Skip to main content

Written Answers

Volume 486: debated on Monday 19 January 2009

Written Answers to Questions

Monday 19 January 2009

Church Commissioners

Pay

To ask the hon. Member for Middlesbrough, representing the Church Commissioners how much has been spent by the Church Commissioners on staff reward and recognition schemes in each of the last three years. (248725)

In each of the last three years for which fully audited figures are available (i.e. 2005-07) the salary and pension contribution cost of staff for whom the Church Commissioners were the managing employer was £3.7 million.

Prime Minister

Departmental Marketing

To ask the Prime Minister how much has been spent by 10 Downing Street on advertising in the last 12 months. (243718)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to him by the Parliamentary Secretary to the Cabinet Office, my hon. Friend the Member for West Bromwich, East (Mr. Watson) on 15 January 2009, Official Report, columns 869-70W.

To ask the Prime Minister how many complaints about advertisements sponsored or funded by his Office were made to the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) in each year from 1997 to 2008; and how many of these were upheld by the ASA in each year. (246657)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to him by the Parliamentary Secretary to the Cabinet Office, my hon. Friend the Member for West Bromwich, East (Mr. Watson) on 14 January 2009, Official Report, column 744W.

House of Commons Commission

Internet

To ask the hon. Member for North Devon, representing the House of Commons Commission on what date the decision was taken to upload videos of parts of the tour of Parliament to a YouTube channel; on what date the decision was taken to restrict access to that channel to members of a private YouTube group; and if he will make a statement. (249395)

Videos of parts of the parliamentary tour were posted on the parliamentary YouTube channel:

http://uk.youtube.com/ukparliament

linked from the main UK Parliament website:

http://www.parliament.uk

on 6 January as part of our ongoing development of the website. They were removed from it on 9 January when some issues with their content were identified.

The YouTube videos were published to the UK Parliament channel as part of specific groups of videos focused on the tours. The functionality of YouTube does not allow these groups to be deleted. To remove them from public view required making the groups private, thereby restricting access.

It is not our policy to restrict access in any way to our content, including YouTube, and this was done in order to prevent inaccurate content from being in the public domain.

They will be reinstated once they meet the required quality standards. As a result of this incident we have reviewed quality control procedures and built in additional checks before material is signed off for release on the website.

Scotland

Charities

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland to which (a) charities and (b) voluntary organisations his Department has provided funding in the last five years; and how much funding was provided to each. (247372)

The Scotland Office, along with the Wales Office and Ministry of Justice, has funded a series of reports on devolution from University College, London. The Scotland Office agreed to contribute £25,000 over three years towards this work.

Departmental Buildings

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how much has been spent on (a) maintaining, (b) decorating and (c) otherwise improving departmental buildings in the last five years; how much has been spent on wallpaper since 2001; and what plans there are for further spending on departmental decoration. (248066)

Under the terms of its building leases the Scotland Office is required to maintain its buildings to an acceptable standard of decoration and repair. Over the period of the last five years, the Office has shared its accommodation with a number of other Government Departments. The following figures show the gross total for repairs and maintenance of Scotland Office buildings, but does not include the contribution by the Departments towards their share of the costs.

The Office does not separately record the amount spent on wallpaper. The plans for further decoration have not yet been finalised, however any costs will be in line with the terms of the building leases.

Cost (£)

2003-04

179,853

2004-05

374,129

2005-06

331,803

2006-07

355,071

2007-08

11,011,254

1In 2007-08 this included roof and exterior repairs to Dover House in London.

Departmental Catering

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what (a) directly-operated and (b) franchised catering outlets his Department provides for staff. (249082)

Departmental Data Protection

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many members of staff in his Department have been (a) investigated, (b) suspended and (c) dismissed for losing (i) memory sticks, (ii) laptop computers, (iii) desktop computers and (iv) mobile telephones belonging to his Department in each year since 1997. (248256)

The Scotland office was established on 1 July 1999. Since this date no members of staff have been investigated, suspended or dismissed for losing memory sticks, laptop computers, desktop computers or mobile phones belonging to the office.

Departmental Internet

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how much his Department has spent on broadband internet in each of the last five years. (245496)

Departmental Coaching: Languages

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many (a) Ministers and (b) civil servants in his Department received coaching in a foreign language in the last 12 months; what expenditure his Department incurred in providing such coaching; and in what languages such coaching was provided. (248074)

No Ministers or civil servants received coaching in a foreign language in the last 12 months.

Departmental Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many members of staff were (a) employed by and (b) seconded to the Scotland Office in (i) Scotland and (ii) London in each quarter since 1999. (248510)

The Scotland Office was established on 1 July 1999. The office does not directly employ staff, all staff in the office are on secondment from other Government Departments, mainly the Scottish Executive and Ministry of Justice. Information on staff numbers is published in the office's annual report, copies of which are in the House Library. The office does not keep central records in a form that would allow staff numbers to be broken down by each quarter since 1999.

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what the responsibilities of each member of his media and communications team are; when each member of staff was recruited; and what the salary of each member of staff is. (248514)

The responsibilities of the Press Office at the Scotland Office are shared by two staff, recruited in September 2006 and March 2007. Both are on secondment from the Ministry of Justice.

The Press Office is responsible for a wide range of civil service communications functions.

To protect the privacy of individual staff, data relating to fewer than five people are not disclosed.

Departmental Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will make it his policy that temporary and permanent employees of his Department employed at the same grade receive the same hourly rate of pay. (248418)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer that I gave him on 17 December 2008, Official Report, columns 763-64W.

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how much has been spent by his Department on staff reward and recognition schemes in each of the last three years. (248705)

Staff in the Scotland Office are seconded from the Scottish Executive (SE) and the Ministry of Justice (MOJ) who each have bonus schemes in operation. Under the special bonus scheme of the SE and the reward and recognition scheme of the MOJ, the office may directly authorise bonus payments (or in the case of the MOJ scheme; small and instantaneous awards e.g. vouchers) for recognising special effort, achievement and commitment. The following table shows the number and cost of non-pensionable bonuses paid under these schemes:

Financial year

Total number of bonuses

Total cost of bonuses (£)

2005-06

8

3,750

2006-07

17

4,750

2007-08

6

2,150

Departmental Catering

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many bonuses were awarded to senior civil servants working at his Department and its agencies in (a) 2007 and (b) 2008; and how much was spent on such bonuses in each of those years. (249861)

Members of the senior civil service in the Scotland Office are seconded from the Scottish Executive and the Ministry of Justice, their bonuses are assessed under a framework set by the Cabinet Office. The office does not hold central information on such bonuses.

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland which (a) food and (b) drinks companies have supplied his Department in each of the last three years; and how much was paid to each of those suppliers in each of those years. (248792)

Departmental Surveys

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how much his Department's central media and communication unit spent on public surveys in each of the last three years. (247919)

The Scotland Office Press Office have not incurred any costs on public surveys in any of the last three years.

Departmental Temporary Employment

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland which companies were used by his Department for providing temporary staff in each of the last five years; and what the value of contracts with each such company was in each of those years. (245296)

The Scotland Office paid the following amounts to recruitment agencies for temporary staff in the last five years:

Number of staff

Total cost (£)

2003-04

Adecco

3

11,952.41

Pertemps

12

18,721.46

Select Appointments

1

22,961.65

2004-05

Select Appointments

1

7,098.31

2005-06

Select Appointments

10

458.62

2006-07

Kelly Services

2

7,500.12

2007-08

Pertemps

3

7,239.74

1 No staff were recruited in this year, however the cost of a late invoice from the previous financial year was incurred.

Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform

Bankruptcy

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform how many individuals were declared bankrupt in each year between 2000 and 2007. (247597)

Table 1 shows the number of bankruptcies in England and Wales between 2000 and 2007. This information is also available on the internet at:

http://www.insolvency.gov.uk/otherinformation/statistics/insolv.htm

Table 1: England and Wales

Number

2000

21,550

2001

23,477

2002

24,292

2003

28,021

2004

35,898

2005

47,291

2006

62,956

2007

64,480

Departmental Ministerial Policy Advisers

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform what expert advisers have been commissioned by his Department and its agencies since 1997; on what topic each was commissioned; and whether the advisers so appointed made a declaration of political activity in each case. (246658)

A list of expert advisers used by BERR since 1997 is not held centrally and any information on such advisers could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Since 2003, the Government have published, on an annual basis, the names and overall cost of special advisers and the number in each pay band. This is published in the form of a written ministerial statement by the Prime Minister before each summer recess.

I have approached the chief executives of the Insolvency Service and Companies House to respond to the hon. Member directly.

Letter from Gareth Jones, dated 16 January 2009:

I am responding on behalf of Companies House to your recently tabled Parliamentary Question to the Minister of State for Business Enterprise and Regulatory Reform.

Whilst we have engaged a number of consultants on various programmes and projects during this period, we have not engaged any third party ‘expert advice’ to help form organisational strategy or policies.

Letter from Stephen Speed, dated 16 January 2009:

The Minister of State, Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform has asked me to reply to your question (2008/448) what expert advisers have been commissioned by his Department and its agencies since 1997; on what topic each was commissioned; and whether the advisers so appointed made a declaration of political activity in each case.

A list of expert advisers used by The Insolvency Service since 1997 is not held centrally and any information on such advisers could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Departmental Public Expenditure

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform what the cost to his Department of provision of office facilities to (a) special advisers and (b) press officers (i) was in the last 12 months and (ii) has been since 1997-98. (244724)

BERR does not hold sufficiently detailed information to answer this question and to produce it would involve disproportionate cost.

Small Businesses: Billing

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform what his latest assessment is of the implementation of the Government’s commitment to pay suppliers within 10 days. (247881)

[holding answer 15 January 2009]: BERR is currently collecting data from other Government Departments and from its own delivery partners on performance in making payments to suppliers within 10 days of receiving a correctly rendered invoice. Although complete figures are not yet available, Government Departments and public bodies have embraced payment within 10 days and are working to implement this across their own organisation and to encourage suppliers to pass on these terms.

During November and December 2008, the first two months of recording the new target, BERR paid 93.1 per cent. and 96.9 per cent. of invoices within 10 working days respectively. Formal reporting by all Government Departments commenced at the start of January 2009 and will be reported to BERR on a quarterly basis.

Energy and Climate Change

Departmental Telephone Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what use (a) his Department and (b) service providers under contract to his Department make of (i) 0844 and 0845 telephone numbers and (ii) revenue-sharing telephone numbers for calls from members of the public; for which services such numbers are used; what prefixes are used for revenue-sharing numbers; how much revenue has accrued from revenue-sharing numbers in each of the last five years; what consideration his Department has given to introducing 03-prefixed telephone numbers for calls to all such services; and if he will make a statement. (247340)

Since its formation on 3 October 2008, the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) has made no use of 0844, 0845 or revenue-sharing telephone numbers for calls from members of the public. DECC already makes use of a 03-prefixed number, charged at the standard national rate, for general inquiries. The Department is not at present party to any contracts, as the Transfer of Function Order related to the creation of DECC has not yet come into force.

Electricity Generation

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how much electricity was generated from each primary source in the most recent year for which figures are available; and if he will make a statement. (248438)

The most recent year for which figures are available is 2007. The following table shows generation from the main sources in 2007. Provisional figures for 2008 will not be available until the end of March 2009.

Electricity generated (GWh)

Gas

164,473

Coal

136,685

Oil

4,693

Other Thermal1

13,030

Primary electricity

73,402

Of which:

Nuclear

63,028

Hydro, wind, wave and solar PV

10,374

Other fuels2

3,859

Total

396,142

1 Includes non-biodegradable wastes, coke oven gas, blast furnace gas, and waste products from chemical processes.

2 Hydro pumped storage.

Note:

Primary electricity is electricity obtained other than from fossil fuel sources e.g. nuclear, natural flow hydro and non-thermal renewables.

Source:

Digest of UK Energy Statistics 2008, Table 5.6, as revised at: http://stats.berr.gov.uk/energystats/dukes5_6.xls

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what percentage of electricity generated in the UK was produced by (a) renewables, (b) coal, (c) gas and (d) nuclear energy in 2008. (248540)

Energy statistics for the calendar year 2008 will not be available until the end of March 2009. These will be provisional until the publication of the Digest of United Kingdom Energy Statistics, 2009 at the end of July 2009. The latest available annual data are for 2007 and are as follows:

Percentage

Renewables

5.0

Coal

34.5

Gas

41.5

Nuclear

15.9

Other fuels1

3.1

Total

100.0

1 Includes non-biodegradable wastes, oil, coke oven gas, blast furnace gas, and pumped storage.

Source:

Digest of UK Energy Statistics 2008, Table 5.6 as revised at:

http://stats.berr.gov.uk/energystats/dukes5_6.xls

Fuel Poverty

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent estimate he has made of levels of fuel poverty in (a) Chorley, (b) Lancashire and (c) each county; and if he will make a statement. (245064)

The most recently available sub-regional split of fuel poverty relates to 2003, and shows that in Chorley there were 2,600 fuel poor households and around 31,000 fuel poor households in Lancashire. Clearly, rising prices will have increased those figures significantly.

Fuel poverty estimates are available for all counties can be seen in the following table:

County

Fuel poor households

Proportion of all households that are fuel poor (percentage)

Avon

24,800

6.0

Bedfordshire

13,100

5.8

Berkshire

16,800

5.3

Buckinghamshire

15,000

5.5

Cambridgeshire

17,300

6.0

Cheshire

25,100

6.2

Cleveland

15,000

6.7

Cornwall and Isles of Scilly

14,400

6.7

Cumbria

14,300

6.8

Derbyshire

26,200

6.5

Devon

29,200

6.4

Dorset

17,500

5.9

Durham

16,700

6.7

East Sussex

19,200

5.8

Essex

39,100

5.8

Gloucestershire

14,600

6.1

Greater London

162,200

5.4

Greater Manchester

68,200

6.6

Hampshire

38,700

5.8

Hereford and Worcester

5,000

6.7

Hertfordshire

22,200

5.3

Humberside

24,700

6.8

Isle of Wight

3,800

6.7

Kent

39,200

6.1

Lancashire

39,300

6.7

Leicestershire

23,500

6.4

Lincolnshire

18,300

6.7

Merseyside

40,500

7.1

Norfolk

22,200

6.5

North Yorkshire

19,900

6.3

Northamptonshire

16,000

6.2

Northumberland

8,500

6.5

Nottinghamshire

28,000

6.5

Oxfordshire

13,300

5.5

Shropshire

11,900

6.6

Somerset

13,300

6.3

South Yorkshire

34,900

6.6

Staffordshire

27,800

6.4

Suffolk

18,000

6.4

Surrey

22,900

5.3

Tyne and Wear

30,300

6.5

Warwickshire

12,700

6.0

West Midlands

68,100

6.6

West Sussex

17,500

5.5

West Yorkshire

56,500

6.6

Wiltshire

15,000

6.0

Worcestershire

13,500

6.1

Housing: Insulation

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the (a) energy savings and (b) emissions reductions which would arise if (i) 60 per cent., (ii) 80 per cent. and (iii) 100 per cent. of UK households were thermally insulated. (242464)

As of April 2008, the remaining potential for insulation measures in Great Britain totalled 7.75 million wall cavities; 6.33 million lofts (where less than 100 mm of insulation is already present); and 6.3 million homes in need of solid wall insulation (excluding homes in conservation areas).

