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Children: Day Care

Volume 474: debated on Tuesday 22 April 2008

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what estimate he has made of the number and proportion of managers of day care settings who were male in (a) Basingstoke, (b) Hampshire and (c) England in each year since 1997. (197431)

Data are not available on the sex of managers of full day care.

The 2006 Childcare and Early Years Providers Survey estimated that the average proportion of male staff working in full day care settings in England was 2 per cent. In total, there were 2,500 male staff working in full day care settings in England.

The average proportion of male staff working in full day care settings in England for each year available is shown in the following table:

Male staff working in full day care settings in England

Average proportion of male staff per setting (percentage)

Total number of male staff

2001

2

1,900

2003

2

2,000

2005

2

2,500

2006

2

2,500

Data are not available at local authority level.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what estimate he has made of the average number of hours worked per week by (a) childcarers in maintained settings, (b) childcarers in private, voluntary and independent nurseries and (c) childminders in each year since 1997. (199873)

The Childcare and Early Years Providers Survey estimated that staff working in full day care in children's centres worked an average (mean) of 34 hours a week in 2006, compared with an average of 17 hours a week for staff in sessional settings. Data for all childcare and early years providers for each year available are shown in the following table.

Average number of hours worked per week by staff in child care and early years provision in maintained schools

2003

2005

2006

Full day care

35

32

33

Full day care in children’s centres

n/a

n/a

34

Sessional

17

18

17

After school clubs

19

n/a

19

Holiday clubs

31.5

n/a

27

Nursery schools

32.5

n/a

32

Primary schools with nursery and reception classes

33

n/a

31

Primary schools with reception but no nursery classes

28

n/a

30

Notes: 1. Children's centres were included in the survey for the first time in 2006; therefore data is not available for previous years. 2. After school and holiday clubs were sampled differently in 2005 and comparable figures for this year are not available. 3. Early years settings in maintained schools were not included in the 2005 survey.

In 2006 full day care staff in privately owned settings worked an average of 35 hours a week, compared with 26 hours for full day care staff in settings under voluntary ownership. 2006 data for all child care providers available are shown in the following table.

Average number of hours worked per week by staff in child care providers, by ownership of setting, 2006

Private

Voluntary

Local authority

School/college

Other

Full day care

35

26

32

33

35

Full day care in children's centres

35

34

34

34

35

Sessional

17

16

20

25

15

Out of school care

26

20

25

19

27

Note:

Data for other providers are not available by type of ownership.

The 2006 Childcare and Early Years Providers Survey estimated that childminders looked after children for an average of 16 hours a week in term time, and for 23 hours a week in school holidays. Data for each year available are shown in the following table.

Average number of hours childminders looked after children

Term time

School holidays

2005

17

25

2006

16

23

Note: The wording in the childminders survey was changed in 2005; therefore comparable data for previous years is not available.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what proportion of (a) private, voluntary and independent nurseries and (b) childminders received funding from local authorities to deliver the free entitlement in each local authority area in each of the last five years. (199875)

The available information is shown in the table.

The table provides information about the number of private, voluntary and independent providers delivering a free early education to three and four-year-olds in England. Data is provided for 2004 to 2007 only because data for 2003 is not available.

The latest figures on early education places for three and four-year-olds in England were published in Statistical First Release (SFR) 19/2007 “Provision for children under five years of age in England: January 2007”, available on my Department's website

www.dcsf.gov.uk/rsgateway/

Number of private, voluntary and independent providers delivering a free early education to three and four-year-olds: January each year

