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Alcohol: Young People

Volume 477: debated on Thursday 19 June 2008

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many underage young people were (a) tried at magistrates courts and (b) convicted of buying alcohol illegally in each of the last five years. (188261)

[holding answer 22 February 2008]: The number of youths tried at magistrates courts and convicted for offences related to buying alcohol illegally in each of the last five years in England and Wales can be viewed in the table.

In addition the police can issue a £50 fixed penalty for the offence of “Buying or attempting to buy alcohol by a person under 18” under section 149(1) of the Licensing Act 2003 (c.17).The number of PNDs issued to youths aged 16 to 17 years were 0 in 2004, 17 in 2005 and 62 in 2006.

The number of persons who were proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts for offences relating to purchase of alcohol by a person aged under 18 years in England and Wales, 2002 to 20061,2,3

Proceeded against

Found guilty

2002

13

9

2003

13

10

2004

10

8

2005

14

9

2006

8

6

1 Data are on the principal offence basis.

2 Data include the following statutes and corresponding offence descriptions :

Licensing (Occasional Permissions) Act 1983 Schedule (Sec 3) para 4(2). Licensing Act 1964 Sec 169(2).

Person under 18 buying or attempting to buy or consuming intoxicating liquor.

Person under 18 buying or consuming intoxicating liquor in Licensed premises.

Licensing Act 2003 S. 149(l)(7a)

Purchase of alcohol by an individual under 18.

3 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts, other agencies, and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source:

Court proceedings data held by CJEA—Office for Criminal Justice Reform—Ministry of Justice