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National Treatment Agency

Volume 485: debated on Tuesday 16 December 2008

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what the role and purpose is of the National Treatment Agency; (241686)

(2) how many staff were employed at the National Treatment Agency (a) when it was first launched and (b) on the latest date for which figures are available;

(3) what the budget was for the National Treatment Agency in (a) its first year of operation and (b) 2007-08.

The National Treatment Agency for Substance Misuse (NTA) is a special health authority within the NHS, established by Government in 2001 to improve the availability, capacity and effectiveness of treatment for drug misuse in England.

The NTA has achieved significant improvements in access to services and is now focusing on improving the quality of treatment in order to maximise the benefit to individuals, families and communities. The NTA also plays an important role in advice and guidance on the quality of and, since April 2008, monitoring access to alcohol treatment.

In 2001-02, the NTA's first year of operation, it received a £2.1 million core grant in aid budget (from the Department) and employed an average number of 271 staff.

In 2007-08, the NTA received a £11.59 million core grant in aid budget (from the Department) and employed an average of 173 staff.

1 Note that although the NTA was established in April 2001, staff began to be appointed only from July 2001 onwards.