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Written Answers

Volume 479: debated on Thursday 17 July 2008

Written Answers to Questions

Thursday 17 July 2008

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Fruit and Vegetable Grading

14. To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what progress is being made in discussions on revising the EU grading rules for fruit and vegetables. (219300)

The June 2007 Agriculture Council agreed to a package of reforms to the CAP fruit and vegetables sector, since when the European Commission have been taking forward the implementation of the new regime. This includes revised rules on marketing standards which are currently under discussion in the Fruit and Vegetables Management Committee.

Upper River Ray

15. To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will make funding available for environmental projects for the Upper River Ray catchment area in Oxfordshire. (219301)

Funding has been available for environmental projects within the Upper River Ray catchment area for over 10 years through various agri-environment schemes.

Agricultural Theft

16. To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what discussions he has had with the Home Secretary on the likely effects on trends in the theft of agricultural equipment and red diesel of rising world oil and metal prices. (219303)

The Secretary of State has not had any discussion with the Home Secretary on the theft of agricultural equipment and red diesel. Farm security is a matter for individual farms to address, with advice from the police if necessary.

I sympathise with farmers who have been victims of crimes, but crime is the remit of the Home Office, and not this Department.

Chewing Gum

17. To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will bring forward proposals for incentives to encourage manufacturers of chewing gum to create a biodegradable product. (219304)

Manufacturers assure us that they continue to put significant resources into developing less adhesive products, while retaining their marketability and safety. Additional tax relief is already available to companies incurring expenditure on qualifying research and development activities.

Food Prices

18. To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps the Government are taking to seek reductions in food prices. (219305)

High food prices are a global issue requiring coordinated action. The G8 recently agreed to invest $10 billion to address short-term humanitarian needs and to improve food security over the longer term. Rising food prices have an impact at home and abroad—particularly for the poorest—and today my Department has published a discussion paper which sets out what we consider necessary to ensure UK food security in a globalised world.

Energy Efficiency

19. To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what discussions he has had with ministerial colleagues on making consumer products more energy efficient. (219308)

The publication of the Progress Report on Sustainable Products and Materials was agreed by the Cabinet Sub-Committee on Energy and Environment. Regular meetings have also been held with industry stakeholders such as retailers and manufacturers.

Consumer Council for Water

20. To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent discussions he has had with representatives of the Consumer Council for Water; and what matters were discussed. (219310)

Ministers and DEFRA officials are in regular contact with the Consumer Council for Water on a range of issues.

Fishing Industry

21. To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent assessment he has made of the performance of the UK fishing industry. (219311)

Information of the performance of the UK fishing industry is published annually by the Marine and Fisheries Agency in: ‘United Kingdom Sea Fisheries Statistics’. The document includes information on the size of the UK fishing fleet, the number of fishermen, key economic indicators, and the quantity and value of sea fish landings, imports and exports. Comparisons are made with the fishing industries in Europe and the rest of the world.

Single Payment Scheme

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent assessment he has made of the Rural Payments Agency's performance against its targets in delivering the single payment scheme. (219296)

The Rural Payments Agency met all of their payment targets for the 2007 Single Payment Scheme. This demonstrates a continued improvement in RPA performance and is another important step towards the agency again providing an acceptable level of service to its customers.

Marine Habitats

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent steps he has taken to safeguard marine habitats; and if he will make a statement. (219297)

The Government are committed to establishing (by 2012) a network of well managed marine protected areas that will conserve the richness of our marine environment.

Carbon Emissions

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of the likely effect of the global economic situation on individual consumers’ carbon footprints. (219302)

In the short-term, high fossil fuel prices and the global downturn could lead to slightly reduced demand for fuel and energy, and thus slightly lower carbon emissions in the economy as a whole, as people reduce their demand for fuel and energy.

If fossil fuel prices remain high in the long run, we expect producers and consumers to adapt and consume less fossil-fuel based energy, leading to reduced carbon emissions.

Environment Protection: Housing

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Brentwood and Ongar of 7 May 2008, Official Report, column 905W, on environment protection: housing, whether the carbon footprint regarding the 60 per cent. reduction target relates to housing only. (219021)

The Green Neighbourhoods project aims to retrofit up to one hundred selected neighbourhoods across England, with concentrations of hard-to-treat homes, with energy saving, microgeneration and water efficiency measures that would aim to reduce the carbon footprints of their homes by at least 60 per cent.

Pesticides: EC Action

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs for what reason the Government abstained from the vote on the proposed Pesticides Directive in the Council of Ministers in respect of changing approval of pesticides from risk-based to hazard-based examination. (219447)

The UK abstained on this issue as we remained concerned that no proper assessment of the potential impact of the proposals on agriculture in the Community, or of their benefits for consumers, had been presented to member states. We could not support measures which would have significant adverse impacts on crop protection and secure no significant health benefits for consumers.

Rural Areas

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent assessment he has made of progress against his Department’s objective of achieving fair access to public services for rural communities. (219307)

DEFRA’s new departmental strategic objective, which is based on outcomes rather than inputs, is “Strong Rural Communities”. Progress against this DSO, published on the DEFRA website, is assessed quarterly against a range of indicators which show, in the main, a very positive picture.

In addition, the Commission for Rural Communities published its “State of the Countryside” report yesterday, in which the accessibility of services for rural communities is discussed in detail.

Wales

Departmental Official Cars

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales which make and model of car he has chosen as his Ministerial car to be provided by the Government Car and Despatch Agency. (217750)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by my hon. Friend the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Transport (Jim Fitzpatrick) on 16 July 2008, Official Report, column 414W.

Departmental Sick Leave

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how many staff in his Department have had five or more periods of sickness absence of less than five days in two or more of the last five years. (218972)

Northern Ireland

Departmental Sick Leave

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many working days have been lost due to sickness amongst employees for which his Department is responsible in each year since 1997. (218041)

The following table details the number of working days lost due to sickness among employees in the Northern Ireland Office in each year from 2000. Details are unavailable prior to 2000. The figures prior to 2004-05 do not include Home Civil Servants (HCS staff); however, they are included in figures from 2004-05 onwards.

Staff included

Total days absence

2000-01

NIO NICS

12,147.5

2001-02

NIO NICS

13,396.4

2002-03

NIO NICS

14,894.5

2003-04

NIO NICS

16,592.5

2004-05

NIO NICS and NIO HCS

18,364.5

2005-06

NIONICS and NIO HCS

17,313.3

2006-07

NIONICS and NIO HCS

18,631.8

Young Offenders

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (1) what procedures are in place to identify (a) mental health problems, (b) learning difficulties and (c) addictions among those entering young offender centres in Northern Ireland; (218760)

(2) what percentage of residents in young offenders centres in Northern Ireland in each of the last five years have been diagnosed as having (a) mental health problems and (b) learning difficulties;

(3) what percentage of those detained in young offender centres have experienced (a) learning difficulties, (b) literacy and numeracy difficulties, (c) time spent as a looked-after child, (d) mental health problems or personality disorder, (e) family break-down and (f) exclusion from school;

(4) what procedures there are for assessment of those entering young offender centres for (a) mental health problems or personality disorders, (b) educational under-achievement, (c) learning difficulties, (d) addictions and (e) family difficulties or breakdown.

All young offenders coming into prison undergo a health care committal screen on the first night. They are asked questions about mental health problems, drug and/or alcohol use or misuse and if they have any particular literacy problems. All inmates are also seen, on initial committal, by Opportunity Youth to identify any alcohol or substance misuse problems. If specific mental health problems are identified then they would receive onward referral to mental health support within health care.

The first assessment will be carried out by a mental health nurse who will provide basic support but, if required, a further referral will be made to another specialist, such as cognitive behavioural therapists, Opportunity Youth or psychiatrists.

A health care induction programme, aimed at providing inmates with information regarding the health services available to them whilst in custody, has been produced and is being delivered twice a week to all new committals. Inmates are informed of the clinics and support services available to them and how to access them. All staff, including the dental team, deliver the induction programme on a rotational basis.

Wider research in the UK suggests that approximately 60-70 per cent. of prisoners have some mental health problem but detailed analysis has not yet been undertaken specifically in relation to the young offender centre population.

Inmates are also given an education assessment within 20 days of committal which assesses literacy and numeracy ability and also tests for dyslexia. They are also asked to make the assessor aware of any other known learning difficulties, in particular ADHD.

In the last three years 31 per cent. of male young offenders have shown some indicators for dyslexia, (this compares with a figure of approximately 10 per cent. in the general population). A pilot is under way to assess better learning difficulties among the young offenders and in particular ADHD, which will also develop and pilot appropriate interventions.

At present, education staff are able to assess but not formally diagnose specific learning difficulties, although they can and do identify indications for certain conditions and plan and deliver lessons accordingly. Prison Service will also consider a diagnosis of dyslexia, which is a more formal process than assessment and must be carried out by a suitable qualified individual, as part of the pilot.

The Prison Service does not routinely have access to the academic, social care and other records of individuals before they come into custody. However, our own assessments on committal show that around 70 per cent. have literacy and numeracy skills below level 1, which is comparable to that of an 11-year-old.

Finally, the hon. Gentleman will be aware that lead responsibility for the provision of prison health care was transferred to the Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety on 1 April 2008 and therefore I have copied these questions and my response to the Health Minister, Michael McGimpsey MLA.

Young Offenders: Children in Care

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what percentage of those detained in young offender centres have been at any time a looked-after child or otherwise in the care of the state. (218802)

The Prison Service does not record the information requested in Northern Ireland. However, research in England and Wales suggests about one in three have been in care as a child.

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what percentage of children who have (a) been arrested, (b) appeared in court, (c) gone through youth conferences and (d) been imprisoned in young offender centres or prison in each of the last 10 years spent time in state administered care. (218834)

Information in the format requested for (a), (b) and (d) is not readily available and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Information available on (c) covers the proportion of initial admissions to the Juvenile Justice Centre, Northern Ireland, received from care homes:

Proportion (percentage)

1998

15

1999

15

2000

28

2001

25

2002

15

2003

21

2004

35

2005

35

2006

35

2007

26

Notes:

1, Figures exclude cases where looked after status is unknown at time of admission.

2. Figures are based only to children whose residential address is a care home at time of admission.

3. Figures are based on the first 10 months of 2007 only.

Culture, Media and Sport

British Grand Prix

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what discussions his Department had with (a) the organisers of Formula 1, (b) Milton Keynes Council and (c) other interested parties on the proposed move of the British Grand Prix from Silverstone to Donington Park; and on what dates each such discussion took place. (219455)

The decision to move the British Grand Prix from Silverstone to Donington is a commercial matter for Formula One Management (FOM) and the Federation Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA).

I have not had any direct discussions with any party about this decision.

However, my officials and I have met regularly with representatives of Motor sport Development UK (MDUK), The British Racing Drivers' Club (BRDC) and colleagues from Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (BERR) to discuss the current redevelopment plans of the Silverstone circuit.

I also met with Bernie Ecclestone on the 18 March 2008 to discuss the British Grand Prix.

Departmental Sick Leave

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many working days have been lost due to sickness amongst employees for which his Department is responsible in each year since 1997. (218043)

Sickness absence figures are contained in the annual report ‘Analysis of Sickness Absence in the Civil Service’, published by the Cabinet Office. Website at

http://www.civilservice.gov.uk/about/statistics/sickness.asp

The sickness absence reports on the Cabinet Office website date back to 2004. DCMS only holds sickness absence data dating back to 2003.

The Department's sickness absence policy provides guidance to employees on the procedures to following in dealing with sick absence. It also details responsibilities of individuals, line managers and human and business resources in monitoring and dealing with sickness absence and encouraging return to work—which includes guidance on making reasonable adjustments for employees.

As part of the Department's attendance, health and well-being programme for employees, there are also policies covering a range of flexible work patterns such as part-time/job share, flexible working hours and working from home to support work-life balance. There is support for employees who may wish to take a career break and/or special leave.

The Department also has an employee assistance programme, which is free to employees (their families and friends) and offers advice and counselling on both personal and work related issues.

Gambling

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what meetings the Gambling Commission has held with (a) Gala Coral, (b) William Hill and (c) Ladbrokes or their representatives on betting shops in the last 12 months; what matters were discussed; what the outcomes were of the discussions; and if he will make a statement. (219544)

As part of its work in regulating the gambling industry the Gambling Commission has various meetings with representatives of the gambling industry, including Gala Coral, William Hill and Ladbrokes.