We project that, if all remaining measures were installed (with solid-wall insulation achieving a ‘U’ value of 0.45 W/m2K), this would save 20.6 million tonnes of carbon dioxide (MtCO2) per year. In terms of energy savings (comprising gas, electricity and oil), this would represent 230.89 TWh per year.

The savings delivered from treating 80 per cent. and 60 per cent. of homes would depend on the combination of measures installed. The following table therefore provides the figures for savings from insulating cavities, lofts and solid walls separately for each of these percentage scenarios.

Cavities

Lofts from < 100 mm

Solid wall insulation

Remaining potential in GB, April 2008 (Million)

7.75

6.33

16.30

Potential carbon savings if 100 per cent. filled (MtCO2/year)

4.9

1.5

14.2

Potential carbon savings if 80 per cent. filled (MtCO2/year)

3.9

1.2

11.4

Potential carbon savings if 60 per cent. filled (MtCO2/year)

2.9

0.9

8.5

Potential gas savings if 100 per cent. filled (TWh/year)

20.02

5.99

57.53

Potential gas savings if 80 per cent. filled (TWh/year)

16.0

4.8

46.0

Potential gas savings if 60 per cent. filled (TWh/year)

12.0

3.6

34.5

Potential electricity savings if 100 per cent. filled (TWh/year)

1.41

0.41

4.36

Potential electricity savings if 80 per cent. filled (TWh/year)

1.1

0.3

3.5

Potential electricity savings if 60 per cent. filled (TWh/year)

0.8

0.2

2.6

Potential oil savings if 100 per cent. filled (TWh/year)

1.58

0.47

4.52

Potential oil savings if 80 per cent. filled (TWh/year)

1.3

0.4

3.6

Potential oil savings if 60 per cent. filled (TWh/year)

0.9

0.3

2.7

1 Excludes houses in conservation areas.

Hydroelectric Power

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what research his Department has commissioned on the use of small-scale hydro-power generation; and what his most recent assessment is of its potential contribution to power generation by 2020. (248770)

The 2008 "Growth Potential for Microgeneration in England, Wales and Scotland" report completed by Element Energy was part funded by the Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (BERR) and included research as to the number of micro-hydro installations currently in operation. Their follow up report, "Numbers of microgeneration units installed in England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland", looked in more detail at the number of installations across the UK and estimated that there were 73 micro hydro installations in the UK generating over 4GWh per annum. Both reports are available from the BERR website at:

http://www.berr.gov.uk/energy/microgenerationresearch.

In Scotland a study has been undertaken by the Forum for Renewable Energy in Scotland (FREDS), looking at the potential for hydropower in Scotland. This study shows this potential to be in the region of 657MW. The FREDS report can be found on the Scottish Executive website at:

http://www.Scotland.gov.uk/Resource/Doc/917/0064958.pdf

This Department, along with the Welsh Assembly Government and in partnership with the British Hydropower Association are currently undertaking a study into the potential for micro and small scale deployment hydropower in England and Wales. This is due to be published later this year.

Natural Gas

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what alternative gas supplies to those previously obtained from Russia are being considered by the Government. (248374)

The UK imports less than 2 per cent. of its gas from Russia. UK gas demand is met from a diverse range of sources including indigenous UK continental shelf production, imports from Norway and from continental Europe including from the Netherlands and LNG imports. In addition, the UK has gas storage. The market can respond to changes in the availability of imports from particular sources, including gas sourced from Russia, to ensure that overall demand is met.

Nuclear Power: France

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what discussions have taken place with the government of France on UK-French co-operation on nuclear power following the President of France’s visit to the UK in 2008. (248542)

Discussions on nuclear co-operation have continued to take place since the President’s visit to the UK: a meeting will take place between officials across a range of issues on 3 February 2009; the exchange programme between the safety regulators continues; and the safety regulators have been in regular contact with relation to Generic Design Assessment.

Nuclear Power: Insurance

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change pursuant to the answer of 12 January, Official Report, column 124W, on nuclear power: insurance, for what reasons the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority has located its wholly-owned subsidiary, Rutherford Indemnity Ltd, in Guernsey. (249359)

The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) did not make a decision to locate Rutherford Indemnity Ltd. in Guernsey. It was located there when it was owned by BNFL before it was transferred to the NDA, when the NDA became the owners of the plant and facilities of BNFL with effect from 1 April 2005.

Sellafield: Management

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of management at the Sellafield nuclear facility before the transfer of responsibility for the site to Nuclear Management Partners. (247140)

The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority is responsible for the management of sites in its ownership.

The new Parent Body Organisation for Sellafield Ltd., Nuclear Management Partners Ltd., was awarded the contract after a competitive procurement process.

The outgoing Parent Body Organisation, BNFL, did not tender for the contract. However, the effectiveness of the previous management arrangements, including cost and efficiency, was used by the NDA as a benchmark to assess value for money in the tenders received during the competition.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what the value is of contracts relating to the handover of responsibility for the Sellafield site to a new private body organisation. (247141)

Under the terms of the Parent Body Agreement signed with the NDA, Nuclear Management Partners (NMP) and Sellafield Ltd., NMP was appointed as the Parent Body Organisation and owner of the shareholding in Sellafield Ltd. on 24 November 2008. The Parent Body Agreement, which has no direct monetary value, is for an initial term of five years. The agreement contains extension options for two further five-year terms and one two-year term, totalling a potential 17 years, which the NDA is entitled to exercise in any order. During this contract period, NMP are entitled to receive dividends based on the fee earned by the Site Licence Company (SLC), Sellafield Ltd. This fee is dependent on the quality and effectiveness of the SLC's performance. The fee is currently anticipated to be worth around £50 million a year.

Severn Barrage: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the costs to the public purse of building the Severn Barrage in the event of all funding being provided from that source. (248168)

The Severn tidal power feasibility study has produced cost estimates of a number of different tidal power projects in the Severn Estuary, and considered how these could be funded and delivered. We expect this work to be published shortly as part of a three-month public consultation.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Environment Protection: Day Care

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what environmental protection legislation governs daycare centres which offer educational training for people with learning disabilities; and if he will make a statement. (246321)

The types of centres described are subject to the same environmental protection legislation that applies to businesses generally. The activities carried out by a business will determine which legislation applies in particular to the business and its activities.

