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Young Offenders: Custodial Treatment

Volume 475: debated on Tuesday 29 April 2008

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) males and (b) females aged (i) under 18 and (ii) 18 to 21 years old were held in the adult prison estate on the latest date for which figures are available. (201646)

At the end of February 2008 there were (a) (i) 2,283 males aged under 18 and (ii) 9,112 males aged between 18 to 20 and (b) (i) 65 females aged under 18 and (ii) 434 females aged 18 to 20 in all prison establishments in England and Wales.

Juvenile prisoners (those aged under 18) are usually held in designated units and prisons. In exceptional individual circumstances they may be held separately within an adult prison for a short period. Similarly sentenced 18 to 20-year-olds are usually held in designated units and establishments. Current operational practice is to hold unsentenced 18 to 20-year-olds in either an adult prison or in cells designated as prison cells within young offender institutions, and in exceptional circumstances the Secretary of State has the power to direct an 18 to 20-year-old sentenced offender to be held as an adult.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many children under 18 years were placed in young offender institutions in each of the last 10 years. (201861)

Young Offender Institutions accommodate sentenced prisoners aged from 15 to 21. The following table gives the number of 15 to 17-year-olds received under immediate custodial sentences into prison establishments in England and Wales between 1997 and 2006.

Aged 15 to 17 (Male and Female)

1997

5,617

1998

5,585

1999

5,877

2000

5,834

2001

5,903

2002

5,738

2003

4,918

2004

5,172

2005

5,175

2006

5,291

This table is taken from table 7.6 in the Offender Management Caseload Statistics 2006, a copy of which can be found in the House of Commons Library and which can be found at this website:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/prisonandprobation.htm

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.