond to the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee.

Cattle

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs pursuant to the answer of 19 March 2008, Official Report, column 1123W, on cattle, if he will make it his policy to collect information on the number and proportion of cows in the national herd which are being kept in zero-grazed conditions. (197110)

Climbing

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of the contribution to the rural economy of (a) mountaineering and (b) hill walking. (197466)

DEFRA has not specifically assessed the contribution to the rural economy of hill walking or mountaineering. However, Natural England has published the results of a survey of leisure day visits in England in 2005 and these do provide an estimate of the value of walking, hill walking and rambling in rural areas. The estimated value, in 2005, of walking, hill walking and rambling in the countryside and along the coast was £1.325 billion.

Not all of this expenditure was made in the rural economy as, for example, many of the visits started from urban areas and involved spend on petrol and ticket fares. Also, this figure does not include overnight spend on accommodation, or spend by overseas visitors. Although mountaineering activity was captured in this survey, the numbers of participants interviewed as part of the telephone survey of 46,000 households was too low to make a statistically reliable estimate of spending specifically associated with this activity.

Youth Hostels: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much funding his Department gave to capital infrastructure projects for youth hostels in each of the last 30 years. (197664)

DEFRA was created in June 2001 and it does not have responsibility or provide direct funding for youth hostels.

Ivory: Trade

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will make it his policy to oppose the application from China to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species to become a trading partner for the agreed ivory stockpiles; and if he will make a statement. (198349)

Trading nation status can only be granted once all the conditions contained in Conference Resolution 10.10 (Rev14) have been complied with. The UK, along with our EU colleagues, will be looking at all information relevant to those conditions before coming to any conclusions. We will take into account all the information available to us, including that from Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species Secretariat visits, third country visits and reports from non-governmental organisations, before taking any decision to approve or oppose China as a trading partner.

Laboratories: Capital Investment

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what capital funding was provided for (a) Pirbright and (b) Weybridge laboratories in the last five years; and what future capital funding is planned. (197429)

Under a ministerial agreement made with the then Department of Trade and Industry, now the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills, DEFRA agreed to provide a total of £67 million capital grant in aid funding during the period 2004-13 for the redevelopment of the Institute of Animal Health laboratory and Pirbright. To date the value of the funding DEFRA has provided is:

£

2004-05

1,195,000

2005-06

3,700,000

2006-07

6,300,000

2007-08

6,537,000

DEFRA capital funding for the Veterinary Laboratories Agency located at Weybridge for the last five years and estimated funding for the current and future years is:

£

2003-04

32,164,000

2004-05

16,993,000

2005-06

20,419,000

2006-07

18,034,000

2007-08

119,000,000

2008-09

110,000,000

2009-10

12,000,000

2010-11

12,000,000

1Estimated

Landfill

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much waste was sent to landfill outside the region of origin in the last period for which figures are available, broken down by region of reception. (197397)

The following tables provide data on inter-regional movements of waste for disposal to landfill in 2006, which is the most current data set available. The data relate to all types of waste deposited in landfill, including inert, hazardous and non-hazardous wastes.

Environment Agency data come from site input returns provided by landfill operators. Providing information on the origin of waste is not mandatory. This is reflected in the ‘not codeable’ column, which shows the quantity of waste that does not have an identified origin.

The data only report on inputs from Scotland, Northern Ireland and ‘Outside UK’ since the Environment Agency does not have comparable information on deposits in those areas.

Inter-regional movements of waste for landfill disposal in 2006

Origin of waste (from site input returns)

Deposit region

North East

North West

Yorkshire and Humber

East Midlands

West Midlands

East of England

London

South East

North East

*3,796,851

38,455

365,653

16,632

7,346

59,985

3,472

11,237

North West

129

*5,925,901

466

12,228

85,647

68

Yorkshire and Humber

28,834

508,257

*4,471,149

625,346

172

36

5

87

East Midlands

268

34,273

205,857

*4,516,410

28,726

196,988

118,775

25,671

West Midlands

3,550

179,493

*3,044,608

1,801

2,037

East of England

179

536

2,868

188,699

13,150

*7,020,162

2,858,121

655,428

London

29

25

14

5

543

275,983

*1,419,923

259,294

South East

50

54

22,828

201

153,720

2,257,928

*7,236,433

South West

8

10

1

66,811

23

1,412

137,592

Wales

111,192

13

16,038

7

3

Total

3,826,290

6,622,246

5,046,085

5,561,643

3,263,244

7,706,897

6,661,444

8,327,851

Total exports

29,439

696,344

574,937

1,045,233

218,635

686,734

5,241,521

1,091,418

Percentage home deposits

99

89

89

81

93

91

21

87

Origin of waste (from site input returns)

Deposit region

South West

Wales

Scotland

Northern Ireland

Outside UK

Not codeable

Total

Percentage un-coded

North East

8,709

5,064

16,461

5,086

149,210

361,406

4,845,567

7

North West

25,432

14

29

3,458,760

9,508,675

36

Yorkshire and Humber

48

56

10

227

1,157,114

6,791,339

17

East Midlands

853

899

70

49

159

1,846,937

6,975,935

26

West Midlands

3,098

6,753

2,533,322

5,774,663

44

East of England

1,524

278

227

75

456,212

11,197,459

4

London

17

21,384

1,977,218

1

South East

363,141

1,944,754

11,979,108

16

South West

*5,447,675

109,469

123,987

5,886,990

2

Wales

5,826

*3,886,036

4,019,116

0

Total

5,830,892

4,033,986

16,781

5,164

149,671

11,903,876

68,956,070

17

Total exports

383,217

147,950

Percentage home deposits

93

96

Notes:

Movements from one region to another can be read from the grid. Inputs to sites in North East from other regions are located along the top row, and exports from North East to other regions are shown in the left hand column.

Waste that is produced and deposited in the same region (‘home deposits’) are indicated by ‘*’.

Source:

Environment Agency Operator Site Returns

Packaging

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment his Department has made of the whole-life carbon footprint of (a) paper and (b) plastic bags. (194606)

The Environment Agency is carrying out a study to consider the environmental impacts of a range of carrier bags (including disposable plastic carrier bags and bio-degradable alternatives) over their entire life cycle, from raw material extraction through to product manufacture, use and final disposal. The study is due to report later this year.

Recycling: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much funding was provided to local authorities to support recycling activities in each year since 1997. (197408)

[holding answer 31 March 2008]: The main sources of funding for local authorities’ waste management services are revenue support grant (RSG) and national non-domestic rates (NNDR), distributed by central Government, and council tax. It is for local authorities to decide what proportion of this funding to invest in waste management services, including recycling. Other funding made available to authorities in England for waste management since 1997 is shown in the following table.

Funding provided

£ million

Scheme

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

Waste Minimisation and Recycling Fund

50

90

90

45

Waste Performance and Efficiency Grant

40

105

110

Grant to Relieve Spending Pressures on Waste

20

Reward Only Incentive Pilots

5

Private Finance Initiative

70

100

125

130

255

280

Local Communications Fund (WRAP)

16.2

Behavioural Change Local Fund (WRAP)

13

Seals: Hunting

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment his Department has made of the European Food Safety Authority's December 2007 report on the animal welfare aspects of seal hunting. (198668)

Seal management is a devolved matter. My Department has noted the findings and recommendations of the European Food Safety Authority's December 2007 report Animal Welfare Aspects of the killing and skinning of seals.

There is no commercial or recreational hunting of seals in England. Government policy is to permit only limited local management of seals where specific interactions between individual seals and particular fisheries or fish farms may result in serious damage to fisheries or property.

The Government fully implement the requirements of the EU Habitats Directive, including prohibiting the use of certain methods of killing seals. The limited seal management undertaken is broadly in line with the relevant general recommendations of the EFSA report.

Sugar: Subsidies

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether he has accepted the application by British Sugar for restructuring aid to the sugar industry in respect of the proportion of aid to be distributed to the contractor industry. (197403)

[holding answer 31 March 2008]: The application for restructuring aid submitted by British Sugar has been determined to be eligible and the European Commission informed. The proportion of the processor's aid to be reserved for beet growers and machinery contractors affected by the restructuring is set by the appropriate Council regulation at 10 per cent. How this part of the aid is allocated between the two groups is for individual member states to decide on the basis of objective criteria determined after consultation with the interested parties.

DEFRA is urgently taking this forward. Eligible beet growers will also share in an additional payment in respect of the tonnage of beet quota renounced.

Communities and Local Government

Aerials

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many mobile phone companies share masts; what arrangements are in place to encourage mobile phone companies to share masts; and if she will make a statement. (195299)

The five UK mobile network operators all participate in mast sharing arrangements with each other and with other companies such as Arqiva, which owns a number of sites.

Planning Policy Guidance Note 8: Telecommunications makes clear that applicants for new masts should provide evidence that they have explored the possibility of erecting antennas on an existing building, mast or other structure and that such evidence should accompany any prior approval or planning application made to the local planning authority. If the evidence regarding the consideration of sharing existing masts and sites is not considered satisfactory, the planning authority, or the Secretary of State on appeal, may be justified in refusing prior approval or planning permission for the development. Site sharing may not always be possible or the most appropriate environmental solution in every case. The ability to site share may be limited by a range of possible factors including the extent of the coverage required, topographical features and reception interference issues.

The mobile operators have established a computer program which monitors site-share usage and is used for making site-share requests between each other.

Arson

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many deliberate (a) property and (b) vehicle fires were attended by each fire and rescue service in each year since 1997. (198061)

Information on the number of deliberate property (i.e. dwellings and other buildings) and vehicle fires, in England, as attended by Fire and Rescue Services, from 1997 to 2006 (the latest calendar year for which information is available), is displayed in Table 1. Data for 2006 are provisional and subject to change.