Examples of legislation which could particularly affect these types of centres are the waste management legislation set out in Part 2 of the Environmental Protection Act and the Environmental Permitting Regulations 2007. A further example is the statutory nuisance legislation set out in Part 3 of the Environmental Protection Act which addresses any activities prejudicial to health or a nuisance: for example, emissions of smoke, fumes, light and noise. A full list of the environmental protection legislation that applies to businesses can be found on the Environment Agency's NetRegs website:

www.netregs.gov.uk

Flood Control

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether he plans to introduce an independently verified kitemark for the flood resilience of properties. (247488)

We have no plans to set up an alternative Quality Mark scheme to that run by the British Standards Institute. In principle, we have no objection to the development of alternative Quality Marks, supported by appropriate independent verification, provided that they deliver good quality products appropriate to the intended use and are easily understood by the public.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what representations he has received on his Draft River Basin Management Plans consultation. (247490)

The consultation on draft River Basin Management Plans is being conducted by the Environment Agency which is the Competent Authority and has responsibility for producing the plans under the Water Framework Directive regulations. The consultation which started on 22 December 2008 will close on 22 June 2009.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of the financial impact on each (a) individual water company, (b) farmer and landowner, (c) local authority, (d) highway authority and (e) other interested party affected by the proposals in the Draft River Basin Management Plans consultation if brought into effect; and if he will make a statement. (247491)

An updated national impact assessment for the water framework directive was published in February 2008 and is available at:

www.defra.gov.uk/corporate/consult/river-basin/IA-river-basin-v2.pdf.

Each of the draft River Basin Management Plans is accompanied by a draft impact assessment which includes an analysis which estimates the likely impact of different options on different sectors. All the major sectors are included that are expected to be impacted by the water framework directive measures, such as the water sector and agriculture and land management. It also includes an assessment of the impact on small and medium sized businesses within each River Basin District.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what economic impact assessment he has made of each individual river management system set out in the Draft River Basin Management Plans consultation if brought into effect; and if he will make a statement. (247492)

Each of the draft River Basin Management Plans impact assessments includes a sector analysis which estimates the likely impact of different options on different groups. An analysis by individual river management system has not been undertaken but could be achieved by aggregating measures for each water body in each river catchment. It is not possible to undertake this work at this level of detail at present as many water bodies still require further work to determine the reasons for not achieving good status.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent discussions he has had with the Environment Agency on flood protection policy. (248590)

DEFRA officials and I work closely with the Environment Agency and meet regularly to discuss a range of issues, including flood protection policy. Most recently, I met Paul Leinster (chief executive) and Lord Smith (chairman) for a bilateral on 11 December.

Flood Control: Departmental Responsibilities

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs which Minister will be responsible for joint action between the Environment Agency and the Meteorological Office on flood warning and prediction matters; and if he will make a statement. (248522)

The Flood Forecasting Centre (FFC), announced by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State on 17 December 2008, will have no impact on existing ministerial responsibilities. The FFC is staffed by experts from the Environment Agency and the Meteorological Office and will ensure better integration of weather and flood warnings and related information.

Forestry Commission: Scotland

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent discussions his Department has had with the Scottish Executive on (a) the (i) statutory duties and (ii) functions of the Forestry Commission and (b) proposals in the draft Climate Change (Scotland) Bill which relate to the Forestry Commission. (248741)

Officials in both DEFRA and the Forestry Commission England are in regular contact on a wide range of issues relating to forestry matters. This includes keeping in touch in general terms with relevant developments such as those relating to the Forestry Commission in Scotland. No detailed discussions have however taken place on the Scottish Climate Change Bill.

Manchester Is My Planet

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what funding his Department has provided to Manchester is my Planet in the last 24 months. (245892)

I have been asked to reply.

This information is not held centrally by the Department of Energy and Climate Change and so would incur disproportionate cost.

Marine and Fisheries Agency: Redundancy

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate he has made of potential (a) job losses, (b) voluntary redundancy payments and (c) involuntary redundancy payments at the Marine and Fisheries Agency following its replacement by the Marine Management Organisation. (247912)

An estimate of potential job losses, voluntary and involuntary redundancy payments at the MFA is not necessary, as staff not wishing to relocate with the MMO will be supported in finding employment elsewhere or reassigned within DEFRA.

Marine Management Organisation

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate he has made of the cost of setting up the planned Marine Management Organisation headquarters in each of the short-listed locations. (247909)

My officials have identified the potential funding required for a relocation, which will be taken into account when 2009-10 budget allocations within DEFRA are agreed.

The one-off funding required for the relocation will be very similar for any of the short listed locations—although ongoing costs such as accommodation will vary between locations.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs when he expects to announce the decision on the location of the headquarters for the Marine Management Organisation. (247910)

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what criteria will be used in deciding the location of the headquarters for the Marine Management Organisation; and what weight will be given to the desirability of a coastal location. (247911)

The business criteria, which all have the same maximum weighting, used in arriving at the short list for the location for the MMO HQ were as follows:

Coastal Location;

Location in terms of wider Government agendas on Relocation (Lyons and Economic Deprivation);

Proximity to Marine Stakeholder Clusters;

Proximity to Institutions with Marine Specialisms; and

Good transport links in particular to key stakeholders and Brussels

The Quality of Life criteria include education, cost of housing, unemployment, health care and crime and these also shared the same maximum weighting for this criteria.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what powers he proposes the Marine Management Organisation should have in relation to the authorisation of (a) coastal barrages and (b) other large capital projects which will affect the marine environment. (248185)

The Marine Management Organisation (MMO) will have the powers necessary to authorise most developments in the relevant marine areas, including coastal barrages, but with some exceptions, such as ‘nationally significant infrastructure projects’ as defined under part 3 of the Planning Act 2008.

Nationally significant infrastructure projects will be handled by the Infrastructure Planning Commission (IPC) established under the Planning Act. As the centre of marine expertise, the MMO will advise the IPC on proposals for nationally significant infrastructure projects and other developments which may affect the marine environment.

The MMO will have a particular role in advising the IPC on conditions that should be imposed to mitigate any adverse impact any development may have on the marine environment or other uses of the sea. The MMO will also be responsible for the subsequent monitoring and enforcement of developments approved by the IPC.

Nature Conservation: British Antarctic Territory

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what progress has been made under the Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels to help reduce the numbers of seabird deaths caused by longline fishing in the British Antarctic Territory; and whether the treaty covers other British Overseas Territories in the region. (247707)

The waters around the British Antarctic Territory are wholly within the area covered by the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). It is mandatory for all long-line fishing vessels to undertake measures to minimise seabird by-catch and to deploy an international scientific observer to monitor compliance with these requirements. In recent years, there has been no by-catch of seabirds in legal fisheries in these waters. There has thus been no need for the Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels (ACAP) to work to reduce by-catch in these waters and it has instead focused its efforts on by-catch reduction in other parts of the oceans. In those areas the Parties to the Agreement have begun to work with regional fisheries management organisations to advance the use of mitigation technologies as well as to improve by-catch monitoring and have agreed a strategy to take this forward.

The UK’s ratification of ACAP includes all UK Overseas Territories in the range of the albatrosses and petrels covered by ACAP, for example, the Falkland Islands, Tristan da Cuhna, South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands and British Antarctic Territory.

