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Written Answers

Volume 481: debated on Monday 20 October 2008

Written Answers to Questions

Monday 20 October 2008

International Development

Africa: Overseas Aid

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much funding was provided by (a) the UK and (b) the EU in the form of aid to African countries in each of the last five years, broken down by country. (226845)

I have placed in the Library a table which details the level of Official Development Assistance (ODA) provided by the United Kingdom, the EU15 and European Commission to African countries over the period 2002-06. I have also included data on the level of UK ODA to African countries in 2007.

Africa: Trade

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what measures his Department is supporting to promote trade between African countries. (226680)

The Department for International Development's (DFID) work to facilitate trade between African countries is mainly focused in east and southern Africa. In east Africa, DFID is preparing a major new regional programme which will help to facilitate trade between East African Community member states (Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi). It will focus on reducing the costs of trading across borders by supporting one stop border posts, customs reforms and the development of revenue sharing arrangements between countries.

In southern Africa, DFID funds the Regional Trade Facilitation Programme. This aims to make it quicker and easier for businesses to trade between countries. Important activities include harmonisation of trade-related regulations and procedures, introduction of one stop border posts, and promotion of exports into the south African market.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what measures his Department is supporting to promote the manufacture of goods marketed in finished form from Africa, rather than the export of raw materials. (226681)

Much of Sub-Saharan Africa has been a relatively difficult place for manufacturing activities. Key reasons for this are poor infrastructure, particularly roads, ports and power infrastructure, a poor business environment and restrictive rules of origin in trade agreements.

The Department for International Development (DFID) works on all of these agendas. For example, DFID provides support to the Infrastructure Consortium for Africa (ICA). This encourages a joined-up approach among donors and partner governments to meet Africa's urgent infrastructure needs. We also provide support to the Investment Climate Facility for Africa which is a new private-public partnership, focused on improving the investment climate in African countries.

DFID's soon to be launched Aid for Trade Strategy will set out how we will support countries to become more competitive traders. In parallel, DFID continues to press for more development-friendly trade agreements with African countries. This is particularly evident in the ongoing negotiations on Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs), where we are arguing for more liberal rules of origin for African exports.

Burma: International Assistance

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps his Department is taking to encourage other donors to contribute to the joint UN-NGO fund in response to the cyclone in Burma, launched on 10th July. (227401)

On 9 July the Secretary of State for International Development wrote to a range of like-minded development Ministers urging them to offer generous support to the UN appeal for Burma which was to be launched the following day. The Secretary of State has also offered to support the United Nations Under-Secretary-General for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, John Holmes, in his efforts to encourage other donors to contribute more to the UN appeal. The Department for International Development (DFID) and Foreign and Commonwealth (FCO) officials have followed up through bilateral contacts with other donors and in international forums.

The Secretary-General of the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN), Dr. Surin Pitsuwan, is also working to encourage other donors to increase their contributions to the Burma cyclone relief effort.

Cuba: Hurricanes and Tornadoes

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development (1) what financial and other support the Government has provided directly or via multilateral agencies to assist with reconstruction in Cuba following hurricanes Gustav and Ike; and whether further assistance is planned; (228441)

(2) what assessment he has made of the progress of reconstruction in Cuba following hurricanes Gustav and Ike; and if he will make a statement.

The Department for International Development (DFID) has provided £250,000 in direct humanitarian aid to Cuba through the International Red Cross for shelter material and water filters for some 40,000 people. In addition, the European Commission Humanitarian Office (ECHO) has announced a relief contribution of €2 million, of which 17.5 per cent. is funded by DFID. The United Nations Relief Agencies have mobilised $8.6 million for relief and rehabilitation works in Cuba, $1.6 million of which is funded by DFID through the UN. However, the UN remains in negotiation with the Cuban authorities on full access and co-operation in order to use that money. We also understand that the Cuban government have received offers totalling $30.5 million from a number of countries to assist with their reconstruction and emergency response efforts following the impact of the recent hurricanes.

Beyond humanitarian relief we do not provide direct reconstruction or long-term development aid to Cuba. We do not have direct access in Cuba either for making our own assessments of humanitarian or reconstruction needs and rely on assessments and programmes undertaken by international agencies such as the World Bank.

Departmental Conditions of Employment

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development if he will place in the Library a copy of his Department's rest and recuperation leave policy for civilians working in operational theatres. (226986)

Arrangements for rest and recuperation leave (“breather breaks”) are developed in response to specific operational needs and the changing context of each country. They currently apply to staff working Iraq and Afghanistan.

Employees are entitled to a two week break away from post for every six weeks worked. Breaks are usually taken within the employee's home country but can be taken elsewhere on condition that this is of equal or lesser cost.

Departmental Marketing

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what assessment he has made of the cost effectiveness of Government-commissioned advertising in the last 12 months relating to matters falling within the remit of his Department. (226527)

The Department for International Development's (DFID) main area of advertising spend is recruitment and procurement advertising which is assessed in terms of response rate and quality. However, DFID is introducing an e-enabled recruitment system that will help with this evaluation in the future.

In the last 12 months DFID has moved increasingly towards advertising via electronic media, which is much easier to track and evaluate in terms of responses to adverts and in terms of which method provides the best value for money. This is an ongoing process and the results are being used to inform future campaigns and promotional work.

DFID is committed to reducing the cost of advertising generally by the use of more focused advertisements and through maximising discounts through the Central Office of Information.

Departmental Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many non-pensionable bonuses were awarded to members of staff in his Department in the last 12 months; and at what cost. (226423)

DFID paid a total of £641,510 in non-consolidated performance bonuses to 71 senior civil servants in the last year in recognition of their performance during the 2007-08 reporting year.

DFID's reward arrangements for the 2007-08 financial year did not allow for the payment of end of year performance bonuses to staff below the senior civil service.

Departmental Public Expenditure

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 6 October 2008, Official Report, column 1043W, on departmental public expenditure, whether the programmes to which underspend can be re-allocated must be within the same country budget as the programme in which the underspend occurred. (228452)

Underspends on programmes do not have to be reallocated to other programmes within the same country budget.

Departmental Recruitment

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much (a) his Department and (b) its executive agencies spent on (i) recruitment consultants and (ii) external recruitment advertising to recruit staff in each of the last five financial years; which recruitment consultants were employed for those purposes in each of those years; and if he will make a statement. (226802)

In accordance with the Civil Service Recruitment Code, all external appointments to the Department for International Development (DFID) are made on merit on the basis of fair and open competition.

Job advertisements for vacancies at the Department for International Development (DFID) are placed in the national press or specialised magazines, in addition to appearing on DFID's own website and on the Civil Service Recruitment Gateway website. DFID does not routinely use recruitment consultants to fill vacancies for permanent posts. However, the central framework of executive search services, which is owned by the Cabinet Office, was used in February 2008 to engage Russell Reynolds Associates, at a cost of £43,671, to help identify suitable applicants for the post of Permanent Secretary in DFID.

DFID also periodically engages temporary staff through recruitment agencies, mainly in administrative grades. A management fee is included in the salary costs for each person supplied by the agency, but it is not possible to disaggregate the management fees from the total amount charged by the agencies without incurring disproportionate costs.

DFID's total spend on recruitment advertising for each of the last five financial years was as follows:

£

2003-04

£519,331

2004-05

£534,731

2005-06

£348,502

2006-07

£425,961

2007-08

£199,758

Overseas Aid

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps he has taken (a) to ensure that UK aid reaches its intended targets and (b) to reduce fraud. (226846)

The Department for International Development has a strong set of controls to manage the risk of misuse of funds. Throughout the management of our programmes, there is a strong emphasis on establishing comprehensive arrangements to guard against fiduciary risks. The rules of UK Government accounting are rigorously applied.

DFID checks on the use of funds by requiring recipients to provide audited financial statements and by conducting annual monitoring reviews. DFID's programme management is supported by regular audits by DFID's Internal Audit Department and the National Audit Office, both providing further evidence of the correct use of aid funds.

Within DFID's fraud policy specific actions to reduce the incidence of fraud include:

DFID's programmes are designed to respond from the outset to the risks of fraud or corruption which are identified through planning tools such as the fiduciary risk assessment;

A specialist Counter Fraud Unit coordinates DFID's response to allegations or suspicions of fraud and corruption, and provides support to management to strengthen systems and processes to prevent or detect future losses; and

Action is taken to recover funds which are lost, and DFID takes a robust approach in dealing with anyone found to have diverted UK aid funds away from their intended recipients. This includes disciplinary sanctions, criminal prosecutions, recovery of losses and the suspension of aid.

House of Commons Commission

Departmental Buildings

To ask the hon. Member for North Devon, representing the House of Commons Commission how much space, in square feet, was occupied by all House staff in each of the last five years. (223930)

Figures on this basis are not readily available. Evidence given to the Administration Committee in March 2006 showed the total floor area occupied by House staff was 13,140 sq m (Third Report 2005-06, HC 1279, p Ev 52). Details of the size of the different buildings on the parliamentary estate were given in my answer to the hon. Member for Lewes (Norman Baker) on 13 November 2007, Official Report, column 87W.

Palace of Westminster

To ask the hon. Member for North Devon, representing the House of Commons Commission what representations the Commission has received from the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment on the erection of temporary structures on the Terrace; what the Commission’s policy is on the erection and dismantling of such structures; and if he will make a statement. (227342)

The Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment has advised that the erection of temporary structures on the Terrace is more a matter for the local planning authority advised by English Heritage rather than their organisation.

The House does not have a policy on the erection of temporary structures, the matter being delegated to the Director General of Facilities who will consult the appropriate authorities according to the sensitivity of the proposal.

Conservation bodies have expressed concern for some time about the appearance of the marquees on the Terrace. However, Members and their visitors greatly value the facilities they provide and they are in considerable demand. The existing structures are, however, coming to the end of their economic life. The question of their replacement will need to be addressed soon requiring wide consultation in both Houses before deciding on a way forward.

