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Written Answers

Volume 475: debated on Friday 9 May 2008

Written Answers to Questions

Friday 9 May 2008

Children, Schools and Families

Child Minding: Registration

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many and what proportion of childminders were deregistered in each year since 1997, broken down by reason for deregistration; (200555)

(2) how many and what proportion of (a) daycare settings and (b) childminders in Basingstoke were awarded ratings of (i) outstanding, (ii) good, (iii) satisfactory and (iv) inadequate following an inspection by Ofsted in each of the last five years.

These are matters for Ofsted. The Chief Inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to the hon. Member and copies of her replies have been placed in the Library.

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 30 April 2008:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for reply.

The regulation of Early Years provision transferred from Local Authorities to Ofsted in September 2001, and was subject to transition arrangements until the end of March 2003.We are only able to provide figures after this transition period, from April 2003.

The data table attached contains figures for each financial year and these are taken from the snapshot of provider lists taken on the first working day of April each year.

A copy of this reply has been sent to right hon. Beverley Hughes MP, Minister of State for Children, Young People and Families, and will be placed in the Library of both Houses.

Numbers and proportions of childminders deregistered in each financial year since 20031

Number

Percentage

Financial year

Number of Childminders at the beginning of the financial year

Cancelled

Resigned

Total

Cancelled

Resigned

Total

2003/04

68,165

1,209

10,864

12,131

2

16

18

2004/05

72,380

2,970

12,378

15,477

4

17

21

2005/06

70,182

968

9,454

10,458

1

13

15

2006/07

71,622

3,204

9,739

13,012

4

14

18

2007/08

69,925

2,859

11,973

14,889

4

17

21

1Please note that percentages in the data tables may not add up to match the total column due to rounding

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 30 April 2008:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, for reply.

The childcare data tables attached have been derived from the Ofsted Early Years summary reports produced annually and from internal Ofsted data reports. The data for financial years 2005-06, 2006-07 and 2007-08 are taken from the Early Years summary reports. The data for years 2003-04 and 2004-05 are taken from Ofsted data reports which provide cumulative data recording the number of inspections during the given financial year.

The figures for each financial year are derived from the snapshot of providers undertaken on the first working day of April each year and include active providers only. For each financial year our figures use the most recent inspection visits, where the reports have been quality assured or have not been withdrawn from publication.

Please note that the outcome judgements changed from a 3-point scale in April 2005 (good, Satisfactory or unsatisfactory), to a 4-point scale (outstanding, good, satisfactory or inadequate) thereafter. Direct comparisons should therefore not be made between these reports scales.

The selection of providers for inspection each year is not random. As a result, it is possible that groups of ‘stronger’ or ‘weaker’ providers are selected, biasing the inspection outcomes. The distribution of inspection grades in any one year, therefore, does not necessarily reflect the national position.

A copy of this reply has been sent to right hon. Beverley Hughes MP, Minister of State for Children, Young People and Families, and will be placed in the library of both Houses.

Judgment on the quality gradings from childcare inspections, in Basingstoke of activeChildminders across the years 1

Number of Inspections

Percentage

2003 to 2005

Good

Satisfactory

Unsatisfactory

Total

Good

Satisfactory

Unsatisfactory

2003/04

22

45

0

67

33

67

0

2004/05

93

52

0

145

64

36

0

Number of InspectionsPercentage

2005 to 2008

Outstanding

Good

Satisfactory

Inadequate

Total

Outstanding

Good

Satisfactory

Inadequate

2005/06

2

40

15

1

58

3

69

26

2

2006/07

0

26

16

5

47

0

55

34

11

2007/08

8

51

34

10

103

8

50

33

10

1 Please note that percentages in the data tables may not sum to 100 per cent. due to rounding.

Judgment on the quality gradings from childcare inspections, in Basingstoke of activeDay care providers across the years 1

Number of Inspections

Percentage

2003 to 2005

Good

Satisfactory

Unsatisfactory

Total

Good

Satisfactory

Unsatisfactory

2003/04

12

19

0

31

39

61

0

2004/05

26

13

0

39

67

33

0

Number of InspectionsPercentage

2005 to 2008

Outstanding

Good

Satisfactory

Inadequate

Total

Outstanding

Good

Satisfactory

Inadequate

2005/06

0

12

11

2

25

0

48

44

8

2006/07

2

12

10

2

26

8

46

38

8

2007/08

2

21

9

2

34

6

62

26

6

1 Please note that percentages in the data tables may not sum to 100 per cent. due to rounding.

Children

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what his estimate is of the proportion of children living with both parents in each local authority area. (200984)

I have been asked to reply.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking what the estimate is of the proportion of children living with both parents in each local authority area. (200984)

As no published tables exist that provide the requested figures, Table C0905 has been specially run and is based on 2001 Census Theme Table on all dependent children (T01). The table covers all local authorities in England and Wales and has been deposited in the House of Commons Library.

Children In Care: Nurseries

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what proportion of children in care aged (a) three and above and (b) below three attended daycare nursery in each of the last 10 years. (204141)

The 2006 Childcare and Early Years Providers Survey estimated that there were 766,900 children attending full day care providers in England. The proportion of children attending, by age, for each year available, is shown in the following table.

Table 1: Percentage of children attending full day care provision, by age

Percentage

2005

2006

Total number of children

704,200

766,900

Under two years old

21

20

Two years old

24

24

Three years old

28

31

Four years old

20

21

Five to seven years old

4

2

Eight years old and over

3

1

Note: Percentages may not sum to 100 per cent. due to rounding.

The Childcare and Early Years Providers Survey does not collect information about children in care.

Children: Day Care

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many (a) childminders, (b) all daycare providers, (c) private, voluntary and independent daycare providers and (d) children's centres there are in each local authority classified by index of multiple deprivation decile. (204128)

Information is not collected on the number of providers by index of multiple deprivation decile.

Since 2003 Ofsted has been responsible for the registration and inspection of childcare providers. A table showing the number of providers and places registered with Ofsted at 31 March 2007 by each local authority has been placed in the Library.

Children's Centres

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many Sure Start children’s centres there will be in 2010; (203712)

(2) how many Sure Start children’s centres have been closed in (a) the Jarrow constituency, (b) South Tyneside, (c) the North East and (d) England in each year since their inception;

(3) how much capital funding for Sure Start children's centres in (a) the Jarrow constituency, (b) South Tyneside, (c) the North East and (d) England his Department has provided in each year since the Sure Start programme commenced;

(4) how many outreach workers his Department has employed in (a) the Jarrow constituency, (b) South Tyneside, (c) the North East and (d) England in each of the last five years;

(5) how many Sure Start children's centres have been established in (a) the Jarrow constituency, (b) South Tyneside, (c) the North East and (d) England in each year since the Sure Start programme commenced.

There are currently 2,906 designated Sure Start Children’s Centres in England. By 2010 there will be 3,500 children’s centres, one for every community. No centres have been closed since their inception. Prior to 2004 there were 524 Sure Start Local Programmes, the vast majority of which have now made the transition into children’s centres.

The further information requested is given in the tables below. Local authorities are responsible for the establishment and operation of children’s centres. The Department does not collect information on the number of outreach workers employed by children’s centres.

Sure Start Local Programmes

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

(a) Jarrow

0

0

1

2

2

(b) South Tyneside

0

1

2

4

5

(c) North East

4

20

30

53

62

(d) England

22

124

240

401

524

Notes:

1. Figures are cumulative.

2. Figures are available for England only.

3. Most SSLPs have now been designated as children’s centres.

Designated Children’s Centres

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

31 March 2008

(a) Jarrow

0

1

3

4

5

6

(b) South Tyneside

0

3

6

9

10

12

(c) North East

6

31

51

114

147

182

(d) England

59

189

443

1,049

1,888

2,906

Notes:

1. Figures are cumulative.

2. Figures are available for England only.

3. Former SSLPs that have become children’s centres are included in these figures.

All Sure Start Local Programme and Children’s Centre Capital Expenditure Estimates

£ million

1999-2000

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

(b) South Tyneside

0.000

0.000

0.000

0.963

0.769

1.075

3.630

0.606

(c) North East

0.000

0.058

3.272

11.098

12.233

12.708

35.789

16.152

(d) England

3.588

1.278

7.816

70.686

83.934

145.923

314.171

219.371

Notes:

1. Data is not available by constituency so we are unable to provide figures for (a) Jarrow.

2. Data is available for England only.

3. The South Tyneside data is actual expenditure but that for the North East and England contains estimates because we do not yet have final data for the entire population.

4. For 2006-07, the expenditure data includes integrated projects (i.e. those which target more than one policy area).

Children's Centres: Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many children's centre outreach workers he proposes to provide by 2010; (204176)

(2) how many outreach workers he proposes to provide in each children's centre in the super output areas ranked in the (a) first to third, (b) fourth to seventh and (c) eighth to tenth deciles of deprivation by 2010.

We expect all Sure Start Children's Centres to provide outreach services, although the level and intensity of such provision will vary according to the needs of the local community. Outreach is part of the role of a wide range of practitioners. While many practitioners engaged in outreach to families with young children will be employed in a children's centre or by a local authority, we encourage local authorities to build on other existing local capacity, such as health visitors, relevant third sector workers, and trained volunteers. Our priority is to help children's centres in the most disadvantaged areas to build their outreach capacity to meet local needs. In this context, children's centre revenue funding provides local authorities with resources for two additional outreach practitioners per children's centre in the most deprived (super output) areas.

We will be reviewing the delivery of outreach in a range of settings with a view to establishing core principles and standards for effective and comprehensive outreach services. We will support this with appropriate training materials and courses and will provide additional funding for practitioners in children's centres to take up new training opportunities.

Class Sizes

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what steps the Government have taken to improve pupil to teacher ratios since 1997. (203732)

The Government have been able to improve the PTR by increasing the supply of teachers. There are now 441,200 teachers in our schools, almost 41,000 more than in 1997. In this period the overall PTR has fallen from 18.6 to 16.9.

The PTR is also influenced by the rise and fall in pupil numbers over time. The Government regularly models the number of teacher training places required in future years by taking account of this and a range of other factors.

Departmental Pensions

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) what his most recent estimate is of the unfunded liability in present value terms of each public sector pension scheme for which his Department is responsible; and on what assumptions for (a) discount and (b) longevity the estimate is based; (200726)

(2) what the unfunded liability in present value terms was of each public sector pension scheme for which his Department is responsible in each year since 1990-91.

The Teachers’ Pension Scheme (TPS) is an unfunded defined benefit scheme. Liabilities are estimated each year by the Government Actuary’s Department and a statement is included in scheme resource accounts.

Financial Services: Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what steps his Department is taking to introduce personal finance education as part of the future schools curriculum at (a) primary and (b) secondary level; and if he will make a statement. (204218)

It is crucial that all young people leave school with the skills and confidence to manage their money well. Personal finance education is already part of Personal, Social and Health Education at Key Stages 1 to 4. However, the revised curriculum for secondary schools includes a new dedicated programme of study for ‘Economic Well Being and Financial Capability’ as part of a revised Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) education. The new curriculum will begin teaching from September 2008 and will add a new focus on financial education in secondary schools. Sir Jim Rose is currently carrying out an independent review of the primary curriculum. He is due to report to Ministers in March 2009.

Additionally, citizenship education, which is statutory at Key Stages 3 and 4, requires that 14 to 16-year-olds be taught how the economy functions, including the role of business and financial services. We are also introducing functional mathematics to the maths GCSE, which means that from 2010 all pupils who achieve a grade C or above will have mastered the basics.

To support schools in meeting these curriculum requirements, we are investing £11.5 million over the next three years to support good financial education in schools. This investment will support revised curriculum guidance for financial capability, innovative curriculum resources with the Child Trust Fund as a focus, and more high-quality training and support for teachers.

Food: Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many people are training to teach food technology. (203149)

The following table shows the total number of trainees on food technology initial teacher training (ITT) courses for the academic year 2007-08.

Number of trainees on food technology ITT courses2007-08Mainstream230Employment based ITT50 Notes:1. Figures are individually rounded to the nearest 102. Figures for mainstream trainees include universities and other HE institutions, SCITT and OU, but exclude employment based ITT (EBITT) schemes.3. Figures include trainees who are resitting all or part of their ITT programme.4. Figures are for the total number of trainees on ITT courses therefore include all trainees at all stages on courses of one to five year durations.5. EBITT figures include trainees through the graduate teacher programme (GTP), the registered teacher programme (RTP), the overseas trained teacher programme (OTTP). There are currently no trainees on a food technology Teach First (TF) programme. Figures are taken from the employment based ITT data management system as at 30 April 2008 and are subject to change,6. Trainees who withdrew before their programme start date are removed from the above data.Source:ITT Trainee Number Census and TDA Employment Based ITT Database

Approximately 800 secondary school food technology teacher training places will be made available over the three-year period 2008-09 to 2010-11.