Pigs

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what support his Department is providing to pig farmers and the pig industry in 2008-09; and what account he took of minimum UK welfare standards in determining that support. (247560)

The Government have been very supportive of a number of initiatives taken by the pig industry itself to address the challenging issues that have faced it during 2008-09. For example we are continuing to develop the public food sector procurement initiative and are currently producing a model specification to enable public bodies to take account of animal welfare in their contracts for pork and bacon products.

The Department is also pursuing, with all parties including supermarkets, how best to provide better origin information so that consumers can make more informed choices, without imposing additional legislation on the industry.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of the long-term economic sustainability of the pig industry; and if he will make a statement. (247563)

Industry organisations such as the British Pig Executive (BPEX) and the National Pig Association (NPA) have kept me fully appraised of the current state and future economic prospects of the English pig industry. At their invitation I have “walked the pigmeat supply chain” to gain a fuller understanding of its economic and environmental sustainability.

DEFRA also routinely monitors the profitability of UK pig production on an annual basis through our ‘Agriculture in the UK’ publication.

The Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee published their report on ‘The English Pig Industry’ on 13 January. We welcome the report and we shall be making a full response to its recommendations in due course.

Plastic Bags

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what plans he has to enable local authorities to require local retailers to reduce significantly their use of single-use carrier bags; and whether he plans to enable local authorities to prohibit the use of single-use carrier bags in (a) their areas and (b) specific circumstances. (248338)

The Government have no such plans. It would be illegal under EU law to prohibit the use of bags, and the Government have no plans to do so or to empower local authorities to do so. A very significant reduction in the number of single-use carriers distributed by supermarkets is in prospect following the agreement reached between the Government and the British Retail Consortium in December, under which leading supermarkets have pledged to reduce bags by 50 per cent. by the spring.

Recycle Now Campaign

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the cost per compost bin of the sales promotion under the Recycle Now Campaign was in each of the last two years. (245823)

The Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) has run a home composting programme since 2004. During this period it has sold nearly two million home composting bins through partner local authorities. WRAP has also provided advice and support to those householders who have adopted home composting as an effective means of reducing their waste.

For the last two complete calendar years, the cost per compost bin spent on direct sales literature and local advertising was £3.13 in 2006, and £3.02 in 2007.

Rural Areas

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs by what means his Department advises other Government departments on rural proofing. (248187)

It is established Government policy that the needs and interests of rural people, businesses and communities should be appropriately reflected in all Departments' mainstream policies and delivery plans. Rural proofing is one of the main tools available to departments to achieve this. DEFRA works with other Government Departments to advise and encourage them to take account of rural interests in developing and implementing their policies, including meeting the requirement to address rural implications in published impact assessments.

DEFRA also sponsors the Commission for Rural Communities which publishes detailed rural proofing guidance, and works closely with Departments on the rural implications of their policies. DEFRA and the Commission for Rural Communities are currently working together to refresh and relaunch the support arrangements and materials available to national, regional and local government to improve rural proofing.

Rural Areas: Community Development

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what plans he has for further review of the effects of the policies set out in the Rural White Paper on rural communities. (248208)

The Rural White Paper 2000 set out a vision of a living, working, vibrant and protected countryside in which people had fair and equitable access to the jobs and services they require. That vision is underpinned by the Rural Strategy 2004, and continues to be reflected in the Government's mainstream policies as they affect rural areas. The Government established the Commission for Rural Communities in 2005 to monitor and advise on the impact of its policies on rural areas, and currently has no plans to carry out any separate review.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps have been taken by (a) his Department and (b) the Commission for Rural Communities to measure (i) community involvement and (ii) community activity in rural areas. (248210)

The Government are committed to supporting community involvement and activity in all areas, including rural ones, and is seeking to promote this through the initiatives announced in the Community Empowerment White Paper. DEFRA does not measure levels of community engagement, but the Department for Communities and Local Government has a range of mechanisms for this.

In addition, the Commission for Rural Communities has undertaken a number of activities in relation to community engagement, including a participation inquiry which looked at the role of local councillors as democratic champions acting on behalf of their communities.

Rural Community Buildings Network

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs when he plans to bring forward proposals to assist the rural community buildings network; and what funding is being made available to the networks. (248152)

DEFRA supported the formation of the Rural Community Buildings Network which was set up in July 2006 to improve communication on matters that affect rural community buildings, share information and best practice, and provide a unified voice to influence local and central government.

DEFRA does not fund this network, and has no plans to bring forward new proposals for it. However, DEFRA will continue to organise and host its regular meetings, and work with the group to promote the benefits of community buildings in rural areas.

Sustainable Development: Housing

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps he is taking to ensure developers and contractors in the housebuilding industry consider the whole-life costs in the production process of housing; and whether he plans to introduce producer responsibility requirements for (a) construction industry and (b) housebuilding industry products. (244110)

DEFRA has no plans to introduce new regulatory requirements with respect to whole-life costs in the production process of housing. However, the higher levels of the Code for Sustainable Homes contain standards that encourage developers voluntarily to use materials with lower environmental impacts over their lifecycle. DEFRA has also worked with BSI and the Carbon Trust to develop a method (the PAS 2050) for any business to assess the lifecycle carbon emissions of a product or service. This was published on 29 October 2008.

Fly-posting

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of legislation governing fly-posting. (247550)

DEFRA funds Keep Britain Tidy to undertake the annual Local Environmental Quality Survey of England which assesses a variety of local environmental quality indicators, including fly-posting. The survey shows that fly-posting levels over the last four years have been low and judged as “good”.

Since the introduction of the Anti-social Behaviour Act 2003, local authorities have had the power to issue fixed penalty notices (FPNs) for fly-posting offences. The number of FPNs issued has increased from 883 with a payment rate of 59 per cent. in 2005-06 to 1,133 with a payment rate of 78 per cent. in 2006-07.

Waste Disposal: Gloucestershire

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs when he expects Gloucestershire County Council to provide its full business case for its waste strategy. (248209)

Gloucestershire county council submitted their outline business case to DEFRA at the end of April 2008 and private finance initiative (PFI) credit support for their project was provisionally approved by the Under-Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, my hon. Friend the Member for Lewisham, Deptford (Joan Ruddock), in August 2008. The project was considered by the cross-departmental Project Review Group (PRG) at its meeting on 21 October 2008 and provisionally approved subject to certain conditions. DEFRA made an announcement on this PFI application on 12 November 2008.

It is standard practice for PFI projects to submit final business cases to the sponsor Department, before the appointment of preferred bidder. In this case, this is expected to be in late 2010.

Water Charges

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent representations he has had seeking an exemption for churches, charities and community groups from surface area water charges; and if he will make a statement. (247769)

The Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs has received a range of representations from various groups regarding surface water drainage charges. The Government are aware of the problem of affordability faced by some customers as a result of the switch to site area charging for surface water drainage and is looking at what can be done.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many hon. Members have written to (a) his Department and (b) Ofwat to complain about water companies charging schools, places of worship and community buildings based upon the surface water drainage use, compared to the previous system of flexible charges. (248149)

From 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2008, DEFRA received correspondence from approximately 60 Members of Parliament on behalf of either schools, places of worship or community buildings regarding changes to charging for surface water drainage.