Communities and Local Government

Conference Centres: South East

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what steps her Department is taking to support the development of improved large conference facilities in the South East. (228020)

[holding answer 17 October 2008]: The Department for Communities and Local Government does not actively support or engage in the development of improved large conference facilities in the south-east. Planning Policy Statement 6 (PPS6): ‘Planning for Town Centres’ sets out the Government's national policies for town centres and main town centre uses, including the provision of conference facilities.

Fire Prevention: Advisory Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government if she will bring forward proposals to regulate the work of fire assessors, with particular reference to the accuracy of advice provided by them. (226664)

The Government have no plans to regulate the work of fire safety risk advisors or assessors.

Fire Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what the latest estimated date is for when each of the nine regional fire control centres will become operational. (226454)

[holding answer 13 October 2008]: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to the hon. Member for Bromley and Chislehurst (Robert Neill) on 2 June 2008, Official Report, column 541W which set out the timetable for the project. Since then, proposed changes to the hardware solution and issues regarding access to the Airwave infrastructure for testing suggest that some rescheduling of the project may be required. The implications of these points are currently being considered and if timescales do need to change an announcement will be made in due course.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government whether she plans to review the Regional Controls Centre Physical Access Control and Security Policy for Regional Controls document; and if she will make a statement. (227312)

The regional control centres buildings are part of the Critical National Infrastructure and have been subject to thorough risk assessments in accordance with Government security policy and guidance as well as ISO 27001/17799 best practice and standards. There are no plans to review the guidance material developed that has been issued covering physical access control and security policy for the regional control centres

We are providing support to the local authority controlling companies who manage the regional control centres and who will create their own access control and security policies based on the guidance material.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how the savings generated by the 2007 National Review of the FiReControl Project Business Case were allocated, broken down by sub-heading; and if she will make a statement. (227350)

The savings generated in the FiReControl Full Business Case v1.0, which was published in June 2007, are broken down as follows:

£ million

Cost element

Estimated annual operating costs for FiReControl

Current control room annual operating cost estimates

Savings

Staff

34

60

26

Accommodation

13

4

-9

IT Services

18

16

-2

Group Services

1

n/a

-1

Total

66

80

14

Part 2 of the 2008 National Business Case to be published later this year will provide updated information.

Fire Services: Pensions

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what the value was of public sector pensions in the fire service in each of the last five years; and what the cost to the public purse was of providing such pensions in each year. (228433)

The value of firefighters' pensions1 in each of the last five years is as follows

£ million

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

Total pensions outgo

399.492

443.019

489.258

453.622

491.571

Cost to public purse

3n/a

327.606

362.895

346.469

370.564

1 These are locally administered schemes and data are provided by fire and rescue authorities.

2 Net of employees' contributions of 11 per cent. of pensionable pay for the 1992 firefighters' pension scheme and 8.5 per cent. for the 2006 new fire-fighters' pension scheme and inward transfers from other pensions schemes

3 Data on employee contributions and transfer values are not collected centrally.

Floods: Bassetlaw

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what hydrological assessments have been made of the state of water courses and consequential flood risk in rural Bassetlaw since 1978. (225323)

I have been asked to reply.

From 1996 the Environment Agency can confirm the following work has been undertaken:

Idle & Torne Catchment Abstraction Management Strategy (CAMS) which was published in March 2007.

Hydrological investigations have been carried out for Anglian Water (by Grontmij) on the River Poulter and River Idle.

Groundwater abstractions operated by Yorkshire Water in the area of the River Idle have been reviewed to ascertain whether they were having an impact on the wellbeing of the River Idle Washlands.

In December 2006 the Environment Agency produced the River Idle Washlands SSSI Water Level Management Plan (WLMP).

The Environment Agency are currently working on the building of a regional groundwater model for the East Midlands Yorkshire Sherwood Sandstone Model. This is due to be completed by the end of this financial year.

Following the flooding of June 2007 the Environment Agency commissioned consultants to produce reports about the events that occurred in Worksop and Retford.

The Environment Agency has carried out the following mapping studies, which include hydrological analyses, within the Bassetlaw constituency:

River Idle Flood Risk Mapping, March 2005

River Maun, Strategic Flood Risk Mapping, March 2007

River Meden, Strategic Flood Risk Mapping, June 2008

River Ryton, Strategic Flood Risk Mapping, March 2008

Tidal Trent Strategy, April 2005

Laneham Beck Strategic Flood Risk Mapping, 2007.

Information on studies carried out pre-1996 is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Local Government: Bank Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government (1) what advice and when her Department has provided to local authorities on financial investment risk since January 2007; (228446)

(2) on what dates and by whom local authorities were provided with risk advice on investments in 2007 and 2008.

CLG's current guidance on local government investments issued under section 15 of the Local Government Act 2003 is available on the Department's website at:

http://www.local.communities.gov.uk/finance/capital/data/lginvest2.pdf.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government which local authorities have identified a severe short-term financial difficulty as result of the financial collapse of an Icelandic bank; and what assessment she has made of the extent of the difficulty in each case. (228448)

I refer the hon. Member to my answer given to the hon. Member for Brentwood and Ongar (Mr. Pickles) on 17 October, Official Report, column 1577W.

Home Department

Alcoholic Drinks: Young People

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people were (a) arrested, (b) cautioned and (c) proceeded against for buying or attempting to buy alcohol for someone under age in each of the last three years. (228123)

[holding answer 17 October 2008]: The information requested on arrests is not collected centrally. The offence of buying or attempting to buy alcohol for someone under age is not a notifiable offence and does not form a part of the arrests collection.

In relation to those cautioned and proceeded against for the offence of buying or attempting to buy alcohol for someone under age; I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by the Minister for Security, Counter-Terrorism, Crime and Policing, my hon. Friend the Member for Gedling (Mr. Coaker) on 23 April 2008, Official Report, column 2146W.

Data for 2007 will be available in November 2008.

Asylum

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether her Department has conducted a review of (a) financial and (b) other support provided to people at all stages of the asylum process. (227536)

Asylum seekers who are destitute, or likely to become destitute, are provided with support under sections 95 and 98 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 from the time they arrive in the UK until their claim has been fully determined. This support takes the form of cash subsistence or accommodation, or both. Failed asylum seekers can receive support, as accommodation and non-cash vouchers, under section 4 of the Act if they would otherwise be destitute and they are taking reasonable steps to return or are able to point to a legitimate barrier to their return.

Cash subsistence support rates for asylum seekers supported under section 95 are reviewed annually.

In January 2008 new regulations came into force following a review and public consultation on essential living needs not connected with the provision of accommodation under section 4 for the most vulnerable.

Regional Target Contracts for the provision of accommodation across the UK were introduced from 2006 following a review which identified how contractual improvements could be made.

We are currently holding regional meetings with stakeholders to seek a range of views on how to improve the way we provide asylum support to asylum seekers, including those unsuccessful in their claim.

Detention Centres

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will publish her Department's evaluation of the alternatives to detention scheme at Millbank, Ashford, Kent. (227552)

An independent consultant was recruited to carry out an assessment of the pilot. The report is being finalised and the findings will be published by the end of December 2008.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what her Department expects the capacity of the immigration detention estate to be in (a) October 2009, (b) October 2010, (c) October 2011 and (d) October 2012. (227554)

In October 2009, on current plans, we expect 3,160 places; and in October 2010, 3,178 places. This reflects the anticipated loss of the Oakington centre over this period. The capacity of the estate beyond 2010 will depend, in particular, on the progress of our plans for the Home Office owned site outside Bicester and the land adjacent to the existing Yarl's Wood removal centre. We anticipate that development at one of those sites will add 400 to 600 beds to the estate by 2012.

Emergency Services: Radio

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what progress has been made on the Airwave programme; and what discussions she has had with the Department of Health on the rollout of the programme to the Ambulance Service. (227377)

The Airwave service is being used operationally by all police forces in England, Wales and Scotland including the British Transport Police and the Serious Organised Crime Agency. Several changes to the service have been made since the original contract was signed in February 2000. These comprise enhancements to resilience and fallback arrangements, plus an extension of the service to include coverage within the London Underground. The testing and release for operational use of the 125 underground stations is due to be completed by 30 March 2009. I hope to be able to provide an update on this in the near future.

The rollout of Airwave to the Ambulance Service, which is still in progress, has been carried out under a separate contract between the Department of Health and Airwave Solutions Limited. Programme management rests with the Department of Health but the police service and the Ambulance Service have appropriate consultation processes in place to progress areas of common interest such as interoperability.

Human Trafficking

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answers of 15 May 2008, Official Report, column 1733W and 5 June 2008, Official Report, column 1126W, on human trafficking, for what offences the 84 convictions were secured. (219468)

The 84 convictions are for human trafficking and related offences, including rape, inciting prostitution, false imprisonment and immigration offences.

Immigrants: Fees and Charges

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate her Department has made of its fee income from immigration documents and services for (a) 2008-09 and (b) each of the subsequent three financial years. (227530)

Our estimate of fee income for 2008-09 from visa application is £300 million.

Our estimate of fee income for 2008-09 from in country application is £350 million.

Forecasts are subject to change on a regular basis, at least quarterly; sometimes more frequently than that, as they are revised to account for various events that we believe will impact upon demand.

We are reviewing the position next year in the run-up to laying fees orders and as part of the development of business plan for next year. We do not currently have estimates of fee income for the subsequent three years at the moment as fees have not yet been set for future years.

Immigrants: Police Custody

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many Immigration Service detainees were held in police cells in each police force area in each year since 2001. (226843)

The information requested could be obtained only by the detailed examination of individual records at disproportionate cost.