These meetings can form part of a formal consultation process, formal liaison with the industry and compliance work. A wide range of regulatory matters have been discussed at the meetings which form part of the Commission's work to ensure effective regulation of the betting industry is maintained. Apart from the normal licensing processes and compliance visits to the operators' premises, the only specific meetings on betting shops with any of the companies have been induction visits for Commissioners and staff.

Reaching Communities Scheme

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what percentage of funding from the Reaching Communities Scheme has gone to projects in (a) rural areas and (b) urban areas. (213450)

The fund does not distinguish between urban and rural areas in awarding and recording these grants.

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what guidance is provided on funding of programmes in rural areas when deciding on grants from the Reaching Communities Scheme. (213451)

Reaching Communities is managed by the Big Lottery Fund, which does not provide any specific guidance to applicants in rural areas but does work with partner or helper organisations to ensure that those groups who experience barriers to participation will be able to develop projects for funding from the programme. Regional information is also provided to committee members who are involved in considering applications.

Sports: Bexley

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what funding his Department has provided to (a) amateur sports clubs and (b) sport in schools in Bexleyheath and Crayford constituency since 1997. (218397)

Departmental and Lottery funding to promote and invest in grassroots and community sport is allocated via Sport England. They hold information according to local authority rather than parliamentary constituency, and have itemised the following investment since 1997 in clubs and schools projects within the London borough of Bexley:

Funding

Recipient

Project

Award date

Financial year

Award amount (£)

Sports Club

Phoenix Sports Club

New Sports Pavilion

27 April 1998

1998-1999

22,007

Sports Club

Danson Park Bowis Consortium Ltd.

Extension to Clubhouse

19 October 1998

1998-1999

41,950

Sports Club

Long Lane Junior Football Club

Upgrade changing facilities and construct STP

21 February 2000

1999-2000

462,330

Sports Club

Bexley Cricket Club

Community Club Development Programme

41,730

Funding

Recipient

Project

Award date

Financial year

Award amount (£)

Sports in Schools

Bexley Council

School Sport Coordinator Partnership

1 September 2002

2002-03

368,344

Sports in Schools

Bexley Council

Sidcup swimming centre -

30 August 2006

2006-07

693,000

Innovation, Universities and Skills

Apprentices

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what recent assessment he has made of the opportunities for people completing apprenticeships to achieve higher education qualifications; and if he will make a statement. (219127)

In World-class Apprenticeships we highlighted the need for clear progression routes for apprenticeships to maximise the apprenticeship experience, including higher education. Sector Skills Councils are developing a strategy for Level 4 Apprenticeships, enabling progression to higher education, including Foundation Degrees. They are mapping all apprenticeship frameworks to see where Level 4 apprenticeships may be required. Arrangements are already in place for apprentices who complete an engineering or e-skills apprenticeship to have their learning recognised through UCAS points to progress to higher education. A further eight frameworks are expected to be recognised by 2010.

We expect the number of opportunities to progress to higher education to rise once the planned mapping has been completed and the responsibility for maintaining progress will lie with the new National Apprenticeship Service (NAS) when it is operational in April 2009.

Departmental Sick Leave

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many and what percentage of staff in his Department and its predecessor have had more than two periods of sickness absence of less than five days in each of the last three years. (218716)

Since the Department was formed in the 28 June 2007 machinery of government changes, 56 staff have had more than two periods of sickness of less than five days. This applies from the date of establishment of the Department to 31 March 2008 (the latest information available). This equates to 6.8 per cent. of current staffing.

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many staff in his Department have had five or more periods of sickness absence of less than five days since establishment. (218982)

Since the Department was established in the 28 June 2007 machinery of government changes, 10 staff have had five or more periods of sickness absence of less than five days. This applies from the date of establishment of the Department to 31 March 2008 (the latest information available). This represents of 1.2 per cent. of DIUS staff.

Home Information Packs

To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many home information packs have been commissioned by (a) his Department and (b) its agencies to market a residential property; for which properties; at what cost; and whether a voluntary home condition report was purchased as part of the packs. (219013)

This Department has not commissioned any home information packs. An answer in respect of all our agencies could be given only at disproportionate cost.

Leader of the House

Departmental Sick Leave

To ask the Leader of the House (1) how many and what percentage of staff in her office have had more than two periods of sickness absence of less than five days in each of the last three years; (218713)

(2) how many staff in her Office have had five or more periods of sickness absence of less than five days in two or more of the last five years.

Data held by the Cabinet Office indicated that in 2007 there were no staff in the Leader's Office who had more than two periods of sickness absence of less than five days.

The number of staff with periods of sick absence lasting less than five days for the calendar year 2006 is already a matter of public record.

Sickness absence information for the previous years is not available in the form requested and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Electoral Commission Committee

Electoral Register: Marketing

To ask the hon. Member for Gosport, representing the Speaker’s Committee on the Electoral Commission how much the Electoral Commission has spent on (a) its own voter registration campaigns and (b) voter registration campaigns run by non-governmental organisations in each of the last 10 years. (218986)

The Electoral Commission informs me that its public awareness campaigns both encourage voter registration and provide information about how to take part in elections, including different methods of voting and voting systems. The Commission is therefore not able to separate out its expenditure on voter registration specifically, from its expenditure on wider campaign activity.

The following table shows the total expenditure on the Commission’s campaign activity in each of the past four years for which the relevant financial records are readily available. Equivalent information for earlier years could be provided only at disproportionate cost. The costs include advertising costs, and expenditure on other campaign activity such as research, call centres, websites and publications.

£

2004-05

5,781,527

2005-06

6,334,064

2006-07

5,260,138

2007-08

4,963,172

Section 13 of the Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act 2000 gives the Commission power to make grants to other bodies to promote public awareness. I am informed that since 2002 the Commission has awarded grants to organisations for projects that raise awareness of the democratic process, including but not limited to promoting voter registration. The following table shows the total grant funding awarded to non-governmental organisations in each year:

£

2002-03

317,808

2003-04

188,339

2004-05

218,335

2005-06

393,734

2006-07

2,308,406

2007-08

1,177,477

The grants scheme is now closed to new applications and all funded projects will end by 31 March 2010.

To ask the hon. Member for Gosport, representing the Speaker’s Committee on the Electoral Commission how much the Electoral Commission spent on voter registration advertising in each of the last five years; and what assessment the Commission has made of the effectiveness of that advertising in increasing voter registration. (218989)

The Electoral Commission informs me that its advertising campaigns both encourage voter registration and provide information about how to take part in elections, including different methods of voting and voting systems. The Commission is therefore not able to separate out its expenditure on voter registration advertising from its wider voter information advertising.

The following table shows the total expenditure on all such advertising in each of the past four years for which the relevant financial records are readily available. Equivalent information for earlier years could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

£

2004-05

4,937,021

2005-06

5,438,551

2006-07

4,412,197

2007-08

4,115,661

A report to the Speaker’s Committee on the Electoral Commission by the Comptroller and Auditor General, published in 2006 and entitled “Is the Public Aware of Democracy?” concluded that the Commission had used its resources in raising public awareness in general effectively, when judged by measures such as recall rates and other industry measures for its advertising, and that there appeared to have been an overall positive effect on voter registration.

Solicitor-General

Departmental Pay

To ask the Solicitor-General what the hourly charging rates of staff of the Treasury Solicitor’s Department were in (a) 2005-06, (b) 2006-07 and (c) 2007-08. (217289)

For those staff of the Treasury Solicitor’s Department who are charged for on an hourly rate, the figures were:

£

2005-06

Litigation Division and Employment and Commercial Contracts Group

Senior Civil Servant

134

Senior Solicitor (Grade 6)

112

Solicitor (Grade 7)

103

Junior Solicitor (Legal Officer)

64

SEO/HEO

64

Legal Trainee, EO and AO

54

Advisory Divisions

Head of Division

162

Senior Civil Servant

134

Grade 6, 7 Adviser

91

Legal Officer

57

SEO/HEO

57

Legal Trainee, EO, AO

54

2006-07

Head of Division (COCAD)

165

Senior Civil Servant

136

Senior Solicitor (Grade 6)

114

Solicitor (Grade 7), Junior Solicitor

104

SEO/HEO

65

Legal Trainee, EO and AO

56

2007-08

Head of Division (COCAD)

167

Senior Civil Servant

138

Senior Solicitor (Grade 6)

115

Solicitor (Grade 7), Junior Solicitor

106

SEO/HEO

66

Legal Trainee, EO and AO

56

Note:

COCAD—Cabinet Office and Central Advisory Division

HEO—Higher Executive Officer

SEO—Senior Executive Officer

EO—Executive Officer

AO—Administrative Officer

Serious Fraud Office

To ask the Solicitor-General what steps she plans to take following the publication in June 2008 of the final report on the review of the Serious Fraud Office; which organisations will be consulted on the report; and if she will make a statement. (215311)

I refer the hon. Member to my written ministerial statement on 10 June 2008, Official Report, column 12WS. The review by Jessica de Grazia provided helpful insights into the work of the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) based on comparisons with US prosecutors.

The new Director of the SFO has found her recommendations on the internal workings of the SFO valuable background for his change programme. We are considering her recommendations on the wider environment in the context of a range of proposals we are already taking forward to strengthen the response to fraud, which is a cross-Government programme of work.

To ask the Solicitor-General what discussions the Attorney-General has had with the (a) Secretary of State for Justice and (b) the Home Secretary on the Final Report on the review of the Serious Fraud Office published in June 2008. (215312)

The Attorney-General shared Jessica de Grazia’s report with the Secretary of State for Justice and the Home Secretary as it was published, and our officials were then and have since been in contact with officials in both Departments and in the prosecuting Departments to consider the recommendations.

To ask the Solicitor-General what plans there are to enhance co-operation between the Serious Fraud Office, the Crown Prosecution Service and the Revenue and Customs Prosecution Office. (216029)

The Serious Fraud Office works closely in collaboration with the other Law Officer Departments and the Attorney-General’s Office on a variety of issues. To ensure her Departments work closely together at a strategic level, my noble Friend the Attorney-General chairs a strategic board on which the directors are represented, which meets quarterly.

Serious Fraud Office: Contracts

To ask the Solicitor-General with how many external contractors the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) has contracts; what estimate she has made of the average annual cost to the public purse of such contracts; and how many such contractors have held contracts with the SFO in each of the last 10 years. (215314)

The Serious Fraud Office (SFO) does not keep records of the number of external contractors it employs. The cost of all non-permanent staff employed at the SFO (including external barristers) for each of the last 10 years is as follows:

Financial year

Expenditure (£)

2007-08

11,521,000

2006-07

10,312,000

2005-06

11,845,000

2004-05

9,492,000

2003-04

8,566,000

2002-03

6,759,000

2001-02

6,596,000

2000-01

5,316,000

1999-2000

4,004,000

1998-99

4,750,000

Serious Fraud Office: Operating Costs

To ask the Solicitor-General what the cost of running the Serious Fraud Office was in each of the last 10 years. (215316)

The cost of running the Serious Fraud Office for each of the last 10 years was as follows:

Financial year

Annual running costs (£)

2007-08

42,071,000

2006-07

40,415,000

2005-06

39,869,000

2004-05

32,808,000

2003-04

27,791,000

2002-03

26,176,000

2001-02

23,002,000

2000-01

19,608,000

1999-2000

15,860,000

1998-1999

16,027,000

Serious Fraud Office: Powers

To ask the Solicitor-General what plans there are to increase the Serious Fraud Office’s investigatory powers; and whether these plans have been amended to take account of the findings in the Final Report on the review of the Serious Fraud Office published in June 2008. (215307)

At present, there are no plans to extend the investigative powers of the Serious Fraud Office beyond those which were recently provided through the Serious Crime Act 2007.

Serious Fraud Office: Prosecutions

To ask the Solicitor-General how many prosecutions were initiated by the Serious Fraud Office in each of the last 10 years; and what the conviction rate from such prosecutions was in each year. (215322)

The Serious Fraud Office has brought prosecutions against the following number of defendants in each of the last 10 years; and the conviction rates arising from these prosecutions are as follows:

Financial year

Defendants tried

Conviction rate (percentage)

2007-08

25

68

2006-07

21

71

2005-06

23

57

2004-05

58

64

2003-04

39

51

2002-03

25

68

2001-02

13

77

2000-01

58

88

1999-2000

12

92

1998-99

42

81

To ask the Solicitor-General in what proportion of Serious Fraud Office prosecutions was pre-trial abuse claimed by the defence in each of the last 10 calendar years. (216028)

The Serious Fraud Office does not centrally maintain statistics about applications made to a judge to stop a trail from proceedings on the basis of allegations of abuse of process.