Languages: GCE A-Level

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many pupils obtained an A-level in (a) German, (b) French and (c) Spanish in each year since 2000. (203774)

The information is as follows.

Number of pupils obtaining a GCE A level

Percentage of pupils entered into exam obtaining a GCE A level

French

1999-2000

14,060

92.3

2000-01

14,148

91.9

2001-02

13,214

97.2

2002-03

12,637

97.9

2003-04

12,298

98.5

2004-05

11,802

98.7

2005-06

12,063

99.0

2006-07

12,028

99.0

German

1999-2000

7,092

93.5

2000-01

7,096

93.3

2001-02

6,188

97.2

2002-03

5,916

97.5

2003-04

5,523

97.9

2004-05

5,141

98.1

2005-06

5,456

98.6

2006-07

5,557

99.0

Spanish

1999-2000

4,207

93.2

2000-01

4,174

92.7

2001-02

4,314

97.4

2002-03

4,434

98.4

2003-04

4,576

98.4

2004-05

4,883

99.0

2005-06

5,148

99.0

2006-07

5,431

98.9

Note:

Figures relate to 16 to 18-year-olds (age at start of academic year, i.e. 31 August) in all schools and colleges.

Literacy: Teaching Methods

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families which reading programmes are approved by his Department for the teaching of synthetic phonics. (202070)

High-quality, systematic phonics, as advocated by the Rose review, should be the prime approach in teaching children to read.

The Department does not approve commercial phonics teaching programmes. To help schools and early years settings in choosing the appropriate phonics support, we have provided a set of core criteria that define the key features of an effective phonics teaching programme. The core criteria build directly on Jim Rose's recommendations.

Schools and settings are able to access self-assessments of commercial phonics resources on the Department's phonics website at

www.standards.dcsf.gov.uk/phonics/.

However, the existence of publishers' self-assessments on this site does not constitute a recommendation or endorsement of the products they represent.

Nurseries: Standards

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many (a) maintained and (b) independent nurseries in each local authority were placed in special measures in each year since 2001. (202181)

This is a matter for Ofsted. HMCI Christine Gilbert has written to the hon. Member, and a cop of her reply has been placed in House Library.

Nurseries: Vacancies

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what estimate he has made of trends in the level of staff vacancies in (a) maintained and (b) private voluntary and independent nurseries since 1997. (204139)

The 2006 Childcare and Early Years Providers Survey estimated that there was a total of 10,400 vacancies in childcare providers (full day care, sessional care and out of school clubs).

The percentage of settings recruiting for none, one, two and three or more vacancies, by type of ownership is shown in Table 1.

Table 1: Percentage of providers trying to recruit staff, by type of provision and ownership, 2006

Private

Voluntary

Number of vacancies

None

1

2

3+

None

1

2

3+

Full day care

Senior Manager

86

13

<0.5

0

88

12

0

0

Supervisory staff

42

44

10

3

49

46

5

0

Other paid childcare staff

51

34

11

4

43

42

13

1

Sessional

Senior Manager

1

1

1

1

86

14

0

0

Supervisory staff

1

1

1

1

55

41

5

0

Other paid childcare staff

1

1

1

1

41

40

19

0

Out of school clubs

Senior Manager

82

16

0

0

84

14

1

0

Supervisory staff

49

24

18

4

51

41

4

4

Other paid childcare staff

43

34

14

3

43

28

18

10

1 Data not included due to a very low base size. Notes: 1. Figures on numbers of vacancies being recruited for in providers under local authority, school/college or other types of ownership are not shown due to very low base sizes. 2. Percentages may not sum to 100 per cent due to rounding and 'don't know' responses.

Data on numbers of vacancies being recruited for in providers under local authority, school/college or other types of ownership are not available due to very low base sizes.

Figures for previous years are not available.

Pre-School Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what estimate he has made of the number of existing early years workers who will require additional qualifications once the integrated qualifications framework comes into effect. (203899)

The integrated qualifications framework, which will be available in 2010, will not impose a requirement for existing early years workers to undertake additional qualifications. The Department has not therefore made any such estimate.

Pupils: English Language

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) what additional support is provided for schools with large numbers of children who have English as a second language; and if he will make a statement; (203496)

(2) what additional funding is made available to (a) primary schools and (b) secondary schools in respect of each pupil who has English as a second language; what the duration of the additional funding is; and if he will make a statement.

The Government provide funding for children including those with English as an additional language through the Dedicated Schools Grant. This grant is supplemented by substantial provision through the ring-fenced Ethnic Minority Achievement Grant (EMAG) distributed to local authorities. For 2008-09 EMAG is worth £187.6 million, rising to £206 million in 2011.

In addition, an Exceptional Circumstances Grant has been introduced to reflect changes in local authorities’ pupil numbers which occur after the three- year indicative allocations of the Dedicated Schools Grant have been announced. It has three elements, covering an increase of more than 2.5 per cent. in overall pupil numbers; an increase of more than 2.5 per cent. in the proportion of pupils with English as an additional language; and a one-off payment to authorities with proportions of pupils with English as an additional language below 10 per cent. which go up by more than 2.5 per cent.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what guidance his Department provides for (a) local authorities and (b) schools on the entering for key stage tests of pupils with English as a second language who arrive in England and are enrolled in school shortly before the test date; and if he will make a statement. (203497)

The Department’s advice is set out in: “New Arrivals Excellence Programme: Guidance” published in September 2007, of which a copy has been placed in the Library. It draws attention to the importance of initial assessment for new arrivals, and advises on appropriate methods. Guidance on entering children for key stage tests is provided by the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority through its Assessment and Reporting Arrangements publications, which can be accessed from the website

www.qca.org.uk/eara

This guidance covers all children, whether or not they have recently arrived in the UK or have English as an additional language. In essence the advice is to enter children wherever they are working at the level of the tests. However, schools may apply for a recently arrived child’s results not to be recorded in published Attainment and Achievement Tables.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what estimate he has made of the proportion of pupils who spoke English as a second language in (a) primary schools, (b) secondary schools and (c) all schools in each local authority area in each year since 1997; and if he will make a statement. (203498)

The proportion of pupils whose first language was other than English for the years 1997 to 2008 (provisional) is as follows:

Percentage

Primary

Secondary

1997

7.8

7.3

1998

8.5

7.8

1999

8.4

7.8

2000

8.7

8.0

2001

9.3

8.0

2002

10.0

8.6

2003

10.5

8.8

2004

11.0

8.8

2005

11.6

9.0

2006

12.5

9.5

2007

13.5

10.5

2008

14.4

110.8

1 2008 figure includes pupils at city technology colleges and academies; figures for earlier years do not.

Analysis by local authority can be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Schools: Admissions

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what proportion of surplus school places there were in those local authorities ranked in the (a) top 10 and (b) bottom 10 in terms of the share of pupils achieving five A* to C GCSEs, including English and mathematics in the last 12 months; and if he will make a statement. (203493)

The Department collects information from each local authority on the number of surplus school places through an annual survey. The most recent data available relate to the position at January 2007.

The following table shows the number of surplus places in maintained secondary schools in local authorities that ranked nationally in the top 10 and lowest 10 in terms of the share of pupils achieving five A*-C GCSEs, including English and mathematics.

Percentage of pupils achieving five A*-C GCSE grades or equivalent, including English and Maths1

Surplus as a percentage of total secondary school places

LAs—top10

Sutton

65.00

4

Isles of Scilly

64.70

20

Kingston upon Thames

61.70

5

Redbridge

61.50

3

Trafford

60.80

9

Buckinghamshire

60.50

4

Barnet

59.70

10

Hammersmith and Fulham

58.00

16

Rutland

58.00

11

Wokingham

57.60

7

LAs—lowest 10

Greenwich

34.00

12

Portsmouth

33.10

9

Nottingham City

33.10

17

Manchester

32.30

9

Middlesbrough

31.90

11

Barnsley

31.50

4

Bristol, City of

31.50

17

Sandwell

30.20

8

Kingston-upon-Hull, City of

30.00

8

Knowsley

26.50

18

1 Figures relate to pupils at the end of Key Stage 4 in all schools published in the Schools Achievement and Attainment tables.

2 The Five Islands Schools on the Isles of Scilly has 2 per cent. surplus places. This is included in our published primary school figures as the school is an all-through school which is middle-deemed primary.

Supply Teachers

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families pursuant to the answer of 28 April 2008, Official Report, column 240W, on supply teachers, what the reasons for the difference in spending on supply teachers between 2005-06 and 2006-07 were; and if he will make a statement. (203904)

Following a review of the answer of 28 April 2008, Official Report, column 240W, and the data given, it appears that a clerical error was made in the response provided.

The correct value of spend on supply teachers in maintained schools in each year from 1997-98 was as follows:

£

Supply teaching staff

Agency supply teaching staff

Total

2002-03

484,510,938

356,530,225

841,041,163

2003-04

462,741,309

372,491,669

835,232,978

2004-05

438,806,050

384,905,468

823,711,518

2005-06

454,848,557

434,073,749

888,922,306

2006-07

433,869,906

439,622,332

873,492,238

Prior to 2002-03 expenditure on supply teachers was not separately identifiable, so these data are not available. Data for the period 2007-08 are not yet available.

Teaching Methods

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families if he will place in the Library (a) the latest data obtained by Ofsted on the extent of setting in schools, broken down by subject, age and pupil and (b) a copy of his Department’s guidance on setting. (202069)

HM Chief Inspector Christine Gilbert has written to the hon. Member with regard to Ofsted’s latest data on setting. A copy of her reply has been placed in the Library. I have placed in the Library a copy of the Department’s guidance on pupil grouping, ‘Grouping Pupils for Success’, and the two pieces of independent research, commissioned by the Department, on which this guidance is based: ‘Pupil Grouping Strategies and Practices at Key Stage 2 and 3’ (published September 2006) and ‘Effective Teaching and Learning for Pupils in Low Attaining Groups’ (published September 2007).

‘Grouping Pupils for Success’ can be accessed at

http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/primary/publications/literacy/group_pup_succ/

‘Pupil Grouping Strategies and Practices at Key Stage 2 and 3’ can be accessed at

http://www.dfes.gov.uk/research/programmeofresearch/projectinformation.cfm?projectid=14415&resultspage=1

‘Effective Teaching and Learning for Pupils in Low Attaining Groups’ can be accessed at

http://www.dfes.gov.uk/research/programmeofresearch/projectinformation.cfm?projectid=14659&resultspage=1

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 30 April 2008:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, for a response to part (a). The Department for Children, Schools and Families will respond separately to part (b).

Our current data do not enable us to count or estimate how many lessons in England are set by ability. The attached tables show the data Ofsted has on the proportion of lessons observed during inspections carried out in the academic year 2006/07, by subject, phase of education and year. Inspectors record whether classes are setted, streamed or banded, as one category, or are mixed ability in composition. A third category is used for lessons in which other forms of grouping are used. When a lesson observed is setted, streamed or banded by ability, a note is made of the ability level of the class concerned.

The data are based on the use of setting, streaming or banding in lessons observed during inspection. Some explanation of these figures may be helpful. Since September 2005, the recording of class organisation has been based either on discussions with the head teacher or teacher by reference to the lesson plan at the time of observation. A much smaller number of lessons is observed than would have been seen under the previous inspection framework. Lessons seen may therefore not represent pupil grouping in the school as a whole.

For clarity, setting is the term used to describe the organisation of pupils in classes on the basis of their prior attainment in the particular subject being taught. The term banding, which is very similar to streaming, is used when the decision as to which pupils are included in a class is based on the prior attainment in a range of subjects. Ofsted does not differentiate between setting, streaming and banding in the data collected during lesson observations.

A copy of this reply has been sent to Jim Knight MP, Minister of State for Schools and Learners, and will be placed in the Library of both Houses.

Truancy: Fixed Penalties

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many parents have received (a) one, (b) two, (c) three and (d) four or more fixed penalty notices in relation to condoned absenteeism of pupils since 2004; and if he will make a statement; (203540)

(2) how many parents have received fixed penalty notices in relation to condoned absenteeism of pupils since their inception, broken down by index of multiple deprivation decile; and if he will make a statement.

The information requested is not available. The Department only collects aggregate data at local authority level on the number of penalty notices issued to parents in respect of the offence of failing to ensure their children's regular school attendance.

Working Tax Credit

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what proportion of people claimed the child care element of the working tax credit in (a) the Basingstoke constituency, (b) Hampshire and (c) England in each year since records were available. (203152)

I have been asked to reply.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave her on 21 November 2007, Official Report, column 916W.