Table 1: Deliberate fires1 by year and location, England, 1997 to 20062

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

FRS area

Properties

Road vehicles

Properties

Road vehicles

Properties

Road vehicles

Properties

Road vehicles

Properties

Road vehicles

England

26,221

35,162

24,357

40,090

25,472

51,888

25,487

58,979

27,653

67,158

England—Non-Met counties

12,763

17,519

12,131

20,505

12,471

26,564

12,867

30,701

14,125

34,545

Avon

448

887

411

1,158

435

1,669

513

2,057

600

2,540

Bedfordshire

261

513

247

533

225

727

246

964

221

865

Berkshire

256

509

213

561

203

720

237

865

244

944

Buckinghamshire

307

562

269

653

279

808

299

890

268

1,033

Cambridgeshire

303

504

316

537

319

827

309

880

315

813

Cheshire

513

432

471

567

472

619

518

667

532

946

Cleveland

615

571

523

755

607

1,125

655

1,207

690

1,483

Cornwall

117

178

147

162

107

169

137

237

158

310

Cumbria

216

300

188

344

252

372

193

430

247

380

Derbyshire

328

507

324

567

336

805

310

802

322

942

Devon

379

443

308

462

342

499

298

556

392

614

Dorset

250

286

206

317

231

401

227

493

256

589

Durham

420

507

366

657

308

732

287

749

383

751

East Sussex

338

455

325

520

293

716

368

882

403

918

Essex

396

649

379

724

471

961

574

1,559

553

1,740

Gloucestershire

179

264

168

256

159

290

185

353

154

464

Hampshire

530

526

560

710

511

802

436

839

501

822

Hereford and Worcester

272

299

218

311

218

415

223

465

287

450

Hertfordshire

333

431

281

466

321

677

347

845

345

885

Humberside

668

722

639

902

681

1,186

595

1,092

650

1,379

Isle of Wight

58

22

45

10

42

21

54

19

70

32

Kent

607

1,086

578

1,397

595

1,864

555

2,373

665

2,143

Lancashire

881

821

933

918

1,101

1,229

1,081

1,169

1,212

1,366

Leicestershire

460

752

496

819

431

1,075

415

1,063

527

1,172

Lincolnshire

167

263

197

364

230

373

185

421

198

473

Norfolk

309

411

287

436

244

489

285

696

286

738

North Yorkshire

189

255

193

252

185

384

198

450

219

553

Northamptonshire

326

550

338

632

337

763

363

941

406

954

Northumberland

178

272

172

236

165

327

166

309

196

372

Nottinghamshire

512

818

551

1,062

624

1,562

589

1,772

680

2,672

Oxfordshire

217

372

188

478

197

544

223

686

170

566

Shropshire

155

309

185

309

163

315

179

409

222

512

Somerset

148

226

120

248

141

374

155

411

165

513

Staffordshire

421

653

412

809

398

955

453

968

497

1,137

Suffolk

168

164

139

148

143

222

176

326

219

400

Surrey

215

329

185

381

164

508

194

636

197

659

Warwickshire

163

343

171

397

151

461

196

511

150

568

West Sussex

261

239

223

291

239

389

269

435

343

540

Wiltshire

198

89

159

159

151

192

174

275

181

306

Isles of Scilly

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

England—Met Counties

13,458

17,644

12,226

19,585

13,001

25,324

12,620

28,278

13,528

32,613

Greater Manchester

2,642

4,042

2,439

4,130

2,738

5,166

2,529

5,717

2,676

7,017

Merseyside

1,725

1,569

1,606

1,838

1,836

2,568

1,865

3,124

1,787

3,473

South Yorkshire

677

1,562

740

1,901

715

2,254

755

2,125

877

2,383

Tyne and Wear

1,372

1,581

1,201

1,738

1,145

2,068

1,110

1,953

1,188

2,259

West Midlands

2,430

3,044

2,078

3,110

2,102

4,154

2,089

4,423

2,127

4,834

West Yorkshire

1,601

2,874

1,459

3,491

1,420

4,169

1,383

4,817

1,673

6,171

Greater London

3,011

2,971

2,703

3,378

3,045

4,945

2,889

6,118

3,200

6,475

200220032004200520062

FRS area

Properties

Road vehicles

Properties

Road vehicles

Properties

Road vehicles

Properties

Road vehicles

Properties

Road vehicles

England

25,144

66,018

26,077

61,088

22,769

46,660

19,848

40,335

18,254

34,893

England—Non-Met counties

13,223

34,976

13,653

32,598

12,398

25,308

10,784

22,232

9,896

19,492

Avon

492

2,147

574

1,838

498

1,502

417

1,373

385

1,258

Bedfordshire

275

968

238

735

261

476

209

434

203

354

Berkshire

239

717

231

628

219

561

143

471

163

413

Buckinghamshire

260

843

288

883

257

675

259

615

222

475

Cambridgeshire

289

1,034

314

961

299

721

245

620

267

576

Cheshire

524

980

496

924

519

892

440

1,011

388

847

Cleveland

731

1,688

656

1,397

495

1,083

397

719

376

628

Cornwall

119

349

109

359

143

271

122

210

98

211

Cumbria

178

408

195

408

163

359

170

330

157

234

Derbyshire

338

1,020

392

894

297

574

289

535

254

456

Devon

373

614

388

623

311

586

310

447

281

429

Dorset

213

515

202

507

173

353

165

320

135

251

Durham

320

823

300

797

287

583

228

535

232

442

East Sussex

368

841

427

695

408

499

301

414

256

340

Essex

536

1,598

524

1,537

474

1,117

377

883

372

768

Gloucestershire

181

532

185

549

171

534

133

386

153

330

Hampshire

412

838

440

815

382

644

309

640

251

682

Hereford and Worcester

210

518

189

426

203

411

156

259

155

304

Hertfordshire

306

891

334

829

282

645

265

531

195

445

Humberside

666

1,695

693

2,079

671

1,582

520

1,387

541

1,073

Isle of Wight

40

45

44

36

38

27

59

21

49

35

Kent

607

1,896

682

1,800

595

1,454

555

1,532

468

1,250

Lancashire

1,040

1,392

1,183

1,274

994

1,043

939

911

855

810

Leicestershire

444

1,171

381

926

326

680

301

510

274

471

Lincolnshire

183

575

194

584

196

463

181

412

171

304

Norfolk

286

732

301

711

285

482

229

471

240

380

North Yorkshire

219

569

167

520

163

347

161

451

158

349

Northamptonshire

415

1,042

392

1,052

384

805

382

755

297

814

Northumberland

188

351

196

390

155

270

125

173

126

181

Nottinghamshire

762

3,064

847

2,499

790

1,707

629

1,346

503

1,120

Oxfordshire

185

565

165

556

171

457

156

426

135

385

Shropshire

217

405

200

346

170

323

190

213

166

253

Somerset

166

612

181

492

172

285

128

247

120

231

Staffordshire

454

1,087

451

1,112

422

906

397

817

367

735

Suffolk

178

375

163

358

150

326

165

309

142

282

Surrey

224

701

282

697

253

539

201

476

252

448

Warwickshire

171

666

200

616

171

553

142

476

141

405

West Sussex

265

474

295

495

296

364

242

341

211

316

Wiltshire

149

237

154

248

154

209

147

225

136

207

Isles of Scilly

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

England—Met Counties

11,921

31,042

12,424

28,490

10,371

21,351

9,064

18,103

8,358

15,402

Greater Manchester

2,374

5,821

2,485

5,132

1,930

4,001

1,811

3,732

1,726

3,206

Merseyside

1,652

3,416

1,728

3,443

1,413

2,806

1,090

2,127

1,036

1,729

South Yorkshire

756

3,098

903

3,098

822

2,280

707

2,040

686

1,985

Tyne and Wear

1,057

2,234

1,092

2,056

827

1,514

748

1,354

684

1,264

West Midlands

1,885

4,612

1,929

4,272

1,584

3,301

1,393

2,704

1,256

1,990

West Yorkshire

1,378

6,482

1,377

5,617

1,280

3,620

1,073

2,722

1,042

2,349

Greater London

2,819

5,379

2,910

4,872

2,515

3,829

2,242

3,424

1,928

2,879

1 Excluding incidents not recorded during periods of industrial action in 2002 and 2003.

2 Provisional. 

Citizen's Advice Bureau: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how much funding her Department provided for the citizen's advice bureau in each of the local housing allowance pathfinder areas to support money advice services. (181374)

I have been asked to reply.

The DWP has paid out around £59 million for the overall implementation of the local housing allowance in the local authorities. This money was for a range of implementation activity. The payments were made in August 2007 and included funds for money management advice, IT costs, training, communications and advertising.

As each local authority decides whether to provide in house money advice services or to contract this out, it is not possible to provide a breakdown of how much funding was used by individual local authorities in support of the services provided by citizen's advice bureau.

Council Tax: Valuation

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government pursuant to the Answer of 19 February 2008, Official Report, column 613W, on council tax: valuation, what steps were taken as a result of the consequentials identified following the data enhancement that took place in the Council Tax Revaluation 2007 programme; and what estimate the group valuation officers made of the number of properties involved in the programme. (193917)

No detailed analysis was undertaken and any action was dealt with as part of the normal duty to maintain the current council tax lists.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government pursuant to the Answer of 19 February 2008, Official Report, column 613W, on council tax: valuation, how many consequentials following data enhancement were identified by the Valuation Office Agency; and what actions her Department has taken as a result of such identifications. (193976)

The issue was one of potential banding changes as a consequence of data enhancement. No detailed analysis was undertaken and they were dealt with as part of the normal duty to maintain the current council tax lists.

Disabled Facilities Grants

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many disabled facilities grant awards were made in each of the last five years. (196987)

The disabled facilities grant is a mandatory grant used to provide adaptations to the homes of disabled people. Local authorities in England report their annual disabled facilities grant expenditure and the number of recipients of disabled facilities grant through the housing strategy statistical appendix. The 2006-07 housing strategy statistical appendix report was recently published. The following table sets out the number of disabled facilities grant recipients in England from 2002-03 to 2006-07:

Number of recipients

2002-03

29,314

2003-04

34,925

2004-05

38,552

2005-06

34,955

2006-07

37,266

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government pursuant to the statement of 25 February, Official Report, columns 66-67WS, on the national strategy for housing in an ageing society: disabled facilities grant (funding), what guidance will be issued to local authorities to ensure that funding provided for the disabled facilities grant (DFG) is spent on DFG related purposes once the ring fencing for this funding is removed. (196997)

[holding answer 27 March 2008]: The removal of the ringfence in respect of the funding for disabled facilities grant will be piloted in a number of local authorities from 2008-09. The pilots will be evaluated and lessons learnt through this process. This will inform good practice guidance for all other local authorities before the ring fence is removed in 2010-11.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many disabled facilities grant awards have been made at the maximum level of £25,000 in the last five years. (196998)

[holding answer 27 March 2008]: The disabled facilities grant is a mandatory grant used to provide adaptations to the homes of disabled people. Local authorities in England report their total annual disabled facilities grant expenditure and the number of recipients of disabled facilities grant through the housing strategy statistical appendix. This does not include information on the individual level of grants awarded.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many disabled facilities grant awards the Government estimate will be made at the new maximum level of £30,000 in the three years after its introduction in April 2008; and what the effect on costs will be. (196999)

[holding answer 27 March 2008]: In 2004, the Government launched a cross departmental review of the disabled facilities grant programme. Bristol university were commissioned to carry out an independent study of the programme and make recommendations for change. One of the recommendations for change was to increase the maximum level for a disabled facilities grant. Bristol estimated that increasing the limit from £25,000 to £30,000 would impact on the national budget in the region of £4.3 million. It is estimated that this increase will affect in the region of 1,000 grant applications each year. The national budget for the disabled facilities grant programme increases by £25 million in 2008-09 and then by £10 million in each of the following two years. This increase meets the cost of the changes made to the programme as well as helping to address the continued growth in demand for adaptations.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government pursuant to the written ministerial statement of 25 February 2008, Official Report, columns 66-67WS, on the national strategy for housing in an ageing society: disabled facilities grant (funding), how many disabled facilities grant awards the Government estimate will be made in (a) 2008-09, (b) 2009-10 and (c) 2010-11. (197107)

The disabled facilities grant is a mandatory grant used to provide adaptations to the homes of disabled people. Local authorities in England report their annual disabled facilities grant expenditure and the number of recipients of disabled facilities grant through the housing strategy statistical appendix.