The SFO holds post-case reviews on conclusion of each case, which provides an opportunity for the case team to discuss and record the successes of the investigation, as well as any lessons learned from issues encountered (and resolved) for the future. This information is shared across the office to ensure that best practice is adopted throughout the organisation.

Serious Fraud Office: Recruitment

To ask the Solicitor-General whether the Attorney-General plans to issue guidance to the Serious Fraud Office on its recruitment practices, with particular regard to recruitment of former police officers. (216032)

Serious Fraud Office: Resignations

To ask the Solicitor-General what reasons were given to the Attorney General for the resignation of the former Chief Executive of the Serious Fraud Office. (216030)

The head of the Serious Fraud Office is the Director. The previous Director, Robert Wardle, was appointed on the basis of a fixed term contract which ended on 20th April 2008.

Serious Fraud Office: Standards

To ask the Solicitor-General whether the (a) targets and (b) priorities of the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) are to be reviewed following the review of the SFO Final Report published by the Attorney General in June. (214971)

The SFO is currently involved in a fundamental review as a result of the arrival of a new Director on 21 April 2008 and the publication of Jessica de Grazia’s Report on the Serious Fraud Office published in June 2008.

As part of this review the Director has already made a number of changes designed to strengthen the leadership team, improve staff training and to shorten the time it takes to get SFO cases into Court. The recommendations made in Jessica de Grazia’s report which relate to the operation and management of the SFO are currently being considered very carefully as part of this, and further developments to build on the performance of the SFO will be introduced over the coming year.

To ask the Solicitor-General whether there are proposals to (a) improve the Serious Fraud Office’s case management procedures and (b) seek efficiency savings in Serious Fraud Office investigations and prosecutions. (215315)

The recently appointed director of the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) has already stated on several occasions that one of his priorities is to enable cases to be brought to court more quickly.

In addition, in March 2007 the SFO established the Case Management Reform Programme (CMRP), which is a business change programme designed to contribute to the strategic aims and objectives of the SFO. In particular, the CMRP aims to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of SFO casework processes, thus increasing the probability that cases will withstand procedural challenge and be concluded within much shorter time frames.

Serious Fraud Office: Working Conditions

To ask the Solicitor-General what assessment she has made of the findings in the recent final report on the Serious Fraud Office on its working culture; and if she will make a statement. (216033)

The Attorney-General and I are aware that the new Director of the Serious Fraud Office has taken account of Jessica de Grazia’s findings and his own assessment since arrival and that he is taking forward a programme of change within the SFO, including of communication and ways of working. This is a welcome approach. In this he will be building on the good work of very many staff in the SFO, which was also acknowledged by Jessica de Grazia.

Children, Schools and Families

Children in Care: Clinical Trials

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what regulations and guidelines govern the participation of children in care in drug trials. (218463)

I have been asked to reply.

Clinical Trials in the European Union are undertaken in accordance with the requirements of Directive 2001/20/EC of the European Parliament and of the European Council on the approximation of the laws, regulations and administrative provisions of the member states relating to implementation of good clinical practice in the conduct of clinical trials on medicinal products for human use. The Directive provides for the protection of clinical trial subjects, including minors, and sets out requirements for the ethical review of clinical trials. The Directive provides for a general rule that minors may only be included in a clinical trial if the informed consent of the parents or legal representative has been obtained.

The Directive was transposed into United Kingdom legislation as the Medicines for Human Use (Clinical Trials) Regulations on 1 May 2004. Two further Commission Directives setting out the detailed principles and guidelines of good clinical practice have been agreed and implemented into UK law. On 1 May 2008 the Government amended UK legislation, following a public consultation, to allow minors to be entered into a trial prior to consent having been obtained from a person with parental responsibility or legal representative in trials of emergency medicines where and while certain conditions are met.

Departmental Buildings

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many (a) new builds and (b) major refurbishments were completed by his Department for a cost in excess of £0.5 million in (i) 2005-06, (ii) 2006-07 and (iii) 2007-08 to which the Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method or equivalent was applied; how many such buildings were assessed as (A) pass, (B) good, (C) very good and (D) excellent; and if he will make a statement. (213692)

The Department for Children, Schools and Families was created on 28 June 2007 and has not completed any new builds since that time. Since 2007, the Department has undertaken one major refurbishment with a value in excess of £0.5 million where BREEAM is applicable. The work is ongoing and a BREEAM assessment will be undertaken once the refurbishment has been completed.

Departmental Internet

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much his Department spent on developing the ‘Build your PlaySpace’ on the departmental website; and if he will make a statement. (217673)

The Department developed the ‘Build your PlaySpace’ interactive tool to engage children and young people in the fair play consultation in a fun and interactive way. The tool is one strand of a wider consultation strategy that includes an activity poster/competition for children and young people, live events to encourage local dialogue with children, young people, their families and practitioners and written consultation.

The cost of developing the ‘Build your PlaySpace’ tool was £50,000 plus VAT.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many people have used the ‘Build your PlaySpace’ on his Department's website; and if he will make a statement. (217674)

The Department developed the ‘Build your PlaySpace’ interactive tool to engage children and young people in the fair play consultation in a fun and interactive way. The tool is one strand of a wider consultation strategy that includes an activity poster/competition for children and young people, live events to encourage local dialogue with children, young people, their families and practitioners and written consultation.

The number of people who have used the ‘Build your PlaySpace’ tool as at 16 July 2008 is 9,286. The interactive tool will be available until 18 August 2008.

Departmental Official Hospitality

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much his Department has spent on hospitality in the last 12 months. (219696)

The purchase of hospitality is recorded under the general heading of Meeting Refreshments. Details of expenditure on hospitality incurred by the Department over the last 12 months and recorded in the Department's Integrated Financial Information System are set out:

Financial Year 2007-08: £ 357,260.54

DCSF was established under Machinery of Government Changes on 28 June 2007. The response also covers those areas of responsibility held by its predecessor, the Department for Education and Skills (DFES).

Departmental Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much has been paid in bonuses to staff of each non-departmental body for which his Department has responsibility in the last 12 months. (219282)

Education: Young Offender Institutions

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many young offenders were assessed on reception into custody as having literacy and numeracy skills below level one at each young offender institution in the last 12 months; and if he will make a statement; (219242)

(2) what proportion of young people entering secure facilities were tested for literacy and numeracy skills in each year since 2001; and if he will make a statement;

(3) what proportion of people in young offender institutions had a reading age of (a) entry level 1 and 2 and (b) entry level 3 in each year since 2001; and if he will make a statement.

The following table gives the number of young offenders who were assessed on reception into custody as having literacy and numeracy skills below level one (those assessed at Pre-entry Level, Entry Level 1, Entry Level 2 and Entry Level 3) at each Young Offender Institution in the last 12 months:

Establishment

Lit

Total

Ashfield

467

584

Brinsford

277

368

Castington

169

213

Cookham Wood

8

22

Downview

10

35

Eastwood Park

25

41

Eastwood Park

676

891

Foston

0

0

Hindley

164

226

Huntercombe

167

253

Lancaster Farms

185

263

New Hall

25

44

Parc

56

73

Parc

361

458

Thorn Cross

55

60

Warren Hill

365

391

Werrington

214

318

Wetherby

416

527

Total

4,309

5,992

The following table gives the number of juvenile young offenders assessed for literacy and numeracy skills on entry to custody in YOIs (data prior to 2003/04 are not available):

Percentage assessed

2003/04

100.0

2004/05

97.7

2005/06

95.1

2006/07

98.0

Data from the Learning and Skills Council’s (2006-07) initial literacy assessments on for juveniles in YOIs is as follows (data prior to 2006/07 are not available):

Entry level 1 and 2

Entry level 3

Below entry level 1

2006/07

1,367

2,219

54

2007/081

864

1,687

58

1 These figures are for August 2007 to May 2008.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many hours per week of education young people in young offender institutions received on average in each year since 2001; and if he will make a statement; (219246)

(2) what the attendance rate for timetabled education and training sessions in young offender institutions was in each of the last five years; and if he will make a statement;

(3) what proportion of young offenders supervised by young offender institutions are in full-time education, training or employment; and if he will make a statement.

The following table shows the average number of hours of education, training and personal development activity received by juvenile offenders in young offender institutions (YOIs) for all the years that YJB data are available:

Average hours per week

2004/05

24.5

2005/06

28.2

2006/07

26.2

The following table gives the attendance rates per establishment in 2006/07:

Establishment

Class efficiency

Ashfield

88.62

Brinsford

84.91

Castington

86.98

Cookham Wood

61.59

Downview

85.31

Eastwood Park

82.71

Feltham

84.15

Hindley

70.19

Huntercombe

72.26

Lancaster Farms

72.13

New Hall

73.70

Parc

92.27

Stoke Heath

81.80

Thorn Cross

76.04

Warren Hill

85.62

Werrington

84.69

Wetherby

82.65

Data on the proportion of juvenile offenders supervised by YOIs who are in full-time education, training or employment are not collected in the format requested. Under the Offenders Learning and Skills Service (OLASS), each young offender has an entitlement to 25 hours of education, training and personal development activity per week. The Youth Justice Board collect data on the average number of hours delivered across YOIs and the latest figures are shown above.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what targets his Department has set to improve the educational provision and performance of young offender institutions; what progress has been made towards meeting these targets; when each such target is to be met; and if he will make a statement. (219247)

The Department for Children, Schools and Families does not set central targets to improve the educational provision and performance of young offender institutions. The Youth Justice Board (YJB) sets and monitors the following performance indicators for education in Young Offender Institutions (YOIs):

Assessment: All young people entering a secure facility are assessed for literacy and numeracy.

Progression: 80 per cent. of young people must improve by one skill level or more in literacy and/or numeracy from the level of need set out in the individual learning plan. In YOIs this indicator relates to young people on DTOs of 12 months or more.

Training plans: All young people entering a secure facility must have a training plan developed and subsequently reviewed in accordance with the “YJB’s National Standards for Youth Justice Services”.

Hours of education and training: to ensure that young people in YOIs receive an average of 25 hours training and personal development activity per week.

The following table shows the performance against these YJB targets for the years for which data are available:

Assessment (percentage)

Progression (percentage)

Training plans (percentage)

Hours of education and training

2003/04

100.0

52.0

n/a

n/a

2004/05

97.7

41.87

93.0

24.50

2005/06

95.1

42.5

80.5

28.24

2006/07

98.0

36.1

94.4

26.20

We have published proposals to improve the education and training young offenders receive in the Youth Crime Action Plan on 15 July.

Foster Care: Truancy

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many foster carers received fixed penalty notices for non-attendance of children in their care at school in each of the last five years. (219482)

Information on the number of foster carers who received fixed penalty notices for non-attendance of children in their care at school in each of the last five years is not collected centrally.

National Healthy Schools Programme

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much his Department has spent on implementation of (a) the Healthy Schools initiative and (b) the Sustainable Schools framework in each year since 2004; and what forecast expenditure on such activities is for (i) 2008-09 and (ii) 2009-10. (219401)

The National Healthy Schools Programme is jointly funded by the Department for Children, Schools and Families and the Department for Health. The following amounts have been allocated for each financial year since 2004:

£ million

2004-05

5.7

2005-06

9.3

2006-07

12.2

2007-08

13.2

£13.2 million provisional funding has been allocated through the area based grant for each year over the next three financial years 2008-09, 2009-10, and 2010-11, with the option of adding more funds in each financial year. We have added £3 million to this financial year bringing the total to £16.2 million for 2008-09.

The Sustainable Schools programme began in May 2006 and the Department has

spent to date:

£

2006-07

600,000

2007-08

1,015,000

We have forecast to spend in 2008-09 and 2009-10:

£

2008-08

1,015,000

2009-10

1,000,000

Pupil Referral Units: Young Offenders

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many pupils attending pupil referral units were (a) convicted of a criminal offence and (b) received an official police caution in the school year 2006-07. (219263)

Schools: Sports

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what recent discussions the Youth Sport Trust has had with the Association for Physical Education on the delivery of the National Schools Sports Strategy. (217525)

Through their joint membership of the consortium contracted to deliver the PE and Sport Professional Development Programme, a workstrand of the PE and Sport Strategy for Young People, the YST routinely meet with AFPE. The last such meeting was held on 12 May.