For the same period, Ofwat received correspondence from 33 Members of Parliament on the subject.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what discussions has he has had with Ofwat on its decision to encourage water companies to charge schools, places of worship and community buildings according to site area. (248151)

The Secretary of State meets Ofwat regularly to discuss a range of issues. The Government are aware of the problem of affordability faced by some customers as a result of the switch to site area charging for surface water drainage and is looking at what can be done.

Olympics

Total Costs

4. To ask the Minister for the Olympics what recent estimate she has made of the total cost of staging the London 2012 Olympics. (248294)

The cost of staging the games will be met from LOCOG's £2 billion budget.

It is intended that this budget will be self-financed—with the exception of a contribution from public funds towards the staging the Paralympic games. For this there is a provision of £66 million in the £9.325 billion public sector funding package.

7. To ask the Minister for the Olympics what her most recent estimate is of the total cost of the London 2012 Olympics. (248297)

The estimate of public expenditure on the London 2012 games remains within the £9.325 billion package that I announced in March 2007.

I provided further details of the budget in my statement of December 2007; and my progress updates of January and July 2008. My next progress report will be in early February.

Economic Downturn

5. To ask the Minister for the Olympics what assessment she has made of the effect of the economic downturn on the budget for the London 2012 Olympics. (248295)

The recent economic climate has affected the financing of the Olympic Village and the International Broadcasting Centre/Main Press Centre (IBC/MPC) projects.

However the venues and infrastructure for the games—including the Olympic Village and the IBC/MPC—are still on track to be delivered within the £9.325 billion public sector funding package.

King George’s Fields Legacy

6. To ask the Minister for the Olympics what assessment she has made of the relevance of the King George's Fields legacy to the planning of the legacy for the London 2012 Olympics. (248296)

As part of the legacy of the 2012 games we are aiming to have two million more physically active people and to get more young people into sport.

Playing fields can play a vital role in enabling people to be more active and I will be working with other departments to see what role playing fields can have in delivering this legacy.

Ticketing Policy

8. To ask the Minister for the Olympics what ticketing policy has been developed for the London 2012 Olympics; and if she will make a statement. (248298)

The London Organising Committee (LOCOG) is responsible for developing its ticketing strategy for the London 2012 games.

I have held detailed discussions with the chairman and Director of Ticketing at LOCOG about the developing strategy, which will be published in 2010. Tickets will go on sale in 2011.

Olympic Games 2012: Digital Broadcasting

To ask the Minister for the Olympics what discussions she has had with (a) the London Organising Committee for the Olympic Games and (b) other partners on coverage of the London 2012 Olympics on digital radio. (247046)

The broadcasting rights to the Olympic games, which include digital radio rights, are managed by the IOC as part of their intellectual property rights. The UK broadcasting rights to the 2012 Olympic games were awarded to the BBC, as a member of the European Broadcasting Union. The broadcasting rights to the 2012 Paralympic games are yet to be awarded.

Olympic Games 2012: North East

To ask the Minister for the Olympics how many (a) schools and (b) students are making use of the pre-games training camps set up in the North East region in preparation for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic games. (248128)

The North East region has identified 20 Olympic and eight Paralympic venues to be used by the athletes of visiting National Olympic and Paralympic Committees preparing for London 2012. The full range of the sporting facilities and services they can offer are contained in the Pre Games Training Camp Guide produced by the London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games.

In the majority of cases the pre games training camps are existing facilities with established community use programmes and as a consequence they are available for school and student organisations to utilise.

Work and Pensions

Benefits

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) how many and what proportion of income support claims have taken more than the target processing time in each month of the last two years, broken down by benefit delivery centre; (242208)

(2) how many and what proportion of jobseeker's allowance claims have taken more than 12 days to process from when the application was first received in each month of the last two years, broken down by (a) benefit delivery centre and (b) number of days to process.

The administration of Jobcentre Plus is a matter for the chief executive of Jobcentre Plus. I have asked the acting chief executive, Mel Groves to provide the hon. Member with the information requested.

Letter from Mel Groves:

The Secretary of State has asked me to reply to your questions - "how many and what proportion of Income Support claims have taken more than the target processing time in each month of the last two years, broken down by Benefit Delivery Centre", and "how many and what proportion of Jobseekers Allowance claims have taken more than 12 days to process from when the application was first received in each month of the last two years, broken down by (a) Benefit Delivery Centre and (b) number of days to process". This is something which falls within the responsibilities delegated to me as Acting Chief Executive of Jobcentre Plus.

The target for Income Support (IS) Average Actual Clearance Time is 10 days. This is calculated from the date all the evidence requirements are met by the customer to the date a decision is made on their claim.

For Jobseekers Allowance (JSA) the Average Actual Clearance Time (AACT) target is 11.5 days. This was reduced from a 12 day target in 0708 to 11.5 days for 08-09. The AACT is calculated from the date of the initial contact made by the customer to the date a decision is made on the claim.

Our benefit processing systems calculate the AACT for both IS and JSA by taking each claim clearances time using the dates as described and calculates an average across the volume of claims processed. The Management Information system in support of these targets generates reports around percentages and volumes cleared within set time bands. While this provides the business with additional management information it is not in direct correlation with the AACT data as they are calculated in different ways.

For IS the time bands recorded are claims processed in 0-5 days, 0-13 days and all claims processed. The JSA time bands recorded are claims processed in 0-5 days, 0-10 days, 0-16 days, 0 -21 days and all claims processed.

The information for October 2006 to October 2008 broken down by Benefit Delivery Centre has been placed in the House Library. The data recorded is to two decimal places as this is how we receive the raw data, when we formally report our targets we round those figures up to one decimal place.

Departmental Air Travel

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to the answer to the hon. Member for Rochford and Southend, East of 6 October 2008, Official Report, column 58W, on departmental air travel, whether figures for 2007-08 have now been calculated. (242014)

The air travel figures for the Department for 2007-08, and which are due to be paid imminently to the ‘GCO2F Government Carbon Offsetting Fund’, are provided in the following table.

All departmental official travel is undertaken in accordance with civil service management code.

April 2007 to March 2008

KMs travelled

Miles travelled

tCO2e (CO2 emissions)

Offsetting cost1(£)

Domestic air travel

12,599,850.34

7,825,994

2169.95

21,504.17

Short-haul air travel

1,047,032.91

650,331

297.64

2,949.63

Long-haul air travel

1,397,087.16

867,756

321.62

3,187.26

Total

15,043,970.41

9,344,081.00

2789.21

27,641.06

1 To be paid by DWP to GCO2F.

Departmental ICT

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to page 36 of the Departmental Framework 2008, if he will place in the Library a copy of the future work programme for the Customer Information System. (240331)

To place the work programme for the Customer Information System in the Library would make public information that may jeopardise the security of the Customer Information System and the personal information it holds. Its disclosure would not be in the public interest. I refer the hon. Member to the answer of 17 December 2008, Official Report, column 826W, which sets out the Department's approach to data and information security.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what computer systems his Department uses to store (a) financial and (b) non-financial data, broken down by (i) version number, (ii) supplier, (iii) system name, (iv) underlying database and (v) operating system. (241313)

The Department has 149 major application systems currently supported by its existing hosting contract(s) as listed in the following table. They store and/or access a wide range of financial or non-financial data.

It is not in the public interest to provide the information requested for each system and I refer the hon. Member to the answer on 17 December 2008, Official Report, column 826W, which sets out the Department's approach to data and information security.