The figures provided by the 2007 housing strategy statistical appendix estimates a total of 42,014 will receive disabled facilities grants in 2008-09. The Department does not hold estimated numbers beyond 2008-09.

Energy Performance Certificates: Complaints

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what complaints procedures are available to those paying for energy performance certificates. (193042)

[holding answer 10 March 2008]: Details of the complaints procedure available to those paying for energy performance certificates are set out in the accreditation scheme standards for Domestic Energy Assessors (DEAs) and Commercial Energy Assessors (CEAs) respectively. A copy of the accreditation scheme standards for DEAs is available at:

http://www.communities.gov.uk/documents/planningandbuilding/pdf/319273

The accreditation scheme standards for CEAs are currently being updated. They will be published on the CLG website shortly.

Fire Services: Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many fire-fighters there were in each local authority area in the East Midlands in each year since 1997. (187034)

Available information, for each Fire and Rescue Service area within East Midlands, is shown as follows:

Firefighters1 in East Midlands 1997-2006

Derbyshire

Leicestershire

Lincolnshire

Northamptonshire

Nottinghamshire

Total East Midlands

1997

841

701

628

520

921

3,611

1998

859

723

588

503

891

3,564

1999

836

710

662

518

923

3,649

2000

863

718

682

517

922

3,702

2001

834

730

674

517

930

3,685

2002

846

701

682

534

930

3,693

2003

808

696

690

535

945

3,674

2004

832

694

716

531

936

3,709

2005

829

739

701

539

888

3,696

2006

805

672

724

517

911

3,629

1 Includes all roles of fire officers including chief officers.

Numbers of firefighters can fluctuate when firefighters retire and are not immediately replaced. These figures provide a snapshot of figures at one point during the year.

Flood Control: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what criteria her Department will use for allocating European Union solidarity flood funding. (198396)

The recommendation to award the UK funding from the European Union Solidarity Fund to assist with recovery from the floods of 2007 was approved by the European Union Budgetary Committee on 28 February 2008. We are currently working alongside the European Commission to draft the implementation agreement which will allow the money to be paid to the UK, and we expect to receive the money in spring.

The nature of the EUSF is that it is to reimburse emergency operations undertaken by public bodies, including central Government.

Regulations governing the EUSF state that it can only be spent on works in the following four categories:

immediate restoration to working order of infrastructure and plant in the fields of energy, water and waste water, telecommunications, transport, health and education—in most circumstances costs relating to energy, water, waste water and telecommunications will not be covered as these costs are borne by the private utilities companies;

providing temporary accommodation and funding rescue services to meet the immediate needs of the population concerned;

immediate securing of preventive infrastructures and measures of immediate protection of the cultural heritage; and

immediate cleaning up of disaster-stricken areas, including natural zones.

Home Information Packs

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what estimate she has made of the average amount of time taken for a conveyancing search to be completed in (a) Milton Keynes unitary authority and (b) England, (i) before the introduction of the home improvement pack legislation and (ii) after the introduction of the legislation. (197340)

[holding answer 31 March 2008]: My Department does not hold the information in the form requested. Based on our survey of local authority property searches services of April 2007, we estimate that on average, property searches took five days in England. As part of this survey, Milton Keynes unitary authority reported an average time of seven days.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many (a) home information packs and (b) home condition reports have been commissioned to date. (198259)

[holding answer 1 April 2008]: The commercial and private nature of a home owner’s decision when to place their property on the market for sale means this information is not available in a robust form. We therefore do not hold this information centrally in the format requested.

Housing: Disabled

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how much was spent by the London borough of Enfield on improving homes for people with disabilities in each of the last three years. (196788)

The disabled facilities grant is a mandatory grant used to provide adaptations to the homes of disabled people. Local authorities in England report their annual disabled facilities grant expenditure through the housing strategy statistical appendix. The 2006-07 housing strategy statistical appendix report was published recently. The 2004-05 to 2006-07 expenditure by the London borough of Enfield is provided in the following table. Communities and Local Government provide 60 per cent. of the value of the disabled facilities grant to local authorities. Local authorities fund the remaining 40 per cent. from their own resources. Expenditure figures for 2007-08 are not yet available.

The following table sets out disabled facilities grant expenditure for the London borough of Enfield.

£

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

Total expenditure

1,860,000

1,203,000

1,689,000

CLG contribution

794,000

844,000

915,000

Neighbourhood Renewal Fund

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government if she will place in the Library a copy of each report on the Neighbourhood Renewal Fund prepared by each of the Government Offices for the Neighbourhood Renewal Unit. (193774)

Government Offices do not systematically prepare such reports, although information on the Neighbourhood Renewal Fund may form part of Local Strategic Partnership reporting.

Work and Pensions

Departmental Contracts

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what contracts were awarded by his Department to (a) KPMG, (b) PricewaterhouseCoopers, (c) Ernst and Young, (d) McKinsey, (e) Deloitte and (f) other consultancy firms in each of the last 12 months; and what the (i) purpose and (ii) value was of each of these contracts. (196578)

Contracts awarded to the suppliers (a) to (e) are listed in the following table. Details of contracts awarded to other consultancy firms (f) can be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Month

Supplier

Purpose

Value (£)

2007

April

PWC

Analysis, evaluation and advice on CSA debt

139,334

May

PWC

NEP—focus groups on the quality of ESOL training to unemployed immigrants

23,070

May

PWC

Management support to ‘Tell us Once’ project

61,230

May

McKinsey

Assurance review of CSA computer system

135,000

May

PWC

Measurement of admin costs

42,000

June

PWC

NEP—City strategy review

36,045

June

PWC

Departmental financial advisors

900,000

July

Deloitte

Investment advice to the enabling retirement savings programme

193,133

July

Deloitte

Child maintenance redesign

308,083

July

Deloitte

Child maintenance redesign

478,386

July

Deloitte

HR operating model

417,348

August

PWC

Support on resilience of the Pensions Protection Fund

20,000

August

KPMG

Financial support on Remploy/TU negotiations

87,000

August

Deloitte

PADA design and implementation

2,000,000

August

Deloitte

Child maintenance redesign

478,386

August

Deloitte

Business design and design capability

850,000

September

PWC

Analysis of costs and benefits of ‘Tell us Once’

970,000

September

Ernst and Young

Data protection advice

49,563

October

None

November

PWC

Support to CPS programme

514,560

November

Deloitte

Support to CPS programme

1,637,981

November

Deloitte

Application Delivery Centre

342,900

December

None

2008

January

Deloitte

Child maintenance redesign—debt provisions

105,705

January

Deloitte

New ways of working implementation

189,510

February

PWC

Review to improve DWP’s performance and development system PDS diversity and equality performance

26,696

February

PWC

Development of a framework and toolkit for corporate, cohesive and capable boards at DWP

39,183

February

Deloitte

Risk management support to RAD

50,000

March

PWC

Support to conduct equal pay audit

21,100

Incapacity Benefit

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people received incapacity benefits or severe disablement allowance on the grounds of dependency on (a) drugs and (b) alcohol in each year since 1997 for which information is available. (185923)

The Government’s drugs strategy was published on 27 February 2008. It stresses the need for the benefit system to support re-integration and personalisation. We will ensure that it provides the right level of support, and also creates incentives for people with drug problems to move towards treatment.

We will put in place arrangements which require drugs misusers on benefits who are not already in treatment to attend a discussion with an appropriate specialist treatment provider or partner organisation.

Entitlement to incapacity benefit is not linked to any specific diagnosis or condition. Entitlement, which is assessed by the personal capability assessment, depends on the effect that a person’s condition has on their ability to carry out a number of activities relevant to work. Most people with drug or alcohol dependency also have other conditions, such as mental illness; and it is these other conditions which result in entitlement to benefits.

We do record the diagnosis of incapacity that is written on a claimant’s medical certificate. The table shows the number of people receiving incapacity benefits whose recorded diagnosis includes drug or alcohol dependency.

Working age incapacity benefit/severe disablement allowance claims which includes a recorded diagnosis of alcoholism or drug abuse from the claimant’s medical certificate.Number as of May:AlcoholismDrug abuseAlcoholism as proportion of caseloadDrug Abuse as proportion of caseload199726,80021,9001.030.84199829,80025,3001.130.96199932,50027,9001.231.05200035,58030,9501.321.15200138,66036,2301.401.32200241,04040,6901.481.47200343,42043,8901.571.58200445,94046,1201.661.66200547,74047,9801.741.75200649,20048,5501.831.81200751,41049,8901.941.89Notes:1. May 1997 to May 1999 (inclusive) numbers are uprated to WPLS totals and rounded to the nearest hundred.2. May 2000 to May 2007 (inclusive) numbers are rounded to the nearest 10.3. Totals may not sum due to rounding.4. May 1997 to May 1999 (inclusive) numbers are based on a 5 per cent. sample, and are therefore subject to a degree of sampling variation.5. These figures should be used as a guide to the current situation only.6. Causes of incapacity are based on the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, published by the World Health Organisation. Source: DWP Information Directorate 5 per cent. sample and 100 per cent. Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study

Medical Examinations: Sight Impaired

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions whether all registered blind people are required to undertake a personal capability assessment. (195534)

Registered blind people are treated as meeting the threshold of incapacity for benefit purposes and are exempt from the personal capability assessment process.

New arrangements will apply when the work capability assessment for the Employment and Support Allowance is introduced in October this year.

Mineral Waters

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many litres of bottled water were purchased by his Department in each of the last three years; and if he will make a statement. (191249)

The Department for Work and Pensions currently has a single contract to supply DWP offices with water coolers, bottled water and associated services and equipment. Bottled water may also be provided for business meetings but is sourced from a variety of contracts and is not accounted for separately.

From April 2006 to March 2007, DWP purchased 3.4 million litres of bottled water. So far this year, from April 2007 to January 2008, DWP has purchased 2.9 million litres. Information prior to these dates is not available.

DWP is committed to phase out the use of bottled water for all business meetings and replace it with tap water. We are aiming to have this process in place by the summer of 2008.