Offensive Weapons: Young People

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many successful prosecutions have been brought against those arrested for the sale of knives to underage persons through commercial premises in (a) England and (b) Wales in the last 10 years; (225731)

(2) how many prosecutions for the sale of knives to underage persons have been brought against commercial premises in (a) England and (b) Wales in the last 10 years;

(3) how many successful prosecutions have been brought against those arrested for the sale of knives to underage persons through internet sites and mail order companies in (a) England and (b) Wales in the last 10 years;

(4) how many prosecutions for the sale of knives to underage persons have been brought against internet sites and mail order companies in (a) England and (b) Wales in the last 10 years.

The available information on prosecutions and convictions for this offence is in the following table. Information does not distinguish individuals prosecuted or convicted. 2007 figures will be published in November 2008. On 1 October 2007 it became illegal to sell a knife to anyone under 18; previously the minimum age was 16.

Number of prosecutions1 and convictions2 for offences relating to sale of a knife to a person under 16 years in England, and Wales 1997 to 20063, 4

England

England: of which(i.e. these figures are included in the England figures) are Others (i.e. companies etc)

Wales

Wales: of which (i.e. these figures are included in the Wales figures) are Others(i.e. companies etc)

Offence description

Statute

Year

Proceeded against

Found guilty

Proceeded against

Found guilty

Proceeded against

Found guilty

Proceeded against

Found guilty

Any person who sells to a person under age of 16 years a knife; knife blade, razor blade, axe and any other article which has a blade, that is sharply pointed and which is made or adapted for use for causing injury to the person.

Criminal Justice Act 1988, sec 141A as added by Offensive Weapons Act 1996, sec 6(1)

1997

2

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

1998

2

2

1

1

0

0

0

0

1999

3

2

1

0

0

0

0

0

2000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2001

6

5

5

4

3

3

0

0

2002

11

10

7

7

0

0

0

0

2003

15

15

7

7

2

2

1

1

2004

9

7

5

4

2

2

0

0

2005

29

26

8

7

0

0

0

0

2006

62

50

20

16

1

1

0

0

1 Prosecution data for England and Wales relate to the number of defendants which includes male, female and others.

The Others column shows the number of prosecutions for others (i.e. companies). This figure is already included in the respective areas' figures.

2 Conviction data for England and Wales relate to the number of defendants which includes male, female and others. The Others column shows the number of convictions for others (i.e. companies). This figure is already included in the respective areas' figures.

3 The statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences the principal offence is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

4 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by police forces and courts. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source:

Office for Criminal Justice Reform—Evidence and Analysis Unit

Smuggling: Meat

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many illegal meat imports were seized at port of entry in each of the last three years; what the (a) estimated market value and (b) weight of such seizures was in each year; what assessment she has made of the recent trends in these figures; and if she will make a statement. (227321)

Information on the number and weight of illegal meat seizures at GB points of entry are as follows:

Financial year

Number of seizures

Total weight (kg)

2005-06

14,698

82,110

2006-07

19,222

73,012

2007-08

14,067

77,230

Anti-smuggling controls on illegal imports of products of animal origin are designed to prevent the introduction of animal disease so the value of goods seized is not relevant in this context and therefore is not recorded.

Customs continue to target the animal products and routes that pose the greatest animal disease risk, taking account of the latest veterinary risk assessments. The increase in seizures in 2006-07 can be attributed to the additional resources deployed to tackle the threat from Avian Influenza during that period. More recently there are also some indications of increased compliance among the travelling public following HMRC’s awareness-raising campaigns.

Terrorism

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department with reference to the statement of 15 December 2005, Official Report, columns 167-71WS, on counter-terrorism: progress report, what progress has been made on the development of a database of individuals who have demonstrated unacceptable behaviour. (227940)

[holding answer 17 October 2008]: Since August 2005, 79 such individuals have to date been excluded from entering this country and placed on the watch list. This is on-going work which is being taken forward in co-operation with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, the Department for Communities and Local Government, police, various community groups, and others who bring to our attention individuals who are considered to be engaging in unacceptable behaviour.

UK Border Agency: Boats

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what percentage of the United Kingdom coastline is patrolled at least once a week by maritime craft from (a) the UK Border Agency and (b) other agencies engaged in border patrol. (227524)

UK Border Agency cutters are deployed on an intelligence-led basis to areas of highest risk. It is longstanding policy not to divulge details of operational deployments, as this could provide information of value to those seeking to circumvent relevant controls, thereby prejudicing the prevention of crime.

UKBA does not record details of operations carried out by other agencies involved in border patrols.

UK Border Agency: Land

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what (a) property and (b) land owned by the UK Border Agency is not in full-time use; and what the estimated market value is of each such holding. (227527)

Bullington (formerly known as Bicester) is the only freehold property which is owned by the UK Border Agency but not in full-time use. No land is in part-time use. Current open market valuation in respect of this property is not available.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much the UK Border Agency expects to pay in rent to (a) other public bodies, (b) local authorities and (c) Government Departments for buildings and land in 2008-09. (227528)

The UK Border and Immigration Agency expects to pay rent of (a) £630,340 to other public bodies; (b) £42,120 to local authorities; and (c) £793,732 to Government Departments for buildings and land in 2008-09.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what (a) buildings and (b) land are (i) owned and (ii) leased by the UK Border Agency; and how many full-time equivalent staff are based at each. (227529)

The UK Border Agency owns four detention centres located at Harmondsworth, Colnbrook, Campsfield and Dungavel. 26.5 full-time equivalent staff are employed at these locations.

A further 96 buildings are leased. 17,463 staff are based at these locations.

Details of the numbers of staff based at each location will be published on the UK Border Agency website by the end of the year.

Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform

Business: Yorkshire

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform what steps the Government has taken to improve business development in (a) Leeds and (b) Yorkshire since 2000. (226395)

Since 2000 the Government have helped to ensure business success by promoting the creation and growth of business and a strong enterprise economy across all regions, ensuring that all Government Departments and agencies deliver better regulation for the private, public and third sectors and delivering free and fair markets, with greater competition, for businesses, consumers and employees.

Since 2000 the regional development agencies (RDAs) have been charged with stimulating the economic regeneration of the English regions through regional economic strategies.

The RDA for Yorkshire and the Humber, Yorkshire Forward, working together with local authorities and other regeneration organisations, has supported the building of a stronger, mixed economy that combines a strong service sector with a higher value manufacturing sector, with more people starting their own businesses and new businesses that survive longer. As a result, the region’s economy has been transformed following the decline in core traditional industries and recovered well from natural disasters such as foot and mouth in 2001 and flooding in 2007. Latest data to 2006 show it has had consecutive years of growth above the EU average.

Latest statistics show there were over 350,000 businesses in the Yorkshire and the Humber region at the start of 2007, up by 94,000 (37 per cent.) from 256,000 in 2001.

Yorkshire Forward has been leading on the simplification of business support provision in the region. The most significant change for business so far has been the rationalisation of the Business Link network and the development of a single regional gateway to business support (Business Link Yorkshire) that was launched in April 2008. This will significantly reduce the duplication of services, provide greater clarity, and redirect resources into front-line support services for businesses in the region. Yorkshire Forward also plans to make significant changes to its own support mechanisms, to focus on supporting six core programmes of activity that aid the overall start up and growth of a business.

Examples of specific support programmes that have supported business development include:

Objective 1 European Funding for South Yorkshire—where the 2000-06 programme worth a total of £2.4 billion (including over £770 million from the European Union’s Structural Fund budget as well as public and private sector resources) resulted in over 1,300 new small and medium enterprises and over 30,000 new jobs in the area.

Objective 2 European Funding for the rest of Yorkshire and the Humber—where total of nearly £1 billion (including £350 million of European Structural Funds alongside UK public and private sector sources) resulted in over 22,000 new jobs.

Yorkshire and Humber Manufacturing Advisory Service (Y and H MAS)—based on a national scheme, where since 2002 advisers have worked with almost 2,500 manufacturers across the region to improve their processes and productivity, helped to secure 17,640 jobs and create 1,140 new jobs and made productivity improvements which have contributed to an overall increase in turnover of over £200 million.

The region’s Graduate Retention Programme, which has been running for six years, funded by Yorkshire Forward in partnership with the region’s universities, which aims to retain graduates from the universities and colleges of Yorkshire and Humber, as well as the attracting graduate talent from outside the region. This is critically important for business’ ability to compete on a national and international stage.

Centres of Industrial Collaboration (CICs)—are funded by Yorkshire Forward. They aim to get knowledge within universities into companies in practical ways. Since their launch in 2003 they have collaborated with over 1,800 businesses and generated more than £39 million of research income for the region.

Leeds and the wider Leeds city region have benefited, as have all parts of the region, from these programmes.

Since 2005, a major new driver for encouraging enterprise in the neediest areas of the region is the Local Enterprise Growth Initiative (LEGI). Yorkshire and Humber has five LEGI partnerships, led by the local authorities, working to ensure wider benefits of business growth spread to more deprived communities. They will be supported by £128.6 million from the Government over five years. The five LEGI schemes cover Leeds, Bradford, Sheffield, Doncaster and North East Lincolnshire.

The Leeds LEGI programme, entitled ‘Sharing the Success’ aims to address great imbalances in the local economy. Leeds has been awarded approximately £20 million to deliver an enterprise programme targeted at tackling worklessness issues in its most deprived neighbourhoods. To date nearly 50 new businesses have started in the LEGI area, nearly 100 new jobs created and over 100 local residents found employment.

Departmental Recruitment

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform how much (a) his Department and (b) its executive agencies spent on (i) recruitment consultants and (ii) external recruitment advertising to recruit staff in each of the last five financial years; which recruitment consultants were employed for those purposes in each of those years; and if he will make a statement. (226803)

When running recruitment campaigns, recruitment costs, including advertising costs are generally devolved to individual management units and there are no central records held of the breakdown of advertising costs. When advertising vacancies, the departments use the most appropriate advertising media be it national, regional, local, trade magazine or website, depending on the nature of the vacancy to be filled.