Communities and Local Government

Council Tax: Valuation

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many dwellings in each local authority in England had council tax band amendments in 2007-08; how many involved properties moving up one or more bands; and how many moved down one or more bands in each local authority. (202624)

Eco-Towns

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government in what regard her Department’s (a) policies and (b) public service infrastructure requirements for eco-town sites differ from the requirements for development at sites which are not designated as eco-towns. (202661)

[holding answer 29 April 2008]: As set out in the consultation document “Eco-towns—Living a greener future” we have set challenging criteria, which build on policies and infrastructure requirements for development at sites which are not eco-towns. For example, in terms of sustainable transport we have said that the location of major facilities and services such as shops and community facilities should be located within a 10-minute walk of homes within eco-towns. Copies of the consultation document are available in the Library of the House.

Eco-Towns: Council Tax

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government if she will commission research on the likely effect of eco-towns on levels of council tax over the next 25 years for (i) residents of the local authority areas in which each of the proposed 15 eco-towns is situated and (ii) residents of all adjacent local authority areas. (203198)

[holding answer 1 May 2008]: We are still consulting on the locations and schemes on the shortlist I published on 3 April 2008.

Eco-Towns: Shops

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government if she will make it her policy only to allow town centre shops to be permitted in eco-towns to reduce levels of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from transportation. (201842)

A well designed eco-town will make it easy to travel more sustainably between homes, services and jobs within the settlement. This would include shops and services located within a 10-minute walk of homes within eco-towns and streets designed to accommodate the needs of pedestrians, cyclists and public transport. We will also need to provide for sustainable travel to nearby settlements.

Eco-Towns: West Sussex

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what discussions (a) she and (b) her Department have had with Wates Developments Ltd on the proposed eco-town at Ford since 1 January 2005. (203809)

[holding answer7 May 2008]: Neither the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government nor Ministers in her Department have held meetings with Wates Developments Ltd on the proposed eco-town at Ford since 1 January 2005. On 3 September 2007, officials met members of Wates Developments involved with the proposal for an eco-town at Ford. At the meeting they outlined their expression of interest for an eco-town, and officials confirmed the process and criteria for eco-towns as set out in the “Eco-towns Prospectus”, published on 23 July 2007.

Housing: Migration

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what research she has (a) commissioned and (b) evaluated on the proportion of projected household growth attributable to net migration in (i) London, (ii) the South East and (iii) the East of England. (201003)

None. Such information is available at the England level only from the Department’s Household Projections.

Waste Disposal

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government when the Government plan to respond to the Sixth Report of the Communities and Local Government Committee, HC 195, on Refuse Collection: Waste Reduction Pilots, published on 21 February 2008. (204470)

The Government submitted their response to the Communities and Local Government Committee on 21 April.

Defence

Armed Forces: Deployment

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the average tour interval for the (a) Army, (b) Royal Air Force, (c) Royal Navy and (d) Royal Marines was at the end of the 2007-08 financial year. (199475)

The information is not held in the format requested, as average tour intervals across the single services as a whole are not currently calculated.

Armed Forces: Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what percentage of force elements reported (a) no serious or critical and (b) no critical weaknesses against required peacetime readiness levels in each year since 1997. (203719)

We have only been collecting and reporting such information since 2001-02. It has been published in the Department's Annual Report and Accounts and quarterly performance reports for the years since, copies of which are available in the Library of the House.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what percentage of force elements reported (a) no serious or critical and (b) no critical weaknesses against the ability to generate from peacetime readiness to immediate readiness for deployment on operations in each year since 1997. (203720)

We have only been collecting such information since 2004-05 and reporting it since 2005-06. It has been published in the Department's Annual Report and Accounts and quarterly performance reports for the years since, copies of which are available in the Library of the House.

Armed Forces: Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will place in the Library copies of his Department’s manning evidence submitted to the Senior Salaries Review Board for each financial year from 1997-98. (185715)

All available information on the manning evidence submitted to the Senior Salaries Review Body from 1997-98 has now been collated and placed in the Library of the House.

Armed Forces: Personnel Management

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what estimate he has made of the effects on his Department's expenditure of the introduction of Joint Personnel Administration in each year since 2005. (202355)

The implementation costs for Joint Personnel Administration (JPA) by financial year were as follows.

£ million

2005-06

14.9

2006-07

37.4

2007-08

22.7

These costs include technical development and delivery costs, but exclude single service costs incurred in adjusting to the new system which were absorbed as part of business operating costs.

The benefits accrued by financial year were as follows.

£ million

2005-06

16.2

2006-07

38.4

2007-08

63.4

These figures include reduced costs within the Service Personnel and Veterans Agency and headcount reductions in each of the Services.

Consequently, the impact of JPA on departmental expenditure was broadly cost-neutral in 2005-06 and 2006-07, with a saving of some £40 million in 2007-08.

Armed Forces: Recruitment

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how his Department plans to monitor the impact of the Armed Forces Benefits Calculator on recruitment. (204354)

The Armed Forces Benefits Calculator (ABC) is a new initiative which builds on the success of the pension calculator to provide service personnel with the means of working out an indicative value for their total remuneration package, incorporating basic pay, specialist pay, individual allowances, pension, and other benefits. As such, it is retention focused: the calculator has been developed to better communicate to service personnel the value of their ‘total reward’ package, and other associated financial remuneration information.

The MOD also regards strongly the ABC’s value to recruiting, because it provides those thinking about joining the armed forces with a means of investigating the type of remuneration and benefits available. In future, the single services will be able to understand its impact, and the role it plays in determining why an individual wishes to enlist, from initial interviews. The calculator uses a combination of existing pay rates and allowances (details of which can be found at http://www.mod-abc.co.uk), and some new values, which have been agreed with subject matter experts and the single services. These new values are included to provide a broad indication of what some of the other benefits that personnel receive in return for military service (such as dental care, and health and fitness facilities) might cost to replicate in civilian life.

Armed Forces: Vehicles

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what timescale his Department has for the phasing out of personnel carriers with (a) inadequate armour and (b) those not designed to withstand improvised explosive device detonations; (201586)

(2) what assessment his Department has made of the operational viability of BAE RG31 vehicles, or similar vehicles, built to withstand improvised explosive device detonations;

(3) what assessment his Department has made of the viability of replacing Land Rover and Vector vehicles in Iraq and Afghanistan with armoured vehicles built to withstand improvised explosive device detonations.

Commanders need a range of vehicles of varying protection, mobility and profile to achieve their missions and tasks and counter the threat.

In 2006 the BAE RG-31 was considered in detail, along with the ADI Bushmaster and FPI Cougar 6x6, to fulfil the need for a large protected patrol vehicle that could meet our demanding protection requirements in the fastest possible time. The Cougar was selected and is now known as Mastiff; it has undergone rigorous assessment throughout the procurement process and continues to be assessed, in order to counter emerging threats.

Additional deliveries of Mastiff and a new medium protected patrol vehicle to be called Ridgeback, may allow a reduction in the number of Snatch Land Rovers; however, commanders hold that a role for lighter vehicles on operations is likely to remain, as part of the suite of protected patrol vehicles and high mobility patrol vehicles available to them.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what restrictions are in place on the movement of armed forces personnel in the back of 4-tonne vehicles with regard to (a) maximum distance travelled and (b) time allowed in the back of the vehicle. (203821)

[holding answer 7 May 2008]: The 4-tonne vehicle referred to in this question is defined as a Dual Purpose Vehicle (DPV). When used to carry passengers, the DPV can be used on public roads for single journeys of not more than 40 miles and not exceeding one hour. This distance and time may only be exceeded when personnel are carrying out operations, training for operations and conducting formal field training exercises.

DPVs fitted with troop-carrying vehicle enhanced seating are exempt from these time and distance restrictions, when travelling on metalled roads. Where they are used to carry passengers in off road scenarios, journey times should not exceed one hour at 20 to 25 mph over an eight hour period. Enhanced seating is being progressively phased in throughout the DPV fleet.

Armed Forces: Working Conditions

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many and what percentage of service personnel at each rank between OR1 and OR6 have worked above 55 hours per week on average since October 2007. (200949)

The information is not held in the format requested and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

However, Defence Analytical Services and Advice (DASA) carries out a continuous sample survey of working patterns, which provides information on hours worked in a given week.

The survey is based on a random sample of 18,000 trained service personnel stratified by service, broad rank group and broad location which aims to provide estimates of the average weekly hours worked for those groups and locations.

Since any respondent only provides a diary of their working hours for a single week, we cannot make any further inferences about individual working patterns over a prolonged period.

Work is currently in progress on the 2007-08 Survey of Working Patterns, and the report is expected to be ready towards the end of 2008.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many and what percentage of service personnel at each rank between OR1 and OR6 worked above 55 hours per week on average between October 2006 and October 2007. (200950)

The information is not held in the format requested and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

However, Defence Analytical Services and Advice (DASA) carries out a continuous sample survey of working patterns, which provides information on hours worked in a given week.

The survey is based on a random sample of 18,000 trained service personnel stratified by service, broad rank group and broad location which aims to provide estimates of the average weekly hours worked for those groups and locations.

Since any respondent will only provide a diary of their working hours for a single week, we cannot make any further inferences about individual working patterns over a prolonged period.

The average weekly hours worked for senior ranks (OR6 to OR9) in 2006-07 was 47.9 and junior ranks (OR1 to OR5) 46.7. Time spent working includes core activities, secondary duties, compulsory fitness, training, organised sports and representational activities but excludes breaks.

A copy of the 2006-07 Continuous Working Patterns report is in the Library of the House.

Colchester

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the longest period is for which a residential or former residential dwelling of his Department in Colchester constituency has remained empty. (195987)

Data is only available for residential properties which are currently empty. Of these, seven properties at Colchester have been vacant for seven years awaiting major modernisation. These seven properties now form part of the Colchester upgrade programme spanning financial years 2009-11.

In 1996, the Ministry of Defence sold most of its Service Family Accommodation (SFA) properties in England and Wales to Annington Homes Ltd (AHL), the majority of which were immediately leased back by this Department for defence use. When surplus to defence requirements, properties are handed back to AHL, which is solely responsible for the property until AHL sells the property on the open market. The MOD is not required to maintain records of these properties once they have been handed back to AHL.

Since May 2007, the total number of void SFA properties in Great Britain has taken from 9,162 to 8,761 properties.

Ex-Servicemen: Housing

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what recent assessment he has made of the ability of the Joint Service Housing Advice Office to assist service leavers on their departure from the armed forces. (203988)

The Joint Service Housing Advice Office's main task is to ensure that the service community is aware of new schemes from both the public and private sector that may help them in their search for civilian housing when they leave the Services.

During 2007, the JSHAO ran 85 briefings designed to encourage Service personnel to make long term housing provision while they are in service. These briefings were attended by over 2,000 service personnel.

The JSHAO maintains links with housing associations that have a specific commitment to help service leavers and their housing needs. It also runs a referral scheme, the MOD Nomination Scheme, through which a total of 81 families and individuals were housed in 2007.

Saudi Arabia: BAE Systems

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether he or any of the Ministers in his Department has been informed by (a) BAE Systems and (b) the Serious Fraud Office of any payments made by BAES to the ex-Saudi ambassador to the US, Prince Bandar bin Sultan. (201581)

It is our policy not to comment on commercially or diplomatically sensitive or legally privileged information because to do so would, or would be likely to, prejudice international relations, commercial confidentiality or our legal obligations.

Territorial Army: Northern Ireland

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many Territorial Army personnel are based in Northern Ireland. (204665)

The number of Territorial Army personnel based in Northern Ireland as at 31 March 2008 was 1,962. Additionally there were 100 TA personnel, normally based in Northern Ireland, mobilised and serving in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Duchy of Lancaster

Assets: Consultants

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster pursuant to the answer of 7 March 2008, Official Report, column 2844W, on Assets: Consultants, on which (a) properties and (b) other parts of the estate each of the firms listed provided advice. (198099)

Cancer

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many newly diagnosed cases of each type of cancer there were in each year since 1997. (201945)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008

As National Statistician I have been asked to reply to your recent parliamentary question asking how many newly diagnosed cases of each type of cancer there were in each year since 1997. [201945]

The latest available figures for newly diagnosed cases of each type of cancer are for the year 2005. Figures for 1997 to 2005 can be found in Tables 1 and 7 of the Annual Reference Volume, Cancer statistics: Registrations, Series MB1, available from the NS website at:

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/StatBase/Productasp?vlnk=8843&Pos=&ColRank=l&Rank=224

Carbon Monoxide: Death

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many deaths there were in England as a result of carbon monoxide poisoning in each year since 1997, broken down by Government Office region. (203133)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking how many deaths there were in England as a result of carbon monoxide poisoning in each year since 1997, broken down by Government Office Region. (203133)

The attached table provides the number of deaths where the toxic effect of carbon monoxide was the cause of death, in England and each government office region, from 1997 to 2006 (the latest year available).

