Skip to main content

Hospitals: Greater London

Volume 476: debated on Monday 19 May 2008

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients were treated by (a) Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Greenwich, (b) Queen Mary's Hospital, Sidcup, (c) Princess Louise Hospital, Bromley and (d) University College Hospital, Lewisham in (i) 1997 and (ii) the last year for which figures are available. (205339)

Information is not available in the format requested. Data are not collected at individual hospital level but by national health service trust. The trusts that manage the specified hospitals are, respectively, Queen Elizabeth Hospital NHS Trust, Queen Mary's Sidcup NHS Trust, Bromley Hospitals NHS Trust and The Lewisham Hospital NHS Trust. We have assumed that my hon. Friend means the Princess Royal University Hospital, which is part of Bromley Hospitals NHS Trust, rather than Princess Louise Hospital, which is in Kensington, and the University Hospital, Lewisham, rather than the University College Hospital.

In addition, we are unable to identify the number of patients treated. The following table therefore provides data for finished admission episodes (FAEs) for these trusts. A FAE is a period of in-patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. Admissions do not represent the number of in-patients as a person may have more than one admission within the year. The latest available data are for 2006-07.

Total admissions to hospital for 2006-07 and 1997-98, for Queen Elizabeth Hospital NHS Trust, Queen Mary's Sidcup NHS Trust, Bromley Hospitals NHS Trust and The Lewisham Hospital NHS TrustTotal FAEsTrust name1997-982006-07Queen Elizabeth hospital NHS trust36,27960,382Queen Mary's Sidcup NHS trust39,41739,211Bromley hospitals NHS trust49,395160,700The Lewisham hospital NHS trust34,82454,613 1 For 2006-07, the figure for Bromley hospitals NHS Trust includes data for the Orpington Treatment Centre. Notes: 1. A FAE is the first period of in-patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. Admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year. 2. Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) are compiled from data sent by over 300 NHS trusts and primary care trusts in England. The Information Centre for health and social care liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data via HES processes. While this brings about improvement over time, some shortcomings remain. 3. HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. During the years that these records have been collected by the NHS, there have been ongoing improvements in quality and coverage. These improvements in information submitted by the NHS have been particularly marked in the earlier years and need to be borne in mind when analysing time series. Changes in NHS practice also need to be borne in mind when analysing time series. For example a number of procedures may now be undertaken in out-patient settings and may no longer be accounted in the HES data. This may account for any reductions in activity over time. 4. Figures have not been adjusted for shortfalls in data (i.e. the data are ungrossed). Source: Hospital Episode Statistics, the Information Centre for health and social care.