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Departmental Sick Leave

Volume 475: debated on Tuesday 6 May 2008

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) how many working days were lost by his Department due to stress-related illness in each of the last 24 months; (198939)

(2) how many of his Department’s staff took more than (a) five, (b) 10, (c) 15, (d) 20, (e) 25, (f) 30, (g) 35 and (h) 40 days leave due to stress in each of the last five years, broken down by pay grade.

The MOD reports sickness absence figures over a 12 month period on a quarterly basis and does not report working days lost on a monthly basis. The MOD does not have a specific sickness absence code for stress. Stress falls within the Mental and Behavioural Disorders ICD10 category, which includes anxiety, depression and stress. The following table shows the number of working days lost for Ministry of Defence Civilian personnel1 which was attributed to Mental and Behavioural Disorders ICD10 category for the 12 month period preceding each quarter point.

1 This includes all permanent and casual non-industrial and industrial civilian personnel, but excludes Trading Fund (except the 31 December 2007 figure), Locally Engaged Civilian and Royal Fleet Auxiliary personnel.

Total working days lost due to Mental and Behavioural disorders in the preceding 12 month period

Qtr ending

Industrial

Non-industrial

Total

31 December 2005

24,680

79,670

104,340

30 March 2006

23,070

76,620

99,690

30 June 2006

22980

75,390

98,380

30 September 2006

21,730

74,950

96,680

31 December 2006

24,730

74,640

99,370

30 March 2007

25,640

105,150

1130,790

30 June 2007

24,530

102,790

127,320

30 September 2007

25,510

102,990

128,500

31 December 2007

25,380

99,570

2135,040

1 Figures from March 2007 onwards are calculated using the Cabinet Office definition of Working Days. Figures prior to this are calculated using the Standardised definition.

2 Total includes Trading Fund personnel, due to a change in definition. Industrial and non-industrial totals may differ from previously published figures for 2007 due to this change in definition.

Data on the number of staff who took between five and 40 days sick leave due to stress could be provided only at disproportionate cost.