Number of deaths with a cause of carbon monoxide poisoning1, England and Government office regions, 1997 to 20052,3

Deaths (persons)

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

England

816

694

646

527

466

419

358

344

232

240

North East

40

46

24

34

23

22

18

16

4

10

North West

129

115

81

51

71

59

66

44

30

30

Yorkshire and the Humber

84

68

65

63

49

37

24

41

31

24

East Midlands

87

68

71

55

55

34

31

27

21

26

West Midlands

88

79

87

77

55

52

45

44

32

34

East of England

80

85

72

48

60

57

52

39

31

27

London

81

51

61

45

36

28

27

37

23

18

South East

143

103

117

84

59

72

54

57

38

37

South West

84

79

68

70

58

58

41

39

22

34

1 Cause of death was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) code 986 for the years 1997 to 2000 and Tenth Revision (ICD-10) code T58 for the years 2001 to 2006.

2 Based on boundaries as of 2008.

3 Figures are for deaths registered in each calendar year.

Childbirth

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on which dates the number of (a) live births and (b) stillbirths that took place in the previous year was published in each of the last five years. (202391)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As the National Statistician I have been asked to reply to your question about the dates on which the number of (a) live births and (b) stillbirths that took place in the previous year were published in each of the last five years. (202391)

The Office for National Statistics is responsible for publishing statistics on the numbers of births registered in England and Wales. The latest year for which figures are available is 2006.

The table below gives the dates on which the numbers of live births and still births in England and Wales for the years 2002 to 2006 were first published. Live births are first published as part of the first release of births and deaths data. Stillbirths are first published in Health Statistics Quarterly (within the infant and perinatal mortality report).

Date of publication (England and Wales)

Year of birth

Live births

Stillbirths

2002

13 May 2003

2 1 August 2003

2003

13 May 2004

19 August 20041

2004

12 May 2005

25m August 20051

2005

18 May 2006

30 August 2006

2006

7 June 20071

23rd August 2007

1 Revisions are sometimes necessary if further information becomes available at a later date. In the instances indicated in the table these were made in August following the first release.

Children

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many and what proportion of (a) individuals and (b) couples had at least one child below the age of five in (i) Basingstoke constituency, (ii) Hampshire and (iii) England in each year for which figures are available. (202989)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician for England and Wales, I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many and what proportion of (a) individuals and (b) couples had at least one child below the age of five years in (i) Basingstoke, (ii) Hampshire and (iii) England in each year for which figures are available. (202989)

The requested counts for Local Authorities/Parliamentary Constituencies are only available from the Census. Figures from earlier Censuses would only be available at disproportionate cost. The figures from the 2001 Census are provided below:

Area

Lone parent families with at least one dependent child aged 0 to 4

Percentage of all families with dependent children, who are lone parent families with at least one dependent child aged 0 to 4

Couple families with at least one dependent child aged 0 to 4

Percentage of all families with dependent children who, are couple families with at least one dependent child aged 0 to 4

England

503,391

8.4

1,810,063

30.1

Hampshire

8,478

5.6

48,421

31.9

Basingstoke and Deane District

1,274

6.5

6,620

33.9

Basingstoke Parliamentary Constituency

1,033

7.5

4,640

33.8

Notes:

1. A dependent child is a person in a household aged 0 to 15 (whether or not in a family) or a person aged 16 to 18 who is a full-time student in a family with parent(s).

2. A family comprises a group of people consisting of a married or cohabiting couple with or without child(ren), or a lone parent with child(ren). It also includes a married or cohabiting couple with their grandchild(ren) or a lone grandparent with his or her grandchild(ren) where there are no children in the intervening generation in the household. Cohabiting couples include same sex couples. Children in a couple family need not belong to both members of the couple.

3. The counts for Hampshire exclude the Unitary Authorities of Portsmouth and Southampton.

Source:

2001 Census Tables S007 and CAS007

Children: Bereavement

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many and what proportion of those under the age of (a) three, (b) five and (c) 16 had been bereaved by the death of their (i) mother, (ii) father and (iii) sibling at the latest date for which figures are available. (202856)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking how many and what proportion of those under the age of (a) three, (b) five and (c) 16 years had been bereaved by the death of their (i) mother, (ii) father and (iii) sibling at the latest date for which figures are available. (202856)

Although information on the relationship of the informant to the deceased is collected at death registration, information on whether the deceased had living children or siblings when death occurred is not, and therefore the information requested is not available.

Children: Death

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many and what proportion of children under the age of (a) three, (b) five and (c) 16 died in each year since 1997. (202849)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking how many and what proportion of children under the age of (a) three, (b) five and (c) 16 died in each year since 1997. (202849)

The total number of deaths and rate per 100,000 for children under the age of (a) three, (b) five and (c) 16 in each year from 1997 to 2006 for England and Wales are shown in the attached table.

Deaths in children by age, England and Wales, 1997-20061

Number of deaths

Rate per 100,000 population of the same age

Under 3

Under 5

Under 16

Under 3

Under 5

Under 16

1997

4,306

4,545

5,711

223

139

54

1998

4,095

4,321

5,415

214

134

51

1999

4,136

4,351

5,388

217

136

51

2000

3,777

4,001

4,965

203

127

47

2001

3,655

3,868

4,891

202

125

47

2002

3,550

3,737

4,724

199

123

45

2003

3,683

3,894

4,862

206

129

47

2004

3,641

3,826

4,725

200

127

46

2005

3,616

3,767

4,647

193

123

45

2006

3,760

3,927

4,814

196

126

47

1 Data are for registrations of death in each calendar year.

Citizen Information Project

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what recommendations of the Citizen Information Project the Office for National Statistics has implemented; and if he will place in the Library a copy of the report. (203127)

The information falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking what recommendations of the Citizen Information Project the Office for National Statistics has implemented. (203133)

On 18 April 2006 (Official Report, column 1WS) the then Chief Secretary to the Treasury announced that the Government had accepted the recommendations by the CIP team based in the Office for National Statistics. The CIP project was subsequently closed by ONS: the relevant government departments will have been responsible for implementing the recommendations. A copy of the report can be found at:

http://www.gro.gov.uk/cip

Construction: Manpower

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many people were employed in the construction industry in (a) the Jarrow constituency, (b) South Tyneside, (c) the North East and (d) the UK in each year since 1997. (198839)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Katen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your parliamentary question asking how many people have been employed in the construction industry in (a) Jarrow constituency, (b) South Tyneside, (c) the North East and (d) the UK in each year since 1997. (198839).

The definitive source for the number of people employed is normally the Labour Force Survey (LFS). However, because of the interest in the construction sector, estimates of the number of jobs have been compiled from the Annual Business Inquiry (ABI/1).

Table 1 attached provides an estimate of jobs in Construction (Standard Industrial Classification (1992) section F) for Great Britain, the North East, South Tyneside and Jarrow for each year from 1997 to 2006, the most recent available. Estimates using the ABI/1 are not available for the United Kingdom.

Figures from the ABI/1 do not include self-employed jobs and therefore these estimates will understate the actual total number of jobs.

As with any survey, results from the ABI/1 are subject to a margin of uncertainty.

Table 1: Number of jobs in Construction Industries1, 2

Thousand (not seasonally adjusted)

Great Britain

North East

South Tyneside

Jarrow3

19974

1,004

53

4

3

1998

1,108

52

3

2

1999

1,131

56

3

2

2000

1,128

56

2

1

2001

1,156

57

2

1

2002

1,163

54

2

1

2003

1,138

53

2

1

2004

1,181

58

2

1

2005

1,213

62

3

2

2006

1,257

60

2

1

1 Standard Industrial Classification (1992) section F. 2 The Annual Business Inquiry does not include estimates of self-employment jobs. Therefore the estimates provided will be lower than the actual total. 3 1995 Parliamentary Constituency Revision Boundary. 4 Figures for 1997 are based on estimates from the rescaled Annual Employment Survey and therefore there is a discontinuity between 1997 and 1998. Notes: 1. Annual Business Inquiry figures are a measure of jobs rather than people. For example, if a person holds two jobs, each job will be counted in the total. 2. Estimates for the United Kingdom using the Annual Business Inquiry are not available. 3. There are significant discontinuities which affect comparisons of the 2006 ABI/1 estimates with earlier years and additionally with respect to changes to Standard Industrial Classifications and Geographies in 2003. More information is available from http://www.statistics.gov.uk/abi/backgroundjnfo.asp. Source: Annual Business Inquiry (ABI/1)

Departmental Carbon Emissions

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how much the Cabinet Office spent on carbon offsetting in each of the last three years; and to which companies payments for carbon offsetting were made in each such year. (204114)

The Cabinet Office is a member of the Government carbon offsetting fund (GCOF). The GCOF aims to fulfil the Prime Minister's commitment to offset emissions attributable to all official and ministerial air travel in central Government. It is available to all central Government Departments and provides a simple and cost-effective way to offset, as well as ensuring high environmental integrity. The GCOF runs for an initial period of three years (2006-07, 2007-08 and 2008-09). The Cabinet Office and DEFRA have offset an extra year (2005-06).

The Cabinet Office has paid £32,326.88 into the GCOF from April 2005 to April 2007. Data are currently being collected for the 2007-08 reporting year, and will be available later in the year.

The GCOF is being managed by EEA Fund Management Ltd, which won the contract to source and deliver 255,000 certified emission reduction credits, with a provision for a further 50,000 credits, over three years from a range of clean development mechanism (CDM) projects. Credits will be supplied from the project portfolio of Trading Emissions plc, to whom EEA is the investment adviser.

Departmental Ministerial Policy Advisors

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what severance payment the Director of Political Strategy in the Prime Minister’s Office, Mr Spencer Livermore, will receive upon leaving his post. (196642)

Paragraph 14b of the Model Contract for Special Advisers sets out the circumstances in which severance is paid. Copies of the model contract are available in the Library of the House. Mr. Livermore did not receive a severance payment.

Departmental Official Hospitality

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how much was spent by his Department and its agencies on (a) alcohol and (b) entertaining in the last 12-month period for which information is available. (187786)

The Cabinet Office does not keep separate records of expenditure on alcohol or entertaining. Such expenditure is included in the Department's hospitality budget and is made in accordance with published departmental guidance on financial procedures and propriety, based on principles set out in “Managing Public Money” and other Treasury guidance.

Departmental Sick Leave

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many of his Department's staff took more than (a) five, (b) 10, (c) 15, (d) 20, (e) 25, (f) 30, (g) 35 and (h) 40 days leave due to stress in each of the last five years, broken down by pay grade. (198965)

The most recent published absence data for the Cabinet Office are available for the 12 months ending 31 March 2007, in the Analysis of Cabinet Office Statistics. This is available on the civil service statistics website at

http://www.civilservice.gov.uk/about/statistics/sickness.asp.

Copies have been placed in the Library of the House.

In order to protect the confidentiality of individuals, it is standard Government practice not to publish records relating to five or less individuals. A breakdown of figures on absence owing to stress by grade and period of absence cannot be provided, since this may compromise the privacy of the individuals because of the small numbers involved.

Departmental Standards

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how his Department plans to work on social clauses to promote adherence to the Best Value Code of Practice on Workforce Matters and the Cabinet Office Code of Practice on Workforce Matters. (203324)

The Department has no plans to work on social clauses to promote adherence to the Best Value Code of Practice on Workforce Matters and the Cabinet Office Code of Practice on Workforce Matters. Under the code, public-sector organisations have a responsibility to ensure that service providers implement the code, whereas social clauses cover additional clauses in public service contracts which are used at the discretion of the public sector commissioner.

Departmental Temporary Employment

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many full-time posts in the Cabinet Office were filled on a temporary basis for a period in excess of six months in each of the last three years. (200656)

For the number of temporary staff working in the Department, I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to the hon. Member for North Cornwall (Dan Rogerson) on 22 April 2008, Official Report, columns 1957-8W, by the Parliamentary Secretary, Cabinet Office, my hon. Friend the Member for Corby (Phil Hope).

The Department does not centrally hold information on length of tenure for temporary staff, and the information could be collected only at disproportionate cost.

Employment

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what proportion of those in employment in (a) Suffolk and (b) the east of England were British-born UK nationals in each of the last five years. (201493)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking what proportion of those in employment in (a) Suffolk and (b) the East of England were British-born UK nationals in each of the last five years. (201493)

The Office for National Statistics compiles employment statistics for local areas from the Annual Population Survey (APS) and its predecessor the annual Labour Force Survey (LFS) following International Labour Organisation definitions.

The attached table shows the percentage of persons of working age (16-64 for men, 16-59 for women) in employment who were British-born UK nationals. Estimates are obtained from the annual LFS for each 12 month period from 2003 to 2004 ending in February. For time series comparisons, the APS estimates from 2005 to 2007 are provided covering the 12 month periods ending in March, but the most recently released estimate is also included, which covers the 12 month period ending in September 2007.