New Deal for Disabled People

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people have taken part in the new deal for disabled people (a) nationally and (b) in West Lancashire. (196857)

Nationally, 271,180 people started the new deal for disabled people between July 2001 and August 2007. In the same period, 490 people started the programme in the West Lancashire constituency.

Pensioners

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what assessment he has made of the effects of measures introduced by his Department since 1997 on pensioners in (a) the UK, (b) the North East, (c) the Tees Valley and (d) Middlesbrough, South and East Cleveland. (198003)

Latest available information shows that average net incomes of pensioner households in the UK increased by 29 per cent. between 1996-97 and 2005-06, and average net incomes of pensioner households in the North East increased by 29 per cent. between 1994-95 to 1996-97 and 2003-04 to 2005-06. Information for the Tees Valley and Middlesbrough, South and East Cleveland is not available.

The Government have introduced a number of measures since 1997 to help older people to enjoy a better standard of living, most notably the introduction of the minimum income guarantee and its successor pension credit. We have successively raised the pension credit standard minimum guarantee by earnings in every year since its introduction. For 2008 the standard minimum guarantee will rise to £124.05—an increase of 4.2 per cent.—more than keeping pace with earnings and prices.

In addition we have introduced winter fuel payments for those aged 60 and over, including an extra one-off payment for winter 2008-09 of £50 for households with someone aged 60 to 79 and £100 for those with someone aged 80 or over announced in the Budget on 12 March 2008.

We have also introduced free television licences for people aged over 75 and from April 2008 those over 60 will be entitled to free off-peak bus travel in England. We have committed to increasing the basic state pension by earnings by 2012, subject to affordability and the fiscal position, or by the end of the next Parliament.

As a result of the personal tax and benefit changes that we have introduced pensioner households nationally will be around £1,500 a year better off in 2008-09 than they would have been under the 1997 system. The poorest third of pensioner households will on average be around £2,100 a year better off.

Our new public service agreement ‘Tackle poverty and promote greater independence and wellbeing in later life’ demonstrates our commitment to ensure that the specific needs of the older population are given due priority.

Social Security Benefits: Recipients

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people in (a) London and (b) England in receipt of (i) jobseeker's allowance and (ii) incapacity benefit have been claiming benefit continuously for (A) more than three months, (B) more than six months, (C) more than a year and (D) more than two years. (189308)

The most recent available information is in the following tables:

Jobseekers allowance claimants in England and London by duration of current claim; as at January 2008

All

Up to 3 months

3 months up to 6 months

6 months up to 1 year

1 year and up to 2 years

2 years and up to 5 years

5 years and over

England

688,505

333,700

147,450

108,025

69,835

24,400

5,105

London

130,730

53,895

30,400

23,595

16,160

5,410

1,280

Note:

Figures are rounded to the nearest five; totals may not sum due to rounding.

Source:

Count of unemployment-related benefits, Jobcentre Plus computer systems (computer held cases only).

Incapacity benefit and severe disablement allowance claimants in England and London by duration of current claim: As at May 2007

All

Up to 3 months

3 months up to 6 months

6 months up to 1 year

1 year and up to 2 years

2 years and up to 5 years

5 years and over

England

2,166,480

105,600

91,420

135,500

189,720

440,810

1,203,400

London

311,410

14,500

13,750

21,020

29,170

69,990

162,980

Note:

Figures are rounded to the nearest 10; totals may not sum due to rounding.

Source:

DWP Information Directorate 100 per cent WPLS

Social Security Benefits: Wales

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many and what proportion of people claimed each type of benefit in (a) Aberavon constituency and (b) Wales in each year since 1979. (190221)

Information is not available prior to 2002. Estimates for the proportion of the population are not available at parliamentary constituency level. The available information is in the following tables.

Working age and pensioner client groups, by statistical group and proportion (percentage) of adult population in Wales, as at May each year

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

All benefits

947,340

949,200

944,530

945,710

949,070

948,240

Proportion

40.5

40.2

39.7

39.5

39.5

39.4

Job seekers

45,700

45,120

38,620

40,320

44,400

40,100

Proportion

2.0

1.9

1.6

1.7

1.8

1.7

Incapacity benefits

223,970

221 ,220

216,800

212,140

206,880

200,540

Proportion

9.6

9.4

9.1

8.9

8.6

8.3

Lone parents

46,580

45,020

42,860

40,540

39,800

38,540

Proportion

2.0

1.9

1.8

1.7

1.7

1.6

Carers

30,350

34,180

41 ,780

46,310

49,860

52,540

Proportion

1.3

1.4

1.8

1.9

2.1

2.2

Other income related benefit

93,770

94,270

134,090

143,110

144,850

145,380

Proportion

4.0

4.0

5.6

6.0

6.0

6.0

Disabled

138,000

142,900

128,630

126,520

129,450

133,590

Proportion

5.9

6.1

5.4

5.3

5.4

5.6

Bereaved

10,610

9,530

8,500

7,860

7,080

6,340

Proportion

0.5

0.4

0.4

0.3

0.3

0.3

State pension only

358,370

356,970

333,260

328,910

326,750

331,220

Proportion

15.3

15.1

14.0

13.8

13.6

13.8

Working age and pensioner client groups, by Statistical group in the Aberavon parliamentary constituency, as at May each year

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

All

25,240

25,280

24,870

24,860

24,720

24,560

Job seekers

1,070

1,110

860

1,000

1,010

960

Incapacity benefits

7,550

7,520

7,340

7,230

6,920

6,700

Lone parent

1,320

1,300

1,220

1,190

1,170

1,180

Carers

1,110

1,310

1,580

1,780

1,980

2,090

Other income related benefits

2,590

2,580

3,640

3,810

3,960

3,920

Disabled

4,620

4,760

4,240

4,100

4,060

4,150

Bereaved

210

190

170

140

140

120

State pension only

6,770

6,530

5,830

5,620

5,480

5,450

Notes:

1. Caseload figures are rounded to the nearest ten.

2. Totals may not sum due to rounding.

3. Figures for attendance allowance, carers allowance, and disability living allowance include those cases with entitlement but where payment is currently suspended (for example, because of an extended stay in hospital or an overlapping benefit).

4. Statistical Group is a hierarchical variable. A person who fits into more than one category will only appear in the top-most one for which they are eligible.

Job Seeker: claimant on jobseekers allowance;

Incapacity benefits: claimant on incapacity benefit or severe disablement allowance;

Lone Parent: claimant on income support with child under 16 and no partner;

Carer: claimant entitled to carer’s allowance;

Other Income related benefit: claimant on income support or pension credit;

Disabled: claimant on attendance allowance or disability living allowance;

Bereaved: claimant on bereavement benefit or widow's benefit;

State Pension only: claimant in receipt of state pension only.

For example a claimant of disability living allowance and jobseekers allowance would appear in “job seeker”, not in “disabled”.

Source:

Department for Work and Pensions Information Directorate: Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study. ONS mid-year population estimates.

Defence

Afghanistan: Compensation

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much the Government paid in compensation to Afghan nationals injured by British armed forces in Afghanistan in each year since 2001. (198015)

Payments totalling $US 295,386 have been paid to Afghan nationals killed or injured by British armed forces in Afghanistan since 2001 as follows:

Financial year

Total payments ($)

2001-02

1

2002-03

35,000

2003-04

1

2004-05

1

2005-06

1

2006-07

36,061

2007-08

224,325

1 None recorded

Air Force: Military Bases

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what is the duration of the contract with the US administration for its use of (a) RAF Menwith Hill and (b) RAF Fylingdales. (198155)

There is no contract for the use of RAF Menwith Hill. The base is made available to the United States Visiting Force under the terms of the NATO Status of Forces Agreement 1951, and other confidential arrangements.

The use of RAF Fylingdales to provide the US with ballistic missile early warning data is governed by the Memorandum of Agreement Concerning Ballistic Missile Early Warning Station at Fylingdales Moor, Yorkshire 1960. This agreement is scheduled to remain in force while the North Atlantic Treaty remains in force. The use of the upgraded early warning radar at RAF Fylingdales to provide data for the US ballistic missile defence system is governed by the Memorandum of Understanding Concerning Ballistic Missile Defence. This agreement is scheduled to last for 25 years, and began in 2003.

Ammunition

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the UK’s stockpile of cluster munitions is; and what the criteria is for their use. (198111)

I am withholding the information requested as its disclosure would, or would be likely to, prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of the armed forces. The use of cluster munitions, as with all munitions, is governed by international humanitarian law.

Armed Forces: Housing

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many individuals in each branch of the armed forces participated in his Department’s shared equity housing scheme. (197932)

Armed Forces: Influenza

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what guidance the Defence Medical Services Department has issued to the armed forces overseas on preparing for an influenza pandemic; and if he will make a statement. (195353)

Guidance and information on infection control procedures for military establishments, both within the UK and overseas, is set down in the Defence Medical Services document “Pandemic Influenza: Infection Control Guidance for Military Settings”, issued in October 2006, and based on Health Protection Agency guidance. In the event that the World Health Organisation declares a pandemic alert, Defence Medical Services personnel on operational deployment will work with military commanders to apply the guidance in-theatre.

In addition, MOD has recently produced a “Pandemic Influenza Guide”, to enable defence personnel to make informed judgements on what to do should an influenza pandemic occur. Two leaflets have also been produced, summarising key aspects of the guidance; TLBs and Trading Funds will be arranging promulgation to their staff shortly.

Armed Forces: Pensions

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many forces’ widows whose husbands retired before 31 March 1973 were receiving an armed forces pension scheme pension at the latest date for which figures are available. (197893)

The information is not held centrally and could be provided only at a disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence for what reasons figures on the number of service pensions paid are not included in UK defence statistics. (197895)

Figures on the number of service pensions paid are not included in the UK Defence statistics as there has been no past requirement for the Defence Analytical Services Agency to routinely process information on the armed forces pension scheme.

Armed Forces: Schools

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what discussions his Department has had with the National Union of Teachers on the provision of materials on (a) the armed forces and (b) Iraq to schools; and what steps have been taken following such discussions. (196606)

Armed Forces: Transexuality

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will place in the Library a copy of the Tri Service Draft on Transgender Service Personnel. (198200)

I will place a copy of the policy document in the Library of the House once it has been finalised.

Army: Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the (a) mean, (b) median and (c) mode length of service of (i) UK nationals and (ii) non-UK nationals in the British Army was in each of the last 10 years. (194551)

This question has been assumed as mean, median and mode return of service and is therefore based on the length of service of those that outflowed during the period.

Non-UK nationals have only been recruited into the Army in significant numbers since 1999 and so a comparatively small number have had the opportunity to serve a full career. This is reflected in the number that have outflowed and the mean, mode and median calculations.