Minimum Wage

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform if he will bring forward proposals to extend the National Minimum Wage Act 1998 to include the time that support workers are obliged to spend sleeping at their place of work; and if he will make a statement. (227696)

There are no current plans to change legislation in this area. We are, however, reviewing the guidance on sleepovers as part of work to reduce uncertainty about what constitutes compliance with the law.

Powers of Entry

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform what (a) primary and (b) secondary legislation sponsored by his Department and its predecessor has (i) amended and (ii) enhanced existing powers of entry since May 1997. (222049)

I refer the hon. Member to the reply given by the Minister of State for the Home Department, my hon. Friend the Member for Gedling (Mr. Coaker) on 7 October 2008, Official Report, column 577W.

Energy and Climate Change

Fuel Poverty

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment he has made of the effects of turbulence in financial markets on the willingness of banks to provide loans to fuel-poor householders to improve their home energy efficiency rating. (226251)

I have been asked to reply.

Low income and vulnerable households are able to access discounted or free energy saving and heating measures as a result of Government policies. These include the Carbon Emissions Reduction Target regulations on energy suppliers (as a result of which free cavity wall and loft insulation are available to households in receipt of certain benefits and tax credits and those over 70), and publicly funded schemes such as the Warm Front scheme in England and the Home Energy Efficiency Scheme in Wales. The Government's Home Energy Saving Programme announced on 11 September set out a £1 billion package of new activity to help all households save energy and save money.

As stated at Budget 2007, based on consultation with major banks and building societies, the Government anticipates that the measures it has put in place and improved energy advice and information have the potential to create a market for “green” financial products designed to help householders invest in energy efficiency and microgeneration installations.

Home Energy Efficiency Scheme: Chelmsford

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many people in West Chelmsford constituency have (a) applied for a grant for energy efficient measures under the Warm Front scheme and (b) been awarded a grant for energy efficient measures under the scheme. (228034)

Between 1 June 2005 and 30 September 2008, 1,273 households in West Chelmsford applied for a Warm Front Grant, 859 have qualified and of these 721 have received assistance. The remaining 138 households are awaiting the delivery of measures.

Prior to 2005 the scheme was delivered by a different scheme manager and the data retained by the present administrator are not sufficient to provide a response with the level of detail requested.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how much has been spent on grants under the Warm Front scheme in West Chelmsford constituency since its introduction. (228035)

Between 1 June 2005 and 30 September 2008, the Warm Front Scheme delivered £955,714.14 of measures into the homes of some of the most vulnerable West Chelmsford residents.

Prior to 2005, the scheme was delivered by a different administrator. The data retained by the present scheme manager is not sufficient to provide a response with the level of detail requested.

Warm Front Scheme

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps he (a) is taking and (b) plans to take to publicise the (i) Warm Front Scheme and (ii) Warm Deal Scheme; how much was spent by his Department and predecessor departments to publicise each scheme since its inception; and if he will make a statement. (227588)

As fuel poverty is now a devolved issue, this answer refers specifically to Warm Front. The Warm Deal Scheme falls within the remit of the Scottish Government.

Warm Front advertising and promotion is not an expense drawn from the Warm Front budget. It is a contractual requirement placed on Eaga, as the main contractor, to generate sufficient interest in the scheme to fulfil the budget.

(a) In promoting the Scheme, Eaga undertakes several streams of activity targeted at reaching those eligible or potentially eligible for assistance. Activities include attendance at local community events, partnerships with both the Department of Health and the Department of Work and Pensions, affinity arrangements with local voluntary and charitable groups and direct mailing activities with local authorities.

(b) Eaga will continue to publicise Warm Front so that it is visible and available to those in need, and will ensure that the scheme assists as many households as possible by fully utilising its budget.

The Government’s Act on CO2 helpline (0800 512012) directs people to advice from the Energy Savings Trust which can include information about Warm Front.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what research he has recently (a) commissioned and (b) evaluated on the effectiveness of the (i) Warm Front Scheme and (ii) Warm Deal Scheme in reducing fuel poverty; and if he will make a statement. (227589)

As fuel poverty is now a devolved issue, this response refers only to Warm Front. The Warm Deal Scheme falls within the remit of the Scottish Government.

DECC’s independent quality assessors, White Young and Green, carry out bi-annual audits of the scheme as well as further ad hoc reports on various subjects requested by the Department.

Further to this, the National Audit Office is performing a value for money audit of the scheme which they anticipate publishing in December of this year.

Transport

Departmental Travel

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many miles (a) Ministers and (b) officials in his Department travelled by (i) car, (ii) rail and (iii) air on Government business in each year since its creation. (228027)

[holding answer 17 October 2008]: I refer the hon. Member to the answer of 1 September 2008, Official Report, column 1413W.

Heavy Goods Vehicles

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what plans he has to reduce congestion on motorways and two-lane roads caused by slow-overtaking heavy goods vehicles; and if he will make a statement. (227802)

[holding answer 17 October 2008]: The Highways Agency is undertaking a series of trials on the Strategic Road Network, restricting HGVs over 7.5 tonnes from using any lane other than the nearside lane for short stretches of road. Trial areas include the M42 Junction 10 to 11 and two sections of the A1 (M) Southbound from junctions 61 and 63. After a successful 18-month trial on the A14 the restriction has been made permanent, and the process of making the order permanent on the M42 is in progress.

In addition, the Highways Agency has constructed new crawler lanes at four locations on the motorway network, one on the M27 and three on the M5 in the south-west area. These sites were identified as places where congestion has been caused by the slow movement of HGVs.

Railway Network: Electrification

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what percentage of the rail network was electrified in (a) 1978, (b) 1988, (c) 1998 and (d) 2008; what plans exist to electrify further sections; and on which of these sections electrification has commenced. (228028)

[holding answer 17 October 2008]: The following table provides the information requested:

Percentage of total route kilometres open to passenger traffic that are electrified

1978

26

1988-89

31

1998-99

34

2006-071

37

1 Latest year for which figures are available. Source: Transport Statistics Great Britain 2007.

The Department for Transport is working closely with the rail industry to examine the case for extending the electrified network.

Railways

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the net change in the number of train carriages on the rail network has been since 1 May 1997, allowing for the removal of Mk 1 trains and other time-expired vehicles, in (a) absolute and (b) percentage terms; and what the change in passenger numbers has been over the same period. (226565)

The Department for Transport does not hold the detailed information.

In May 1995 the number of vehicles on lease was 10,401 and, as of today, the number on lease on the Rail Network is around 11,150, an increase of around 7.2 per cent. It should also be noted that a further 1,300 vehicles will be delivered as part of the High Level Output Specification (HLOS), of which 423 have already been ordered. In 1997-98 there were 846 million passenger journeys and by 2007-08 this had risen to 1,232 million.

Although the numbers may seem disproportionate in percentage terms it should be noted that off peak traffic and non-London traffic has grown substantially faster than London peak traffic; hence, a large proportion of the extra journeys are being made on what were previously under utilised trains.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether his Department has a comparator to assess the relative value for money of private and public operation of railway passenger services. (227147)

The Government's policy is that rail passenger services are provided by the private sector through competition to operate publicly-specified franchises. There are no public operations which could provide the yardstick for a comparator.

Railways: Contracts

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport which train operators have requested a time extension for payments of the premia due under their franchise agreements in the last 12 months. (227127)

[holding answer 14 October 2008]: No operators have requested a time extension for payments of premia due in the last 12 months.

Railways: Fares

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what steps he has taken to ensure the implementation of fair and competitive pricing structures by train operating companies. (225701)

Train operators have been encouraged to implement the simplified fares structure set out in the 2007 White Paper, reducing the number of principal fare types to three types—Anytime, Off-peak and Advance, with standard terms and conditions for each category.

Train Operating Companies continue to set fares, where regulated, within the Policy of limiting overall increases to RPI + 1 per cent., in all but two cases. The Southeastern franchise, and the West Yorkshire part of the Northern franchise, are subject to an overall regulatory cap of RPI + 3 per cent. to reflect investment by the franchisees.

Unregulated fares are set commercially and are a matter for each Train Operating Company.

Railways: Infrastructure

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what European Union law governs whether train and station operations should be separated from rail infrastructure maintenance and renewals. (227148)

Directive 91/440/EEC requires separation of accounting between infrastructure management business and the provision of transport services, and prohibits the transfer of public funds between these functions. It allows member states to achieve this through the organisation of distinct divisions within a single entity or by requiring the infrastructure to be managed by a separate entity.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether his Department has made an assessment of the value for money of (a) integrating rail infrastructure and operations in the public sector and (b) separating train and station operations from rail infrastructure maintenance and renewals. (227149)

No such formal assessment has been made. It is generally accepted that the structures put in place at privatisation were flawed. The 2004 Rail White Paper and 2005 Railways Act set out a new streamlined structure, specified by the Government and delivered by the private sector, under which rail investment is based on affordability and value for money as determined by the independent Office of Rail Regulation.

This structure provides coherent and effective management and delivers safe, reliable railways that work efficiently. The new arrangements provide much-needed stability for the industry as a whole.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment his Department has made of the value for money of operating rail passenger services in the public sector after each passenger franchise expires. (227150)

The Government's policy is that rail services are provided by the private sector to a specification developed in the public sector; therefore, no formal assessment has been made of the value for money of operating rail passenger services in the public sector.

