Skip to main content

Reoffenders

Volume 485: debated on Tuesday 16 December 2008

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what the average adult re-offending rate was for male prisoners two years after release in the latest period for which figures are available; (243097)

(2) what the average adult re-offending rate was for female prisoners two years after release in the latest period for which figures are available.

Table 1 shows the one year reoffending rates for offenders leaving custody in the first quarter of the years 2000 to 2006, by gender (data for 2001 are unavailable due to problems with archived data for community sentences). The table shows the proportion of offenders that committed at least one further offence and the number of further offences committed per 100 offenders.

Table 1: One year reoffending rates, offenders leaving custody by gender, 2000-2006

Number of offenders

Proportion of offenders offending (one year)

Number of offences per 100 offenders (one year)

Male

2000

Q1

14,543

51.6

244.1

2002

Q1

14,385

55.0

283.8

2003

Q1

13,202

53.9

276.8

2004

Q1

14,359

51.8

249.9

2005

Q1

13,353

49.1

227.0

2006

Q1

13,178

46.6

207.5

Female

2000

Q1

1,184

48.0

262.5

2002

Q1

1,193

55.8

340.9

2003

Q1

1,156

54.1

305.1

2004

Q1

1,402

53.7

285.2

2005

Q1

1,242

49.1

244.8

2006

Q1

1,202

45.0

218.6

Two year reoffending rates by gender are available for the 2000 to 2005 cohorts. For these cohorts, the only figures available are the proportion of offenders who committed a further offence within two years. These figures are shown in Table 2.

Table 2: Two year reoffending rates, offenders leaving custody by gender, 2000-2005

Number of offenders

Proportion of offenders offending (two year)

Male

2000

Q1

15,268

65.4

2002

Q1

14,665

67.7

2003

Q1

14,095

66.1

2004

Q1

14,972

64.7

2005

Q1

13,501

62.4

Female

2000

Q1

1,259

58.2

2002

Q1

1,222

64.6

2003

Q1

1,199

63.4

2004

Q1

1,408

64.3

2005

Q1

1,203

59.4

It should be noted that comparisons between the one and two year rates should be interpreted with caution. This is due to a slight improvement in the method used to count offenders released from custody (or starting court orders under probation supervision) when we moved to measuring reoffending over one year rather than two.

Further information on the one year rates of reoffending can be found in:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/reoffendingofadults.htm.

Further information on the two year rates can be found in:

http://rds.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs05/hosb2505.pdf