Justice

Departmental Disciplinary Proceedings

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) officials in his Department and (b) employees of (i) agencies and (ii) other bodies reporting to his Department were (A) dismissed and (B) disciplined for matters related to their conduct in the last two years. (217604)

According to centrally held records in the Ministry of Justice (former DCA), including HMCS, OPG, Tribunals Service, Wales Office, Scottish Office and MOJ HQ, 40 members of staff were dismissed for matters relating to conduct in the period April 2006 to the end of March 2007, and 53 members of staff were dismissed for the period April 2007 to the end of March 2008.

The former DCA does not hold the information on the number of staff disciplined for matters related to their conduct centrally in the format requested. This could be obtained only at disproportionate cost. The only information of this type held is on the Prison Service.

According to centrally held records in the public sector Prison Service, 130 members of staff have been dismissed, and a further 587 members of staff have been formally disciplined, for matters relating to their conduct in the period 1 July 2006 through 30 June 2008.

Departmental Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what proportion of staff of his Department and its agencies did not receive the maximum bonus possible under a bonus scheme applying to them in the last two years. (217416)

The core Ministry of Justice employs staff previously employed on several sets different terms and conditions, each with their own legacy arrangements for bonus payments.

The information provided as follows relates to former DCA senior civil service (SCS) and grades below SCS. The data exclude payments to magistrates courts staff (who became civil servants within this Department in April 2005 and whose terms and conditions did not normally allow for payment of performance or special bonuses) and staff in the Tribunals Service who joined the former DCA on 1 April 2006 about whom information is not available to us prior to 2007.

Proportion of members of the senior civil service not paid the maximum bonus amount during the past two years

Percentage

2006

82

2007

75

Proportion of staff below the SCS who did not receive the maximum performance bonus amount during the past two years (not awarded maximum performance bonus in respect of the 2006 and 2007 performance years)

Percentage

2006

86.80

2007

83.70

Notes:

1. Performance bonuses are paid to staff who are assessed to have performed over and above the standard expected from them over the course of the whole performance year.

2. During the above years there was one single amount paid to staff receiving an exceeded marking. This was £400.

3. Data referring to proportion refers only to those staff on relevant terms and conditions (i.e. only include former DCA and Court Service staff but not staff on magistrates courts terms and those who joined from the other Government Departments during machinery of government changes in 2005 and 2006 and who were not subject to the former DCA performance management or reward systems during the relevant period).

4. Information on performance bonus payments for the 2007-08 performance year is not yet available. These payments are implemented as part of the annual pay award which will be paid in August.

5. The information contained above excludes payments to staff on Home Office terms and conditions who transferred to the Ministry of Justice with the establishment of the Ministry in May 2007. Information for these staff for 2007-08 is included in the answer to this question provided by the Home Office. Information for 2007-08 as information is not yet available.

Proportion of staff below the SCS who did not receive the maximum special bonus amount during the past two years.

Special bonuses are paid to staff ‘in year’ for exceptional contribution over and above that normally expected during the performance year. Awards are benchmarked locally and there is ‘no maximum’ amount payable.

HM Prison Service. HM Prison Service became an Executive agency of the Ministry of Justice on 9 May 2007.

In 2006-07, no member of staff employed by HMPS was awarded the maximum bonus available.

In 2007-08, two members of staff received this bonus. The total number of staff in post at this time was 51,239, therefore as a proportion more than 99.99 per cent. of staff did not receive the maximum possible bonus.

Domestic Violence: Convictions

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many convictions there were for offences connected to domestic violence in each of the last three years, broken down by criminal justice area. (218749)

Convictions for offences involving domestic violence cannot be identified from the information held on the court proceedings database as the circumstances behind each offence are not collected centrally by my Department.

Driving Offences: Insurance

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many prosecutions for offences related to driving without insurance there were in each police force area in each of the last 10 years; and what the average penalty imposed in each year was. (219058)

The available information relates to the offence of ‘use of a motor vehicle uninsured against third party risks’. Tables A and B provide data on prosecutions, convictions (findings of guilt) and court imposed fines from 1997 to 2006 (latest available). Table C covers fixed penalty notices issued from 1 June 2003 to 2006. Data for 2007 will be available later this year.

Table A: Proceedings and findings of guilt at magistrates courts for the offence of using a motor vehicle uninsured against third party risks1 by police force area, England and Wales, 1997 to 2006