Software versions are governed by the Department's Enterprise Architecture which specifies that they should be no more than one version older than the current baseline version, so that systems are up to date and support is available.

Application (short name)

Application (long name/description)

ATAS

Audit Trail Analysis Service (amended from System)

ATS

Appeals Tracking System

BAS

Benefits Adviser Service

BAMS

Benefits Agency Medical Service

BCS

Business Controls System

BDBSH

Birkenhead Dis Ben Syst Healthcheck (A)

BEL

Benefit Enquiry Line

BIS

Business Information system

BOC

Better off Calculator

BCS

Business Controls System

CA (GB)

Carer's Allowance formally known as ICA

CA (NI)

Carer's Allowance (Northern Ireland)

CA Online

Carer's Allowance Online

CBS

Call Booking System

CFS

Contract and Funding System

ChIS

Child care Information System

CIB

Corporate Integration Backbone Services

CIS

Customer Information System

CMS

Customer Management System

CMS MIS

Customer Management System Management Information System

CMS NISSA

Customer management System Northern Ireland Social Security Agency

Comet

Comet

Complaints

Complaints Database

CPP

Common Payments Package

CRU

Compensation Recovery Unit

CRU NI

Compensation Recovery Unit NI

CRU On-line

Compensation Recovery Unit Online

CRU les

Compensation Recovery Unit Interactive e services

CSA Accounting

CSR Accounting (BMS/R)

CSR Accounting (BMS/R)

CSA DMS (GB)

CSA Debt Management System

CSCS

Child Support Computer System

CSCS Training

CSIMS

Customer Services Incident Management System

CSR (CS2)

CSR (Child Support 2)

DACS (NI)

Disability and Carers System (Northern Ireland)

DBS

Departmental Briefing System

DCDB FD

DCDB Fraud Database

DIS

Departmental Interface Server Replacement

DiSC

Disability Services Client System

DLA(NI)

Disabled Living Allowance Northern Ireland

DLACS/AACS

Disability Living Allowance /Attendance Allowance

DM

Debt Management (including DM Ml)

DMAS

Decision Making and Appeal System

DMS

Debt Management System

DRS

Document Repository System

ECFPOD

Electronic Claim Form Pensions Overseas Direct

EDON/DVI

Direct Vacancy Input

ELES

ESA LegaSuite Enquiry Service

Elise

Elise

Empower

eNIRS JC+

eNIRS JC+

ERM

Employer Relationship Management

ESA CAM

Employment Support Allowance Customer Account Management

ESA VME

Employment Support Allowance VME

ETD

Electronic Transfer of Data

FAMIS (PP)

FAMIS Payroll & Personnel

FAMIS ACC

FAMIS Accounting

FAMIS Ingres

FAMIS Ingres

FAO

Financial Accounting Operations

FAS

Financial Assistance Scheme

FRAIMS

Fraud Referral and Intervention Management System

FSD

Flexible Service Delivery

GMS

Generalised Matching Service

HBMS

Housing Benefits Matching System

HBSDC

Housing Benefit Subsidy Data Collection

HQ Library

HQ Library

leS Core

leS Core

IICS

Industrial Injuries Computer System

IJB

Internet Job Bank

INCAP

See PSCS/Incap

ISCS

Income Support Computer System

ISCS (NI)

Income Support Computer System Northern Ireland

ITG online

Integration Services Online (Provides new applications with online access to legacy applications which includes the following components: Integration Services Online for PFS, CMS, NTC, CSR and BMSR

ITG batch

Integration Services Batch (Provides new applications with batch access to legacy applications which includes the following components: Integration Services Batch for PFS, CMS, NTC, CSR, BMSR, WFI(P), RM, PXP, CRU, DLA, KFEM, LPS, LMS, NOL, OB, PCFE, GIREC, SIS, VA, DEBTMAN, FNCS, HBSDC, IPBA, IRDEG, NAFM).

IWB

In Work Benefit

JABS

Jobseeker Attendance Band System

JBA

Job Broking Access

Job Broking Access for Partners

Job Warehouse

Job Warehouse

JSAPS

Jobseeker's Allowance Payments System

Jobpoint KMS

Jobpoint Kiosk Management Service

JSMA

Jobcentre Search and Match app

LFR

Leeds File Registry

LMDW

Labour Market Data Warehouse

LMS

Labour Market System

LMSMI

Labour Market System Management Information

LO/DO/RO/HO/OA

Office Automation

LPS

Local Payment System

MD

Mesothelioma Database

MFSR (Opstrat Access)

Multi Function Servers providing access to Opstrat applications which includes the following component: MFSR DFP Web Logic Application

MFSR (Printer Access)

Multi Function Servers providing access to Opstrat printing.

MOP

Method of Payment Application—CCMS

MI Challenge Database

MI Challenge Database

MPS

Course booking system

MyDWP

MyDWP

NDDP

New Deal for Disabled People database—client management system AKA NDDP CMS

New Deal for Disabled People

Duplicate of NDDP

NDEMI

New Deal Management Information

NIRS1

National Insurance Recording Systems 1

NOL

Notification Online

NOL/DLA

Notification Online/Disabled Living Allowance

NTC

New Tax Credits

OAS

Overseas Awarding System

OLE

OLE and Trusted Channel

OVBII

Overseas Branch Industrial Injuries

PACS

Payment Accounting Computer System

PCC

Parliamentary Correspondence

PCFE

Pension Credit Front End

PDS2000

Pensions Direct System 2000

PDES

Pension Direct Enquiry Service

PENS

Penserver

PFS

PFS

PFS MIS

Pensions Forecasting System MIS

PIB

PTP Integration Backbone Application

PSCS (NI)

PSCS/Incap

Pensions Services and Incapacity Benefit Computer System

PSOD

Pension Sharing on Divorce

PTP

Pension Transformation Programme (excluding the PxP PTP component, but including the following components: PTP Siebel Application, eDocs, PTP Bank Wizard, PTP QAS Application)

PxP

Push and Pull

RATS

Reassessment Appeals Tracking System

Respond

Respond Pensions and ICE

RDAS

Referral and Data Analysis Service

RMS

Resource Management System

Rightfax

Rightfax

RKMS

Remote Kiosk Management System

RTPF

Real Time Pensions Forecasting

RPTC

Retirement Pension teleclaims for Northern Ireland

Self Serv Portal

Self Service Portal

SFAS

Social Fund Accounting System

SFCS

Social Fund Computer System

SFCS (NI)

SIDDB

Sustainability in DWP Database

SPVAFS

Service Personnel and Veterans Agency Futures Suite

Spyts

Special Payments (including CSA)

SSP

Small Systems Platform (Assaults and Accidents Database(AAD), Disability and Discrimination Database (DDB), Electronic Filing System (EFS), Official Correspondence Database (OCD), Under 18 Support Team (UEST)

STARS

Storage and Retrieval System

TeS

Tactical E-Services

TPJB

Third Party Job Bank

VME PROXY

VME PROXY

WFES

Winter Fuels Enquiry Service

WFPS

Winter Fuel Payment System

WFTC

Working Families Tax Credit/Disabled Person's Tax Credit

WFTC/DPTC

WFTC/DPTC (NI)

Workstep

Workstep

WPCS (WPKI)

WPCS (WPKI)

War Pensions Computer System

Employment and Support Allowance

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) what his Department’s estimate is of the number of people who will be in receipt of employment and support allowance (a) in total, (b) in the work-related activity group and (c) in the support group in each of the next five years; and if he will make a statement; (241197)

(2) what his Department’s estimate is of the number of people who will be on employment and support allowance (ESA), broken down by (a) income-based ESA and (b) contributory-based ESA in each of the next five years; and if he will make a statement.

