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Accidents: Cycling

Volume 483: debated on Tuesday 18 November 2008

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what estimate his Department has made of the cost to the NHS of treating patients who were involved in cycling accidents and were not wearing a cycle helmet in the latest period for which figures are available; (235603)

(2) how many people were admitted to hospital as a result of cycling accidents in each of the last five financial years.

The national health service has not been asked to identify separately the costs of treating road traffic accident victims or those injured in cycling accidents because of the burden it would impose. Where a patient receives a compensation payment for their injuries, however incurred, the NHS is able to reclaim the costs of their treatment from whoever pays the compensation. In 2007-08, over £137 million was recovered in this way.

Information on admissions to hospital as a result of cycling accidents from 2002-03 to 2006-07 is shown in the following tables.

Total admissions to hospital as a result of cycling accidents* from 2002-03 to 2006-07, NHS Hospitals England and activity performed in the Independent sector in England commissioned by English NHS

Total admissions to hospital as a result of cycling accidents

V10 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with pedestrian or animal

V11 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with other pedal cycle

V12 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with 2-3 wheeled motor vehicle

V13 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with car pick-up truck or van

V14 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with heavy transport vehicle or bus

2006-07

13,368

89

208

62

1,873

129

2005-06

13,533

71

195

59

1,800

118

2004-05

12,659

54

220

53

1,497

120

2003-04

12,049

50

176

54

1,471

118

2002-03

10,795

50

158

61

1471

117

V14 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with heavy transport vehicle or bus

V15 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with railway train or railway vehicle

V16 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with other nonmotor vehicle

V17 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with fixed/stationary object

V18 Pedal cyclist injured in noncollision transport accident

V19 Pedal cyclist injured in oth and unspc transport accident

2006-07

129

1

18

518

9,191

1,279

2005-06

118

3

8

511

9,538

1,230

2004-05

120

2

19

412

9,119

1,163

2003-04

118

4

17

336

8,687

1,136

2002-03

117

0

20

377

7617

924

Notes:

ICD-10 Clinical Codes External Cause Codes:

V10 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with pedestrian or animal

V11 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with other pedal cycle

V12 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with 2-3 wheeled motor vehicle

V13 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with car pick-up truck or van

V14 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with heavy transport vehicle or bus

V15 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with railway train or railway vehicle

V16 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with other nonmotor vehicle

V17 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with fixed/stationary object

V18 Pedal cyclist injured in noncollision transport accident

V19 Pedal cyclist injured in oth and unspc transport accident

Finished admission episodes

A finished admission episode is the first period of inpatient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. Finished admission episodes are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Please note that admissions do not represent the number of inpatients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year.

Cause code

The cause code is a supplementary code that indicates the nature of any external cause of injury, poisoning or other adverse effects. The field within HES counts only the first external cause code which is coded within the episode.

Data Quality

Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) are compiled from data sent by more than 300 NHS trusts and primary care trusts (PCTs) in England. Data are also received from a number of independent sector organisations for activity commissioned by the English NHS. The NHS Information Centre for health and social care liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data via HES processes. While this brings about improvement over time, some shortcomings remain.

Ungrossed data

Figures have not been adjusted for shortfalls in data (i.e. the data are ungrossed).

Assessing growth through time

HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. During the years that these records have been collected by the NHS there have been ongoing improvements in quality and coverage. These improvements in information submitted by the NHS have been particularly marked in the earlier years and need to be borne in mind when analysing time series.

Some of the increase in figures for later years (particularly 2006-07 onwards) may be due to the improvement in the coverage of independent sector activity.

Changes in NHS practice also need to be borne in mind when analysing time series. For example, a number of procedures may now be undertaken in outpatient settings and may no longer be accounted for in the HES data. This may account for any reductions in activity over time.

Source:

Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), The NHS Information Centre for health and social care