The following tables show the mean, mode and median length of service on outflow for trained regular army direct entry and late entry officers and other ranks. Because of the very small population of outflow from non-UK nationals this information is not comparable with the outflow from UK nationals.

Direct entry officers

UK nationals

Non-UK nationals

Financial year of outflow

Mean

Mode

Median

Number of outflow

Mean

Mode

Median

Number of outflow

2006-071

16 years 2 months

6 years

16 years

710

13 years 9 months

4 and 9 years

9 years

20

2005-06

17 years

6 and 34 years

14 years

660

11 years 5 months

5 and 6 years

7 years

30

2004-05

16 years 9 months

6 years

14 years

630

11 years 2 months

4 years

6 years

20

2003-04

17 years 3 months

5 and 34 years

16 years

570

13 years 3 months

4 and 34 years

8 years

10

2002-03

17 years 11 months

34 years

16 years

570

7 years 10 months

34 years

5 years

20

2001-02

17 years 4 months

34 years

16 years

650

16 years 11 months

6 years

10 years

10

2000-01

16 years

4 years

12 years

650

13 years 4 months

16 years

11 years

20

1999-2000

16 years 7 months

34 years

12 years

630

11 years 10 months

6 years

8 years

20

1998-99

14 years 11 months

4 years

9 years

750

11 years 3 months

5 and 8 years

8 years

20

1997-98

14 years 11 months

6 years

9 years

650

13 years 4 months

7 years

8 years

20

Late entry officers

UK nationals

Non-UK nationals

Financial year of outflow

Mean

Mode

Median

Number of outflow

Mean

Mode

Median

Number of outflow

2006-071

9 years 6 months

3 and 4 years

9 years

260

10 years 6 months

7 and 8 years

8 years

10

2005-06

10 years 6 months

6 years

10 years

280

10 years 8 months

4 years

10 years

10

2004-05

10 years 10 months

14 years

11 years

230

11 years 4 months

6 and 10 years

10 years

10

2003-04

11 years 8 months

15 and 16 years

12 years

182

11 years 10 months

2

9 years

0

2002-03

11 years 11 months

15 years

12 years

200

17 years 3 months

16 years

17 years

0

2001-02

12 years 3 months

15 years

12 years

220

19 years 3 months

19 years

19 years

0

2000-01

12 years

14 years

12 years

210

14 years 6 months

2

14 years

0

1999-2000

11 years 8 months

6 years

11 years

190

14 years 3 months

2

15 years

0

1998-99

11 years 11 months

5 years

12 years

230

9 years 10 months

2

5 years

0

1997-98

10 years 2 months

5 years

9 years

260

12 years

11 years

11 years

0

Other ranks

UK nationals

Non-UK nationals

Financial year of outflow

Mean

Mode

Median

Number of outflow

Mean

Mode

Median

Number of outflow

2006/071

10 years 2 months

22 years

6 years

9,210

5 years 5 months

4 years

4 years

420

2005-06

10 years 6 months

22 years

6 years

10,130

5 years 6 months

4 years

4 years

290

2004-05

9 years 5 months

22 years

6 years

10,420

4 years 8 months

4 years

3 years

250

2003-04

9 years 5 months

22 years

6 years

9,220

4 years 1 month

1 year

3 years

190

2002-03

9 years 11 months

22 years

6 years

9,370

6 years 8 months

3 years

4 years

160

2001-02

9 years 9 months

22 years

6 years

9,570

6 years 7 months

22 years

5 years

130

2000-01

9 years 11 months

22 years

7 years

9,630

8 years 3 months

3 years

4 years

110

1999-2000

10 years

22 years

7 years

9,440

11 years

22 years

8 years

110

1998-99

9 years 9 months

22 years

7 years

10,100

9 years 6 months

3 years

6 years

100

1997-98

9 years 9 months

22 years

7 years

9,560

10 years 8 months

22 years

7 years

100

1 The financial year 2006-07 is for an 11 month period from 1 April 2006 to 28 February 2007.

2 Due to insufficient numbers of outflow we are unable to publish the mode without disclosing sensitive personal data.

Notes:

1. Figures have been rounded to the nearest 10 to prevent disclosure of sensitive personal data.

2. ‘0’ Denotes zero or rounded to zero.

3. UK nationals equal personnel with a nationality at birth of UK or UK dependency

4. Non-UK Nationals equal personnel with a nationality at birth of Commonwealth(excluding UK), Eire and other.

Committee of Permanent Representatives

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 16 March 2008, Official Report, column 652W, on Committee of Permanent Representatives, whether each agenda item listed was decided as an (a) A, (b) B, (c) I or (d) false B Point. (196713)

The Committee of Permanent Representatives II considers agenda items as either “I points” (agreed without discussion) or “II points” (items scheduled for debate). There are no items considered as A, B or false B points.

My answer on 13 March 2008, Official Report, column 652W, set out which items were considered as “I points” and which were considered as “II points”.

Defence: Procurement

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what his Department's outstanding offset obligations are in respect of previous procurement exercises conducted since 1997; what the unfulfilled value was in each case; when the decision to undertake each exercise was taken; what the (a) originally anticipated and (b) currently anticipated completion date is of each; and if he will make a statement. (197738)

The Ministry of Defence holds no industrial participation (IP) obligations. Since 1997, 13 IP commitments have been made by offshore companies relating to defence procurements. 12 of these are outstanding with a combined value of £526 million. These are listed as follows, along with commencement dates and planned dates for completion.

Programme

Start date

Completion date

ASTOR

February 1999

April 2011

BSFM

August 2007

August 2011

C-17

August 2006

December 2010

Chinook Support

December 2006

December 2011

Javelin

December 2002

March 2013

Javelin (Training)

May 2003

March 2013

MTADS/PNVS

May 2005

December 2010

NLAW

January 2002

January 2017

Litening Pods

November 2006

November 2010

Shielder

September 2006

September 2009

Soothsayer

August 2003

August 2011

Watchkeeper

October 2005

October 2012

Departmental Property

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the locations are of accommodation sold by his Department in each year since 1993; and if he will make a statement. (196971)

Details of all Ministry of Defence (MOD) accommodation sold as far back as 1993 are not available, as central records were not kept until 2000. However, the following table provides details of MOD property sold in the UK since 2000.

Financial year beginning

Site

Town

2006

Agricultural Land Disposal (2) (DCSA Forest Moor)

Harrogate

Monkmoors Disposal Area (DE Eskmeals)

Millom

Higham Grange—OMU (DCSA Radio Inskip)

Preston

Administration Site (RAF Boulmer Remainder of Old Admin Site)

Boulmer

Rawcliffe PSD (UNITER Building Rawcliffe Bridge)

Goole

Agricultural Land Disposal (3) (DCSA Radio Forest Moor)

Harrogate

Monkmoors Disposal Area (Garage No. 2, Hycemoor) (DE Eskmeals)

Millom

Monkmoors Disposal Area (Garage No. 5, Hycemoor) (DE Eskmeals)

Millom

Meagill (Woodland) (DCSA Radio Forest Moor)

Blubberhouses

Killymeal Hse, Dungannon

Dungannon

Aberdeen—Ashwood Circle 23-37

Aberdeen

Arbroath Condor Drive

Arbroath

Benbecula—Tuzo Close MQs

Balivanich

Inverness—Dev Site-Raigmore Ave—Plot 2

Inverness

Cupar—Tarvitt Drive North

Cupar

Cupar—Tarvitt Drive East

Cupar

Cupar—Tarvitt Drive South

Cupar

Cupar—Tarvitt Drive Centre

Cupar

Portpatrick—Ground Monitor Station

Portpatrick

Penicuik—Parkhead Lodge

Glencorse

Forres—Thornhill

Forres

Forres—Thornhill Estate Properties—With DE for Disposal

Forres

Forres—Thornhill Estate Properties

Forres

Garelochhead—Rowmore Cottages

Garelochhead

Rosneath Grass Verge

Rosneath

Paisley—Lammermuir Drive

Paisley

Perth—Stormont Road SFA (Phase 3)

Scone

(Peterhead) Invernettie Estate Properties—Operational

Peterhead

Boddam—The Sheilings Estate Properties—with DE for Disposal—Phase 4 (part) (No. 5 and 7)

Boddam

Saxa Vord—17, 20-29 and 53-76 Settlers Hill

Haroldswick

Irvine Dundonald Cres

Irvine

Lossiemouth—Development Site

Lossiemouth

Forres—Thornhill

Forres

Lossiemouth—St. Gerardines Road

Lossiemouth

Perth—Stormont Road SFA (Phase 3)

Scone

Edinburgh—Cramond Place Evens SFA Properties—With DE for Disposal

Edinburgh

Edinburgh—Polton Estate

Edinburgh

Saxa Vord—17, 20-29 and 53-76 Settlers Hill

Haroldswick

Poor Wood ATE Caerwent

Caerwent

UNITER Building ATE Templeton

Templeton

Army Medals Office, Droitwich

Droitwich Spa

West Raynham (tech site)

West Raynham

West Raynham (Former owner sale—Townsend)

West Raynham

Families Club

Norwich

RAF Stoke Holy Cross

Poringland

South Creake Seismic Station

South Creake

RAF Neatishead

Neatishead

RAF Coltishall and Sewage Treatment Works

Norwich

Rushley Cottage

Great Wakering

Land adjoining 23 Hillside Crescent (Manchester SFA)

Ashton under Lyne

Lossiemouth—Cromarty Place

Lossiemouth

Elgin—Shaw Place

Elgin

Lossiemouth

Lossiemouth

West Raynham (‘Former owner sale’—Overman)

West Raynham

Higham Grange Nissen Hut (DCSA Radio Inskip)

Preston

16 Hillside Crescent Manchester SFA

Ashton under Lyne

17 Hillside Crescent Manchester SFA

Ashton under Lyne

8 Ladysmith Road Manchester SFA

Ashton under Lyne

Land adjoining No. 16 Hillside Crescent Manchester SFA

Ashton under Lyne

Barrack—Carpet Store

Norwich

18 Hillside Crescent Manchester SFA

Ashton under Lyne

Mahon Road, Portadown

Portadown

Higham Grange—Nissen Hut—Additional (DCSA Radio Inskip)

Preston

West Raynham (tech site)

West Raynham

Halton Hospital—Disposal Site

Wendover

Queens Gate

Aldershot

General Aviation Area (Part)

Aldershot

Whitewall Creek—Chatham

Frindsbury

Maidstone ACF HQ (Maidstone TA)

Maidstone

Guillemont Fields and Rhine Banks Estate (part)

Aldershot

Access to Riverside Cottage

Upper Upnor, Rochester

Halton Tennis Centre

Halton

Sportsground at Uckfield Road

Crowborough

Driving Test Centre (Land at North Lane)

Aldershot

Longcott Road Plots

Shrivenham

Northern Parade

Portsmouth

Clayhall Cemetery

Gosport

RM Dunkeswell South (Plots 1a and 1b)

Honiton

DMC Plymouth (Ernsettle House)

Plymouth

Bullpoint—School Site

Plymouth

RM Dunkeswell North

Honiton

St. Mawgan Airfield (BFI 7)

Newquay

St. Mawgan Airfield (Seaview Bungalow)

Newquay

DMC Dean Hill (Depot Open Market)

West Dean

DMC Dean Hill (Depot Open Market) (Rolling Stock—Train, carriages etc.)