Railways: Milton Keynes

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport pursuant to the answer of 14 October 2008, Official Report, column 1043W, on railways: Milton Keynes, how many more southbound Virgin trains will call at Milton Keynes during (a) peak and (b) off-peak times once the platform upgrade is complete than did so before the work commenced. (228450)

On weekdays between 0600 and 0900, the number of southbound Virgin trains calling at Milton Keynes Central will increase from four to seven trains once the upgrade is completed. In off-peak periods, the number will increase from two to three per hour.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport pursuant to the answer of 14 October 2008, Official Report, column 1043W, on railways: Milton Keynes, what the aggregate number of Virgin trains stopping per day at Milton Keynes will be once the platform upgrade is completed and a new timetable introduced; and what change this will represent from the previous aggregate number. (228451)

The number of trains, operated by Virgin Trains and stopping at Milton Keynes Central station, once the enlargement work is completed, is likely to be 110 on a normal weekday. This will represent a 31 per cent. increase from today's number of 84 services operated by Virgin Trains and stopping at Milton Keynes.

Railways: Standards

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what estimate he has made of the number of hours of delays there will be on the railway in (a) 2010, (b) 2015 and (c) 2025. (226696)

The High Level Output Specification, published in July 2007, required an improvement in the Public Performance Measure (PPM) to an average of 92.6 per cent. by the end of 2013-14, with associated reductions in significant lateness and cancellations. Delay hours are reported periodically by Network Rail, but are not separately estimated by the Department for Transport.

Roads: Lancashire

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what recent discussions he has had with Lancashire county council on improving safety on (a) the A59 and (b) other roads in the council's area. (228538)

The Department for Transport has not held formal meetings with Lancashire county council specifically about the A59. The A59 is a non-trunk principal road. The county council is primarily responsible for safety on the road, and other similar roads, within its administrative area.

Departmental officials have talked with Lancashire county council officials about work supported by a road safety partnership grant not specific to the A59, about major (costing more than £5 million each) road projects and about local transport planning and delivery more generally.

Speed Limits

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) how many 20 mph speed limit zones have been introduced in each region in (a) each of the last eight years and (b) 2008; (227069)

(2) how many 20 mph speed limit zones have been introduced near schools in each region in (a) each of the last eight years and (b) 2008.

This information is not held by the Department. Local traffic authorities are responsible for setting local speed limits and have powers to introduce 20 mph speed limits and 20 mph zones if they believe it appropriate to do so. They are not required to inform the Department when they change a speed limit.

The Department has recently commissioned a new research project on local road safety policy and practice. Some of the information gathered from local authorities as part of this project includes details about the implementation of 20 mph zones. The project will take three years with an interim report due in March 2009.

Vehicle Number Plates

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport when he proposes to amend the Road Vehicles (Display of Registration Mark) Regulations 2001 so as to permit the display of the Union Flag and the national flags of Wales, England and Scotland. (224689)

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Agriculture: Subsidies

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much was raised from the modulation element of the single farm payment in (a) 2006-07 and (b) 2007-08. (224939)

For the financial years, 1 April to 31 March, 2006-07 and 2007-08 the modulation deducted from the single payment scheme payments are £136 million and £350 million respectively.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the (a) lowest, (b) highest, (c) median and (d) mean value was of claims under the 2007 Single Payment Scheme. (227308)

The lowest, highest, median and mean values of the 2007 Single Payment Scheme (SPS) payments are:

Value (£)

Lowest

0.01

Highest

2,191,054.026

Median

4,593.99

Mean

13,920.94

The lowest value is a result of a non compliance penalty.

These figures are subject to change as RPA continue to make 2007 SPS payments.

Agriculture: Temporary Employment

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many work permits were allocated under the Seasonal Agricultural Workers Scheme in each of the last five years. (227298)

I have been asked to reply.

The UK Border Agency has a Seasonal Agricultural Workers Scheme (SAWS) that enables the provision of short term, low skilled workers to be employed in the agricultural industry. The permit to work that is issued to SAWS participants is known as a work card.

Work cards allocated to SAWS operators by UKBA by year are:

Number

2004

20,557

2005

16,248

2006

16,244

2007

16,250

2008

16,250

The figures quoted are not provided under National Statistics and have been derived from local management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change.

Animals: Disease Control

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many livestock disease reactors were identified through pre-movement testing in each year such testing has been in operation. (227316)

The information requested is as follows.

TB contribution

The numbers of bovine tuberculosis (TB) reactor cattle identified in England each year since TB pre-movement testing became mandatory in March 2006, are given in the following table:

Number of TB reactors identified in England by pre-movement testing

Number

2008 (1 January-31 July 2008)

184

2007 (1 January-31 December 2007)

372

2006 (27 March-31 December 2006)

278

Source:

Animal Health database (10 September 2008)

Pre-movement testing applied to cattle over 15 months old from 27 March 2006 and was extended to cattle over 42 days old from 1 March 2007.

Cumulative TB pre-movement statistics are updated monthly and are published on the DEFRA website. The published figures are an underestimate of the impact of the policy and show the minimum benefits. The number of reactors identified does not take into account the benefits of herd owners utilising Government paid TB surveillance tests as pre-movement tests or the number of inconclusive reactors identified by pre-movement testing which have ended up as reactors when retested.

Bees: Diseases

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of the prevalence of deformed wing virus in the bee population in England; and what assessment he has made of the potential impact of this virus on bee productivity. (227329)

Deformed Wing Virus (DWV) is a virus associated with varroa, a parasitic mite infesting bees. Varroa is widespread in the UK and while it cannot be completely eradicated, beekeepers can keep productive bees despite its presence, providing they operate effective controls. Controlling the varroa mite vector by means of a careful programme of integrated pest management is the most effective way of controlling virus infections. DEFRA has published detailed advice for beekeepers on this.

Bluetongue Disease

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what strains of (a) avian influenza and (b) bluetongue were confirmed in the UK in each of the last three years; where such cases occurred; and how many animals were slaughtered in each case, broken down by region. (227326)

The information is as follows:

(a) Avian Influenza

Type of Avian Influenza/location

Animals culled

May 2006

Low pathogenic H7N3 in chickens in Dereham, Norfolk

49,386

February 2007

H5N1 (highly pathogenic) in turkeys at Bernard Matthews plant in Suffolk

156,786

May/June 2007

Low pathogenic H7N2 in Wales and Merseyside

67

November 2007

H5N1 (highly pathogenic) on two premises near Diss, Norfolk

90,650

January/February 2008

H5N1 (highly pathogenic) confirmed in 11 wild birds in the Chesil Beach area in Dorset

10

June 2008

H7N7 (highly pathogenic) avian influenza confirmed on a premises near Banbury in Oxfordshire

24,895

1 Cases were in wild not domestic birds.

(b) Bluetongue

Bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8) is the only strain of Bluetongue virus to have been detected in the UK to date. The first case was detected on 22 September 2007.

As at 16 October 2008, a total of 147 cases of BTV-8 had been detected. These are shown in the following table, by UK region, for the last three years:

2006

2007

2008

England

66

180

Northern Ireland

Scotland

Wales

21

1 No circulating Bluetongue disease has been found in the UK in 2008. The 80 cases confirmed this year in England comprise 73 that involve animals infected in 2007 but confirmed as infected in 2008, and seven that were detected through post-import tests on livestock imported from abroad. 2 This case was detected as a result of post-import testing.

A total of six infected animals were culled in England in 2007 prior to 28 September 2007.

On 28 September 2007, it was confirmed that BTV-8 was circulating in the local midge population in the affected area of East Anglia. Since Bluetongue is spread by midges, the culling of animals infected by Bluetongue would no longer have been an effective measure to control disease spread, and in line with the Bluetongue Control Strategy, the decision was taken not to slaughter further infected animals.

Bovine Tuberculosis: Disease Control

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what consideration his Department has given to the use of contra bait or other measures to control breeding in the management of badger populations infected with tuberculosis. (227774)

DEFRA is funding proof-of-concept research into fertility control for managing animal populations. As part of this research, we are evaluating this approach specifically for the management of urban badger populations. The research is focused on population control, not disease control. Lowering population numbers in itself does not necessarily mean that disease transmission risks are lowered.

Bovine Tuberculosis: Vaccination

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs when he expects a bovine tuberculosis vaccine to be available for (a) badgers and (b) cattle. (227319)

Badger vaccines are likely to be available sooner than cattle vaccines. The earliest projected date for the widespread use of Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) oral badger vaccine is 2014. Injectable BCG badger vaccines may be available by 2010.

The earliest projected date for the widespread use of a BCG cattle vaccine with a differential diagnostic test (DIVA) is mid to late-2015.

Climate Change: Diseases

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of the increase in mean surface temperatures on the potential for (a) malaria, (b) equine fever, (c) dengue fever, (d) lyme disease, (e) African Horse Sickness, (f) Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, (g) Rift Valley fever and (h) other vector borne diseases to spread to the UK; and what steps he has taken towards securing vaccines for these diseases. (227327)

DEFRA has an ongoing programme of international disease surveillance that monitors disease outbreaks. Risk assessments for African Horse Sickness and Rift Valley Fever have been published on the DEFRA Website. Equine fever could refer to a number of diseases of the horse, so we are unable to say whether we have performed a risk assessment for it.

DEFRA has not conducted specific assessments of the potential increase of the risk of these diseases as a result of an increase in mean surface temperatures. Surface temperatures are only one factor affecting the potential spread of disease and/or vectors. A number of natural and human-related factors, such as trade, animal movements and livestock husbandry practices may have a more significant role in disease spread in the short-term. Some research is under way to investigate potential implications of climate change for animal diseases.

No steps have been taken to secure vaccines against these diseases. Vaccines are often specific for particular types and strains, and decisions on vaccine procurement would need to be taken on the basis of risk assessments and our agreed control strategy for each disease.

Malaria, Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, Dengue fever and Lyme disease are human health issues and therefore queries should be addressed to the Department of Health.

Dairy Farming

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate he has made of the number of dairy farmers in each of the last 10 years. (228535)

The number of holdings and associated farmers (full and part-time) in England where dairy is the predominant activity are shown as follows. Farmers includes partners, directors and spouses (if working on the holding).

