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Disability Living Allowance

Volume 482: debated on Tuesday 11 November 2008

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what legislation provides for the disability living allowance mobility component; what (a) statutory instruments, (b) departmental circulars and (c) other documents he (i) has issued and (ii) plans to issue in the next 12 months consequent on the provisions of that legislation; and if he will make a statement. (229500)

The disability living allowance mobility component is provided for primarily by the Social Security Contributions and Benefits Act 1992 (1992 c4)/Part III Non-contributory Benefits and the Social Security (Disability Living Allowance) Regulations 1991, SI.1991/2890, as amended. The most easily accessible version of the amended legislation can be found on the internet at:

www.dwp.gov.uk/advisers/docs/lawvols/bluevol/

Prior to, and since the introduction of disability living allowance in 1992, there have been numerous departmental communications to staff on the mobility component including guidance, information notes, memos and bulletins. Details of these communications are not centrally collated and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

There are currently no plans to amend the disability living allowance regulations in the next 12 months. It is not possible to say what circulars or other documents will be issued during this period.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many and what proportion of people claiming (a) disability living allowance and (b) attendance allowance receive awards for an indefinite period, broken down by condition. (230089)

The available information is in the tables.

Disability living allowance cases in payment by main disabling condition: Indefinite awards Great Britain, February 2008

Indefinite awards

Proportion of awards that are for an indefinite period (percentage)

Arthritis

474,300

86

Back Ailments

197,000

78

Muscle/Joint/Bone Disease

169,000

70

Blindness

58,900

86

Deafness

23,000

63

Heart Disease

132,800

87

Chest Disease

77,200

87

Stroke Related

87,700

83

Frailty

2,500

93

Epilepsy

33,200

48

Multiple Sclerosis

59,000

93

Parkinson's Disease

15,400

96

Diabetes Mellitus

28,900

53

Learning Difficulty

182,100

62

Mental Health Causes

211,300

43

Renal Disorders

7,300

59

AIDS

6,300

84

Skin Disease

4,300

29

Malignant Disease

40,100

57

Other

226,800

66

Attendance allowance cases in payment by disabling condition: Indefinite awards Great Britain, February 2008

Indefinite awards

Proportion of awards that are for an indefinite period (percentage)

Arthritis

474,000

99

Back Ailments

32,500

98

Muscle/Joint/Bone Disease

81,700

98

Blindness

53,200

100

Deafness

3,300

98

Heart Disease

125,700

99

Chest Disease

65,800

99

Stroke Related

99,200

98

Frailty

217,000

100

Epilepsy

4,100

99

Multiple Sclerosis

2,500

100

Parkinson's Disease

30,700

99

Diabetes Mellitus

29,700

99

Learning Difficulty

2,400

100

Mental Health Causes

133,100

99

Renal Disorders

4,700

93

AIDS

100

Skin Disease

1,000

95

Malignant Disease

25,900

92

Other

87,000

79

— = Nil or negligible. Notes: 1. Caseload figures are rounded to the nearest hundred. 2. Figures are subject to a high degree of sampling error and should be used only as a guide. 3. Percentages are rounded to the nearest whole number. 4. Totals show the number of people in receipt of an allowance and exclude people with entitlement where the payment has been suspended, for example if they are in hospital. 5. Where more than one disability is present the main disabling condition only is recorded. "Other" includes 25 medical conditions. 6. A diagnosed medical condition does not mean that someone is automatically entitled to disability living allowance or attendance allowance. Entitlement is dependent on an assessment of how much help someone needs with personal care and/or mobility because of their disability. These statistics are only collected for administrative purposes. 7. Although the preferred data source for benefit statistics is 100 per cent. Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study, the 5 per cent. sample data has been used in this case because it provides some detail not yet available from the 100 per cent. data sources, in particular, more complete information on the disabling condition of disability living allowance claimants. Source: Department for Work and Pensions, Information Directorate, 5 per cent. sample.