As these estimates are for a subset of the population in a small geographical area, they are based on small sample sizes, and are therefore subject to large margins of uncertainty.

In order to produce estimates for small geographical areas, APS and annual LFS estimates are provided based on survey microdata. It should be noted that the estimate provided is weighted to population estimates consistent with those published in 2003. Reweighted analyses using the latest population estimates, published in summer 2007, will available from 14 May 2008.

Table 1 :British born UK nationals as a proportion of those in employment1 in (a) Suffolk and (b) the East of England in the last five years

Percentage

12 months ending:

Suffolk

East of England

February 2003

93

92

February 2004

93

93

March 2005

94

92

March 2006

91

91

March 2007

93

89

September 2007

92

89

1 Persons of working age (male 16 to 64, female 16 to 59).

Source:

Annual Labour Force Survey and Annual Population Survey

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster if he will make an estimate of the number of people who are (a) in full-time work, (b) in part-time work for 20 to 30 hours per week, (c) in part-time work for 10 to 20 hours per week, (d) in part-time work for less than 10 hours per week and (e) out of work, broken down by age decile. (202553)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question about the number of people (a) in full-time work, (b) in part-time work for 20 to 30 hours per week, (c) in part-time work for 10 to 20 hours per week, (d) in part-time work for less than 10 hours per week and (e) out of work, broken down by age decile. (202553)

The attached table gives estimates of the number of people in full-time and part-time employment and the number of unemployed people for the categories requested for the three month period ending December 2007.

It should be noted that the estimates provided are weighted to population estimates consistent with those published in 2003. Reweighted analyses using the latest population estimates, published in summer 2007, will available from 14 May 2008.

As with any sample survey, estimates from the LFS are subject to a margin of uncertainty.

People aged 16 and over by labour market status, three months ending December 2007—United Kingdom, not seasonally adjusted

Thousand

In employment

Part-time1

Age group

Full-time1

Total part-time

Less than 10 hours per week2

10 to 19 hours per week2

20 to 30 hours per week2

More than 30 hours per week2

Unemployed3

16 to 19

574

794

284

348

149

14

355

20 to 29

4,452

983

112

390

420

60

431

30 to 39

5,009

1,384

129

492

675

89

257

40 to 49

5,532

1,618

134

530

822

132

244

50 to 59

4,139

1,312

130

399

668

114

181

60 to 69

1,095

857

182

301

332

42

48

Aged 70 and over

49

155

58

47

46

4

3

All aged 16 and over

20,850

7,103

1,029

2,506

3,112

456

1,517

1 Based on respondents’ self-classification of their main job as either full-time or part-time.

2 The weekly hour figures shown relate to the total hours usually worked in an individuals main job. rounded to the nearest hour.

3 Number of unemployed people measured using the internationally agreed definition recommended by the International Labour Organisation (ILO).

Note:

The estimates are grossed using population estimates consistent with those published in spring 2003.

Source:

ONS Labour Force Survey

Employment: Disabled

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what his most recent estimate is of the number of people with a registered disability in employment. (200600)

[holding answer 23 April 2008]: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question about the most recent estimate of the number of people with a registered disability in employment. [200600]

The Disabled Persons Register used to be maintained by the government under the now defunct Disabled Persons (Employment) Act 1944. The Disability Discrimination Act 1995 came into force in 1996 and ended the facility for disabled people to be registered as such.

Statistics on workers with health problems or disabilities are available from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). For the reason mentioned above, people who are “registered disabled” cannot be identified but a similar measure is available, as follows. For the three months ending December 2007 there were an estimated 3.5 million people of working age in employment in the UK with a long-term health problem or disability which either substantially limited their day-to-day activities or affected the kind or amount of work they could do, or both.

Working age refers to men aged 16 to 64 and women aged 16 to 59.

It should be noted that the estimate provided is weighted to population estimates consistent with those published in 2003. Reweighted analyses using the latest population estimates, published in summer 2007, will available from 14 May 2008.

As with any sample survey, estimates from the LFS are subject to a margin of uncertainty.

Health Services

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster whether his Department provides health or social care services out of public funds, with reference to the statement by the Minister of State, Department of Health, in the Health and Social Care Bill Committee, of 17 January 2008, Official Report, column 327. (200219)

My Department currently provides an occupational health advisory service for staff which may be regarded as health and social care paid for out of public funds for the purposes of the Health and Social Care Bill.

Industrial Health and Safety

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster pursuant to the answer of 13 March 2008, Official Report, column 593W, on industrial health and safety, what the incident reported in 10 Downing Street between April 2006 and March 2007 was; whether it involved (a) an injury, (b) a disease and (c) a dangerous occurrence; and how many of those affected were (i) civil servants, (ii) special advisers and (iii) Ministers. (198174)

The incident related to the use of a drilling machine by a sub-contractor working on behalf of the Cabinet Office and was recorded as a near-miss/dangerous occurrence under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995. No injuries were suffered by any person.

JP Morgan

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how much the Cabinet Office paid to JPMorgan in each year since 1997; and what the purpose of each payment was. (199588)

Low Incomes: Taxation

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what research the Social Exclusion Unit has undertaken on the effects of the tax system on low-income households. (203805)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave the hon. Member for Preseli Pembrokeshire (Mr. Crabb) on 7 May 2008, Official Report, column 694.

Lung Cancer: Death

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what the mortality rate was for lung cancer on Merseyside in the last year for which figures are available. (201618)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking what the mortality rate was for lung cancer on Merseyside in the last year for which figures are available. (201618)

The age-standardised mortality rate1 for Merseyside metropolitan county2, where lung cancer was the underlying cause of death3, was 57 per 100,000 population in 20064 (the latest year available).

1 Age-standardised mortality rates per 100,000 population, standardised to the European Standard Population.

Age-standardised rates are used to allow comparison between populations which may contain different proportions of people of different ages.

2 Based on boundaries as of 2008.

3 Cause of death for lung cancer was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes C33-C34.

4 Figures are for deaths registered 2006.

Manufacturing Industries: Statistics

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what assessment he has made of the effect on the quality of labour market statistical information from (a) the manufacturing industry and (b) the furniture industry of the reduction in the sample size for the Monthly Production Inquiry. (201982)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2009:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question on the assessment of the effect on the quality of labour market statistical information from (a) the manufacturing industry and (b) the furniture industry of the reduction in sample size of the Monthly Production Inquiry (MPI). (201982)

The MPI collects turnover and employment information from businesses in Great Britain, which is used mainly for the compilation of National Accounts and Labour Market Statistics.

Monthly series for employee jobs in the manufacturing sector are published on the Office for National Statistics (ONS) website. In March 2008, when ONS published estimates for January 2008, the MPI sample of businesses was reduced by around 10 per cent, as part of a wider ONS efficiency programme and to meet ONS’ targets to reduce the burden it places on business. The sample was reallocated across the sample cells (defined by business size-bands and industries) to make the best use of the survey information. This offset the quality impact of reducing the sample size and enabled us to meet our aim of maintaining the quality of estimates at the aggregate level. At the more detailed level, some industries gained in quality at the expense of others.

Sampling errors are a key measure of survey quality, and were estimated to inform the sample changes and assess the impact on quality. The coefficient of variation is simply the sampling error given as a percentage of the actual estimate, which allows for a relative measure of error for comparative purposes. Please note that estimates of sampling error are themselves subject to a margin of uncertainty.

(a) The estimate of GB employee jobs in manufacturing in January 2008 was 2,806 thousand. The previous coefficient of variation of 1.2 per cent gave us 95 per cent confidence that the estimate was between 2773 and 2839 thousand. The changes resulted in a small increase in precision, with a coefficient of variation of 1.1 per cent, giving us 95 per cent confidence that the estimate was between 2776 and 2836 thousand.

(b) The estimate of GB employee jobs series in furniture manufacturing in January 2008 was 102 thousand. The previous coefficient of variation of 5.9 per cent gave us 95 per cent confidence that the estimate was between 96 and 108 thousand. The changes resulted in a small decrease in precision, with a coefficient of variation of 6.9 per cent, giving us 95 per cent confidence that the estimate was between 95 and 109 thousand.

Migration Statistics

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what additional resources are being made available to the Office for National Statistics to undertake the work-plan it has recommended to improve migration estimates. (199298)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your question on what additional resources are being made available to the Office for National Statistics to undertake the Workplan it has recommended to improve migration estimates. (199298)

The statistical work programme for the next four year period is being finalised and will be published shortly. ONS will also be making a related announcement that will provide the details of the migration statistics improvement programme.

NHS Statistics

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what information was made available, and when, to Ministers in his Department on the Department of Health's NHS quarterly in-patient and out-patient waiting times statistics' failure against the six criteria of clarity, accuracy, objectivity, professionalism, use of simple language and ease of use; and what representations have been made to his Department by the Office of National Statistics on this matter. (202771)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking what information had been available, and when, to Ministers on the Department of Health's NHS quarterly inpatient and outpatient waiting times statistics’ failure against the six criteria of clarity, accuracy, objectivity, professionalism, use of simple language and ease of use; and what representation had been made to his Department by the Office of National Statistics on this matter. (202771)

Statistical Heads of Profession in the relevant Departments, the Chair of the UK Statistics Authority, and I as his Chief Executive, all received a copy of the Statistics Commission's 39th Report which was published on 13 March 2008 and entitled ‘Releasing Official Statistics: A Review of Statistical First Releases’. Heads of Profession in other Departments will have informed their Ministers as appropriate. That report described the Commission's recent review of a sample of statistical releases issued by the Government Statistical Service against six key criteria relating to release practices. Included in the Commission's sample was the Department of Health's NHS quarterly Inpatient and Outpatient Waiting Times release. The Head of Profession for Statistics in the Department of Health wrote to the National Statistician at the time indicating that remedial measures would be taken where appropriate. It is now the case that commentary will be included with all Department of Health statistical releases. Additionally, and once the Authority's statutory Head of Assessment is in place, the Authority will consider when and how it will assess this release against its Code of Practice for Official Statistics.

Office for National Statistics: Bird and Bird

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how much was spent on (a) legal and (b) other advice given to the Office for National Statistics by Bird and Bird Solicitors in each year since 2005. (201643)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking how much was spent on (a) legal and (b) other advice given to the Office for National Statistics by Bird and Bird Solicitors in each year since 2005. (201643)

The Office for National Statistics has spent nothing on either legal or other advice from Bird and Bird Solicitors since 2005.

Older Workers

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many people aged (a) 50 to 55, (b) 56 to 60 and (c) 61 to 65 years (i) are in full-time work, (ii) work for more than 30 hours per week, but not full-time, (iii) work for between 20 and 30 hours per week, (iv) work for between 10 and 20 hours per week and (v) work for fewer than 10 hours per week. (203480)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question about how many people aged (a) 50 to 55, (b) 56 to 60 and (c) 61 to 65 years (i) are in full time work, (ii) work for more than 30 hours per week, but not full time, (iii) work for between 20 and 30 hours per week, (iv) work for between 10 and 20 hours per week and (v) work for fewer than 10 hours per week. (203480)

The attached table gives estimates of the number of people in full-time and part-time employment for the categories requested for the three month period ending December 2007.

It should be noted that the estimates provided are weighted to population estimates consistent with those published in 2003. Reweighted analyses using the latest population estimates, published in summer 2007, will be available from 14 May 2008.

As with any sample survey, estimates from the LFS are subject to a margin of uncertainty.

People in full-time and part-time1 employment, by age group, three months ending December 2007, United Kingdom, not seasonally adjusted

Thousand

In employment

Part-time1

Age group

Full-time1

Part-time1

Less than 10 hours per week2

10 to 19 hours per week2

20 to 30 hours per week2

More than 30 hours per week2

50 to 55

2,701

758

63

227

394

75

56 to 60

1,728

714

100

224

343

48

61 to 65

719

510

102

183

199

26

All aged 16 and over

20,850

7,103

1,029

2,506

3,112

456

1 Based on respondents’ self-classification of their main job as either full-time or part-time

2 The weekly hour figures shown relate to the total hours usually worked in an individuals main job. rounded to the nearest hour.

The estimates are grossed using population estimates consistent with those published in spring 2003

Source:

ONS Labour Force Survey

Prostate Cancer

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster with reference to the answer of 5 February 2008, Official Report, column 1056W, on prostate cancer, how many diagnoses of prostate cancer there were in (a) England, (b) each strategic health authority area and (c) each primary care trust area in each year since 1997. (201666)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking how many diagnoses of prostate cancer there were in (a) England, (b) by each strategic health authority area and (c) each primary care trust area in each year since 1997. [201666]

The latest available figures for newly diagnosed cases of prostate cancer are for the year 2005. Figures for 1997 to 2005 for (a) England and (b) each strategic health authority area were given in the answer of 5 February 2008, Official Report, column 1056W. Figures for (a) England and (c) each primary care trust area for the same period are given in the table below.