Number of offences

1997

1998

1999

2000

Police force area

Total proceedings

Total findings of guilt

Total proceedings

Total findings of guilt

Total proceedings

Total findings of guilt

Total proceedings

Total findings of guilt

Avon and Somerset

15,354

9,424

16,892

9,875

15,098

9,357

14,609

9,515

Bedfordshire

4,724

2,951

4,449

2,992

3,479

2,328

3,594

2,307

Cambridgeshire

3,440

2,395

3,425

2,507

3,058

2,233

2,929

2,216

Cheshire

4,838

3,499

4,961

3,658

5,463

3,872

5,729

4,075

Cleveland

3,925

2,798

4,204

2,908

4,331

3,027

4,793

3,573

Cumbria

4,223

3,089

3,787

2,866

3,597

2,772

3,507

2,684

Derbyshire

5,565

3,830

5,137

3,522

5,120

3,613

5,318

3,914

Devon and Cornwall

8,422

4,967

7,232

4,263

7,493

4,681

9,234

5,872

Dorset

5,271

3,458

4,198

2,777

4,776

3,013

6,035

3,540

Durham

3,992

2,912

4,261

3,086

5,899

4,475

5,470

4,328

Essex

7,161

4,507

7,025

4,635

7,336

5,035

7,898

5,328

Gloucestershire

3,577

2,115

4,465

2,885

4,443

2,867

4,174

2,539

Greater Manchester

30,655

20,548

30,836

21,430

33,228

23,697

33,783

23,865

Hampshire

11,768

7,844

11,557

8,028

11,553

8,123

10,559

7,535

Hertfordshire

4,580

2,573

5,799

3,056

4,748

2,789

5,258

3,310

Humberside

4,408

3,479

4,279

3,501

4,894

3,920

5,024

4,043

Kent

6,935

4,755

6,958

4,808

6,151

4,232

9,033

6,408

Lancashire

20,334

11,577

18,794

11,198

18,111

10,800

18,354

10,981

Leicestershire

9,706

5,990

9,481

6,265

11,054

7,281

10,263

6,713

Lincolnshire

4,589

3,001

5,000

3,466

5,345

3,744

4,500

3,307

London, City of

2,671

1,382

3,127

1,431

2,521

1,141

1,738

776

Merseyside

10,896

8,435

9,747

7,694

8,932

6,920

10,054

7,708

Metropolitan Police

42,283

25,873

35,064

22,874

31,285

20,893

29,649

20,117

Norfolk

3,932

3,456

3,434

3,060

3,468

3,000

3,951

2,844

Northamptonshire

4,999

3,083

4,849

3,271

5,571

4,151

3,949

2,971

Northumbria

12,470

8,064

11,837

8,079

13,296

9,299

13,195

9,385

North Yorkshire

3,926

2,778

3,744

2,538

4,003

2,656

3,905

2,548

Nottinghamshire

8,078

6,149

8,726

6,658

7,957

6,156

7,748

6,034

South Yorkshire

11,228

7,346

11,553

7,831

11,763

8,424

12,690

8,871

Staffordshire

8,180

5,251

8,210

5,379

8,021

5,725

8,777

6,740

Suffolk

3,258

2,202

3,743

2,283

4,189

2,547

3,923

2,319

Surrey

4,942

2,439

3,908

2,051

4,436

2,278

4,941

2,571

Sussex

9,333

4,726

8,202

4,150

7,415

4,198

6,796

3,777

Thames Valley

11,887

6,258

11,948

6,311

13,543

7,291

12,816

7,426

Warwickshire

4,316

2,595

3,769

2,394

3,523

2,192

4,135

2,309

West Mercia

7,082

4,848

8,207

5,624

7,450

5,224

7,686

5,512

West Midlands

29,878

18,484

30,928

18,969

27,409

16,407

28,148

17,896

West Yorkshire

23,980

15,042

23,549

14,682

25,776

15,903

26,529

15,476

Wiltshire

3,463

2,311

4,820

2,712

4,708

2,558

4,901

2,620

Dyfed-Powys

3,079

1,953

2,852

1,952

3,017

2,044

3,072

2,073

Gwent

4,097

2,899

4,478

3,344

4,451

3,452

4,680

3,777

North Wales

4,859

3,280

4,452

3,309

4,102

3,097

3,697

2,839

South Wales

14,829

9,936

16,187

10,629

15,406

10,467

14,615

10,273

England and Wales

397,133

254,502

390,074

254,951

387,419

257,882

391,659

262,915

Number of offences

2001

2002

20032

Police force area

Total proceedings

Total findings of guilt

Total proceedings

Total findings of guilt

Total proceedings

Total findings of guilt

Avon and Somerset

13,022

8,393

15,124

9,700

17,163

10,558

Bedfordshire

4,651

2,895

4,731

3,147

5,041

3,490

Cambridgeshire

2,508

1,967

2,875

2,266

3,301

2,694

Cheshire

4,975

3,885

5,765

4,540

6,385

5,354

Cleveland

4,789

3,606

5,994

4,282

5,575

3,980

Cumbria

3,595

2,887

3,540

2,876

3,488

2,849

Derbyshire

5,429

4,218

5,614

4,670

5,793

4,888

Devon and Cornwall

8,648

5,723

9,598

6,354

9,676

6,608

Dorset

5,262

2,965

6,176

3,371

7,034

4,263

Durham

5,394

4,343

5,840

4,614

5,802

4,518

Essex

7,708

5,388

7,811

5,359

7,489

5,440

Gloucestershire

4,683

2,677

4,417

2,286

4,412

2,579

Greater Manchester

37,088

26,399

36,337

27,527

38,208

29,559

Hampshire

10,349

7,614

10,912

8,063

10,619

8,095

Hertfordshire

5,816

3,672

6,612

4,191

7,216

5,078

Humberside

4,730

3,641

4,464

3,551

5,509

4,411

Kent

9,592

7,042

10,059

7,697

9,788

7,452

Lancashire

16,280

9,748

17,555

11,020

21,229

13,689

Leicestershire

10,475

6,792

10,699

7,372

11,304

8,066

Lincolnshire

4,083

2,956

4,242

3,057

5,883

4,269

London, City of

1,826

1,020

2,353

1,330

2,563

1,605

Merseyside

9,467

7,693

10,360

8,551

12,776

10,627

Metropolitan Police

32,032

22,566

36,485

27,116

43,100

31,463

Norfolk

4,744

3,033

5,563

3,590

6,322

4,461

Northamptonshire

2,028

1,626

1,211

885

4,157

3,242

Northumbria

12,504

9,184

12,309

9,286

12,951

9,826

North Yorkshire

3,545

2,171

3,340

2,096

3,774

2,353

Nottinghamshire

7,856

6,181

7,460

5,922

9,224

7,609

South Yorkshire

14,623

10,079

13,859

9,975

13,745

9,882

Staffordshire

6,027

4,678

7,056

5,723

7,214

6,072

Suffolk

4,123

2,373

4,759

2,845

5,808

3,579

Surrey

5,101

2,804

5,554

3,145

4,657

2,880

Sussex

6,814

3,995

6,413

3,698

5,808

3,665

Thames Valley

11,728

7,092

12,842

8,283

14,516

9,718

Warwickshire

4,204

2,665

3,711

2,389

3,756

2,899

West Mercia

7,787

5,731

7,849

5,812

7,735

6,014

West Midlands

27,010

18,066

32,339

22,010

36,409

25,370

West Yorkshire

27,618

15,842

24,873

13,952

26,966

16,967

Wiltshire

5,292

3,264

5,326

3,162

4,794

3,006

Dyfed-Powys

2,953

1,906

3,316

2,275

3,094

2,236

Gwent

4,758

3,817

4,508

3,660

4,083

3,448

North Wales

3,376

2,551

4,048

2,987

5,968

4,523

South Wales

13,805

9,721

16,499

11,488

16,932

11,650

England and Wales

388,298

264,869

410,398

286,123

447,267

320,935

Number of offences

2004

2005

2006

Police force area

Total proceedings

Total findings of guilt

Total proceedings

Total findings of guilt

Total proceedings

Total findings of guilt

Avon and Somerset

17,489

10,862

14,625

8,688

11,834

7,444

Bedfordshire

4,534

3,190

4,776

3,334

4,356

3,137

Cambridgeshire

3,120

2,654

3,371

2,827

4,107

3,432

Cheshire

6,515

5,372

4,592

3,871

4,463

3,803

Cleveland

6,597

5,080

4,611

3,819

4,013

3,383

Cumbria

3,446

2,753

2,855

2,199

2,654

2,098

Derbyshire

6,326

5,505

5,869

5,190

4,352

3,841

Devon and Cornwall

8,943

6,178

7,404

5,241

7,500

5,348

Dorset

6,075

3,618

5,752

3,584

5,177

3,207

Durham

5,300

4,029

4,454

3,186

3,285

2,427

Essex

7,132

5,323

7,035

5,413

6,507

5,340

Gloucestershire

3,695

2,438

3,500

2,042

2,838

1,876

Greater Manchester

34,942

26,722

30,280

22,869

26,516

20,263

Hampshire

9,750

7,467

7,882

6,251

6,529

5,356

Hertfordshire

7,463

5,382

7,763

5,716

7,641

5,849

Humberside

5,170

4,298

4,840

4,136

5,085

4,406

Kent

10,673

8,347

8,535

7,050

8,154

7,055

Lancashire

16,065

9,948

17,960

10,945

15,246

9,448

Leicestershire

10,833

7,790

7,306

5,340

5,912

4,345

Lincolnshire

6,621

4,766

5,644

3,907

5,242

3,873

London, City of

2,812

1,122

1,499

1,068

1,575

1,130

Merseyside

13,023

10,385

10,728

8,757

7,807

6,591

Metropolitan Police

47,806

36,465

47,223

36,033

46,132

37,075

Norfolk

5,084

3,734

4,442

3,436

4,054

3,175

Northamptonshire

5,804

4,641

4,441

3,606

3,859

3,101

Northumbria

11,685

9,106

11,728

9,348

10,347

8,629

North Yorkshire

4,065

2,508

3,865

2,569

3,270

2,298

Nottinghamshire

9,224

7,755

7,358

6,299

5,994

5,097

South Yorkshire

11,416

8,497

11,246

8,484

10,307

7,838

Staffordshire

7,439

6,317

7,224

5,959

6,328

5,399

Suffolk

5,718

3,541

4,279

2,738

3,799

2,499

Surrey

3,927

2,581

4,491

2,874

4,173

2,712

Sussex

4,371

3,068

4,569

3,370

5,074

3,763

Thames Valley

12,920

9,144

11,255

7,887

10,329

7,600

Warwickshire

4,160

3,433

3,469

2,958

3,512

2,981

West Mercia

7,249

5,498

7,144

5,604

7,042

5,679

West Midlands

39,696

27,453

34,786

24,890

29,998

21,378

West Yorkshire

32,404

20,175

26,667

16,220

21,641

13,751

Wiltshire

4,641

2,778

4,599

2,814

4,466

2,793

Dyfed-Powys

2,244

1,645

2,639

1,890

2,413

1,745

Gwent

3,474

2,961

3,241

2,761

3,088

2,670

North Wales

6,022

4,773

4,211

3,331

5,057

3,969

South Wales

15,946

11,143

12,605

8,694

11,805

7,984

England and Wales

441,819

320,445

392,763

287,198

353,481

265,788

1 An offence under the Road Traffic Act 1988 s. 143 (2)

2 As from 1 June 2003, ‘driving a motor vehicle while uninsured against third party risks’ became a fixed penalty offence.

Notes:

1. It is known that for some police force areas, the reporting of court proceedings in particular those relating to summary motoring offences may be less than complete.

2. Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Table B: Average fine imposed1 at magistrates courts for the offence of using a motor vehicle uninsured against third party risks2 by police force area, England and Wales, 1997 to 2006

£

Police force area

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

20033

2004

2005

2006

Avon and Somerset

259

204

165

182

130

133

138

154

154

155

Bedfordshire

314

293

274

226

164

169

137

143

156

183

Cambridgeshire

221

209

215

182

119

118

131

152

171

182

Cheshire

274

248

237

211

149

153

167

179

190

195

Cleveland

162

167

170

179

167

173

171

189

202

210

Cumbria

150

171

220

265

152

151

159

169

171

186

Derbyshire

270

279

283

296

337

355

367

367

376

372

Devon and Cornwall

184

185

178

179

133

132

127

134

145

150

Dorset

295

302

301

261

121

114

125

158

171

176

Durham

181

177

194

160

118

122

121

116

123

132

Essex

174

149

140

123

101

104

112

164

182

202

Gloucestershire

154

202

247

240

91

86

133

147

143

140

Greater Manchester

245

226

236

232

152

151

157

167

176

181

Hampshire

132

135

138

136

119

122

124

131

138

141

Hertfordshire

193

164

173

204

155

166

181

198

208

216

Humberside

159

148

143

137

122

132

137

150

180

194

Kent

246

241

227

271

209

192

191

197

204

221

Lancashire

332

296

237

219

111

113

141

156

169

183

Leicestershire

318

318

276

254

134

135

138

150

145

152

Lincolnshire

159

197

209

188

133

134

148

179

185

196

London, City of

332

314

346

375

369

368

334

230

198

214

Merseyside

200

203

200

207

163

167

148

137

141

147

Metropolitan Police

202

185

184

169

139

140

143

147

165

179

Norfolk

242

256

265

210

99

107

139

152

152

165

Northamptonshire

243

286

310

280

280

339

245

183

156

172

Northumbria

136

146

148

144

130

135

135

137

142

148

North Yorkshire

249

236

230

211

130

136

141

166

177

185

Nottinghamshire

164

165

153

150

152

156

152

188

138

147

South Yorkshire

194

206

191

170

128

137

146

125

147

143

Staffordshire

251

228

234

198

152

163

166

186

230

256

Suffolk

193

192

192

183

128

138

133

136

156

162

Surrey

243

242

215

218

201

215

221

197

195

217

Sussex

218

186

181

167

118

117

138

162

170

169

Thames Valley

292

257

268

250

134

135

158

198

206

217

Warwickshire

228

175

177

188

156

168

164

210

200

230

West Mercia

268

282

282

263

176

180

165

193

208

218

West Midlands

207

190

189

201

169

192

200

206

207

211

West Yorkshire

255

242

242

209

120

123

134

144

144

146

Wiltshire

152

182

186

204

283

286

280

200

208

228

Dyfed-Powys

183

182

175

169

155

166

172

187

184

191

Gwent

253

225

225

208

148

154

171

157

171

172

North Wales

210

226

272

230

144

150

149

154

163

173

South Wales

190

180

183

188

159

173

158

154

149

158

England and Wales

224

214

212

203

150

155

160

169

177

185

1 Magistrates courts data only. Fines given at the Crown court total nationally (England and Wales) less than 10 each year.

2 An offence under the Road Traffic Act 1988 s. 143 (2)

3 As from 1 June 2003, ‘driving a motor vehicle while uninsured against third party risks’ became a fixed penalty offence.

Notes:

1. It is known that for some police force areas, the reporting of court proceedings in particular those relating to summary motoring offences may be less than complete.

2. Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Table C: Fixed penalty notices issued for the endorsable offence of driving a motor vehicle while uninsured against third party risks1 by police force area, England and Wales, 20032 to 2006

Police force area

20032

2004

2005

2006

Avon and Somerset

5

47

63

115

Bedfordshire

0

0

62

154

Cambridgeshire

0

63

53

138

Cheshire

0

40

101

203

Cleveland

48

70

159

102

Cumbria

0

0

0

0

Derbyshire

0

0

0

112

Devon and Cornwall

0

0

42

80

Dorset

0

0

0

0

Durham

0

0

7

13

Essex

0

0

6

362

Gloucestershire

0

0

0

3

Greater Manchester

9

44

13

3

Hampshire

0

111

125

393

Hertfordshire

11

177

389

532

Humberside

0

0

0

0

Kent

10

12

31

249

Lancashire

42

91

174

409

Leicestershire

34

62

19

212

Lincolnshire

0

0

0

46

London, City of

2

21

9

51

Merseyside

0

0

0

102

Metropolitan Police

43

147

490

1,408

Norfolk

0

0

0

3

Northamptonshire

5

40

93

74

Northumbria

38

7

4

12

North Yorkshire

33

95

92

121

Nottinghamshire

21

42

101

162

South Yorkshire

0

0

0

0

Staffordshire

36

122

152

274

Suffolk

0

0

0

95

Surrey

0

0

0

12

Sussex

0

0

0

115

Thames Valley

0

0

0

0

Warwickshire

31

50

70

146

West Mercia

0

0

32

281

West Midlands

0

37

0

3

West Yorkshire

3

46

104

328

Wiltshire

0

0

0

141

Dyfed-Powys

0

0

0

0

Gwent

0

0

0

0

North Wales

87

139

297

200

South Wales

0

0

0

0

England and Wales

458

1,463

2,688

6,651

1 An offence under the Road Traffic Act 1988 s. 143 (2).

2 As from 1 June 2003, ‘driving a motor vehicle while uninsured against third party risks’ became a fixed penalty offence.

3 Force unable to supply data due to technical reasons.

Notes:

1. Offenders are subject to a £200 fixed penalty. However this can be increased to a maximum of £5,000 if the matter goes to court.

2. Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Electoral Register

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what the percentage of voter registration is estimated to be in each (a) constituency and (b) local authority area in England; (218824)

(2) what the target level for voter registration is;

(3) what plans he has to enable local authorities to maximise voter registration.

The Government have not made any estimate of the percentage of voter registration in each constituency and local authority area in England. The Electoral Commission estimated that 3.5 million eligible electors were not registered to vote in their report, Understanding Electoral Registration, which was published in September 2005. However the number of electors registered in England continues to grow and between 2 December 2006 and 1 December 2007 the number of parliamentary electors grew from 37,588,775 to 37,817,466 and the number of local government electors grew from 38,223,259 to 38,599,775.

The Government have not set any target level for voter registration, as we believe that all eligible electors should be registered to vote. To support this aim we have taken a number of steps to increase voter registration rates. Section 9 of the Electoral Administration Act 2006 placed a new duty on electoral registration officers to take all necessary steps to maintain the electoral register, including sending the annual canvass form more than once, making house to house inquiries and inspecting records that they are permitted to inspect. It is for the ERO to decide on the best steps to use in conjunction with their local knowledge to ensure that requirements for making contact with persons and maintaining the register are complied with. To support such activities we have made £2.5 million available each financial year under our Participation Fund, which allows EROs to apply for additional funding to assist them in promoting electoral awareness within their areas.

The Act also includes a provision for the Electoral Commission to introduce new performance standards for EROs. The Electoral Commission is currently developing these standards and the final set of standards will be published during July 2008. A copy of these standards will be laid before the House and the information obtained from local authorities as a consequence will give us a better understanding of the actions taken to increase registration.

Incapacity Benefit: Fraud

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people previously in receipt of incapacity benefit who have had their entitlement to benefit withdrawn following a medical assessment appealed against the decision in the last year for which figures are available; and how many of those appeals were successful. (219451)

The Tribunals Service holds data on the number of appeals made against decisions regarding incapacity benefit. This includes information on anyone who may have been refused incapacity benefit on their initial claim. It is not possible to specify the number of appeals made by people who have previously been in receipt of incapacity benefit and who have subsequently had their entitlement to the benefit withdrawn following a medical assessment.

Between April 2007 to March 2008, the number of incapacity benefit appeals listed for hearing was: 65,723; the number of cases heard at hearing was: 57,806. Of these, 29,636 (45.1 per cent.) cases were successful.

Land Registry Act 2002

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if the Government will bring forward proposals to amend section 73(7) of the Land Registry Act 2002. (218586)

It is possible that an amendment will be required to some of the provisions in the Land Registration Act 2002 to reflect the transfer of the Adjudicator’s present jurisdiction into the proposed Lands and Housing Chamber of the First Tier Tribunal to be created under the provisions of the Tribunals, Courts and Enforcement Act 2007 and announced following the Ministry of Justice’s recent consultation.

However, the changes will only reflect the transfer and will not affect the rights of the parties in these disputes. At this stage, no timetable has been fixed for making the transfer.

Sentencing

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment he has made of the effects of regional variation in sentencing practices, including custodial sentences, affecting young offenders. (218801)

The Youth Justice Board have commissioned a research study of sentencing decisions made by courts, to identify why some young people are sentenced to custody and others to community sentences. They will be considering its recommendations to inform any future work in respect of sentencing practice.

In the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008 we introduced the Youth Rehabilitation Order, the new generic community sentence for young people aged under 18, and made a number of other youth justice provisions. To reflect this change we will also be asking the Sentencing Guidelines Council to produce sentencing guidelines for young people. The guidelines and training will be delivered to sentencers to help ensure consistent and appropriate application of the new sentencing framework.