2004

2005

2006

2007

England

19,940

20,100

20,800

20,430

North East

450

470

470

460

Darlington

25

25

25

25

Durham

75

75

80

80

Gateshead

45

50

45

45

Hartlepool

10

15

15

10

Middlesbrough

20

25

30

25

Newcastle upon Tyne

75

75

75

75

North Tyneside

25

25

25

30

Northumberland

85

85

85

90

Redcar and Cleveland

15

15

15

10

South Tyneside

10

10

15

15

Stockton-on-Tees

25

30

30

25

Sunderland

30

35

30

30

North West

2,365

2,390

2,480

2,455

Blackburn with Darwen

50

45

50

45

Blackpool

55

55

55

55

Bolton

85

80

90

85

Bury

55

55

65

65

Cheshire

330

335

345

345

Cumbria

165

175

185

185

Halton

55

50

55

50

Knowsley

15

15

15

20

Lancashire

460

465

475

485

Liverpool

125

125

130

130

Manchester

115

115

120

120

Oldham

90

100

95

95

Rochdale

90

90

90

85

Salford

55

65

65

70

Sefton

75

70

75

75

St. Helens

55

55

55

50

Stockport

80

85

90

85

Tameside

50

50

55

50

Trafford

75

80

80

85

Warrington

70

75

70

75

Wigan

100

95

90

85

Wirral

120

125

130

120

Yorkshire and the Humber

1,615

1,625

1,715

1,670

Barnsley

50

55

60

60

Bradford

125

130

135

125

Calderdale

90

90

95

105

Doncaster

55

70

70

70

East Riding of Yorkshire

130

110

130

125

Kingston Upon Hull, City of

55

55

55

60

Kirklees

175

180

190

180

Leeds

175

180

185

180

North East Lincolnshire

50

45

45

40

North Lincolnshire

55

60

60

60

North Yorkshire

305

295

320

305

Rotherham

55

60

55

55

Sheffield

140

140

150

150

Wakefield

60

70

65

60

York

90

90

100

95

East Midlands

1,715

1,770

1,810

1,795

Derby

65

70

70

70

Derbyshire

285

275

285

285

Leicester

105

115

125

120

Leicestershire

340

355

350

350

Lincolnshire

285

300

305

300

Northamptonshire

285

305

320

320

Nottingham

70

75

75

75

Nottinghamshire

245

250

255

255

Rutland

25

25

30

25

West Midlands

1,940

1,940

2,070

2,015

Birmingham

330

335

360

340

Coventry

100

105

105

110

Dudley

85

85

85

80

Herefordshire

105

105

100

100

Sandwell

40

45

45

50

Shropshire

175

170

175

170

Solihull

65

70

70

75

Staffordshire

340

300

375

370

Stoke-on-Trent

60

65

70

65

Telford and Wrekin

60

65

70

60

Walsall

30

30

35

35

Warwickshire

235

240

240

240

Wolverhampton

30

30

40

35

Worcestershire

285

290

295

285

East of England

2,520

2,535

2,590

2,550

Bedfordshire

180

185

185

175

Cambridgeshire

295

305

305

300

Essex

620

640

640

635

Hertfordshire

430

455

460

465

Luton

60

65

60

60

Norfolk

380

340

385

365

Peterborough

95

95

100

95

Southend-on-Sea

80

65

75

70

Suffolk

335

335

335

325

Thurrock

50

50

50

50

London

2,570

2,530

2,705

2,620

Inner London

1,025

960

1,070

1,015

City

5

5

5

5

Camden

90

80

85

85

Hackney

85

90

95

85

Hammersmith and Fulham

65

65

65

65

Haringey

55

70

70

70

Islington

80

75

75

75

Kensington and Chelsea

45

50

45

45

Lambeth

100

75

110

105

Lewisham

too

85

105

95

Newham

55

55

60

55

Southwark

95

100

100

95

Tower Hamlets

55

55

55

50

Wandsworth

130

110

130

125

Westminster

60

50

60

55

Outer London

1,545

1,570

1,635

1,605

Barking and Dagenham

25

30

30

35

Barnet

120

115

120

115

Bexley

60

65

65

65

Brent

80

85

85

85

Bromley

160

150

170

160

Croydon

130

135

140

140

Ealing

95

100

105

100

Enfield

95

100

105

105

Greenwich

60

65

65

65

Harrow

75

80

75

75

Havering

85

90

90

95

Hillingdon

80

70

70

75

Hounslow

65

70

70