Table 1: Registrations of newly diagnosed cases of malignant neoplasm of prostate1, males: England, and Primary Care Organisations grouped within Strategic Health Authorities 2,3 1997-2005

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

England

19,878

20,375

22,203

24,256

27,380

27,777

27,672

29,406

28,886

North East SHA

County Durham

180

206

174

202

248

232

263

247

247

Darlington

47

46

66

47

39

69

57

54

47

Gateshead

74

98

114

94

115

126

120

100

148

Hartlepool

34

36

43

40

47

45

60

46

36

Middlesbrough

77

70

77

71

83

48

95

86

103

Newcastle

77

101

116

152

126

181

127

121

91

North Tees

42

63

82

81

87

88

75

72

79

North Tyneside

72

74

92

126

134

122

141

125

106

Northumberland

91

146

157

161

248

196

194

178

229

Redcar and Cleveland

64

52

93

101

84

83

110

94

97

South Tyneside

45

47

57

49

51

73

76

59

64

Sunderland Teaching

84

124

158

119

145

126

157

139

156

North West SHA

Ashton, Leigh and Wigan

54

72

76

109

138

131

134

191

209

Blackburn with Darwen

44

43

62

61

68

57

68

66

59

Blackpool

58

70

69

72

84

112

141

132

90

Bolton

88

94

84

86

164

115

104

167

142

Bury

65

68

77

68

100

126

100

123

136

Central and Eastern Cheshire

128

162

222

256

280

268

281

313

282

Central Lancashire

205

193

193

222

252

226

255

331

379

Cumbria

204

198

189

232

249

281

222

243

299

East Lancashire

164

160

186

231

236

201

226

214

232

Halton and St. Helens

107

118

123

81

123

130

135

173

143

Heywood, Middleton and Rochdale

52

81

78

102

116

97

114

123

130

Knowsley

46

40

45

57

58

78

68

111

74

Liverpool

136

145

168

149

194

185

191

306

221

Manchester

139

124

133

132

174

164

152

180

205

North Lancashire

170

197

174

154

243

206

247

301

263

Oldham

67

84

70

88

107

108

131

185

171

Salford

97

77

72

88

69

73

109

118

126

Sefton

108

101

128

128

151

159

174

267

228

Stockport

141

117

134

155

195

191

177

205

228

Tameside and Glossop

93

108

107

114

114

131

128

159

146

Trafford

113

112

121

128

128

150

136

182

138

Warrington

69

60

48

78

93

70

66

73

61

Western Cheshire

87

76

165

175

175

139

152

158

177

Wirral

131

140

124

154

151

144

131

158

166

Yorkshire and the Humber SHA

Barnsley

75

68

69

79

78

111

105

116

120

Bradford and Airedale

118

132

151

181

211

208

199

221

212

Calderdale

66

76

73

84

101

67

86

111

111

Doncaster

105

100

111

121

138

103

127

133

113

East Riding of Yorkshire

144

147

151

167

180

205

222

235

242

Hull

74

102

87

93

112

106

109

145

116

Kirklees

167

142

131

143

151

169

177

197

171

Leeds

277

271

300

318

390

316

384

406

364

North East Lincolnshire Care Trust Plus

59

54

62

74

108

116

99

75

89

North Lincolnshire

76

61

82

72

67

90

71

77

73

North Yorkshire and York

290

358

349

484

529

525

546

607

575

Rotherham

66

58

47

84

75

90

62

85

79

Sheffield

204

104

182

320

338

289

265

294

277

Wakefield District

136

143

128

151

152

203

186

205

186

East Midlands SHA

Bassetlaw

47

34

35

42

43

52

61

37

60

Derby City

82

65

86

107

116

118

120

120

144

Derbyshire County

241

260

305

343

380

416

381

400

430

Leicester City

65

63

84

103

98

111

89

106

95

Leicestershire County and Rutland

195

183

260

329

331

295

328

412

442

Lincolnshire

283

340

350

359

441

453

511

559

612

Northamptonshire

224

273

286

330

385

405

346

352

432

Nottingham City

98

87

88

88

75

61

44

115

98

Nottinghamshire County

218

214

248

215

236

208

206

305

295

West Midlands SHA

Birmingham East and North

175

145

168

174

257

277

256

289

233

Coventry Teaching

128

135

129

160

171

179

164

193

194

Dudley

93

112

128

121

148

156

198

137

187

Heart of Birmingham Teaching

88

102

87

90

113

124

128

143

112

Herefordshire

81

72

76

104

118

107

101

112

108

North Staffordshire

85

78

79

78

122

86

104

85

104

Sandwell

109

116

166

143

150

1.87

157

126

132

Shropshire County

158

166

158

187

206

219

211

204

218

Solihull

109

123

119

139

154

181

148

188

155

South Birmingham

139

139

158

166

236

221

221

221

220

South Staffordshire

198

206

274

297

297

346

377

434

393

Stoke on Trent

80

73

74

94

102

93

117

91

104

Telford and Wrekin

54

58

62

57

61

72

81

70

66

Walsall Teaching

90

96

97

111

146

173

147

168

193

Warwickshire

193

263

265

327

325

333

286

337

308

Wolverhampton City

90

109

104

141

143

157

156

138

174

Worcestershire

215

254

267

334

327

324

397

441

449

East of England SHA

Bedfordshire

114

136

148

142

191

180

189

192

183

Cambridgeshire

222

183

249

292

328

361

354

351

415

East and North Hertfordshire

192

204

241

277

240

215

241

304

361

Great Yarmouth and Waveney

89

113

137

127

158

152

153

132

109

Luton

45

35

45

56

48

53

45

74

76

Mid Essex

124

147

160

147

191

149

190

145

203

Norfolk

328

350

393

474

500

655

521

581

531

North East Essex

103

120

120

202

221

193

180

140

207

Peterborough

46

60

73

81

81

95

77

78

75

South East Essex

185

161

160

206

230

203

227

211

177

South West Essex

166

135

129

165

205

190

208

197

183

Suffolk

319

280

330

324

368

385

447

419

394

West Essex

113

155

165

198

221

220

201

197

229

West Hertfordshire

201

187

259

247

210

219

161

143

310

London SHA

Barking and Dagenham

74

75

84

74

80

72

63

70

63

Barnet

92

130

150

128

140

150

127

140

134

Bexley

102

111

108

99

102

111

92

102

79

Brent Teaching

91

112

116

112

116

124

124

126

127

Bromley

80

86

104

99

122

149

127

96

87

Camden

79

69

70

50

75

98

71

57

83

City and Hackney Teaching

82

68

68

67

84

87

84

87

74

Croydon

123

105

111

121

148

193

166

170

224

Ealing

104

103

113

96

101

102

132

114

121

Enfield

101

94

106

112

123

127

123

120

112

Greenwich Teaching

82

84

89

107

86

75

75

84

81

Hammersmith and Fulham

36

40

41

53

69

33

70

62

75

Haringey Teaching

74

63

65

51

90

72

77

90

98

Harrow

83

79

91

86

78

71

112

92

128

Havering

109

112

122

136

155

167

155

188

141

Hillingdon

99

117

79

87

80

89

107

111

92

Hounslow

53

49

45

62

63

60

69

59

58

Islington

79

64

61

65

74

55

54

75

67

Kensington and Chelsea

56

58

55

73

67

67

65

70

59

Kingston

72

59

73

74

82

87

83

81

68

Lambeth

89

81

85

102

108

116

116

101

109

Lewisham

91

99

88

119

139

134

91

105

75

Newham

78

69

61

73

59

65

73

72

53

Redbridge

102

109

113

104

121

90

108

92

83

Richmond and Twickenham

71

68

70

63

70

104

76

75

66

Southwark

59

63

102

101

95

94

90

85

80

Button and Merton

140

156

146

189

196

168

179

187

148

Tower Hamlets

57

59

66

41

55

57

67

39

41

Waltham Forest

68

82

83

50

62

67

83

49

61

Wandsworth

106

114

109

109

138

155

125

127

112

Westminster

61

83

68

94

96

76

78

86

76

South East Coast SHA

Brighton and Hove City

127

90

130

143

120

106

98

106

98

East Sussex Downs and Weald

234

207

249

231

235

224

184

215

216

Eastern and Coastal Kent

304

310

330

292

344

366

395

405

402

Hastings and Rother

93

94

91

93

82

130

110

98

97

Medway

98

87

81

81

108

122

103

106

126

Surrey

517

488

524

571

573

530

517

478

522

West Kent

294

307

303

323

412

342

402

349

361

West Sussex

413

411

514

554

564

477

453

504

492

South Central SHA

Berkshire East

142

148

154

172

231

207

258

265

221

Berkshire West

195

220

259

240

216

215

272

284

221

Buckinghamshire

210

207

266

287

356

345

324

365

292

Hampshire

502

516

561

668

738

833

725

762

733

Isle of Wight NHS

56

48

69

48

94

91

100

97

104

Milton Keynes

62

82

80

98

127

121

109

119

96

Oxfordshire

169

237

247

344

355

364

339

383

314

Portsmouth City Teaching

46

52

70

67

81

80

87

89

86

Southampton City

99

124

103

110

153

109

127

126

101

South West SHA

Bath and North East Somerset

91

82

87

91

82

142

126

128

124

Bournemouth and Poole

233

216

233

262

272

302

268

310

290

Bristol

140

152

164

137

167

208

210

204

179

Cornwall and Isles of Scilly

276

254

312

274

401

383

359

334

356

Devon

434

377

370

430

574

590

635

648

519

Dorset

336

312

308

400

439

503

469

510

423

Gloucestershire

235

250

282

309

354

301

324

373

372

North Somerset

104

112

126

107

140

151

198

179

125

Plymouth Teaching

106

115

94

36

140

110

158

191

143

Somerset

248

258

238

261

350

365

351

381

415

South Gloucestershire

98

83

109

109

108

156

166

149

138

Swindon

54

58

57

70

57

102

71

86

109

Torbay

81

67

71

85

88

78

106

106

121

Wiltshire

193

199

217

255

273

351

387

390

368

1 Malignant neoplasm of prostate is defined as code C61 in the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10)

2 Based on NHS boundaries as of October 2006.

3 Each primary care organisation (PCO) is listed under the strategic health authority (SHA) to which it reports. The 152 primary care organisations include 148 primary care trusts (PCTs), and 4 care organisations (COs). The PCOs are not all coterminous with SHAs?see Annex C footnotes at:

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/geography/health_areas.asp

Source:

Office for National Statistics

Public Appointments Commissioner: Stratagem

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, what payments the Office of the Commissioner for Public Appointments made to Stratagem in each of the last five years; and on what date and for what purpose in each case. (202289)

I understand that the Office of the Commissioner for Public Appointments has made no payments to Strategem in the last five years.

Self-Employed: North East

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many self-employed people worked in the construction industry in (a) the Jarrow constituency, (b) South Tyneside, (c) the North East and (d) the UK in each year since 1997. (202455)

The information falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking how many self-employed people worked in the construction industry in (a) Jarrow constituency, (b) South Tyneside, (c) the North East and (d) the UK in each year since 1997. (202455)

The Office for National Statistics compiles employment statistics for local areas from the Annual Population Survey (APS) and its predecessor the annual Labour Force Survey (LFS) following International Labour Organisation definitions.

Table 1, attached, shows the number of people aged 16 and over, resident in the Jarrow constituency, South Tyneside, the North East and the UK who were self employed in the construction industry in each year since 1997. Estimates are obtained from the annual LFS for each 12 month period from 1997 to 2004 ending in February. For time series comparisons, the APS estimates from 2005 to 2007 are provided covering the 12 month periods ending in March, but the most recently released estimate is also included, which covers the 12 month period ending in September 2007.

As these estimates are for a subset of the population in small geographical areas, they are based on small sample sizes, and are therefore subject to large margins of uncertainty.

In order to produce estimates for small geographical areas, APS and annual LFS estimates are provided based on survey microdata. It should be noted that the estimate provided is weighted to population estimates consistent with those published in 2003. Reweighted analysis using the latest population estimates, published in summer 2007, will be available from 14 May 2008.

Table 1: Number of self-employed people in the construction industry in Jarrow, South Tyneside, the North East and the UK

Thousand

12 months ending

Jarrow

South Tyneside

North East

UK

February 1997

1

1

15

111

February 1998

1

1

20

681

February 1999

1

1

20

668

February 2000

1

1

16

643

February 2001

2

1

13

653

February 2002

1

1

14

694

February 2003

1

1

18

725

February 2004

2

1

18

787

March 2005

1

1

19

816

March 2006

1

1

23

820

March 2007

2

1

24

842

September 2007

1

1

24

838

1 Sample size too small to provide estimates

2 Less than 500

Source:

Annual Labour Force Survey & Annual Population Survey

Skin Cancer

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many people aged (a) three to nine, (b) 10 to 19, (c) 20 to 29, (d) 30 to 39, (e) 40 to 49, (f) 50 to 59 and (e) 60 years and over have been diagnosed with skin cancer in each of the last five years. (202750)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking how many people aged (a) three to nine, (b) 10 to 19, (c) 20 to 29, (d) 30 to 39, (e) 40 to 49, (f) 50 to 59 and (g) 60 years and over have been diagnosed with skin cancer in each of the last five years. [202750]

The most recent available figures for newly diagnosed cases of malignant melanoma of skin registered in England are for the year 2005. Figures for 2001-2005, by age group, are given in the table below.

