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Nurses: General Practitioners

Volume 481: debated on Tuesday 21 October 2008

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many (a) nurses and (b) allied health professionals work in GP practices in each London borough; (227789)

(2) how many GP practices there are in each London borough.

Information on the number of nurses and general practitioner practices can be found in the following table.

However, information on allied healthcare professionals is not held centrally.

GP practices and practice nurses by primary care trust (PCT) in London, as at 30 September 2007

GP practices

Practice nurses

Havering PCT

51

103

Kingston PCT

28

72

Bromley PCT

51

117

Greenwich Teaching PCT

45

116

Barnet PCT

74

153

Hillingdon PCT

50

95

Enfield PCT

61

96

Barking and Dagenham PCT

42

83

City and Hackney Teaching PCT

47

91

Tower Hamlets PCT

36

82

Newham PCT

67

105

Haringey Teaching PCT

59

92

Hammersmith and Fulham PCT

31

47

Ealing PCT

79

131

Hounslow PCT

57

79

Brent Teaching PCT

70

105

Harrow PCT

39

90

Camden PCT

43

65

Islington PCT

40

61

Croydon PCT

62

145

Kensington and Chelsea PCT

44

36

Westminster PCT

51

91

Lambeth PCT

54

136

Southwark PCT

49

102

Lewisham PCT

48

115

Wandsworth PCT

49

123

Richmond and Twickenham PCT

31

59

Sutton and Merton PCT

54

131

Redbridge PCT

49

84

Waltham Forest PCT

53

84

Bexley Care Trust

32

100

Total

1,546

2,989

Notes:

1. The annual GP Census collection does not collect data broken down by allied health professionals working within GP practices.

2. Data not available for London boroughs. PCT boundaries correspond exactly to London boroughs.

Data quality:

Work force statistics are compiled from data sent by more than 300 national health service trusts and primary care trusts (PCTs) in England. The NHS Information Centre for health and social care liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data.

Processing methods and procedures are continually being updated to improve data quality. Where this happens any impact on figures already published will be assessed but unless this is significant at national level they will not be changed. Where there is impact only at detailed or local level this will be footnoted in relevant analyses.

Source:

The Information Centre for health and social care General and Personal Medical Services Statistics