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Crime

Volume 479: debated on Monday 1 September 2008

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what percentage and how many violent incidences according to the British Crime Survey resulted in the victim needing (a) medical attention from a doctor, (b) some form of medical attention and (c) a hospital stay in England and Wales in each year since 1997. (220922)

The percentage of violent incidents resulting in the victim needing (a) medical attention from a doctor, (b) some form of medical attention and (c) a hospital stay in England and Wales are published annually in the Home Office statistical bulletin Crime in England and Wales (copies of which are available in the House of Commons Library) and are included in the following table.

Comparable figures prior to 2001-02 are not available due to changes to question wording introduced in 2001-02.

Analysis of the number of violent incidents broken down as requested is not routinely produced and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost. Copies of the BCS datasets are made publicly available for secondary analysis at the UK Data Archive.

Medical attention in violent incidents1, 2001-02 to 2007-08, BCS

Percentage

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

Some form of medical attention2

14

16

15

16

15

16

12

Medical attention from a doctor

n/a

11

11

11

11

12

9

Hospital stay3

2

2

1

2

2

2

1

Unweighted base

1,037

1,420

1,413

1,468

1,536

1,667

1,547

1 From 1997 to 2005-06, 'All violence' included wounding, robbery, snatch theft, assault with minor injury and assault with no injury. In 2006-07 there were revisions to the BCS violence category and snatch theft was excluded. 'All violence' now includes wounding, robbery, assault with minor injury and assault with no injury. 2 Asked of victims where force or violence was threatened or used. 3 This question asks whether the victim stayed in hospital for at least one night and is asked of those who sought medical attention (excluding dentists); base is victims of all violent incidents.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many and what percentage of violent incidents occurred, according to the British Crime Survey, where the victim was classified by ACORN as (a) wealthy achievers, (b) in urban prosperity, (c) comfortably off, (d) moderate means and (e) in hard pressed in England and Wales in each year since 1997; (220930)

(2) how many and what percentage of (a) violent incidents, (b) burglaries, (c) vehicle-related thefts, (d) vandalism and (e) theft from the person occurred, according to the British Crime Survey, where the victim lived in (i) a semi-detached house, (ii) a detached house, (iii) a terraced house, (iv) a flat or maisonette and (v) other accommodation in England and Wales in each year since 1997;

(3) how many and what percentage of (a) violent incidents, (b) burglaries, (c) vehicle related thefts, (d) vandalism and (e) theft from the person occurred, according to the British Crime Survey, where the victim was a (i) owner-occupier, (ii) social renter and (iii) private renter in England and Wales in each year since 1997;

(4) how many and what percentage of (a) violent incidents, (b) burglaries and (c) vehicle related thefts occurred, according to the British Crime Survey, where the victim was (i) unemployed, (ii) employed, (iii) a student, (iv) looking after a family home, (v) long-term or temporarily sick, (vi) retired and (vii) other unclassified in England and Wales in each year since 1997;

(5) how many and what percentage of (a) violent incidents, (b) burglaries, (c) vehicle related thefts, (d) vandalism and (e) theft from the person occurred, according to the British Crime Survey, to a victim whose yearly income was (i) less than £10,000, (ii) between £10,000 and £20,000, (iii) between £20,000 and £30,000, (iv) between £30,000 and £40,000, (v) between £40,000 and £50,000 and (vi) £50,000 and above in England and Wales in each year since 1997;

(6) what percentage and how many (a) victims of burglary and (b) non-victims of burglary according to the British Crime Survey owned (i) a burglar alarm, (ii) a deadlock, (iii) an outdoor sensor, (iv) an indoor sensor, (v) window locks, (vi) window bars and (vii) a security chain on the door in England and Wales in each year since 1997;

(7) what percentage and how many (a) violent incidents and (b) burglaries occurred according to the British Crime Survey where the victim had (i) a long-standing illness or disability which limits activities, (ii) a long-standing illness which does not limit activity and (iii) no long-standing illness in England and Wales in each year since 1997.

The annual Home Office Statistical Bulletin Crime in England and Wales routinely presents analyses of the British Crime Survey (BCS) showing the risk of being a victim of crime by the various socio-demographic characteristics requested. Copies of these publications are available in the House of Commons Library (the most recent publication is Crime in England and Wales 2007-08).

Information on the number and proportion of incidents broken down as requested are not routinely produced could be obtained only at disproportionate cost. Copies of the BCS datasets are made publicly available for secondary analysis at the UK Data Archive.