Dairy type holdings

Farmers, partners, directorsand spouses

2007

10,649

21,082

2006

12,628

25,706

2005

12,918

26,168

2004

13,264

28,057

2003

13,770

28,918

2002

14,537

30,425

2001

14,293

30,178

2000

15,219

31,418

1999

16,313

33,216

1998

17,014

34,405

Notes:

1. The 2007 dairy farm type was calculated using data taken from the cattle tracing system and is therefore not directly comparable to previous year’s results. Prior to 2007, the farm type was based on June survey data. As the annual June survey is based on a sample, estimates have been made for holdings not surveyed.

2. Figures prior to 2001 are not directly comparable with later results as they cover main (commercial) holdings only and also because of a register improvement exercise in 2001 which impacted on the labour figures.

Source:

June Survey of Agriculture and Horticulture

Domestic Waste: Waste Disposal

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will make a statement on the implications of the Local Government Ombudsman ruling 06/C/10554, in relation to the waste policies of local authorities which seek to restrict the number of household bins which are collected. (224617)

The Ombudsman found against this particular local authority on the basis that it had made insufficient effort to assess whether requiring the householder to have only one bin for the size of the household, was reasonable.

The ruling does not change the fact that local authorities can, under section 46 of the Environment Protection Act 1990, restrict the number of waste receptacles per household. However, section 46 requires the arrangements for receptacles to be reasonable and it is the authority's failure to comply with that requirement that led to the Ombudsman's investigation and subsequent ruling.

Flood Control

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what representations he has received on the consultation on restructuring of inland drainage boards. (224593)

The Inland Drainage Board Sub Catchment review set a direction of travel following an independent report produced in 2006. The independent report outlined the strengths and weaknesses of the current performance of internal drainage boards and made recommendations for future improvements.

There has not been formal consultation on this, but representations have nevertheless been received from interested organisations and internal drainage boards, making points on the detail of the report as well as seeking guidance on the review itself.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs when the Government will (a) respond to and (b) set out its five proposals for action in respect of the consultation on options for allocation of responsibility for the ownership and long-term maintenance of drainage systems; and if he will make a statement. (224612)

The Government will not be providing a separate response for the consultation and has indicated in the Summary of Responses to the consultation that the next steps will be announced in the response to the Pitt Review "Lessons learned from the 2007 floods".

The response to the Pitt Review is due in November.

Floods: Coastal Areas

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how often the Environment Agency updates its maps of river and coastal flood risks. (226700)

The Environment Agency is continually updating its Flood Map, which shows areas that could be affected by flooding from rivers or the sea. Flood Maps, published on the Environment Agency's website, are sent to local authorities for planning and Civil Contingencies Act purposes. These show areas at risk of flooding and are updated and published on a quarterly basis.

Floods: Housing

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate he has made of the number of homes at risk of (a) coastal flooding and (b) inland flooding, broken down by region. (226463)

The latest national flood risk assessment (NaFRA) was carried out during 2006. The NaFRA data were published in March 2007.

A brief summary of appendix L of the NaFRA 2006 report follows and indicates the number or properties (both homes and businesses) at risk from tidal and fluvial flooding.

Environment Agency water management region

Number of properties at risk from tidal flooding

Number of properties at risk from fluvial flooding

Number of properties at risk from both tidal and fluvial

Anglian

183,652

119,034

14,936

Midlands

25,358

196,002

1,092

North-east

138,385

146,704

10,824

North-west

65,614

47,742

3,220

South-west

72,999

89,612

6,394

Southern

124,769

133,797

11,095

Thames

418,295

281,327

36,611

Incineration: Waste Management

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps his Department is taking to encourage alternatives to incineration for the management of non-recyclable waste. (225010)

It is local authorities, not DEFRA, who are responsible for deciding how waste is managed as part of their local waste management strategies. Any plans for facilities that converted waste to energy should emerge out of local waste strategies, so that all options for reuse, recycling and composting can be explored before landfill.

Recovering energy from waste offers a considerable climate change benefit compared to the alternative landfill. This is primarily through avoided landfill methane emissions, with the energy recovered from the biodegradable part of that waste not only displacing conventional power generation based on oil, coal or natural gas, but also counting towards our renewable energy targets.

Milk: Imports

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much milk was imported in each of the last 10 years; and from which countries such milk was sourced. (227607)

[holding answer 16 October 2008]: The following table shows the volume of liquid milk imported into the UK from 1997 to 2007, by country of dispatch, as recorded in the Official Trade Statistics.

UK imports of liquid milk, 1997 to 2007, by country of dispatch

Million litres

Country

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Irish Republic

81

88

60

60

55

26

19

24

8

19

19

Germany

24

27

17

20

11

6

4

8

15

20

18

France

20

20

13

9

10

10

9

10

11

15

14

Denmark

11

40

30

25

9

1

0

1

1

0

0

Belgium-Luxembourg

14

11

7

7

4

2

4

11

9

24

24

Netherlands

1

0

4

0

1

2

1

0

3

7

13

Austria

0

3

1

0

0

Other countries

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

All countries

150

188

134

122

90

48

37

55

47

84

88

Source:

HM Revenue and Customs.

Data prepared by Trade Statistics, Agricultural Statistics and Analysis Division, DEFRA.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much milk was produced in England in each of the last 10 years. (227608)

[holding answer 16 October 2008]: The volume of milk produced in England is shown in the following table.

Production of milk in England

Million litres

1998

9,843

1999

10,645

2000

9,951

2001

9,518

2002

9,590

2003

9,622

2004

9,291

2005

9,128

2006

9,071

2007

8,791

Source:

DEFRA.

Oil: Waste Management

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the UK's obligations are on encouraging the recovery and re-use of waste under the waste framework directive; what assessment he has made of the degree to which the duty regime applicable to waste derived fuel oil from 1 November 2008 contributes towards this objective; and what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on this subject. (226447)

The waste oil directive requires member states to ensure the collection and correct management of waste oil and to take measures to give priority to the regeneration of waste oil above combustion. As a specific measure applying to waste oil, the waste oil directive takes precedence over the waste framework directive.

It is the view of the Government that the duty regime applicable to waste derived fuel oil from 1 November 2008 should have no adverse effects on the volume of waste oil collected, as correct management of hazardous waste is a legal requirement. Waste oil has a value and there will continue to be a demand for waste-derived fuel. A higher duty rate for waste-derived fuel could also encourage the provision of regeneration of waste oil in preference to combustion.

I have not held discussions on this issue with the Chancellor of the Exchequer, but officials in my Department are in regular contact with officials in HM Revenue and Customs on this issue.

Pitt Review

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will publish a plan and timetable for implementing the findings of Sir Michael Pitt's review of flooding. (226701)

The Government will be publishing a full response to Sir Michael Pitt's recommendations shortly.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs pursuant to his written ministerial statement of 4 February 2008, Official Report, columns 49-50WS, on flood and coastal erosion risk management (budget allocations and outcomes targets), what plans he has to make funding allocations beyond those indicated in the statement to enable the implementation of Sir Michael Pitt's recommendations on flooding. (226702)

I refer the hon. Member to the statement given by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on 25 June 2008, Official Report, column 301. Sir Michael Pitt's review included a recommendation that

“The Government should commit to a strategic long-term approach to its investment in flood risk management, planning up to 25 years ahead”.

The Government will be publishing their response to all of Sir Michael Pitt's recommendations shortly.

Rural Payments Agency: Personal Records

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many instances of the loss of personal documents have been recorded by the Rural Payments Agency in each of the last five years. (225106)

During the last five years the Rural Payments Agency (RPA) has had one formally recorded incident of the loss of personal information which was subsequently recovered shortly after being reported missing. Informal reporting of lost and recovered personal information has occurred during the five year period and RPA's system for recording such occurrences has been strengthened with further improvements in train.

Sewers

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs when he expects to publish a further consultation on the transfer of private sewers and lateral drains connected to the public network to water and sewage companies; what the future timetable of this work is; and if he will make a statement. (227341)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given on 10 September 2008, Official Report, column 1942W, by my hon. Friend the Member for Oldham, East and Saddleworth (Mr. Woolas).

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs when he plans to publish the Government’s response to his Department’s consultation on the transfer of private sewers to sewerage undertakers; and if he will make a statement. (227943)

[holding answer 17 October 2008]: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by my hon. Friend the Member for Oldham, East and Saddleworth (Mr. Woolas) on 10 September 2008, Official Report, column 1942W.

Supermarkets: Waste Disposal

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much waste was produced by supermarkets in each of the last three years; and how much of this was (a) recyclable and (b) recycled. (227322)

DEFRA does not hold statistics relating to the waste produced specifically by supermarkets. However, in July 2008, the Food and Drink Federation (FDF) and DEFRA published the results of a survey of food and packaging waste arising across FDF member companies during 2006. The results show that of the 835,000 tonnes of food and packaging waste produced at 236 FDF member production sites in 2006, 686,000 tonnes were recycled or recovered in some way. Overall, only 138,000 tonnes were sent to landfill.

Sustainable Development

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what progress has been made (a) in the UK and (b) internationally in implementing the recommendations arising from the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development regarding sustainable consumption. (228492)

At the international level responsibility principally lies with the ‘Marrakech Process’ and the seven international task forces which it has so far fostered. Among the themes covered by the task forces are sustainable lifestyles, education for sustainable development and sustainable tourism. The task forces focus on practical activities that help with the shift to more sustainable patterns of consumption at regional and local levels. A first draft of a 10-year framework programme has recently been produced and can be found on the Marrakech Process website.