West Dean

11 Hillside Close

Salisbury

Elles Road

Wareham

Playground Area (Depot/Warehouses)

Ludgershall

Elmtree Close Recreation Ground

Devizes

Land (Higham Road) North of Hoo Road

Wainscott, Rochester

Tented Area

Weymouth

1, 2, 3 and 4 Langton Park

Wroughton

In-Flight Refuelling: Procurement

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what consideration he has given to acquiring future strategic tanker aircraft by adding the UK’s requirement to that of the United States. (197734)

As I announced in my statement to the House on 31 March 2008, Official Report, column 31WS, we have concluded a contract with AirTanker Ltd to deliver the Future Strategic Tanker Aircraft service from 2011. It is a holistic contract including provision of purpose designed training and maintenance facilities at RAF Brize Norton, together with through life training and maintenance support services, until 2035. The US has selected an aircraft to meet its requirement but has not yet concluded the commercial arrangements. We believe that the FSTA contract is the most cost effective way to meet the UK requirement.

Iraq: Peacekeeping Operations

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many awards for (a) bravery and (b) distinguished service were issued to personnel who had served in Iraq in each year since 2003, broken down by (i) service, (ii) rank and (iii) regiment. (195380)

It has not been possible to collate the necessary information in the format requested within the required timescale. I can however provide aggregate figures as follows:

Service

Gallantry

Meritorious service

Total

Royal Navy/Royal Marines

32

77

109

Army

328

310

638

Royal Air Force

43

70

113

Royal Fleet Auxiliary

5

5

Total

403

462

865

The Army figures can be further broken out into regiment follows:

Regt/Corps

Gallantry

Meritorious service

Total

Household Cavalry Regiment

7

7

1st The Queen's Dragoon Guards

6

6

12

The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards

2

2

4

The Royal Dragoon Guards

1

1

The Queen's Royal Hussars

4

2

6

9th/12th Royal Lancers

1

1

The King's Royal Hussars

3

3

6

The Light Dragoons

4

4

The Queen's Royal Lancers

4

5

9

Royal Tank Regiment

1

4

5

The Queens Own Yeomanry

2

2

Royal Artillery

14

27

41

Royal Engineers

20

40

60

Royal Corps of Signals

2

15

17

Grenadier Guards

2

2

Coldstream Guards

2

2

4

Scots Guards

3

3

6

Irish Guards

7

3

10

Welsh Guards

3

5

8

Royal Regiment of Scotland

34

14

48

Princess of Wales' s Royal Regiment

43

4

47

Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

7

5

12

Royal Anglian Regiment

9

4

13

The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment

15

12

27

The Yorkshire Regiment

4

10

14

The Mercian Regiment

6

6

12

The Royal Welsh

19

4

23

The Rifles

35

10

45

The Royal Irish Regiment

5

5

10

The Parachute Regiment

29

10

39

The London Regiment

1

1

The Royal Gurkha Rifles

1

1

Queen's Gurkha Engineers

1

1

Royal Army Chaplains Department

1

1

Army Air Corps

5

2

7

The Royal Logistic Corps

16

41

57

Royal Army Medical Corps

6

16

22

Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

12

12

24

Adjutant General's Corps

2

13

15

Small Arms School Corps

1

1

Intelligence Corps

9

9

Queen Alexandra's Royal Army Nursing Corps

4

4

Total

328

310

638

I will write to the hon. Member with more detailed information when this has been collated.

Substantive answer from Bob Ainsworth to Nick Harvey:

I undertook to write to you in answer to your parliamentary question on 19 March 2008, Official Report, columns 1174-75W with more detailed information on bravery and distinguished service since 2003.

After further investigation by officials it has become clear that the information is not held in the format you requested and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Since 2003 there have been 10 operational honours lists, all of which have been published in the London Gazette, http://www.london-gazette.co.uk, copies of which were forward to the Library of the House. The operational honours list was gazetted on the following dates:

31 October 2003

23 April and 7 September 2004

18 March and 9 September 2005

24 March, 8 September and 15 December 2006

19 July 2007

7 March 2008

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many UK armed forces personnel were stationed in Basra in each month since December 2007; and if he will make a statement. (196918)

The number of established UK military posts in southern Iraq over the period requested is shown in the table (to the nearest hundred):

Number

31 December 2007

4,500

31 January 2008

4,100

29 February 2008

4,000

31 March 2008

4,000

The actual number of UK military personnel in theatre varies significantly from day-to-day for a variety of reasons, including leave (rest and recuperation), temporary absence for training, evacuation for medical reasons, the roulement offerees and other factors.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many UK armed forces personnel have served (a) one, (b) two, (c) three and (d) four or more tours of duty in Iraq since March 2003. (197890)

The information is not held in the format requested and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Museums: Grants

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence to which military museums the Department makes grants; and how much the grant for each was in each year since 1997. (196600)

The information is as follows:

Grant in aid

£ million

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-2000

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-081

Royal Naval Museum

0.62

0.82

0.75

0.83

0.94

0.88

0.88

0.96

1.14

1.03

0.90

0.87

Fleet Air Arm Museum

0.40

0.42

0.56

0.5

0.51

0.53

0.53

0.55

0.56

0.58

0.59

0.61

Royal Navy Submarine Museum

0.28

0.32

0.37

0.53

0.44

0.49

0.49

0.51

0.65

0.55

0.56

0.58

Royal Marines Museum

0.51

0.59

0.66

0.58

0.62

0.66

0.65

0.69

0.70

0.78

0.74

0.77

National Army Museum

3.40

3.49

3.33

4.13

4.21

4.77

4.86

5.52

5.24

4.95

5.37

5.50

Royal Air Force Museum

3.14

4.06

4.98

3.8

4.82

5.99

6.06

6.81

7.03

7.10

6.77

7.02

1 Estimate

In addition there are a number of regimental museums which have their costs paid direct by the Department.

Territorial Army

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many Territorial Army centres there were in each of the last 10 years. (196871)

[holding answer 26 March 2008]: In 1998 there were 455 Territorial Army Centres. Following the Strategic Defence Review a decision was taken to reduce this number to 341, with 27 being retained for use by cadet force units and the remainder being disposed of. As at 1 March 2008 there were 362 centres in use by the Territorial Army.

Information on the specific number of Territorial Army Centres in existence in each year since 1998 could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

War Pensions

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many veterans of the Second World War are in receipt of a war pension. (196803)

Information on Veterans of the Second World War in receipt of a War Pensions could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Scotland

Departmental Publications

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what guidance is issued to members of his Department on the authorship and publication on the internet of material relating to their official duties; and if he will make a statement. (196746)

The Civil Service Code, the Civil Service Management Code and Propriety Guidance on Government Communications, all provide guidance to staff on the publication of material relating to their official duties. Copies of each of these are in the Libraries of the House. They are also available on the Cabinet Office website at:

http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/

Children, Schools and Families

Citizenship: Teachers

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families whether he plans to increase the number of initial teacher training and continuing professional development places for citizenship teachers. (198650)

There are 270 Initial Teacher Training (ITT) places for Citizenship in 2007/08 and 265 in 2008/09 to 2010/11. Numbers of Citizenship ITT places are being kept at much the same level as they are now for the next three years despite significant reductions in pupil numbers.

The Citizenship Continuing Professional Development certification course will be carried forward extended with similar levels of funding as 2007/08.

Education: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much funding each local education authority in the East of England has received from his Department and its predecessors in each year since 1997. (169965)

The Department does not collect the information in the format requested and to do so would incur disproportionate cost.

General Certificate of Secondary Education: Greater London

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many children obtained fewer than five A* to C grades at GCSE, including mathematics and English, in each London borough in each of the last 10 years. (196565)

The available information is given in the following tables:

Numbers and percentages of 15-year-old pupils in London who did not achieve 5 or more A*-C grades at GCSE1, including English and Mathematics2, 3 1997 to 2007

1997

1998

1999

Local authority

Number of 15 year old pupils

Number of 15 year olds not gaining 5+ GCSEs at grades A*-C including English and Maths

Percentage not gaining 5+ GCSEs at A*-C including English and Maths

Number of 15 year old pupils

Number of 15 year olds not gaining 5+ GCSEs at grades A*-C including English and Maths

Percentage not gaining 5+ GCSEs at A*-C including English and Maths

Number of 15 year old pupils

Number of 15 year olds not gaining 5+ GCSEs at grades A*-C including English and Maths