Young Offenders

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what guidance his Department has issued to secure establishments on screening of young offenders for (a) mental illness, (b) learning difficulties and (c) physical disabilities. (218805)

All young offenders receive health screening on reception into prison. This is via an evidence based initial health screen used throughout all prisons in England and originally developed by Professor Grubin of the University of Newcastle. Young offenders are also screened for their educational needs. A new reception screen for young people has been developed by the Youth Justice Board and is being piloted. It contains a section looking at disability and impairment and covers physical and mental health problems.

A general learning needs assessment is used to identify all learning difficulties and disabilities. Where problems are identified, either as a result of the health screen or the education screen, a referral to an appropriate professional would be expected to be made.

Transfer of the responsibility for commissioning health services in Young Offender Institutions, and adult prisons in England, commenced in 2003 and was fully devolved to the NHS by April 2006. Primary Care Trusts work with their partner establishments to develop a comprehensive health needs assessment of the population and commission on the basis of that need.

Young Offenders: Custodial Treatment

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will take steps to prohibit imprisonment of offenders under the age of 14 years. (218806)

We have greatly strengthened and expanded the range of pre-court diversions and community sentences available for the police and courts to use when dealing with young people who have offended. The Government’s Youth Crime Action Plan, which was published on 15 July, builds on this by setting out cross-Government arrangements for tackling offending and re-offending by young people.

However, for a small minority of young people who commit serious offences, custody is the only appropriate response to what has occurred and the only means of protecting the public.

Any offender aged 14 or under who is sentenced to custody is accommodated in a secure training centre or secure children’s home. These have high staffing ratios, a child-centred approach and a particular emphasis on education.

Young Offenders: Rehabilitation

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what facilities there are for the detoxification of children in each (a) secure training centre, (b) secure children's home and (c) young offender institution. (219123)

There is a 24-hour clinical presence in each of the young offender institutions, and in Oakhill secure training centre, which experiences and manages the greatest number of cases of drug and alcohol dependence among young people. All other secure training centres and secure children's homes have arrangements in place to identify and manage, often with the assistance of local NHS substance misuse services, cases of substance dependence.

The Youth Justice Board, Department of Health and the National Treatment Agency for Substance Misuse are about to issue jointly developed clinical guidance for the treatment of substance dependence among young people in secure settings. This will be the first document of its kind in the world.

The guidance has been piloted in five young offender institutions (Ashfield, Downview, Hindley, New Hall and Wetherby), one secure training centre (Oakhill), and two secure children's homes (Vinney Green and Aycliffe).

Young Offenders: Remand in Custody

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment he has made of trends in the number of children remanded in custody while awaiting trial. (218836)

The proportion of young people held on remand in custody has remained relatively stable over the past five years. The decision to remand a young person in custody remains a matter for the courts.

The following table (based on data supplied by the Youth Justice Board) shows the number of young people remanded to custody at the end of June in the years 2003-08 and the percentage of the overall under-18 custodial population this represented.

Number of young people remanded to custody1

Percentage of under-18 custodial population

2003

559

19.9

2004

587

21.6

2005

565

20.3

2006

648

22.2

2007

607

20.9

2008

636

20.6

1 Young people remanded to custody on the last Friday of June 2003-08.

Young Offenders: Reparation by Offenders

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what guidance his Department has issued to (a) local authorities and (b) police services on the use of restorative justice techniques as a way of preventing young people entering the criminal justice system. (218833)

The Ministry of Justice has not issued any guidance to local authorities and/or police services on the use of restorative justice techniques as a way of preventing young people entering the criminal justice system.

However Restorative Justice has been embedded in the youth justice system since the 1998 Crime and Disorder Act which recommends its use as part of existing disposals, if appropriate for the individual/s involved. Restorative justice approaches can be found in both out-of-court and in-court disposals-for example, in reprimands, warnings, referral orders-and will also play a part in the delivery of youth conditional cautions and the youth rehabilitation order which form part of the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008.

We announced in the children's plan that we will be piloting a new out of court disposal that will sit below reprimands and final warnings. This will be the youth restorative disposal which uses restorative techniques to allow a young person to apologise for committing an offence thus making them take responsibility for their actions at the scene of the offence.

Our commitment to the use of restorative justice when dealing with young offenders is further evidenced by its inclusion in the youth crime action plan as part of our vision for the future of youth justice.

Communities and Local Government

Council Tax: Flood Control

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what estimate she has made of the number of local authorities exercising their discretionary powers to discount council tax for flood victims. (219731)

No estimate has been made of the number of local authorities exercising their discretionary powers to reduce the council tax payable in respect of properties damaged by floods.

The Government are, however, currently seeking information from local authorities to determine which of them intend to use their discretionary powers under Section 13A of the Local Government Finance Act 1992 to grant discounts in respect of the council tax payable on properties which are still vacant and require major repairs due to the floods of June and July 2007. The Government recently announced their intention to provide financial support to those authorities who exercise their discretion under section 13 A in these circumstances.

Departmental Alcoholic Drinks

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what measures are in place in her Department to monitor expenditure on alcohol for hospitality purposes. (219604)

All official hospitality is recorded in a hospitality register, held at directorate level. Human resources require register holders to supply aggregate figures from time to time, and conducts spot-checks on the registers themselves.

Departmental Press

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what the communications and press budget for her Department has been in each year since its establishment. (215742)

[holding answer 2 July 2008]: The Department was established in 2006. The pay budget for the Department's Communications Directorate is as follows:

Financial year

£

2006-07

3,328,565

2007/08

3,601,646

This includes press office costs of £1,465,772 in financial year 2007-08.

For the press office element of the overall budget in previous years, I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to the hon. Member for Yeovil (Mr. Laws) on 31 March 2008, Official Report, column 717W.

Departmental Research

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what proportion of her Department's budget and that of its predecessor was used for research within its areas of responsibility in each of the last 10 years. (218061)

The proportion of my Department and its predecessor's spend on research since1998-99 against the total Departmental spend for that particular year is set out in the following table.

Financial year

Proportion of research expenditure against total departmental spend (percentage)

Department for Environment, Transport and the Regions

1998-99

0.3

1999-2000

0.3

2000-01

0.4

Department for Transport, Local Government and the Regions

2001-02

0.1

Office of the Deputy Prime Minister

2002-03

0.1

2003-04

0.1

2004-05

0.1

2005-06

0.1

Communities and Local Government

2006-07

0.1

2007-08

0.1

Digital Switchover Help Scheme

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government if she will place in the Library a copy of the presentation on the inclusion of a return path within help scheme equipment referred to in the minutes of the Emerging Technologies Group meeting of 27 February 2008. (215266)

A copy of the presentation made at the Emerging Technologies Group meeting of 27 February 2008 will be deposited in the Library of the House. One slide has been omitted from the slideshow since at this stage the disclosure of that slide would be likely to be prejudicial to ongoing discussions between Government Departments about the development of the policy.

Eco-towns

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government for what reason the advertisement from her Department on eco-towns published in the Stratford Herald indicated that the site of the proposed eco-town at Long Marston fell entirely within Warwickshire; and if she will arrange for corrected versions of the advertisement to be placed in local newspapers in (a) Worcestershire and (b) Gloucestershire. (212747)

As part of the first stage of consultation the details of all the shortlisted locations, including Middle Quinton/Long Marston, are set out in the expressions of interest submitted by bidders, and these informed the summaries of the proposed locations set out in the consultation document “Eco-towns—Living a greener future”. These details are available from our website together with further information about the schemes. Warwickshire was given as the location for the Middle Quinton proposal as the bulk of the scheme lies in that county. In any future material we will make clear that parts of the scheme extend across the boundary into Worcestershire and also have an impact on Gloucestershire.

We have just completed the first stage of consultation and through this and ongoing work we are assembling more details about sites, including Middle Quinton/Long Marston. In the second stage we will publish—for further consultation—a draft planning policy statement and a draft sustainability appraisal which will set out more detail for each location. Also as part of this there will be further consultation events around the shortlisted locations to provide further information and listen to the public’s views, and details will be provided to media in all three counties.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what plans she has to speed up planning procedures in respect of applications for developments of eco-towns. (217804)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer that I gave to the hon. Member for Welwyn Hatfield (Grant Shapps) today (PQ 213886).

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government in which of the sites proposed for an eco-town and not included on the shortlist her Department or its predecessor has (a) sold or (b) otherwise disposed of land under arrangements whereby her Department would benefit from a future sale of the land in the last 10 years. (210092)

One of the Department's agencies, English Partnerships, holds surplus public sector land which is included in the bid for the Pennbury eco-town proposals outside Leicester, which is one of the shortlisted sites.

As regards other former ownerships, information about land sold or disposed of by my Department and its predecessors in the last 10 years in relation to the other shortlisted eco-town sites, and those not shortlisted for further consultation and assessment, could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government by what means she plans to accelerate the planning process for eco-towns. (213886)

The draft eco-towns planning policy statement, which we will publish in draft for consultation, will become a useful addition to the policy framework and will set out how local planning authorities will consider eco-towns through the planning system, which we already have in place. The eco-towns planning policy statement will be an important material consideration in the determination of any planning application for an eco-town, particularly where the development plan is silent or out of date.

Eco-towns: Greenbelt

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Brentwood and Ongar of 7 May 2008, Official Report, column 1037W, on eco-towns: planning permission, and the answer to the hon. Member for the Cotswolds of 25 April 2008, Official Report, column 2303W, on eco-towns: green belt, which eco-town bids involve greenfield development; and what estimated number of hectares of greenfield land would be developed in each case. (213580)

Most of the eco-town proposals include a mix of brownfield and greenfield land. Initial summaries of greenfield/brownfield were included in the consultation paper “Eco-towns—living a greener future” published on 3 April. Several of the schemes have since been adjusted in the light of consultation with local partners and we will set out an updated summary of this information when the Eco-towns update document is published.

Empty Property

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government pursuant to the answer of 7 July 2008, Official Report, column 1355W, on empty property, what estimate she has made of the number of homes that will be made available using the £200 million fund; and what assessment she has made of the effect this initiative and the Settled Homes Initiative will have on (a) the numbers of households on housing waiting lists and (b) the number of empty properties on the housing market. (219792)

We have given Housing Corporation flexibility in 2008-09 to acquire up to £200 million worth of completed stock that can be put to use as affordable housing. We estimate that this will enable the purchase of between 3,000 to 5,000 properties. So far the Housing Corporation has allocated some £19 million, since the scheme was announced in May, bringing over 600 homes into the affordable housing programme.

If properties at the right price, in the right locations and offering good standards are available, the Housing Corporation will consider investing further resources to support delivery of our demanding affordable housing targets.

In 2007, £30 million was provided for the Settled Homes Initiative which will enable six schemes in London to purchase around 900 empty homes and convert them over time into quality settled social housing.

Energy: Conservation

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what estimate her Department has made of the number of A-rated energy labelled circulator pumps installed in (a) domestic and (b) non-domestic properties. (219267)

The labelling scheme on circulators is voluntary and therefore the Government do not hold information on the number of A rated circulator pumps installed in the UK.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government when her Department plans to include energy efficient circulator pumps within Part L of the Buildings Regulations for domestic and non-domestic properties; and if she will make a statement. (219268)

The Department has started a review of the energy efficiency provisions within Part L of the Building Regulations. As part of this we are considering the potential for introduction of energy efficiency standards for pumps in domestic and non-domestic properties. Any such proposals would be the subject of formal consultation in 2009 with the aim of making amendments that would come into effect in 2010.

Housing Renewal Areas

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what timetable she has set for establishing new (a) output targets and (b) funding agreements for Housing Market Renewal Pathfinders. (217849)

Discussions with housing market renewal partnerships to agree output targets and funding agreements for 2008-09 are in hand. We expect to have completed new funding agreements, containing output targets, by September. As before, copies of these funding agreements will be placed in the Library of the House.

Housing: Construction

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what assessment she has made of the likely effect of conditions in the economy on plans to build 83,200 houses in Hertfordshire by 2021. (219341)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given on 12 June 2008, Official Report, column 497W, to the hon. Member for Falmouth and Camborne (Julia Goldsworthy).