Within England, DEFRA is implementing a programme on sustainable consumption and production. The main actions and objectives are described in DEFRA’s progress report on sustainable products and materials (published in July 2008 and available on the DEFRA website). As far as sustainable consumption is concerned, we have published a framework for pro-environmental behaviours which sets out a social marketing style approach to helping people move to more sustainable living. This includes core principles and approaches, headline behaviour goals, consumer insight, a segmentation model and an assessment of the implications for policy. The framework has been used, for example, to inform the development of the Government’s Act on CO2 campaign.

Warm Front Scheme

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) how many people in North Yorkshire received Warm Front grants in each of the last five years; (223900)

(2) how many people in Yorkshire and the Humber received Warm Front grants in each of the last five years.

I have been asked to reply.

The following below shows the number of households assisted under Warm Front 2 since it started in June 2005 in the Yorkshire and Humber and North Yorkshire areas.

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-091

Yorkshire and Humber

14,210

36,033

39,488

12,179

North Yorkshire

Craven

149

308

273

167

Hambleton

160

359

391

193

Harrogate

302

591

566

189

Richmondshire

83

263

230

77

Ryedale

101

308

252

66

Scarborough

272

747

1343

380

Selby

127

410

384

172

York

382

982

1042

273

1,576

3,968

4,481

1,517

1 To 16 September 2008

Waste Disposal: Fees and Charges

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the estimated yearly effect on the (a) tax bill and (b) other expenditure of a family in the lowest income quintile is under his Department's impact assessment of new charges for the collection of household waste. (225558)

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what his policy is on whether care homes should be subject to the new charges for the collection of household waste. (225645)

Waste Management: Public Participation

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will place in the Library a copy of each of the responses to the consultation on joint waste authorities' regulations and guidance. (225644)

Waterwise: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether his Department requires the water industry to provide funding to Waterwise; and if he will make a statement. (226553)

Justice

Church of England: Public Appointments

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the average length of time has been to fill clergy vacancies in Lord Chancellor-appointed livings in each of the last five years. (227649)

This information is not held in this form and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many vacancies there are for clergy in the livings to which the Lord Chancellor makes the appointment. (227650)

On 15 October, there were 13 vacancies in livings to which the Lord Chancellor makes the appointment. This includes those livings where the patronage is shared and it is the Lord Chancellor’s turn to make the presentation.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether there are plans to review the procedures for clergy appointments by his Department. (227651)

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) male and (b) female clergy have been appointed by his Department in each of the last five years. (227652)

The figures requested are as follows:

Female

Male

2004

1

11

2005

1

5

2006

3

5

2007

1

8

2008 (to date)

1

3

In the same period, the Lord Chancellor has also appointed one female Canon Residentiary in 2006, and four male Canon Residentiaries, one in each of 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008.

Community Orders

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many community orders were issued in each month since April 2005; and how many times each of the 12 requirements was used. (227002)

Table 1 shows the number of community orders supervised by the Probation Service in England and Wales which commenced between April 2005 and March 2008. Table 2 shows the monthly commencement figures in England and Wales for each of the 12 requirements associated with the community order.

The figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Table 1: Number of community orders commencing in England and Wales, by month, April 2005 to March 2008

Number

April 2005

931

May 2005

3,244

June 2005

5,348

July 2005

6,072

August 2005

6,954

September 2005

7,824

October 2005

8,602

November 2005

9,812

December 2005

7,790

January 2006

10,108

February 2006

10,212

March 2006

11,184

April 2006

9,140

May 2006

10,654

June 2006

11,033

July 2006

10,133

August 2006

10,483

September 2006

10,494

October 2006

11,005

November 2006

10,961

December 2006

8,238

January 2007

11,067

February 2007

10,782

March 2007

11,582

April 2007

9,951

May 2007

11,337

June 2007

11,444

July 2007

11,705

August 2007

11,374

September 2007

10,268

October 2007

12,308

November 2007

11,756

December 2007

8,228

January 2008

11,933

February 2008

11,287

March 2008

10,136

Table 2: Number of requirements given with a community order which commenced in England and Wales, by month and type of requirement. April 2005 to March 2008

Community Order

Supervision

Unpaid work

Accredited programme

Drug treatment

Curfew

Specified activity

April 2005

438

566

217

60

38

20

May 2005

1,866

1,793

978

276

138

139

June 2005

3,227

2,859

1,674

533

253

252

July 2005

3,678

3,260

1,911

598

302

294

August 2005

4,267

3,681

2,134

692

389

348

September 2005

4,843

4,202

2,440

734

461

348

October 2005

5,405

4,390

2,685

960

517

405

November 2005

6,149

5,151

3,027

1,112

582

468

December 2005

4,864

4,045

2,371

887

528

364

January 2006

6,229

5,378

2,991

990

691

545

February 2006

6,362

5,463

3,176

1,004

753

605

March 2006

7,014

5,972

3,347

1,112

824

605

April 2006

5,641

4,864

2,515

914

715

500

May 2006

6,500

5,836

2,926

1,036

751

644

June 2006

6,841

5,990

3,122

1,061

822

661

July 2006

6,295

5,407

2,828

962

785

652

August 2006

6,398

5,732

2,780

1,010

853

646

September 2006

6,371

5,763

2,707

949

805

707

October 2006

6,757

5,966

2,873

1,022

919

751

November 2006

6,709

6,047

2,924

1,028

971

768

December 2006

5,101

4,504

2,092

805

723

621

January 2007

6,587

6,244

2,749

1,015

996

773

February 2007

6,487

5,975

2,716

982

997

797

March 2007

6,862

6,738

2,750

1,099

1,016

856

April 2007

5,911

5,711

2,212

960

882

646

May 2007

6,734

6,583

2,536

1,017

1,035

765

June 2007

6,817

6,573

2,679

1,059

1,034

681

July 2007

6,964

6,649

2,665

1,056

1,135

755

August 2007

6,829

6,345

2,619

1,078

1,061

782

September 2007

6,067

5,799

2,241

900

996

660

October 2007

7,164

7,074

2,658

1,093

1,249

730

November 2007

6,862

6,612

2,542

1,077

1,341

782

December 2007

4,817

4,477

1,775

810

875

539

January 2008

6,679

6,747

2,516

1,045

1,309

774

February 2008

6,453

6,212

2,317

1,076

1,270

774

March 2008

5,828

5,586

2,040

987

1,168

674

Total

208,016

190,194

88,733

32,999

29,184

21,331

Community order

Alcohol treatment

Residential

Mental health

Exclusion

Prohibited activity

Attendance centre

April 2005

19

1

0

2

3

0

May 2005

90

4

6

15

3

4

June 2005

155

17

17

23

5

12

July 2005

177

29

25

21

10

9

August 2005

184

36

34

17

15

12

September 2005

181

46

34

38

25

15

October 2005

184

43

43

29

19

13

November 2005

194

47

54

28

28

18

December 2005

172

45

49

22

22

11

January 2006

189

51

53

25

31

17

February 2006

200

64

60

44

22

17

March 2006

208

64

64

37

40

25

April 2006

185

45

58

34

27

17

May 2006

216

60

43

48

35

29

June 2006

222

62

65

41

48

39

July 2006

212

58

61

41

49

29

August 2006

229

69

76

42

43

28

September 2006

204

76

76

43

47

18

October 2006

227

60

70

44

50

29

November 2006

202

74

69

54

39

20

December 2006

144

78

55

57

52

19

January 2007

200

78

62

61

51

33

February 2007

200

80

44

82

67

34

March 2007

258

66

57

68

67

33

April 2007

215

75

61

55

56

31

May 2007

268

81

54

58

83

31

June 2007

270

95

68

60

63

38

July 2007

310

95

53

86

75

47

August 2007

324

70

58

88

70

40

September 2007

262

75

39

56

61

49

October 2007

339

86

55

83

95

37

November 2007

347

70

59

79

85

38

December 2007

274

61

42

69

74

20

January 2008

331

81

56

80

84

38

February 2008

330

61

68

108

88

45

March 2008

299

75

53

69

78

42

Total

8,021

2,178

1,841

1,807

1,710

937

Departmental Disciplinary Proceedings

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many staff in his Department and its predecessors and their agencies were (a) dismissed and (b) disciplined for their conduct in each of the last 10 years. (227078)

Information in a validated and comparable form is available only for dismissals for the last two years. Figures for these years for dismissals are as follows:

Dismissals

2006-07

112

2007-08

101

To obtain the other information in the format requested would incur disproportionate costs as all personal files of current and ex-employees would have to be checked to collate this information for the past 10 years.

Departmental Overtime

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the cost of overtime payments paid to staff in his Department was in each of the last 12 months, broken down by pay grade. (221298)

The 24 hour, seven days a week operational nature of the Ministry’s work in various sectors of the justice service necessitates a large number of our staff to regularly provide out of hours work. This flexible additional work is required in order to better protect the public and meet the needs of a modern service.

In line with good practice guidelines overtime is paid only with prior management authority to carry out specific work, which cannot be done within normal working hours. The majority of overtime paid in the Ministry of Justice relates to work done in Her Majesty’s Prison Service. Within Her Majesty’s Court Service examples of such work include provision of out of hours legal advice to judges on issues such as Emergency Protection Orders or Extradition matters, or the provision of Saturday court sittings. The Ministry of Justice is also responsible for overtime payments made to probation staff in the National Offender Management Service.

The following table shows the overtime payments to staff within the Ministry of Justice broken down by month from July 2007 to August 2008.