Percentage not gaining 5+ GCSEs at A*-C including English and Maths

City of London

0

0

— 

0

0

0

0

Camden

1,689

1,097

64.9

1,717

1,123

65.4

1,657

1,077

65.0

Hackney

1,333

1,103

82.7

1,368

1,137

83.1

1,412

1,156

81.9

Hammersmith and Fulham

1,018

687

67.5

981

638

65.0

961

589

61.3

Haringey

1,725

1,416

82.1

1,805

1,445

80.1

1,778

1,387

78.0

Islington

1,406

1,174

83.5

1,406

1,187

84.4

1,409

1,125

79.8

Kensington and Chelsea

553

398

72.0

549

387

70.5

586

402

68.6

Lambeth

1,236

1,006

81.4

1,252

1,005

80.3

1,252

965

77.1

Lewisham

2,012

1,621

80.6

2,056

1,600

77.8

2,093

1,599

76.4

Newham

2,691

2,066

76.8

2,733

2,079

76.1

2,865

2,171

75.8

Southwark

1,786

1,480

82.9

1,795

1,469

81.8

1,860

1,490

80.1

Tower Hamlets

2,334

1,983

85.0

2,254

1,854

82.3

2,241

1,785

79.7

Wandsworth

1,656

1,271

76.8

1,633

1,203

73.7

1,710

1,268

74.2

Westminster

1,327

1,028

77.5

1,285

966

75.2

1,273

951

74.7

Inner London

20,766

16,330

78.6

20,834

16,093

77.2

21,097

15,965

75.7

Barking and Dagenham

1,712

1,336

78.0

1,686

1,306

77.5

1,699

1,290

75.9

Barnet

3,252

1,880

57.8

3,244

1,730

53.3

3,268

1,724

52.8

Bexley

2,507

1,614

64.4

2,494

1,555

62.3

2,553

1,552

60.8

Brent

2,154

1,505

69.9

2,188

1,424

65.1

2,211

1,473

66.6

Bromley

3,014

1,734

57.5

2,978

1,624

54.5

3,078

1,615

52.5

Croydon

3,264

2,337

71.6

3,227

2,251

69.8

3,165

2,153

68.0

Ealing

2,480

1,781

71.8

2,427

1,628

67.1

2,423

1,627

67.1

Enfield

3,166

2,173

68.6

3,081

2,053

66.6

3,148

2,000

63.5

Greenwich

2,415

1,935

80.1

2,333

1,789

76.7

2,349

1,813

77.2

Harrow

2,082

1,250

60.0

2,074

1,205

58.1

1,994

1,112

55.8

Havering

2,802

1,741

62.1

2,722

1,642

60.3

2,643

1,490

56.4

Hillingdon

2,494

1,743

69.9

2,469

1,633

66.1

2,519

1,627

64.6

Hounslow

2,601

1,787

68.7

2,492

1,592

63.9

2,526

1,609

63.7

Kingston upon Thames

1,315

727

55.3

1,327

681

51.3

1,326

709

53.5

Merton

1,559

1,089

69.9

1,589

1,094

68.8

1,601

1,068

66.7

Redbridge

2,609

1,584

60.7

2,635

1,469

55.7

2,738

1,465

53.5

Richmond upon Thames

1,547

982

63.5

1,437

856

59.6

1,479

857

57.9

Sutton

2,004

1,057

52.7

1,964

958

48.8

2,042

964

47.2

Waltham Forest

2,264

1,698

75.0

2,311

1,674

72.4

2,314

1,658

71.7

Outer London

45,241

29,953

66.2

44,678

28,164

63.0

45,076

27,806

61.7

London

66,007

46,283

70.1

65,512

44,257

67.6

66,173

43,771

66.1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

England (maintained sector)

537,661

362,671

67.5

527,538

348,045

66.0

533,730

341,930

64.1

200020012002

Local authority

Number of 15 year old pupils

Number of 15 year olds not gaining 5+ GCSEs at grades A*-C including English and Maths

Percentage not gaining 5+ GCSEs at A*-C including English and Maths

Number of 15 year old pupils

Number of 15 year olds not gaining 5+ GCSEs at grades A*-C including English and Maths

Percentage not gaining 5+ GCSEs at A*-C including English and Maths

Number of 15 year old pupils

Number of 15 year olds not gaining 5+ GCSEs at grades A*-C including English and Maths

Percentage not gaining 5+ GCSEs at A*-C including English and Maths

City of London

0

0

— 

0

0

0

0

Camden

1,690

1,037

61.4

1,636

986

60.3

1,434

897

62.6

Hackney

1,406

1,086

77.2

1,381

1,043

75.5

1,438

1,100

76.5

Hammersmith and Fulham

1,037

646

62.3

1,052

622

59.1

1,085

631

58.2

Haringey

1,871

1,463

78.2

1,851

1,392

75.2

1,914

1,400

73.1

Islington

1,364

1,125

82.5

1,352

1,068

79.0

1,382

1,078

78.0

Kensington and Chelsea

593

371

62.6

586

346

59.0

573

339

59.2

Lambeth

1,256

998

79.5

1,282

962

75.0

1,262

911

72.2

Lewisham

2,056

1,545

75.1

2,200

1,619

73.6

2,139

1,494

69.8

Newham

2,973

2,285

76.9

2,991

2,135

71.4

2,962

2,057

69.4

Southwark

1,830

1,435

78.4

1,861

1,434

77.1

1,952

1,473

75.5

Tower Hamlets

2,338

1,859

79.5

2,477

1,908

77.0

2,411

1,791

74.3

Wandsworth

1,736

1,194

68.8

1,782

1,172

65.8

1,790

1,122

62.7

Westminster

1,331

965

72.5

1,272

886

69.7

1,309

867

66.2

Inner London

21,481

16,009

74.5

21,723

15,573

71.7

21,651

15,160

70.0

Barking and Dagenham

1,723

1,267

73.5

1,721

1,245

72.3

1,701

1,184

69.6

Barnet

3,304

1,728

52.3

3,399

1,817

53.5

3,428

1,685

49.2

Bexley

2,641

1,563

59.2

2,827

1,720

60.8

2,785

1,620

58.2

Brent

2,319

1,432

61.8

2,356

1,490

63.2

2,626

1,567

59.7

Bromley

2,940

1,465

49.8

3,218

1,725

53.6

3,354

1,647

49.1

Croydon

3,204

2,171

67.8

3,341

2,182

65.3

3,330

2,098

63.0

Ealing

2,422

1,617

66.8

2,383

1,507

63.2

2,451

1,537

62.7

Enfield

3,226

2,098

65.0

3,363

2,104

62.6

3,325

2,049

61.6

Greenwich

2,313

1,783

77.1

2,303

1,749

75.9

2,357

1,769

75.1

Harrow

2,090

1,132

54.2

2,040

1,083

53.1

2,074

1,065

51.4

Havering

2,664

1,450

54.4

2,859

1,534

53.7

2,858

1,523

53.3

Hillingdon

2,505

1,587

63.4

2,632

1,663

63.2

2,606

1,654

63.5

Hounslow

2,569

1,634

63.6

2,620

1,652

63.1

2,596

1,520

58.6

Kingston upon Thames

1,327

633

47.7

1,378

637

46.2

1,390

660

47.5

Merton

1,548

1,039

67.1

1,507

990

65.7

1,571

1,040

66.2

Redbridge

2,901

1,521

52.4

2,810

1,308

46.5

2,879

1,372

47.7

Richmond upon Thames

1,435

840

58.5

1,477

815

55.2

1,470

845

57.5

Sutton

2,039

894

43.8

2,213

1,026

46.4

2,255

962

42.7

Waltham Forest

2,329

1,631

70.0

2,365

1,576

66.6

2,351

1,529

65.0

Outer London

45,499

27,485

60.4

46,812

27,823

59.4

47,407

27,326

57.6

London

66,980

43,494

64.9

68,535

43,396

63.3

69,058

42,486

61.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

England (maintained sector)

534,343

335,196

62.7

554,506

343,261

61.9

558,002

337,539

60.5

200320042005

Local authority

Number of 15 year old pupils

Number of 15 year olds not gaining 5+ GCSEs at grades A*-C including English and Maths

Percentage not gaining 5+ GCSEs at A*-C including English and Maths

Number of 15 year old pupils

Number of 15 year olds not gaining 5+ GCSEs at grades A*-C including English and Maths

Percentage not gaining 5+ GCSEs at A*-C including English and Maths

Number of 15 year old pupils

Number of 15 year olds not gaining 5+ GCSEs at grades A*-C including English and Maths

Percentage not gaining 5+ GCSEs at A*-C including English and Maths

City of London

0

0

— 

0

0

0

0

Camden

1,420

851

59.9

1,429

817

57.2

1,457

866

59.4

Hackney

1,403

1,031

73.5

1,283

871

67.9

1,292

851

65.9

Hammersmith and Fulham

1,129

648

57.4

1,184

685

57.9

1,147

613

53.4

Haringey

1,981

1,411

71.2

2,150

1,482

68.9

2,090

1,418

67.8

Islington

1,317

1,021

77.5

1,411

1,003

71.1

1,369

960

70.1

Kensington and Chelsea

588

323

54.9

579

315

54.4

575

273

47.5

Lambeth

1,342

938

69.9

1,370

860

62.8

1,380

866

62.8

Lewisham

2,231

1,560

69.9

2,294

1,551

67.6

2,209

1,391

63.0

Newham

3,070

2,021

65.8

3,137

1,957

62.4

3,230

1,930

59.8

Southwark

1,981

1,460

73.7

2,057

1,466

71.3

2,246

1,541

68.6

Tower Hamlets

2,557

1,904

74.5

2,469

1,776

71.9

2,440

1,704

69.8

Wandsworth

1,798

1,131

62.9

1,868

1,151

61.6

1,854

1,089

58.7

Westminster

1,331

837

62.9

1,400

894

63.9

1,377

857

62.2

Inner London

22,148

15,136

68.3

22,631

14,828

65.5

22,666

14,359

63.4

Barking and Dagenham

1,770

1,207

68.2

1,956

1,339

68.5

1,940

1,290

66.5

Barnet

3,486

1,758

50.4

3,549

1,713

48.3

3,391

1,610

47.5

Bexley

2,974

1,719

57.8

3,075

1,715

55.8

3,245

1,768

54.5

Brent

2,646

1,584

59.9

2,644

1,535

58.1

2,604

1,391

53.4

Bromley

3,380

1,746

51.7

3,618

1,860

51.4

3,495

1,705

48.8

Croydon

3,493

2,237

64.0

3,619

2,259

62.4

3,721

2,218

59.6

Ealing

2,681

1,620

60.4

2,682

1,626

60.6

2,581

1,400

54.2

Enfield

3,361

2,073

61.7

3,431

2,040

59.5

3,525

2,035

57.7

Greenwich

2,351

1,731

73.6

2,524

1,780

70.5

2,497

1,649

66.0

Harrow

2,129

1,119

52.6

2,222

1,118

50.3

2,183

1,096

50.2

Havering

2,870

1,442

50.2

3,066

1,501

49.0

3,014

1,515

50.3

Hillingdon

2,671

1,705

63.8

2,933

1,844

62.9

2,933

1,798

61.3

Hounslow

2,641

1,575

59.6

2,642

1,519

57.5

2,623

1,420

54.1

Kingston upon Thames

1,419

591

41.6

1,480

669

45.2

1,489

601

40.4

Merton

1,568

1,004

64.0

1,595

1,020

63.9

1,532

947

61.8

Redbridge

3,009

1,357

45.1

3,016

1,338

44.4

2,972

1,307

44.0

Richmond upon Thames

1,478

766

51.8

1,476

769

52.1

1,491

798

53.5

Sutton

2,326

1,016

43.7

2,628

1,086

41.3

2,474

1,005

40.6

Waltham Forest

2,408

1,578

65.5

2,610

1,737

66.6

2,545

1,619

63.6

Outer London

48,661

27,828

57.2

50,766

28,468

56.1

50,255

27,172

54.1

London

70,809

42,964

60.7

73,397

43,296

59.0

72,921

41,531

57.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

England (maintained sector)

572,040

346,077

60.5

590,096

351,633

59.6

583,265

335,905

57.6

20062007

Local authority

Number of 15 year old pupils

Number of 15 year olds not gaining 5+ GCSEs at grades A*-C including English and Maths

Percentage not gaining 5+ GCSEs at A*-C including English and Maths

Number of 15 year old pupils

Number of 15 year olds not gaining 5+ GCSEs at grades A*-C including English and Maths