Registrations of newly diagnosed cases of malignant melanoma of skin1, by sex and age group, England, 2001-05

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Males

3-9

0

4

0

0

0

10-19

11

12

10

17

27

20-29

113

106

98

116

118

30-39

270

277

271

306

315

40-49

398

403

397

489

487

50-59

538

577

602

603

725

60 and over

1,455

1,542

1,666

1,776

1,991

Total 3+

2,785

2,921

3,044

3,307

3,663

Females

3-9

0

3

3

1

2

10-19

28

19

23

38

41

20-29

234

240

186

225

282

30-39

452

450

513

515

537

40-49

588

510

565

644

672

50-59

678

744

749

767

772

60 and over

1,600

1,727

1,791

1,866

2,054

Total 3+

3,580

3,693

3,830

4,056

4,360

Persons

3-9

0

7

3

1

2

10-19

39

31

33

55

68

20-29

347

346

284

341

400

30-39

722

727

784

821

852

40-49

986

913

962

1,133

1,159

50-59

1,216

1,321

1,351

1,370

1,497

60 and over

3,055

3,269

3,457

3,642

4,045

Total 3+

6,365

6,614

6,874

7,363

8,023

1 Malignant melanoma of skin is coded to C43 in the International Classification of Diseases Tenth Revision (ICD-10)

Source:

Office for National Statistics

Unemployment

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (1) how many and what proportion of households included no-one in full-time employment (a) in 1997 and (b) in the latest year for which figures are available, broken down by (i) constituency, (ii) local authority and (iii) region; (203278)

(2) how many and what proportion of people lived in households with no-one in full-time employment (a) in 1997 and (b) in the latest year for which figures are available, broken down by (i) constituency, (ii) local authority and (iii) region.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician I have been asked to reply to your two parliamentary questions. The first asks how many and what proportion of households included no-one in full-time employment (a) in 1997 and (b) in the latest year for which figures are available, broken down by (i) constituency, (ii) local authority and (iii) region (203278). The second asks how many and what proportion of people lived in households where no-one was in full time employment (a) in 1997 and (b) in the latest year for which figures are available, broken down by (i) constituency, (ii) local authority and (iii) region (203279).

Estimates in the attached tables are provided from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). There is currently no annual household dataset, so the figures are given for the April-June quarter to be consistent with those published in the 'Work and worklessness among households' First Release (see web link

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/pdfdir/work0807.pdf).

A copy of the tables has been placed in the House of Commons Library.

Data for English and Welsh parliamentary constituencies has been provided for 1999 as data are not available for 1997. Data for Scottish parliamentary constituencies are only available for 2007.

The household datasets (like the main quarterly LFS microdatasets) are weighted to the population estimates published by ONS in February and March 2003. They do not incorporate the more recent population estimates used in the headline LFS series.

Figures for households are based on working age households. A working-age household is a household that includes at least one person of working-age, that is a woman aged 16 to 59 or a man aged 16 to 64.

The LFS is a sample survey covering over 52,000 households in the United Kingdom in each three month period. As with any sample survey, estimates from the Labour Force Survey are subject to a margin of uncertainty.

Unemployment: Enfield

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many people were unemployed in (a) the London Borough of Enfield and (b) the (i) Chase, (ii) Enfield Highway, (iii) Enfield Lock, (iv) Highlands, (v) Southbury, (vi) Town and (vii) Turkey Street wards in the borough in each of the last 10 years. (202864)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking how many people were unemployed in (a) the London Borough of Enfield and (b) the following wards in the borough: (i) Chase, (ii) Enfield Highway, (iii) Enfield Lock, (iv) Highlands, (v) Southbury, (vi) Town and (vii) Turkey Street in each of the last 10 years. [202864]

The Office for National Statistics produces estimates of total unemployment for unitary and local authorities, from a statistical model, following International Labour Organisation (ILO) definitions.

Table 1, attached, shows model based estimates of the total number of unemployed, for the Enfield borough. Estimates are obtained for each 12 month period from 1997 to 2004 ending in February. For time series comparisons, the estimates from 2005 to 2007 are provided covering the 12 month periods ending in March, but the most recently released estimate is also included, which covers the 12 months ending in September 2007. Corresponding estimates for local government wards are not available.

As these estimates are for a subset of the population in a small geographical area, they are based on small sample sizes, and are therefore subject to large margins of uncertainty.

It should be noted that the estimate provided is weighted to population estimates consistent with those published in 2003. Reweighted analyses using the latest population estimates, published in summer 2007, will be available from 14 May 2008.

ONS also compiles statistics for local areas of people claiming Jobseeker's Allowance (JSA). Table 2, attached, shows the total numbers of people resident in the Enfield borough and the specified wards, claiming JSA. At ward level, data is only available for periods from 2004. In addition, March 2008 data has been included as being the latest data available.

Table 1: Number of persons unemployed in Enfield borough for the last 10 years.

Thousand

12 months ending

Unemployed

February 1997

12

February 1998

10

February 1999

10

February 2000

9

February 2001

9

February 2002

8

February 2003

9

February 2004

9

March 2005

9

March 2006

12

March 2007

10

September 2007

9

Source:

Annual Labour Force Survey and Annual Population Survey.

Table 2: Number of persons claiming Job Seekers Allowance .

Enfield Borough

Chase

Enfield Highway

Enfield Lock

Highlands

Southbury

Town

Turkey Street

February 1997

10,260

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

February 1998

7,869

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

February 1999

7,442

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

February 2000

6,898

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

February 2001

5,744

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

February 2002

5,501

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

February 2003

5,905

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

February 2004

6,081

190

378

340

140

310

159

284

March 2005

6,077

208

347

379

137

262

150

298

March 2006

6,732

212

398

362

165

275

155

315

March 2007

6,153

185

355

347

131

290

122

312

March 2008

5,220

194

328

307

130

251

123

276

n/a = data not available

Source:

DWP

Voluntary Organisations: Heywood

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (1) what proportion of contracts awarded to third-sector organisations that provide services in the Heywood and Middleton constituency were three year contracts in the latest period for which information is available; (202913)

(2) what progress has been made towards ensuring that third-sector organisations providing services in the Heywood and Middleton constituency are awarded three-year contracts.

This Government are committed to ensuring that three-year funding for third-sector organisations becomes the norm rather than the exception. I will be reporting on Government progress in meeting this funding commitment to HM Treasury on an annual basis. The first report will be made in the autumn 2008 and will be laid before Parliament. It is expected that local authorities will be making reports on three-year funding from 2009 onwards.

The information requested is currently not recorded centrally.

Voluntary Organisations: Pensions

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (1) how many third-sector organisations providing public services have provided (a) a contracted out, final-salary based defined benefit pension scheme or (b) a defined contribution scheme with employer contributions of at least 6 per cent. to new starters working on those contracts; (203320)

(2) how many third-sector organisations providing public services have stakeholder pension schemes for new starters on those contracts;

(3) how many third-sector organisations providing public services who have stakeholder pension schemes for new starters on those contracts match employee contributions of more than 6 per cent.

The information requested is not held centrally. Where public services contracts involve a transfer of staff from a public sector organisation to a private or third-sector service provider (or a subsequent retender of that contract where TUPE applies), the Code of Practice on Workforce Matters in Public Sector Service Contracts may apply. Where the code does apply, it will be for the relevant Government Department to monitor the implementation of the code, including in relation to pensions provision by service providers.

Voluntary Organisations: Standards

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (1) what steps the Office of the Third Sector has taken to monitor (a) the application of and (b) compliance with the code of practice on workforce matters designed to prevent the development of a two tier workforce in public service contracts outsourced to the third sector; (203317)

(2) what steps the Office of the Third Sector has taken to assess the effects of the codes of practice on workforce matters designed to prevent the development of a two-tier workforce in public service contracts outsourced to the third sector;

(3) whether the Third Sector Action Plan will be used to promote adherence to the Best Value Code of Practice on Workforce Matters and the Cabinet Office Code of Practice on Workforce Matters.

Public-sector organisations oversee the way in which service providers implement the code, where appropriate. If employees or trade unions feel that the code is not being applied correctly, they are invited in the first instance to alert the relevant public sector organisation. They are also supplied with contact details to seek advice in cases in which they consider that the public-sector organisation has failed to meet its responsibilities In addition, it is part of the ongoing work programme of the Public Services Forum to review the implementation of the code. This review will be undertaken in partnership by trade unions, the third and private sectors and Government.

Given these existing channels for concerns about the code to be raised and acted upon, the Office of the Third Sector has not taken steps to monitor application of, compliance with or the effectiveness of the code on workforce matters. “Partnership in Public Services”, the cross-Government public service action plan, includes 18 key actions to reduce the barriers to third-sector involvement in public service delivery, and does not include promotion of the code.

Widowed People

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many widowers alive today had spouses who died before 1972. (203901)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 May 2008:

As National Statistician I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking how many widowers alive today had spouses who died before 1972. (203901).

The information you requested is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Cars: Manufacturing Industries

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate he has made of the amount of pollution generated in the process of manufacturing a standard family car. (204203)

DEFRA has not undertaken any work to quantify the pollution associated with car manufacture. However, the King Review gives estimates of the carbon dioxide emitted at all life cycle stages. Similar information on other pollution impacts is published by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders, and is also covered by the ‘Environmental Improvement of Passenger Cars' report recently published by the European Commission.

Domestic Wastes: Contracts

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Bromley of 31 March 2008, Official Report, columns 491-6W, on Domestic Wastes: Contract, if he will place in the Library copies of the final reports of the research projects with the SIS codes of (a) WR0103, (b) WR0104, (c) WR0106, (d) WR0107, (e) WR0112, (f) WR0217, (g) WR0506, (h) WR0512, (i) WR0705 and (j) WR0601. (202934)

Every research project commissioned by DEFRA is published on our website once it is complete. The following projects are completed and arrangements are in hand to place them in the House Library.

WR0107 - Modelling Impacts of Lifestyle Changes on Household Waste Arisings.

WR0112 - Understanding Household Waste Prevention Behaviour.

WR0512 - Evaluation of the Household Waste Incentives Pilot Scheme.

WR0601 - Health and Environmental Impacts of Vermin/Insects in the Context of Waste Management Operations.

The following projects are not yet complete, but will be made available as soon as final reports have been accepted for publication:

WR0103 - Household Waste Prevention Policy Side Research Programme.

WR0104 - Lifestyle Scenarios: Futures for Waste Composition.

WR0106 - Achieving Household Waste Prevention and Promoting Sustainable Resource Use through Product Service Systems.

WR0506 - Benefits of Third Sector Involvement in Waste Management.

Although co-funded by DEFRA, the following projects were commissioned by other bodies and reports for these studies can therefore be obtained from them.

WR0217 - Assessment of Occupational Health and Safety Risks of Waste Collection and Handling Systems (Commissioned by the Health and Safety Executive).

WR0705 - Updated Lifecycle Study on Reusable and Disposable Nappies (Commissioned by the Environment Agency).

EU Law

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps his Department has taken to implement (a) EC Regulation 166/2006, (b) EC Regulation 1882/2002, (c) Council Directive 96/61/EC, (d) EU Directive 2003/87/EC and (e) Commission Directive 2003/35. (203722)

The information requested is as follows.

(a) Steps taken to implement EC Regulation 166/2006

The EC regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council concerning the establishment of a European Pollutant Release and Transfer Register (E-PRTR) and amending Council directives 91/689/EEC and 96/61/EC was agreed on 18 January 2006 and came into force on 24 February 2006. PRTRs are publicly accessible compilations of data that describe the releases of substances to the environment and waste transfers. The E-PRTR regulation is a directly binding piece of European legislation and does therefore not need to be transposed into domestic law. In August 2007 DEFRA published a consultation document concerning among other issues proposals on designating competent authorities, enforcement, reporting requirements and quality assessment of the collected emissions data. We have recently published the Summary of Responses received during the consultation period.

(b) Steps taken to implement EC Regulation 1882/2002

This regulation is published and updated daily and contains, for information, the Standard Import Values for determining the entry prices, on import into the EU, for certain fruit and vegetables. These values are used for customs tariff purposes by HM Revenue and Customs and importers. The regulation does not require implementation.