Total overtime costs

Area of Ministry of Justice

£

July 2007

Former Department for Constitutional Affairs agencies and associated offices

1

National Offender Management Service and Office for Criminal Justice Reform

31,876.28

Her Majesty’s Prisons Service

906,672.93

Total overtime costs

938,549.21

August 2007

Former Department for Constitutional Affairs agencies and associated offices

1

National Offender Management Service and Office for Criminal Justice Reform

16,104.67

Her Majesty’s Prisons Service

1,324,897.48

Total overtime costs

1,341,002.15

September 2007

Former Department for Constitutional Affairs agencies and associated offices

413,339.04

National Offender Management Service and Office for Criminal Justice Reform

19,722.17

Her Majesty’s Prisons Service

949,660.93

Total overtime costs

1,382,722.14

October 2007

Former Department for Constitutional Affairs agencies and associated offices

531,030.82

National Offender Management Service and Office for Criminal Justice Reform

28,146.40

Her Majesty’s Prisons Service

826,973.12

Total overtime costs

1,386,150.34

November 2007

Former Department for Constitutional Affairs agencies and associated offices

700,991.79

National Offender Management Service and Office for Criminal Justice Reform

17,890.91

Her Majesty’s Prisons Service

1,226,404.48

Total overtime costs

1,945,287.18

December 2007

Former Department for Constitutional Affairs agencies and associated offices

650,574.97

National Offender Management Service and Office for Criminal Justice Reform

25,758.91

Her Majesty’s Prisons Service

702,118.36

Total overtime costs

1,378,452.24

January 2008

Former Department for Constitutional Affairs agencies and associated offices

643,558.45

National Offender Management Service and Office for Criminal Justice Reform

19,050.76

Her Majesty’s Prisons Service

962,208.19

Total overtime costs

1,624,817.40

February 2008

Former Department for Constitutional Affairs agencies and associated offices

834,554.36

National Offender Management Service and Office for Criminal Justice Reform

27,367.16

Her Majesty’s Prisons Service

891,539.35

Total overtime costs

1,753,460.87

March 2008

Former Department for Constitutional Affairs agencies and associated offices

782,040.82

National Offender Management Service and Office for Criminal Justice Reform

26,682.83

Her Majesty’s Prisons Service

912,752.52

Total overtime costs

1,721,476.17

April 2008

Former Department for Constitutional Affairs agencies and associated offices

1,025,311.68

National Offender Management Service and Office for Criminal Justice Reform

47,924.58

Her Majesty’s Prisons Service

969,909.44

Total overtime costs

2,043,145.70

May 2008

Former Department for Constitutional Affairs agencies and associated offices

707,760.34

National Offender Management Service and Office for Criminal Justice Reform

26,259.54

Her Majesty’s Prisons Service

971,016.57

Total overtime costs

1,705,036.45

June 2008

Former Department for Constitutional Affairs agencies and associated offices

694,089.43

National Offender Management Service and Office for Criminal Justice Reform

26,186.03

Her Majesty’s Prisons Service

959,315.12

Total overtime costs

1,679,590.58

July 2008

Former Department for Constitutional Affairs agencies and associated offices

765,693.44

National Offender Management Service and Office for Criminal Justice Reform

n/a

Her Majesty’s Prisons Service

n/a

Total overtime costs

765,693.44

August 2008

Former Department for Constitutional Affairs agencies and associated offices

649,501.42

National Offender Management Service and Office for Criminal Justice Reform

n/a

Her Majesty’s Prisons Service

n/a

Total Overtime Costs

649,501.42

1 The information requested could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Departmental Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many non-pensionable bonuses were awarded to members of staff in his Department in the last 12 months; and at what total cost. (226424)

Bonus payments in the Ministry of Justice may be either ‘Year-end’ bonuses, paid to high performing staff to reflect their individual contribution during the previous performance year or ‘In year’ bonuses may be paid to staff to recognise exceptional contribution during the performance year. During the financial year 2007-08 2,535 end of year bonuses and 5,327 in year bonuses were paid.

The cost of bonus payments made during the financial year 2007-08 was £4,559,454. This includes Employer’s National Insurance contributions at 9 per cent. Bonus payments are non pensionable and therefore are not subject to Employer’s Pension Contributions.

Departmental Public Participation

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many citizens’ juries his Department has held since 1 July 2007; what the cost was of each; what issues were discussed at each event; and how many (a) Ministers and (b) members of the public attended each event. (227480)

The Ministry of Justice has not held any citizens’ juries since 1 July 2007.

Driving Offences

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people have been prosecuted for driving without insurance in (a) Wales and (b) each region of England in (i) each of the last 10 years and (ii) 2008. (227073)

Available information on magistrates courts proceedings for the offence of ‘use of a motor vehicle uninsured against third party risks’ from 1997 to end 2006 (latest available) is contained in the following table. Data for 2007 will be available later this year; while 2008 data will be available later in 2009.

From 1 June 2003, the offence of ‘use of a motor vehicle uninsured against third party risks’ became a fixed penalty offence. The table does not include fixed penalty notices issued and paid where there is no further action for the offence but may include cases where fixed penalty notices were issued but not paid and subsequently referred to court.

Proceedings at magistrates courts for ‘using a motor vehicle uninsured against third party risks’1, by GOR, 1997 to 2006

Number of offences

Government office region

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

20032

2004

2005

2006

Wales

26,864

27,969

26,976

26,064

24,892

28,371

30,077

27,686

22,696

22,363

North East

20,387

20,302

23,526

23,458

22,687

24,143

24,328

23,582

20,793

17,645

North West

70,946

68,125

69,331

71,427

71,405

73,557

82,086

73,991

66,415

56,686

Yorkshire and the Humber

43,542

43,125

46,436

48,148

50,516

46,536

49,994

53,055

46,618

40,303

East Midlands

32,937

33,193

35,047

31,778

29,871

29,226

36,361

38,808

30,618

25,359

West Midlands

49,456

51,114

46,403

48,746

45,028

50,955

55,114

58,544

52,623

46,880

East

27,095

27,875

26,278

27,553

29,550

32,351

35,177

33,051

31,666

30,464

London

44,954

38,191

33,806

31,387

33,858

38,838

45,663

50,618

48,722

47,707

South East

44,865

42,573

43,098

44,145

43,584

45,780

45,388

41,641

36,732

34,259

South West

36,087

37,607

36,518

38,953

36,907

40,641

43,079

40,843

35,880

31,815

1 An offence under the Road Traffic Act 1988 s.143(2).

2 As from 1 June 2003, ‘driving a motor vehicle while uninsured against third party risks’ became a fixed penalty offence.

Notes:

1. It is known that for some police force areas, the reporting of court proceedings in particular those relating to summary motoring offences may be less than complete.

2. Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many drivers under the age of 25 years were prosecuted for driving using a mobile phone in each region of England and Wales in (a) each of the last five years and (b) 2008 to date. (227142)

Available information on prosecutions in the period 1 December 2003 to end 2006 (latest available) taken from the Court Proceedings Database held by my Department, are provided in the following table. 2007 data should be available later this year; 2008 data will be available late in 2009.

The vast majority of “use of hand held mobile phone while driving” offences are dealt with by the offer of a fixed penalty. The table does not include fixed penalty notices but does include cases where fixed penalty notices were issued but not paid and subsequently referred to court.

Proceedings at magistrates courts1,2 for the offence of ‘use of hand held mobile phone while driving’2, by drivers under age 25, and by Government office regions, England and Wales, 2004, 2005, 2006Number of offencesGovernment office region200420052006North East7525North West285172Yorkshire and the Humber103037East Midlands72419West Midlands111520East161945London52115103South East133535South West111623Wales413141 Includes cases where a fixed penalty notice was originally issued but not paid and subsequently referred to court.2 Offences under the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 110 (1), 110 (2) and 110 (3). Introduced 1 December 2003. In December 2003, there was one prosecution in the Bedfordshire police force area. The offender was aged over 25.Note:It is known that for some police force areas, the reporting of court proceedings in particular those relating to summary motoring offences may be less than complete.. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Driving Offences: Fines

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many fines have been issued for drivers exceeding the speed limit in a 20 mph zone in the last eight years; and what the average such fine was in (a) Wales and (b) each region of England in (i) each of the last eight years and (ii) 2008. (227067)

While the data held by my Department include information on fines for speed limit offences, that information does not specify the particular limit breached nor the part of the country in which the offence occurred.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what average fine was levied for driving an unsafe car which did not comply with MOT requirements in (a) Wales and (b) each region of England in (i) each of the last 10 years and (ii) 2008. (227075)

Driving an unsafe car which does not comply with M.O.T. requirements can result in the commission of a number of different offences.

Available information on average fines for different offences and offence groups is contained in my Department's Statistical Bulletin "Motoring Offences and Breath Test Statistics, England and Wales 2006" and its associated "Offences relating to motor vehicles, England and Wales 2006, Supplementary tables". The documents are available on the Ministry of Justice website at:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/motoringoffences.htm

This information is not however broken down by area.

Firearms: Sentencing

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people have been convicted for possession of an illegal firearm in each of the last 10 years, broken down by police force area. (227526)

The number of persons found guilty at all courts for firearm possession offences in England and Wales, by police force area for the years 1997 to 2006 can be viewed in the following table.

These data are on the principal offence basis. The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offence for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences, the offence selected is the one for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

Court proceedings data for 2007 will be available in November 2008.

Number of persons found guilty at all courts for offences relating to possessing firearm, ammunition, or shotgun without a certificate or possessing or distributing prohibited weapons or ammunition in England and Wales, by police force area for the years 1997 to 20061, 2, 3, 4

Found guilty

Force

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

Avon and Somerset

54

52

19

21

31

24

25

24

26

25

Bedfordshire

15

9

5

4

6

10

10

10

7

4

Cambridgeshire

16

23

17

12

2

8

14

8

6

15

Cheshire

18

8

11

9

7

8

8

23

13

18

City of London

1

4

1

1

2

4

2

5

1

1

Cleveland

15

15

9

10

7

8

15

12

13

9

Cumbria

7

13

4

12

8

3

4

10

10

5

Derbyshire

24

15

30

23

13

19

12

23

21

21

Devon and Cornwall

38

29

25

14

18

18

24

22

20

28

Dorset

8

8

9

8

8

11

13

9

11

8

Durham

8

12

10

16

9

8

14

18

28

17

Essex

46

51

29