Percentage not gaining 5+ GCSEs at A*-C including English and Maths

City of London

0

0

 —

0

0

Camden

1,482

810

54.7

1,444

793

54.9

Hackney

1,397

889

63.6

1,323

777

58.7

Hammersmith and Fulham

1,151

588

51.1

1,078

455

42.2

Haringey

2,116

1,392

65.8

2,066

1,300

62.9

Islington

1,468

995

67.8

1,479

932

63

Kensington and Chelsea

584

269

46.1

606

264

43.6

Lambeth

1,406

824

58.6

1,423

838

58.9

Lewisham

2,221

1,318

59.3

2,255

1,344

59.6

Newham

3,307

1,947

58.9

3,316

1,854

55.9

Southwark

2,333

1,536

65.8

2,282

1,408

61.7

Tower Hamlets

2,566

1,707

66.5

2,527

1,610

63.7

Wandsworth

1,847

1,078

58.4

1,793

957

53.4

Westminster

1,395

830

59.5

1,371

746

54.4

Inner London

23,273

14,183

60.9

22,963

13,273

57.8

Barking and Dagenham

2,001

1,249

62.4

2,097

1,275

60.8

Barnet

3,439

1,530

44.5

3,285

1,337

40.7

Bexley

3,217

1,603

49.8

3,290

1,655

50.3

Brent

2,581

1,321

51.2

2,654

1,340

50.5

Bromley

3,584

1,648

46.0

3,484

1,557

44.7

Croydon

3,791

2,183

57.6

3,803

2,126

55.9

Ealing

2,646

1,370

51.8

2,631

1,342

51

Enfield

3,640

2,082

57.2

3,729

1,961

52.6

Greenwich

2,501

1,718

68.7

2,477

1,637

66.1

Harrow

2,150

1,005

46.7

2,209

972

44

Havering

3,059

1,392

45.5

3,072

1,425

46.4

Hillingdon

2,972

1,685

56.7

3,048

1,695

55.6

Hounslow

2,606

1,285

49.3

2,639

1,314

49.8

Kingston upon Thames

1,528

633

41.4

1,497

579

38.7

Merton

1,570

951

60.6

1,611

971

60.3

Redbridge

3,125

1,280

41.0

3,279

1,272

38.8

Richmond upon Thames

1,408

711

50.5

1,460

764

52.3

Sutton

2,522

940

37.3

2,572

908

35.3

Waltham Forest

2,588

1,586

61.3

2,595

1,505

58

Outer London

50,928

26,172

51.4

51,432

25,613

49.8

London

74,201

40,355

54.4

74,395

38,909

52.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

England (maintained sector)

593,061

332,453

56.1

599,403

325,476

54.3

1 Figures for 1997 include GCSEs and GNVQs. Figures from 2004 include GCSEs and other equivalent qualifications approved for use pre-16.

2 English and Mathematics refer to GCSE full course only.

3 Includes pupils at maintained schools including CTCs and Academies.

Geography: Assessments

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what response he has made to the recommendations of the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority that A-level geography coursework be abolished; and if he will make a statement. (189205)

Following the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority's (QCA's) recommendations, the new criteria for A-level geography courses from September 2008 remove the requirement for coursework to be assessed. Fieldwork will, however, become a specific requirement in the A- level criteria from September 2008. QCA is working closely with the Geographical Association, Royal Geographical Society and awarding bodies to ensure that assessment methods continue to provide satisfactory ways of assessing fieldwork. Through the Action Plan for Geography, Government funding has set up a virtual fieldwork and local learning centre to help teachers make the most of geography in their local areas, including expert advice and planning on embedding fieldwork in the curriculum.

Physical Education: Standards

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many (a) primary and (b) secondary schools were deemed to have unsatisfactory physical education and sports provision in each of the last 10 years. (195963)

This is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply has been placed in the Library.

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 1 April 2008:

PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION NUMBER 195963: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families, how many (a) primary and (b) secondary schools were deemed to have unsatisfactory physical education and sports provision in each of the last 10 years. Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for reply.

Between September 1996 and July 2005, inspectors made an overall judgement about the quality of teaching in each subject inspected. From September 2003 to July 2005, they made an additional judgement about the overall quality of provision in each subject inspected. These judgements were made using a seven point scale: excellent, very good, good, satisfactory, unsatisfactory, poor and very poor. Since September 2005 there has been no specific subject reporting in routine school inspections so we are unable to provide all the information you request. Since this time too physical education has been inspected in a sample of 30 primary and 30 secondary schools each year.

The information requested is set out in the three tables attached. The first shows the overall quality of provision in physical education in 2003/04 and 2004/05 and the second and third show the overall quality of teaching in physical education between 1997/98 and 2004/05. Figures 4-6 show these same data in terms of percentage of schools inspected. Please note that these percentages are calculated from weighted data so that they provide a more accurate representation of English schools as a whole at that time.

These data cover three different inspection frameworks (1996, 2000 and 2003) and comparisons should be treated with caution as the guidance used by inspectors varied between different frameworks.

In addition, the 2000 framework incorporated a differentiated inspection system in which the most effective schools had short inspections and other schools had full inspections. There was detailed reporting on each subject only in full inspections.

The 2003 framework also involved a differentiated inspection system in which inspectors tailored the inspection to the school. In schools where the core subjects were weak, more time was allocated to the inspection of these subjects while less time was given to other subjects and teaching in physical education was not always observed in the course of a given inspection. Therefore these data do not cover all the schools inspected during this period and this is more likely to be the case in primary than in secondary schools.

A copy of this reply has been sent to Jim Knight MP, Minister of State for Schools and Learners, and will be placed in the library of both Houses.

Figure 1. Overall quality of provision, based on effectiveness, in the area of learning, subject or course—physical education

Number of schools

Total inspected

Excellent

Very good

Good

Satisfactory

Unsatisfactory

Poor

Very poor

Primary schools

2004/05

772

4

86

383

290

9

0

0

2003/04

1,829

9

131

763

879

47

0

0

Secondary schools

2004/05

480

9

135

241

74

18

3

0

2003/04

616

9

127

335

120

23

2

0

Figure 2. Quality of teaching of physical education in primary schools

Number of schools

Total inspected

Excellent

Very good

Good

Satisfactory

Unsatisfactory

Poor

Very poor

2006/07

2005/06

2004/05

741

3

96

418

220

4

0

0

2003/04

1,622

4

121

879

593

25

0

0

2002/03

2,110

5

103

1,053

912

37

0

0

2001/02

2,263

2

104

1,077

1,037

42

1

0

2000/01

2,356

2

93

1,100

1,116

43

2

0

1999/20001

1,537

1

57

698

750

28

3

0

1998/99

3,331

1

81

1,460

1,734

54

1

0

1997/98

5,915

5

171

2,478

3,069

186

6

0

Figure 3. Quality of teaching of physical education in secondary schools

Number of schools

Total inspected

Excellent

Very good

Good

Satisfactory

Unsatisfactory

Poor

Very poor

2006/07

2005/06

2004/05

481

2

119

290

56

14

0

0

2003/04

619

2

100

416

88

13

0

0

2002/03

439

0

63

303

69

4

0

0

2001/02

446

0

40

304

89

13

0

0

2000/01

462

0

41

331

88

4

0

0

1999/20001

259

1

21

182

52

3

0

0

1998/99

767

0

52

490

206

16

2

1

1997/98

623

1

36

400

181

5

0

0

Figure 4. Overall quality of provision, based on effectiveness, in the area of learning, subject or course—physical education

Percentage

Excellent

Very good

Good

Satisfactory

Unsatisfactory

Poor

Very poor

Primary schools

2003/04

1

8

42

47

2

0

0

2004/05

1

11

50

37

1

0

0

Secondary schools

2003/04

2

21

54

19

4

0

0

2004/05

2

28

51

15

4

1

0

Figure 5. Quality of teaching of physical education in primary schools

Percentage

Excellent

Very good

Good

Satisfactory

Unsatisfactory

Poor

Very poor

2006/07

2005/06

2004/05

0

13

56

30

1

0

0

2003/04

0

8

55

35

2

0

0

2002/03

0

5

50

43

2

0

0

2001/02

0

5

48

46

2

0

0

2000/01

0

4

47

47

2

0

0

1999/20001

0

4

45

49

2

0

0

1998/99

0

2

44

52

2

0

0

1997/98

0

3

42

52

3

0

0

Figure 6. Quality of teaching of physical education in secondary schools

Percentage

Excellent

Very good

Good

Satisfactory

Unsatisfactory

Poor

Very poor

2006/07

2005/06

2004/05

0

25

60

12

3

0

0

2003/04

0

17

67

14

2

0

0

2002/03

0

14

69

16

1

0

0

2001/02

0

9

68

20

3

0

0

2000/01

0

9

72

19

1

0

0

1999/20001

0

8

70

20

1

0

0

1998/99

0

7

65

26

2

0

0

1997/98

0

6

66

28

1

0

0

1 The framework change in January 2000 means that data for that year cannot be aggregated across two frameworks so the data shown are for inspections from January 2000 to July 2000.

Primary Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many key stage two pupils did not reach level 4 or above in a combination of reading, writing and mathematics key stage two tests in 2007; (197612)

(2) how many primary schools there were in which less than 50 per cent. of key stage two pupils gained level 4 or above in a combination of reading, writing and mathematics key stage two tests;

(3) how many primary schools there were in which less than 50 per cent. of key stage two pupils gained level 4 or above in a combination of English, mathematics and science key stage two tests.

The provisional results from the Key Stage 2 tests in 2007 published last August show that 40 per cent. of pupils did not reach level 4 or above in a combination of reading, writing and mathematics (see table 5 of the Statistical First Release on National Curriculum Assessments at Key Stage 2 in England, 2007 (Provisional), via the following link:

http://www.dfes.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000737/index.shtml

This represents a considerable improvement since 1997 when over two thirds of 11-year-olds failed to reach this standard.

The available information on level 4 achievement in combinations of subjects at school level shows that there were 3,655 schools with 50 per cent. of pupils (or less) achieving Level 4+ in reading, writing and mathematics. Further information can be provided only at disproportionate cost.

These figures are based on provisional data because the reading and writing figures are not checked by schools as part of the Achievement and Attainment tables checking exercise.

Pupil Exclusions

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what steps the Government plan to take to improve the handling of children excluded from school. (198124)

Revised exclusions guidance published in September 2007, put local authorities under a duty to arrange suitable full time education from the sixth day of exclusion for children permanently excluded. For fixed period exclusions, this sixth day duty lies with the school.

Furthermore, the Children's Plan, published in December, set out our commitment to improve provision outside school for excluded pupils and other pupils who for a range of reasons are unable to attend a mainstream school. A copy of the Plan is in the Library. We plan to publish a strategy pape