70

Kingston upon Thames

45

50

50

50

Merton

55

60

65

60

Redbridge

75

80

80

80

Richmond upon Thames

100

100

105

100

Sutton

70

70

70

65

Waltham Forest

70

70

75

70

South East

4,065

4,160

4,190

4,160

Bracknell Forest

50

50

50

50

Brighton and Hove

95

105

110

115

Buckinghamshire

260

270

270

270

East Sussex

270

270

260

255

Hampshire

660

660

655

655

Isle of Wight

60

60

60

60

Kent

725

710

710

730

Medway

125

130

125

115

Milton Keynes

110

110

110

110

Oxfordshire

330

340

345

335

Portsmouth

85

85

90

90

Reading

50

55

55

55

Slough

20

20

20

20

Southampton

80

95

90

90

Surrey

545

560

565

555

West Berkshire

75

80

80

80

West Sussex

390

425

440

430

Windsor and Maidenhead

70

70

75

75

Wokingham

70

70

70

70

South West

2,700

2,680

2,765

2,700

Bath and North East Somerset

90

85

85

85

Bournemouth

75

80

85

85

Bristol, City of

115

135

135

130

Cornwall and Isles of Scilly

275

275

295

285

Devon

405

395

395

400

Dorset

210

215

215

210

Gloucestershire

380

380

385

365

North Somerset

95

100

100

100

Plymouth

115

110

110

110

Poole

65

50

55

55

Somerset

320

300

340

320

South Gloucestershire

140

130

140

140

Swindon

75

80

80

80

Torbay

45

45

40

40

Wiltshire

290

295

295

290

Note:

Figures are rounded to the nearest 5

Source:

Early Years Census

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what guidance his Department gives local authorities to promote the childcare sustainability grant to childcare providers. (199876)

The Department's statutory guidance, “Securing Sufficient Childcare”, which was distributed to local authorities in summer 2007, contains examples of circumstances in which they should consider providing financial support from the Sure Start, Early Years and Childcare Grant for childcare providers. While it is for local authorities to decide their own priorities for funding providers, and how they publicise the availability of funding, the guidance makes clear the need to demonstrate “transparency and fairness”.

Local authorities are told that they

“should ensure that appropriate criteria are in place for deciding which providers should receive support, and that funding systems treat providers in all sectors of the market equitably”.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much his Department allocates to each local authority for the childcare sustainability grant; and what indicators are used to assess how much each local authority should receive in respect of the grant. (199897)

In the 2006-08 period, funding for this activity was included as part of Sure Start, Early Years and Childcare Grant which covered not only child care sustainability but support for early years outcomes, quality and inclusion. A number of different factors were used to determine the allocations, including numbers of children, deprivation measures, Ofsted registered stock figures, and rurality measures. In addition, for the 2008-11 period, an inflationary uplift was added to this wider allocation block above and the resulting funding was split equally between child care sufficiency and access and early years outcomes, quality and inclusion. These funding streams sit within the wider revenue block of the Sure Start, Early Years and Childcare Grant and the overall allocations were smoothed to ensure that each authority received a minimum increase of 5 per cent.

The 2008-09 allocations, by authority, are shown in the following table.

Sure Start, Early Years and Childcare Grant: Childcare Sufficiency and Access Funding, 2008-09