Housing: Sales

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what assessment she has made of current trends in the housing market; what steps she plans to take to implement the lifetime homes standard in current market conditions; and if she will make a statement. (219795)

The Government do not publish forecasts for house prices or house-building. The National Strategy for Housing in an Ageing Society, launched in February this year, stated that we would be undertaking a review of the take-up of Lifetimes Homes Standards across all sectors in 2010 in order to decide what further measures may be necessary to drive change in this area. This review will look at all relevant considerations including market conditions.

In the meantime, the up-take of Lifetime Homes Standards continues to be encouraged through our policy of making them a required element in the Code for Sustainable Homes at Level 6 from 2008, Level 4 from 2010 and Level 3 from 2013. This will have the effect of ensuring that all publicly funded housing is built to Lifetime Homes Standards from 2011.

Housing: Standards

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what estimate she has made of the savings which will accrue to local authorities from implementing the lifetime homes standard. (219793)

In the consultation document ‘The Future of the Code for Sustainable Homes (Making a rating mandatory)’ (July 2007) we published a Partial Regulatory Impact Assessment which estimated that the total quantified benefits arising from implementation of Lifetime Homes Standards would be £95.2 million per year. A breakdown of the costs and benefits are provided in that document. The proportion of this benefit accruing to local authorities is not specifically identified.

Local Authorities: Housing

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what recent assessment she has made of the role of parish and town councils as (a) residential landlords and (b) housing enablers. (219186)

The Department supports the development of a wide range of capable, viable and well managed housing providers. The Department has not made any assessment of the role of parish and town councils as residential landlords or housing enablers.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what (a) guidance and (b) financial assistance her Department has provided to local authorities to invoke (i) mandatory and selective houses in multiple occupation licensing powers and (ii) the Housing Health and Safety Rating System since the implementation of the Housing Act 2004. (219522)

The Department has published guidance for local authorities on the criteria for making applications for additional houses in multiple occupation (HMO) licensing and selective licensing schemes. The Department has also published Housing Health and Safety Rating System: Operating Guidance for local authorities and Housing Health and Safety Rating System: Enforcement Guidance and Housing Health and Safety Rating System: Guidance for landlords and property related professionals.

The Department has funded the Local Authorities Co-ordinators of Regulatory Services (LACORS) to support local housing authorities in England and Wales in implementing mandatory HMO licensing and on the Housing Health and Safety Rating System. LACORS issues guidance, advice, and coordinates and disseminates best practice in relation to regulation of private sector housing.

Planning: Public Participation

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what assessment she has made of the use of charrettes to involve local people in the planning process (a) in Hertfordshire and (b) elsewhere. (219697)

The Department has made no assessment of this particular technique either in Hertfordshire or elsewhere. The choice of methods for consultation is a local matter.

Poverty

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what the 100 most deprived wards in the UK were in (a) 2004 and (b) the most recent period for which figures are available. (219631)

Data on deprivation are no longer collected at ward level. However, the following tables provide details of the 100 most deprived lower super output areas (LSOA) in England for 2004 and 2007. LSOAs have between 1,000 and 3,000 people living in them and, in most cases, are smaller than wards. The tables provide the name of the ward in which the LSOA is situated, as well as the local authority district.

Most deprived lower super output areas in England: 2004

Rank of IMD1

LSOA code

Ward name

LA name

1

E01006559

Breckfield

Liverpool

2

E01005204

Harpurhey

Manchester

3

E01006755

Speke

Liverpool

4

E01005133

Central

Manchester

5

E01005203

Harpurhey

Manchester

6

E01005067

Ardwick

Manchester

7

E01006468

Princess

Knowsley

8

E01006676

Granby

Liverpool

9

E01005202

Harpurhey

Manchester

10

E01006561

Breckfield

Liverpool

11

E01005106

Bradford

Manchester

12

E01005108

Bradford

Manchester

13

E01006778

Vauxhall

Liverpool

14

E01006469

Princess

Knowsley

15

E01006436

Kirkby Central

Knowsley

16

E01005484

Central and Falinge

Rochdale

17

E01012070

Middlehaven

Middlesbrough

18

E01005482

Central and Falinge

Rochdale

19

E01014656

Lawrence Hill

Bristol, City of

20

E01005240

Moss Side

Manchester

21

E01005205

Harpurhey

Manchester

22

E01006599

Clubmoor

Liverpool

23

E01007122

Bidston

Wirral

24

E01005228

Lightbowne

Manchester

25

E01012891

St. Andrew’s

Kingston upon Hull, City of

26

E01006647

Everton

Liverpool

27

E01006777

Vauxhall

Liverpool

28

E01013818

Aspley

Nottingham

29

E01006515

Abercromby

Liverpool

30

E01005129

Central

Manchester

31

E01005609

Blackfriars

Salford

32

E01006703

Melrose

Liverpool

33

E01006646

Everton

Liverpool

34

E01006704

Melrose

Liverpool

35

E01005658

Langworthy

Salford

36

E01011372

City and Holbeck

Leeds

37

E01005350

Coldhurst

Oldham

38

E01006563

Breckfield

Liverpool

39

E01006560

Breckfield

Liverpool

40

E01009638

St. Michael’s

Coventry

41

E01006598

Clubmoor

Liverpool

42

E01006467

Princess

Knowsley

43

E01005095

Beswick and Clayton

Manchester

44

E01005130

Central

Manchester

45

E01012895

Southcoates East

Kingston upon Hull, City of

46

E01006750

Smithdown

Liverpool

47

E01008439

West City

Newcastle upon Tyne

48

E01013956

St. Ann’s

Nottingham

49

E01005132

Central

Manchester

50

E01006494

Tower Hill

Knowsley

51

E01006493

Tower Hill

Knowsley

52

E01011361

Chapel Allerton

Leeds

53

E01006674

Granby

Liverpool

54

E01006442

Longview

Knowsley

55

E01026625

Nelson

Great Yarmouth

56

E01007124

Bidston

Wirral

57

E01007132

Birkenhead

Wirral

58

E01012041

Gresham

Middlesbrough

59

E01005065

Ardwick

Manchester

60

E01009585

Henley

Coventry

61

E01012069

Middlehaven

Middlesbrough

62

E01010730

Little Horton

Bradford

63

E01006756

Speke

Liverpool

64

E01013137

East Marsh

North East Lincolnshire

65

E01008291

Benwell

Newcastle upon Tyne

66

E01006447

Northwood

Knowsley

67

E01005201

Gorton South

Manchester

68

E01009365

Sparkbrook

Birmingham

69

E01007293

Tranmere

Wirral

70

E01007127

Birkenhead

Wirral

71

E01008214

Felling

Gateshead

72

E01006691

Kensington

Liverpool

73

E01005144

Cheetham

Manchester

74

E01006779

Vauxhall

Liverpool

75

E01005257

Newton Heath

Manchester

76

E01006470

Princess

Knowsley

77

E01006740

St. Mary’s

Liverpool

78

E01011663

Seacroft

Leeds

79

E01010732

Little Horton

Bradford

80

E01012875

Orchard Park and Greenwood

Kingston upon Hull, City of

81

E01005213

Hulme

Manchester

82

E01008012

Manor

Sheffield

83

E01011357

Chapel Allerton

Leeds

84

E01006638

Dovecot

Liverpool

85

E01013960

St. Ann’s

Nottingham

86

E01012028

Clairville

Middlesbrough

87

E01004672

Church Street

Westminster

88

E01009488

Washwood Heath

Birmingham

89

E01014653

Lawrence Hill

Bristol, City of

90

E01012266

Portrack and Tilery

Stockton-on-Tees

91

E01006679

Granby

Liverpool

92

E01005612

Broughton

Salford

93

E01006630

Dingle

Liverpool

94

E01006732

Pirrie

Liverpool

95

E01005142

Cheetham

Manchester

96

E01008380

Kenton

Newcastle upon Tyne

97

E01006448

Northwood

Knowsley

98

E01008818

Southwick

Sunderland

99

E01005243

Moss Side

Manchester

100

E01006540

Anfield

Liverpool

1 Where 1 is most deprived

Most deprived lower super output areas in England: 2007

Rank of IMD1

LSOA code

Ward name

LA name

1

E01006755

Speke

Liverpool

2

E01005204

Harpurhey

Manchester

3

E01021988

Golf Green

Tendring

4

E01012721

Park

Blackpool

5

E01006778

Vauxhall

Liverpool

6

E01006467

Princess

Knowsley

7

E01006559

Breckfield

Liverpool

8

E01006561

Breckfield

Liverpool

9

E01006468

Princess

Knowsley

10

E01012673

Bloomfield

Blackpool

11

E01005484

Central and Falinge

Rochdale

12

E01006676

Granby

Liverpool

13

E01024858

Bank Hall

Burnley

14

E01008836

Thomholme

Sunderland

15

E01005482

Central and Falinge

Rochdale

16

E01009585

Henley

Coventry

17

E01005466

Balderstone

Rochdale

18

E01009365

Sparkbrook

Birmingham

19

E01006647

Everton

Liverpool

20

E01006469

Princess

Knowsley

21

E01013137

East Marsh

North East Lincolnshire

22

E01007532

Central

Doncaster

23

E01012070

Middlehaven

Middlesbrough

24

E01006599

Clubmoor

Liverpool

25

E01006703

Melrose

Liverpool

26

E01007122

Bidston

Wirral

27

E01006740

St. Mary’s

Liverpool

28

E01008380

Kenton

Newcastle upon Tyne

29

E01006646

Everton

Liverpool

30

E01012720

Park

Blackpool

31

E01012041

Gresham

Middlesbrough

32

E01006699

Melrose

Liverpool

33

E01006563

Breckfield

Liverpool

34

E01006560

Breckfield

Liverpool

35

E01012655

Wensley Fold

Blackburn with Darwen

36

E01013818

Aspley

Nottingham

37

E01006756

Speke

Liverpool

38

E01010606

Bowling

Bradford

39

E01005067

Ardwick

Manchester

40

E01005658

Langworthy

Salford

41

E01012875

Orchard Park and Greenwood

Kingston upon Hull, City of

42

E01006442

Longview

Knowsley

43

E01007127

Birkenhead

Wirral

44

E01012678

Brunswick

Blackpool

45

E01006674

Granby

Liverpool

46

E01006630

Dingle

Liverpool

47

E01005568

Newbold

Rochdale

48

E01024908

Trinity

Burnley

49

E01006777

Vauxhall

Liverpool

50

E01005256

Newton Heath

Manchester

51

E01006732

Pirrie

Liverpool

52

E01005655

Langworthy

Salford

53

E01006679

Granby

Liverpool

54

E01028276

Ravensdale

Mansfield

55

E01006704

Melrose

Liverpool

56

E01005350

Coldhurst

Oldham

57

E01005196

Gorton South

Manchester

58

E01006540

Anfield

Liverpool

59

E01013139

East Marsh

North East Lincolnshire

60

E01010485

Low Hill

Wolverhampton

61

E01013136

East Marsh

North East Lincolnshire

62

E01024877

Daneshouse with Stoneyholme

Burnley

63

E01005228

Lightbowne

Manchester

64

E01006515

Abercromby

Liverpool

65

E01010617

Bowling

Bradford

66

E01009488

Washwood Heath

Birmingham

67

E01025041

Central

Hyndbum

68

E01008291

Benwell

Newcastle upon Tyne

69

E01012266

Portrack and Tilery

Stockton-on-Tees

70

E01020909

Woodhouse Close

Wear Valley

71

E01012069

Middlehaven

Middlesbrough

72

E01010823

Undercliffe

Bradford

73

E01012114

Grangetown

Redcar and Cleveland

74

E01005096

Beswick and Clayton

Manchester

75

E01009358

Soho

Birmingham

76

E01006779

Vauxhall

Liverpool

77

E01006677

Granby

Liverpool

78

E01009476

Washwood Heath

Birmingham

79

E01006558

Breckfield

Liverpool

80

E01012897

Southcoates East

Kingston upon Hull, City of

81

E01008011

Manor

Sheffield

82

E01006598

Clubmoor

Liverpool

83

E01005099

Blackley

Manchester

84

E01005203

Harpurhey

Manchester

85

E01006760

Tuebrook

Liverpool

86

E01009379

Sparkbrook

Birmingham

87

E01025286

Ribbleton

Preston

88

E01006417

Cherryfield

Knowsley

89

E01005667

Ordsall

Salford

90

E01005612

Broughton

Salford

91

E01007132

Birkenhead

Wirral

92

E01008214

Felling

Gateshead

93

E01015842

Kursaal

Southend-on-Sea

94

E01005205

Harpurhey

Manchester

95

E01007133

Birkenhead

Wirral

96

E01006470

Princess

Knowsley

97

E01007128

Birkenhead

Wirral

98

E01015155

St. Peter and the Waterfront

Plymouth

99

E01006746

Smithdown

Liverpool

100

E01005613

Broughton

Salford

1 Where 1 is most deprived

Regional Spatial Strategies: Eco-towns

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Bromley and Chislehurst of 4 June 2008, Official Report, column 983W, on eco-towns, whether regional spatial strategies will include plans for eco-town developments where the development is not supported by the local planning authority. (213932)

Regional spatial strategies (RSS) set out a vision for how a region can tackle housing shortages and affordability. New eco-towns could be part of how regions meet their housing shortfall.