(c) and (e) Steps taken to implement Council Directive 96/61/EC and Commission Directive 2003/35

The Council directive 96/61/EC on integrated pollution prevention and control (IPPC) was agreed on 24 September 1996 and came into force on 30 October 1996. The IPPC directive provided a transitional period from 30 October 1999 to 30 October 2007 during which existing installations could be brought under the requirements of the directive. New installations had to comply from the outset.

In England and Wales the IPPC directive was transposed through the Pollution Prevention and Control (England and Wales) Regulations 2000. The PPC regulations were introduced under the Pollution Prevention and Control Act 1999.

The parts of the Public Participation directive 2003/35/EC which amended the IPPC directive and came into force on 25 June 2003 were transposed in England and Wales on that date through the PPC regulations. This directive provides an increase in the already high level of public participation in the process by which regulators consider applications for environmental permits to operate new or substantially changed industrial installations subject to the IPPC directive.

From 6 April 2008 the PPC regulations have been superseded by the Environmental Permitting (England and Wales) Regulations 2007.

The IPPC directive and its subsequent amendments have since been codified and repealed by directive 2008/1/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 15 January 2008 concerning integrated pollution prevention and control (codified version).

(d) Steps taken to implement EU Directive 2003/87/EC:

The EU emissions trading directive 2003/87/EC was agreed on 22 July 2003 and came into force on 25 October 2003. The directive has been transposed into UK legislation through the greenhouse gas emissions trading scheme regulations.

On 24 May 2005 the UK published the approved National Allocation Plan (NAP) and installation-level allocations for Phase I of the EU ETS, which ran from 2005 to 2007. The approved NAP and final allocation decision for phase ii of the scheme, running from 2008 to 2012, were published on 16 March 2007.

On 23 January 2008, the European Commission published its draft proposals for the review of the EU ETS required under article 30 of the EU directive on the EU ETS. The role of the review is to develop the EU ETS in a positive way post-2012 and learn from experiences so far. The UK welcomed the European Commission's ambitious proposals for tackling climate change and delivering a low-carbon economy in Europe. The UK will now be entering into negotiations with other member states and the Commission and will also be releasing a formal consultation soon. Once agreed by the European Council and European Parliament, the changes will need to be transposed into UK law.

Fly-Tipping: Bexley

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many incidents of fly-tipping there were in the London Borough of Bexley in each of the last five years; and how many people were prosecuted in each such year for such offences. (203383)

Data are only available from 2004 onwards.

I have arranged for a table to be placed in the Library of the House showing the number of fly-tipping incidents and prosecutions recorded in each local authority by local authorities on Flycapture for 2004-05, 2005-06 and 2006-07.

Following the release of the 2006-07 Flycapture statistics on 9 October 2007, this information has been sent to all MPs. It is also available to download electronically on DEFRA'S Flycapture website at:

http://www.defra.gov.uk/environment/localenv/flytipping/flycapture-data.htm

Food: Waste Disposal

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment has been made of the effects of kerbside food waste collections on levels of household composting. (202953)

Separate collections of food waste are relatively novel in the UK. In the 19 trials being conducted by the Waste and Resources Action Programme, early indications are that public participation in collections is of the order of 60-80 per cent. Of the food waste being put out for disposal around 70 per cent. is being captured by the food waste collection. The remainder is being disposed of in the residual bin. This excludes any food waste that may be home-composted. Many of the trials are being conducted in urban areas where the uptake of home composting is low as properties have either very small or no gardens. However, a customer survey in some of the trial areas indicated that between 58 per cent. and 74 per cent. of respondents considered that the availability of a food waste collection had not changed what they put in their home composting bin.

WRAP proposes to continue to monitor the food waste collection trials, and will be reporting on its findings in due course.

Some local authorities are trialling the collection of food waste with garden waste collections. The partial evidence available so far suggests that these arrangements are not generally successful in capturing food waste from the residual waste stream, Furthermore, separate research carried out by WRAP in 2007 indicates that the existence of kerbside garden/organic collections has limited impact on levels of home composting by home composting households. The main reasons given are:

1. They consider home composting to be more environmentally friendly and divert as much via that route as they can, using collection services only for items that they decide are unsuitable for home composting (pernicious weeds, large and woody items etc.)

2. As they are keen gardeners they want to make as much compost as possible, and will use the collection service only for items that don't readily compost

3. At certain times of the year their gardens produce an excess of certain waste materials and they will consider using the kerbside service to get rid of this excess material.

The inference is that food waste collected with garden waste has little overall impact on the amount of material which is home-composted.

Nature Conservation: EU Law

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what shadow price per hectare of salt marsh he has used for the purpose of implementation of Council Directive 92/43/EEC on the conservation of natural habitats and of wild fauna and flora. (204622)

A key mechanism for delivery of this Directive is the flagship agri-environment scheme, environmental stewardship. Shadow prices are not used to determine payment rates for this scheme as they are derived from the income forgone by the landowner in carrying out the prescribed management. The payments for salt marsh options available under the environmental stewardship higher level scheme, were, in common with all the other options, calculated in 2004. There are a number of options available ranging from the maintenance of coastal saltmarsh (30/ha) to the creation of inter-tidal/saline habitat on arable land (at 700/ha).

Regeneration: Castle Point

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on what funding allocated by his Department for the Castle Point Regeneration Partnership is planned to be spent. (203642)

The Castle Point Regeneration Partnership includes various bodies such as the Department for Communities and Local Government, the East of England Development Agency, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, Essex county council and Castle Point borough council which contribute funding to the project. Neither DEFRA nor Natural England has set aside funds for the Castle Point Regeneration Partnership.

Waste Disposal: Fees and Charges

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether his Department has powers to sanction local authorities that do not offer waste disposal free of charge to schools and prisons. (202485)

The duty on a local authority to collect household waste is contained in section 45(1) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990. Waste from schools and prisons is classified by schedule 2 of the Controlled Waste Regulations 1992 (CWR) as household waste. Local authorities have no powers to charge for the disposal of household waste.

There are no powers in the EPA for DEFRA or the Secretary of State to sanction any authorities that charge for the disposal of household waste.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs pursuant to the answer of 21 April 2008, Official Report, column 1373W, on Waste Disposal: Fees and Charges, if he will place in the Library a copy of the August letter to local authorities on section 46 powers. (204578)

Waste Management: Prisons

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what representations his Department has received from local authorities on Schedule 2 waste obligations to collect rubbish from prisons without imposing a charge. (202944)

Since January 2008 DEFRA has received four letters from local authorities and one from the Local Government Association (LGA) asking the Government to consider the right of Schedule 2 waste producers to free waste disposal.

The letter from the LGA and my reply to it have both been published on the LGA's website.

Waste Management: Private Finance Initiative

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what his policy is on the inclusion of (a) incineration and (b) recycling facilities in projects undertaken as part of his Department's waste private finance initiative funding scheme; and if he will make a statement. (202946)

Local authorities are best placed and responsible for deciding the most appropriate waste management facilities for their areas. Recovering energy from waste is a sustainable option for residual waste that would otherwise go to landfill. It is important that plans for energy from waste facilities emerge out of local waste strategies, so that all options for reuse, recycling and composting can be explored first.

The Government wish to encourage local authorities to consider using anaerobic digestion. Other than this, we do not generally think it appropriate to express a preference for one technology over another. Any given technology is (where applicable) more beneficial if both heat and electricity can be recovered. Particular attention should therefore be given to the siting of plant to maximise opportunities for Combined Heat and Power.

The current Waste Private Finance Initiative (PFI) criteria were issued in May 2006. Projects must meet these criteria in order to be considered for PFI credits. The criteria aim to ensure that PFI credits are allotted to projects that are value for money and enable the investment in residual waste infrastructure necessary if the demanding targets in the Landfill Directive and Waste Strategy for England 2007 are to be met.

The following criteria are included:

2. PFI credits are awarded to authorities primarily to deliver increased diversion of biodegradable municipal waste from landfill. Proposals should demonstrate how the schemes:

contribute to or complement longer-term national targets for recycling and composting as well as diversion of biodegradable and other municipal waste from landfill, indicating the amount of biodegradable and other municipal waste expected to be diverted from landfill over the whole life of the project;

support or complement the authorities' plans for recycling set out in their Municipal Waste Management Strategies.

5. The use of residual waste treatment options involving recovery, including energy from waste solutions, will have an integral role in treating the waste we cannot 'design out', re-use or recycle. Such options should be considered while also demonstrating that there is no future barrier to meeting reduction, reuse and recycling targets.

6. Proposals should demonstrate that other relevant authorities, the public, and interested parties have been consulted and that there is a broad consensus supporting a recognised long term waste management strategy which is reflected in the proposed solution.

10. Preferential consideration will be given to capital projects which focus on residual treatment plant only, including, but not limited to, Energy from Waste, Mechanical Biological Treatments and Anaerobic Digestion. The full criteria are available on the DEFRA website.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Anguilla: Politics and Government

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on negotiations on the constitutional future of Anguilla. (203990)

At the beginning of 2006, the Governor of Anguilla appointed a Constitutional and Electoral Reform Commission to take forward Anguilla's constitutional review process. The commission reported in August 2006. Following this, a first round of constitutional talks between Anguilla and the UK, scheduled for July 2007, was postponed at the request of the Government of Anguilla to allow for greater public consultation and for the people of Anguilla to be better informed about the constitutional options. The most recent public forum was held in April 2008. The Government are awaiting the outcome of these consultations, and are available to open constitutional talks when the Government of Anguilla are ready.

Belarus: Surveillance

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what reports he has received on the (a) sale of covert surveillance technology by UK companies to the Belarusian security service and (b) use of such equipment by the Belarusian security service. (203959)

[holding answer 7 May 2008]: The Government are aware of reports of meetings between UK surveillance technology companies and the authorities of Belarus. The Government are not involved in these meetings and therefore have no information about their content.

All export licence applications for military and dual use goods, including surveillance equipment, are closely examined and assessed on a case-by-case basis against Consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria.

Where licensable surveillance equipment is concerned, particular attention is given to Criterion 2 of the Consolidated Criteria - "The respect of human rights and fundamental freedoms in the country of final destination". The Government will not issue an export licence for any military or dual use goods where there is a clear risk that the proposed export might be used for internal repression.

Cameroon: Politics and Government

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assessment he has made of the implications of the recent change to the constitution of the Republic of Cameroon altering the limits of presidential terms for the political situation in that country. (203937)

[holding answer 7 May 2008]: The amendment to the Cameroonian constitution to remove presidential term limits was passed in the Cameroonian National Assembly on 10 April. The constitution now places no restrictions on the number of terms for which a president, including the incumbent, may serve. It also accords some immunities to presidents for acts committed during their tenure and allows a longer period for the organisation of elections in the case of a presidential vacancy.

As noted in my answer of 23 April 2008, Official Report, column 2121W, the Government supported an EU public statement concerning the amendment of the constitution of Cameroon on 27 March. We will continue to work with EU partners. In addition, our high commission in Yaounde has raised the constitutional amendment bilaterally with a number of Cameroonian Ministers and stressed the need for urgent action to deal with the democratic deficits and other reforms that need to be addressed.

China: Falun Gong

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent discussions he has had with the Government of China on the Falun Gong. (204367)

We remain concerned by reports of the mistreatment of Falun Gong adherents in various provinces of China, particularly those detained in Re-education Through Labour (RTL) camps. We raise our concerns, over individual practitioners and for the need to reform RTL, with the Chinese Government at every appropriate opportunity. We did this most recently at the 16th round of the UK-China Human Rights Dialogue in Beijing on 28 to 31 January.

Commonwealth: Scholarships

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs pursuant to the answer of 24 April 2008, Official Report, columns 2189-90W, on the Chevening scholarships programme, how many Commonwealth scholarships were awarded in each of the last five years. (204115)

The following number of Foreign and Commonwealth Office-funded Commonwealth scholarships was awarded in each of the last five years:

Country

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Total

Australia

21

24

19

13

11

88

Bahamas

0

0

0

1

0

1

Brunei Darussalam

1

0

0

0

0

1

Canada

27

26

25

27

25

130

Cyprus

0

1

0

0

1

2

Malta

1

2

1

2

2

8

New Zealand

7

9

5

11

6

38

Singapore

2

0

1

2

1

6

Total

59

62

51

56

46

274

Departmental Domestic Visits

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs on how many occasions he has visited (a) Scotland, (b) Wales and (c) Northern Ireland in an official capacity in the last 12 months. (204396)

My right hon. Friend the Foreign Secretary has not, as yet, visited the devolved Administrations in his official capacity.

East Africa: Peace Negotiations

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will assess the merits of convening a regional conference on East Africa and related countries to include Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, Uganda and Kenya to discuss common objectives towards peace in that region; and if he will make a statement. (203500)