£

Barking and Dagenham

406,977

Barnet

791,906

Barnsley

540,409

Bath and North East Somerset

371,612

Bedfordshire

910,435

Bexley

503,471

Birmingham

2,819,672

Blackburn with Darwen

766,870

Blackpool

349,044

Bolton

702,894

Bournemouth

391,687

Bracknell Forest

256,045

Bradford

1,282,566

Brent

597,230

Brighton and Hove

567,103

Bristol

976,036

Bromley

740,285

Buckinghamshire

1,254,645

Bury

531,676

Calderdale

551,502

Cambridgeshire

1,467,051

Camden

500,316

Cheshire

1,579,483

City of London

89,607

Cornwall

1,061,627

Coventry

810,119

Croydon

840,075

Cumbria

973,830

Darlington

280,965

Derby

602,785

Derbyshire

1,574,419

Devon

1,466,131

Doncaster

691,640

Dorset

720,426

Dudley

655,626

Durham

1,131,249

Ealing

741,495

East Riding of Yorkshire

682,454

East Sussex

1,062,222

Enfield

602,110

Essex

2,916,612

Gateshead

505,540

Gloucestershire

1,349,268

Greenwich

638,101

Hackney

663,740

Halton

585,708

Hammersmith and Fulham

383,577

Hampshire

2,924,575

Haringey

561,050

Harrow

444,783

Hartlepool

300,336

Havering

484,970

Herefordshire

391,717

Hertfordshire

2,687,393

Hillingdon

578,208

Hounslow

513,755

Isle of Wight

301,393

Isles of Scilly

67,485

Islington

579,570

Kensington and Chelsea

386,679

Kent

3,079,754

Kingston upon Hull

593,823

Kingston upon Thames

362,413

Kirklees

1,041,375

Knowsley

446,859

Lambeth

748,965

Lancashire

2,748,524

Leeds

1,716,504

Leicester City

809,577

Leicestershire

1,367,999

Lewisham

710,780

Lincolnshire

1,370,260

Liverpool

1,124,985

Luton

517,813

Manchester

1,120,447

Medway

567,324

Merton

441,959

Middlesbrough

557,832

Milton Keynes

597,734

NE Lincolnshire

425,160

Newcastle upon Tyne

669,703

Newham

854,138

Norfolk

1,581,566

North Lincolnshire

351,449

North Somerset

459,330

North Tyneside

445,466

North Yorkshire

1,302,625

Northamptonshire

1,584,537

Northumberland

704,945

Nottingham City

670,369

Nottinghamshire

1,676,706

Oldham

616,635

Oxfordshire

1,522,554

Peterborough

516,738

Plymouth

600,584

Poole

296,946

Portsmouth

499,713

Reading

372,658

Redbridge

537,595

Redcap and Cleveland

509,609

Richmond upon Thames

441,101

Rochdale

577,312

Rotherham

577,665

Rutland

138,736

Salford

555,569

Sandwell

665,165

Sefton

610,600

Sheffield

1,188,059

Shropshire

676,628

Slough

324,548

Solihull

562,854

Somerset

1,162,040

South Gloucestershire

636,318

South Tyneside

570,524

Southampton

515,286

Southend

399,405

Southwark

860,074

St. Helens

493,513

Staffordshire

1,967,330

Stockport

624,846

Stockton-on-Tees

467,888

Stoke on Trent

668,842

Suffolk

1,547,758

Sunderland

917,188

Surrey

2,518,131

Sutton

445,871

Swindon

497,421

Tameside

550,028

Telford and the Wrekin

446,962

Thurrock

363,322

Torbay

336,661

Tower Hamlets

752,138

Trafford

507,372

Wakefield

703,744

Walsall

610,569

Waltham Forest

577,321

Wandsworth

615,646

Warrington

554,554

Warwickshire

1,210,685

West Berkshire

398,313

West Sussex

1,689,972

Westminster

406,986

Wigan

684,213

Wiltshire

1,079,461

Windsor and Maidenhead

366,393

Wirral

793,175

Wokingham

362,337

Wolverhampton

598,033

Worcestershire

1,325,067

York

349,363

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what criteria providers must fulfil to gain access to funding from the local authority child care sustainability grant; and how much from the grant has been allocated to (a) maintained child care settings and (b) private, voluntary and independent child care providers in each local authority since its inception. (199898)

The Memorandum of Grant which sets out the funding and payment arrangements for the Sure Start, early years and child care grant makes it clear to local authorities that a key objective of the grant is to support child care sufficiency and access, and contains brief guidance on activities that the funding is intended to help.

Local authorities have considerable discretion in choosing which child care providers to help in the light of local circumstances, and the “Securing Sufficient Childcare” statutory guidance contains some specific examples of situations in which they should consider making financial support available to providers.

The Department does not collect information on the allocations of funding from local authorities to individual child care providers within their areas.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the average level of funding given by each local authority to (a) private, voluntary and independent nurseries, (b) maintained childcare settings and (c) childminders in order to provide 2.5 hours of childcare a day was in each of the last five years. (200067)

Funding for nursery education provision is provided for local authorities through the Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG). Local authorities—in consultation with their School Forums—are responsible for determining the level of funding for early years providers in all sectors delivering the free early education entitlement.

The Department published local authorities’ estimates of the average per pupil amount allocated by local authorities to maintained providers and to private, voluntary and independent sector providers for delivery of the free entitlement early years provision in August 2007. The Free Entitlement to Early Years Provision Table for 2007-08 can be found on the DCSF website at

http://www.dfes.gov.uk/localauthorities/section52/subPage.cfm?action=section52.default&ID=87