The 15 shortlisted eco-town locations have only reached the first stage. Bids that have cleared the first hurdle will face considerably tougher tests ahead if they progress and will need to improve proposals still further. All the shortlisted locations will face further examination including public consultation and a detailed sustainability appraisal which will test the merits and challenges for each one. Importantly no new eco-town housing will be on the green belt.

All proposals for eco-towns will be subject to the planning process and subject to local planning decisions. However it is too early to speculate on what may happen in each local area and on local planning authority support.

Rented Housing

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what (a) primary and (b) secondary legislation governs regulation of the private rented sector; and what plans she has to bring forward legislative proposals affecting regulation of the sector. (219521)

Primary and secondary legislation flowing from the Housing Acts of 1985, 1988, 1996 and 2004 govern the regulation of the private rented sector. In January of this year we announced an independent review of the private rented sector to be carried out by Julie Rugg and David Rhodes at the university of York. The review has a wide ranging terms of reference including regulation of the sector and will report in October 2008. We will consider any proposals for legislation that emerge as part of work on the Housing Green Paper due later this year.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government which organisations have (a) met the team leading the independent review of the private rented sector announced by her Department on 23 January 2008 and (b) been invited to contribute to the review of houses in multiple occupation announced by the Housing Minister on 9 April 2008. (219532)

The independent review of the private rented sector is not due to report until October this year and, therefore, it is not possible to give a full list of organisations that the review team have met. So far the team have met over 200 stakeholders, ranging from Government interests and consumer groups to landlords and institutional investors, through one to one and round table meetings. A list of all organisations which have had an input to the team's evidence gathering will be included in the report on the review when it is issued in October.

ECOTEC Research and Consulting, the organisation undertaking research into high concentrations of houses in multiple occupation (HMOs) on behalf of the Department, has spoken to a range of stakeholders including representatives of local authorities, universities, housing providers and their representative bodies, members of the national HMO lobby and colleagues in the Northern Ireland Executive. A full list of organisations that took part in interviews and focus groups will be published as part of the research.

Home Department

Alcoholic Drinks: Antisocial Behaviour

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) arrests and (b) prosecutions for (i) being drunk and disorderly, (ii) being found drunk on a highway, public place or on licensed premises and (iii) being drunk in or when entering a designated sports event there have been in each police force area in England and Wales in each year since 1997. (219162)

The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates court for the offences of (i) being drunk and disorderly (ii) being drunk on a highway, public place or on licensed premises and (iii) being drunk in or when entering a designated sports event can be found in the following tables. Data have been broken down by police force area in England and Wales from 1997 to 2006.

The arrests collection held by the Ministry of Justice covers persons arrested for recorded crime (notifiable offences) only. Details of the circumstances of an arrest are not collected centrally. Summary offences of ‘being drunk and disorderly' are non-notifiable and as a result are not covered by the collection.

Number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates' courts for selected alcohol related offences, broken down by police force area, England and Wales, 1997 to 20061, 2Any person who in any public place is guilty, while drunk, of disorderly behaviour3Force1997199819992000200120022003200420052006Avon and Somerset361374383363399408427371226187Bedfordshire1663142201861871972191368480Cambridgeshire122144159148151154189167169132Cheshire58671465259056364865250584111City of London26315443445370535161Cleveland77470770868462163071563120595Cumbria808812802521558514525471328322Derbyshire294286231254292357425342211228Devon and Cornwall888771709704817895672477365480Dorset2723903434064695515201669887Durham406504491538563541603406378286Essex515490553584513409194204183255Gloucestershire1472001531581641802011396244Greater Manchester1,4151,3071,2061,2151,0671,005965505260183Hampshire1,2701,3931,3061,1331,0721,117977590455251Hertfordshire29633738838140650844936525579Humberside250225255234247213213127163138Kent5607208659009119281,1071,118532436Lancashire1,6181,6731,8272,1652,3662,2102,180908615560Leicestershire27273724262619181216Lincolnshire4786245844585065285564847060Merseyside2,9672,9402,1511,9791,9262,1182,0391,348692765Metropolitan Police1,4491,5501,4401,2191,4942,4642,4661,1829081,104Norfolk108114115131146151183945851North Yorkshire342382411459482452512195202212Northamptonshire26242129332925324131Northumbria3,1223,5673,5483,8593,5163,5873,9443,9394,5324,352Nottinghamshire563570526482529507501261224262South Yorkshire1,1869681,1481,2641,2481,2711,4971,204551544Staffordshire3203052474—215251343223209160Suffolk269212213228267333357337217201Surrey208208280412473477439289247121Sussex522512398512631733801474266371Thames Valley1,0861,3051,1619799979791,090895282232Warwickshire3096662862281951251621112735West Mercia-654574561488543-455413483516437West Midlands1,102846522472437463307531373797West Yorkshire2,6552,7643,0972,8092,1012,0712,2607146871,384Wiltshire370426267275262284426290147105Dyfed-Powys200198153145162173223214162122Gwent748532420360308273207263238209North Wales8241,006949799839669545436220222South Wales1,5821,5831,2121,162998802725903737335England and Wales31,89133.29531,05229,98029,74430,73931,34322,60116,34216,143 1 These data are on the principal offence basis.2 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.3 Includes Criminal Justice Act 1967 Sec.91.4 Staffordshire police force were only able to submit sample data for persons proceeded against and convicted. Although sufficient to estimate higher orders of data, these data are not robust enough at a detailed level.

Being found drunk in a highway or other public place whether a building or not, or a licensed premise1

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

Avon and Somerset

62

65

94

83

74

86

85

93

97

81

Bedfordshire

54

153

96

52

31

20

48

28

31

17

Cambridgeshire

37

31

39

46

51

51

71

48

55

59

Cheshire

73

63

50

36

18

24

26

13

3

19

City of London

5

1

1

7

1

2

1

Cleveland

4

13

2

3

2

3

4

3

5

Cumbria

43

42

25

14

18

16

9

24

21

19

Derbyshire

38

43

47

64

60

53

40

11

6

8

Devon and Cornwall

284

300

332

249

216

228

185

106

77

81

Dorset

13

15

18

29

12

13

15

11

4

Durham

24

39

38

22

45

22

7

8

16

14

Essex

230

209

173

137

117

53

12

15

5

10

Gloucestershire

53

90

57

34

35

34

20

14

14

17

Greater Manchester

7

15

12

6

9

4

11

6

7

3

Hampshire

355

488

350

240

166

131

77

58

55

22

Hertfordshire

21

47

66

43

32

21

18

19

14

1

Humberside

12

13

14

6

5

6

5

2

1

Kent

157

148

148

148

144

154

154

123

58

47

Lancashire

216

222

191

249

186

181

71

37

45

16

Leicestershire

1

6

5

3

1

1

1

1

Lincolnshire

36

51

27

26

15

16

10

9

3

4

Merseyside

50

56

40

36

41

33

19

13

8

8

Metropolitan Police

263

289

251

172

316

191

150

119

128

100

Norfolk

66

66

68

68

58

58

72

40

27

14

North Yorkshire

82

95

87

136

138

146

120

59

37

32

Northamptonshire

7

6

6

7

1

9

3

5

3

4

Northumbria

25

34

48

32

22

21

16

34

36

47

Nottinghamshire

2

12

7

6

11

9

12

4

3

South Yorkshire

19

17

22

33

14

9

6

13

5

2

Staffordshire

82

71

41

2

17

17

37

41

43

39

Suffolk

108

81

97

72

53

61

57

66

27

29

Surrey

92

97

108

121

122

83

88

93

89

75

Sussex

226

226

130

81

130

102

88

44

56

82

Thames Valley

215

247

207

173

145

123

128

98

51

51

Warwickshire

8

99

17

9

7

7

6

2

1

West Mercia

99

65

78

20

23

10

6

10

10

10

West Midlands

61

53

31

21

12

9

26

22

46

52

West Yorkshire

53

107

73

71

29

37

92

76

35

44

Wiltshire

68

73

66

52

60

53

50

66

80

72

Dyfed-Powys

93

153

134

138

77

72

78

63

37

66

Gwent

21

25

21

25

38

50

25

11

7

2

North Wales

17

18

15

8

4

9

9

1

3

7

South Wales

114

243

251

252

229

206

218

207

213

76

England and Wales

3,495

4,182

3,582

3,031

2,785

2,433

2,174

1,715

1,462

1,240

1 Includes all under S12 of the Licensing Act 1872.

(a) Being found drunk in a highway or other Public place whether a building or not, or a licensed premises.

(b) Being drunk while in charge on any highway or other public place of any carriage horse, cattle or steam engine.

(c) Being drunk when in possession of any loaded fire arms.

2 Staffordshire police force were only able to submit sample data for persons proceeded against and convicted. Although sufficient to estimate higher orders of data, these data are not robust enough at a detailed level.

Drunk in, or when entering, a designated sports event1

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

Avon and Somerset

6

23

6

5

3

3

9

10

3

2

Bedfordshire

15

5

11

9

4

2

2

3

4

4

Cambridgeshire

9

6

5

5

8

4

2

4

2

Cheshire

4

3

2

3

1

2

5

4

1

Cleveland

9

7

26

4

15

26

14

13

20

23

City of London

Cumbria

4

1

2

1

1

1

Derbyshire

2

5

5

3

11

4

15

8

2

Devon and Cornwall

2

1

2

2

1

1

2

3

6

Dorset

6

13

3

11

12

8

3

1

3

Durham

1

1

3

2

5

Essex

1

1

4

3

8

Gloucestershire

3

7

6

7

1

Greater Manchester

9

28

9

13

7

13

11

14

28

32

Hampshire

41

15

8

16

16

9

19

22

14

11

Hertfordshire

1

1

.—

2

1

2

1

3

Humberside

5

3

5

1

2

1

3

3

Kent

2

1

10

3

3

1

3

Lancashire

61

33

24

26

26

23

16

11

22

43

Leicestershire

2

2

3

4

2

4

3

Lincolnshire

1

2

1

2

1

Merseyside

3

9

—13

10

9

8

7

7

7

2

Metropolitan Police

198

191

115

73

37

61

72

59

17

30

Norfolk

12

14

7

1

11

10

7

8

21

4

North Yorkshire

6

2

3

15

13

4

3

1

2

Northamptonshire

1

1

1

Northumbria

102

43

26

20

44

42

44

16

21

24

Nottinghamshire

40

34

42

19

26

20

13

28

13

17

South Yorkshire

48

20

27

23

41

31

17

30

26

40

Staffordshire

3

1

2

5

2

5

6

2

Suffolk

5

5

3

2

7

5

6

29

4

11

Surrey

Sussex

1

1

3

1

Thames Valley

15

21

6

3

9

3

2

4

5

2

West Mercia

2

1

2

1

1

1

West Midlands

59

52

25

15

55

85

72

84

103

199

West Yorkshire

32

33

30

53

68

47

25

34

49

46

Wiltshire

12

22

2

18

11

1

1

5

6

3

Dyfed Powys

Gwent

North Wales

2

3

7

5

2

4

1

South Wales

2

6

3

2

5

3

3

7

3

England and Wales

713

601

430

381

452

439

376

432

409

528

1 Sporting Events (Control of Alcohol etc) Act 1985 S 2(2) 2 Staffordshire police force were only able to submit sample data for persons proceeded against and convicted. Although sufficient to estimate higher orders of data, these data are not robust enough at a detailed level.

Alcoholic Drinks: Crime

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people were convicted of crimes in which alcohol was a contributory factor in England and Wales in each of the last three years. (215021)

The Ministry of Justice does not hold statistics on convictions in which alcohol has been a contributory factor.

Alcoholic Drinks: Young People

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) fixed penalty notices were issued and (b) prosecutions were brought for the offences of (i) selling alcohol to a person under age, (ii) buying alcohol under age and (iii) buying alcohol on behalf of someone under age in the last year for which figures are available. (206386)