Skip to main content

Armed Forces

Volume 485: debated on Tuesday 9 December 2008

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what definition his Department uses of harmony with regard to each of the three services. (240495)

[holding answer 8 December 2008]: Harmony Guidelines are formulated by the single services. Each of the services has a slightly different metric that reflects the ethos and expectations of armed forces personnel. The guidelines are kept under regular review in order to ensure that they reflect the operational requirement of the Department but remain balanced with the requirement of training and recuperation, including leave. Part of recuperation considers retention issues and the assessment of the work/life dynamic is of particular concern. Harmony is split into two related but separate requirements: unit harmony, that primarily relates to force structures and commitments; and individual harmony, that relates to the effect of all separation on individual service personnel.

The Harmony Guidelines are given in the following table.

Unit Harmony Guideline

Individual Harmony Guideline

Royal Navy

Force planners assume that RN and RM units will, over a three year period, spend a maximum of 60 per cent. of their time deployed and 40 per cent. of their time in their base port

The Royal Navy sets Separated Service as a maximum of 660 days Separated Service in a rolling three year period

Army

The Army uses FORM (Formation Operational Readiness Mechanism) to plan for Army units to conduct a six month operational tour followed by an interval of 24 months

The Army tries to adhere to 415 days Separated Service in a 30 month rolling period

Royal Air Force

On the whole, the RAF deploys personnel on individual basis with the RAF Regt being the major exception. The RAF utilises the Operational Deployment Guideline to plan for personnel and units to spend four months on deployed operations followed by 16 months at base

The Royal Air Force has a Separated Service planning target of 280 days in a 24-month rolling period

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) if he will break down the basic salary levels in the armed forces by (a) service and (b) rank; (241749)

(2) what the pay grades are of officers above the NATO rank of OF-3 in all three services, broken down by rank.

Pay rates for all members of the armed forces up to the rank of Brigadier and equivalent are recommended by the independent Armed Forces’ Pay Review Body (AFPRB) in its annual report to the Prime Minister and the Secretary of State for Defence. Copies of the AFPRB’s 37th report—2008 (Cm 7315) and its Supplement (Cm 7347), which covers the pay of service medical and dental officers, are available in the Library of the House. Both reports show the recommended pay rates for officers and other ranks, for financial year 2008-09, by service rank (including NATO equivalent) and spine point. The recommendations contained in both reports have been accepted in full by the Government and implemented with effect from 1 April 2008.

Pay rates for all senior service officers of the ranks shown as follows are recommended by the independent Review Body on Senior Salaries (SSRB) in its annual report to the Prime Minister, the Lord Chancellor, the Secretary of State for Defence and the Secretary of State for Health.

2 Star—Rear Admiral/Major General/Air Vice Marshal (NATO Equivalent—OF7)

3 Star—Vice Admiral/Lieutenant General/Air Marshal (NATO Equivalent—OF8)

4 Star—Admiral/General/Air Chief Marshal (NATO Equivalent—OF9)

Chief of the Defence Staff

Copies of the SSRB’s 30th report on senior salaries (Cm 7388) are available in the Library of the House. The recommendations contained in the report in respect of senior service officers have been accepted in full by the Government and implemented with effect from 1 April 2008.