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Trauma: Health Services

Volume 479: debated on Monday 1 September 2008

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of provision of pre-hospital care for people who (a) are severely injured and (b) have suffered trauma; (221316)

(2) what recent assessment he has made of the level of provision of pre-hospital care for trauma patients, with particular reference to those patients aged under 16 years;

(3) what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of secondary transfer for patients who have suffered severe trauma during the last five years;

(4) what assessment he has made of the number of patients requiring trauma care who were aged under 16 years in the each of the last five years.

(5) what assessment he has made of the number of trauma patients in accident and emergency departments not seen by a consultant in the last five years; and if he will make a statement;

(6) what his estimate is of the number of hospitals in England that do not have a formal trauma team but which admit severely injured patients.

No such assessment has been made centrally. These are matters for the national health service to determine. Over the last year, as part of the Next Stage Review, each strategic health authority has set out its vision for improving health and healthcare based on the recommendations of clinically-led pathway groups including acute care. These visions identify the need for high quality trauma services and a common theme was the need for specialised centres for major trauma.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what measures he has put in place to improve the treatment and survival rates of patients who have suffered head trauma; (221320)

(2) what steps have been taken by his Department to ensure the provision of adequate trauma teams in NHS health care settings where severely injured patients may be received.

These are matters for the national health service to determine. Over the last year, as part of the Next Stage Review, each strategic health authority has set out its vision for improving health and health care based on the recommendations of clinically-led pathway groups including acute care. These visions identify the need for high quality trauma services and a common theme was the need for specialised centres for major trauma. It is now for primary care trusts to commission appropriate services, in consultation with their local populations, on the basis of the recommendations of the pathway groups.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what evaluation he has made of the 2007 report of the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death, Trauma: Who cares; (221325)

(2) what progress has been made by his Department in taking forward the recommendations of the 2007 report of the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death.

We welcomed the report of the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death, “Trauma: who cares”, on its publication in 2007. The clinical pathway groups who developed proposals for the best models of acute care as part of the “Next Stage Review: High quality care for all” (2008) will have considered the Enquiry’s recommendations in their deliberations.