We expect 10 per cent. of new employment and support allowance customers will flow into the support group, and 90 per cent. of new employment and support allowance customers will flow into the work-related activity group. However, we expect that at least 20 per cent. of customers in the longer term employment and support allowance caseload will be in the support group, because these people will be much less likely to leave the benefit than those in the work-related activity group.

Information on estimated caseloads up to the end of the Government’s spending plan period, to 2010-11, is in the following table.

Employment and support allowance: estimated benefit caseloads

Thousand

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

Employment and Support Allowance

100

290

510

Of which:

Income-based only

40

110

190

Contributory only

50

140

250

Both

10

40

70

Work Related Activity Group

90

240

410

Of which:

Income-based only

30

90

150

Contributory only

40

120

200

Both

10

30

60

Support Group

10

50

100

Of which:

Income-based only

0

20

40

Contributory only

10

20

50

Both

0

10

10

Notes:

1. Figures for 2008-09 relate to six months only; employment and support allowance was introduced on 27 October 2008.

2. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10,000. Components may not sum to totals due to rounding.

3. Figures are consistent with autumn/pre-Budget report 2008 benefit expenditure tables, to be published shortly on the DWP website. These will be accessible via the following link: http://www.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd4/expenditure.asp

Employment: Lone Parents

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the average income of a lone parent with a single child in receipt of income support was at the latest date for which information is available; and if he will make a statement. (244143)

The median net total weekly income for lone parents with a single child in receipt of Income Support is £210.

Notes:

1. The Family Resources Survey is a nationally representative sample of approximately 26,000 households.

2. Data for 2006-07 was collected between April 2006 and March 2007.

3. The figures are based on a sample of households which have been adjusted for non-response using multi-purpose grossing factors which align the Family Resources Survey to Government Office Region populations by age and sex. Estimates are subject to sampling error and remaining non-response error.

4. Weekly income is based on self-assessment and therefore may be subject to misreporting.

Source:

Family Resources Survey, 2006-07

Employment: Yorkshire and the Humber

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what steps he plans to take to maintain levels of employment in Yorkshire and Humberside. (242683)

The administration of Jobcentre Plus is a matter for the acting chief executive of Jobcentre Plus, Mel Groves. I have asked him to provide my hon. Friend with the information requested.

Letter from Ruth Owen:

The Secretary of State has asked Mel Groves to reply to your question concerning what steps he plans to take to maintain the level of employment in Yorkshire and Humberside. This is something that falls within the responsibilities delegated to Mr Groves as Acting Chief Executive of Jobcentre Plus. Mr Groves is currently on annual leave. I am replying on his behalf as Chief Operating Officer.

Jobcentre Plus has a key role in helping both individuals and employers in the current economic situation. Our priority is to ensure people receive the benefits they are entitled to and the support and training necessary to get back to work as soon as possible and help employers fill their vacancies with suitably qualified people.

As you know we have seen a rise in the number of people claiming Jobseeker’s Allowance across the region. Jobcentre Plus is very well placed to help people who have recently lost their jobs to move back into work as soon as possible. While around 28,000 new customers claimed Jobseeker's Allowance in November across the region, over 34,000 new vacancies were notified to us and 21,700 customers moved off the register.

We continue to actively engage with employers across the region to help them meet their local recruitment needs. We have had a magnificent response through our Local Employment Partnerships initiative with 3,120 employers now signed up to offering work opportunities for our most disadvantaged customers and newly redundant people, resulting in 6,417 jobs. We are also working closely with local employers and partners, for example, in the call centre, care and retail sectors to offer bespoke pre employment training to fill their significantly increased vacancies. We also offer a wide range of support for people facing redundancy. This includes helping support employers to retain their staff through retraining; and encouraging staff to gain vocational qualifications to prepare for the economic recovery rather than having to make staff redundant. We also support employers where they need to go into short time or temporary stop working and we are tailoring our advice to meet their needs.

A strengthened Rapid Response Service was launched on 12 November 2008, doubling national funding from £3 million to £6 million. Through the Rapid Response Service, Jobcentre Plus has access to funds to enable those individuals made redundant to receive the necessary help to get them back into work. Such measures could include:

Skills Transfer Analysis (to help identify an individual’s transferable skills and training needs relevant to the local labour market);

Job-Focussed Training (to assist individuals with appropriate training and certification linked to employment or self-employment linked to the needs of the local labour market).

We will also visit employees facing redundancy at their place of work to explain the support and benefits available to them. Employees can also access the vacancies we hold nationally by visiting our website at www.jobcentreplus.gov.uk or by telephoning us on 0845 6060 234 and by using the jobpoints at their local Jobcentre. Additional information is also available through our ‘Job Kit’ which provides guidance and support for customers on benefits and how to look for a job and our ‘Find your way’ leaflet for employers.

The Government announced on 12 January 2009 that it is enhancing the support available to customers who are unemployed for six months from April 2009. This includes further support from Jobcentre Plus advisers, plus options to take up subsidised employment, self employment, training or voluntary work. This will all be available in the Yorkshire and Humber Region, delivered through Jobcentre Plus and partners.

Jobcentre Plus is also represented on the Regional Economic Delivery Group, chaired by the Yorkshire and Humber Regional Minister Rosie Winterton. The group is working to secure and coordinate public sector infrastructure investment and steer the regional response to the economic climate. Reporting to this group is the Yorkshire and Humber Financial Services Task force led by Yorkshire Forward (the Regional Development Agency). This group is co-ordinating the region’s response to potential job losses and producing a long term strategy to secure the future of high skilled employment in the sector. This working group is currently developing an action plan to support Bradford and Bingley Building Society. The group will be widening its remit to cover other industrial sectors.

In addition to this support we recently decided that our customers in Yorkshire and the Humber can have access to CV writing, Jobsearch advice and support through our Programme Centres immediately rather than waiting 6 months.

I have asked Ian Hunter, District Manager West Yorkshire, to meet with you to discuss the help Jobcentre Plus are providing to maintain the level of employment across the region.

Housing Benefit

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the average (a) daily, (b) weekly and (c) monthly level of housing benefit claimed per claimant was (i) in total and (ii) in each of the smallest geographical areas for which figures are available, in each of the last five years; and if he will make a statement. (246594)

Jobcentres

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to the Answer of 26 November 2008, Official Report, columns 1993-94W, on jobcentres, what estimate he has made of the number of people using jobcentres in each year since 2002. (241038)

Jobseeker’s Allowance

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many and what proportion of jobseeker's allowance claimants who had better off in-work calculations carried out by Jobcentre Plus in the last year were found to be (a) worse off, (b) between £0 and £9 a week better off, (c) between £10 and £19 a week better off, (d) between £20 and £29 a week better off, (e) between £30 and £49 a week better off, (f) between £50 and £74 a week better off, (g) between £75 and £99 a week better off and (h) more than £100 a week better off; and if he will make a statement. (242187)

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) what the average time between application and payment of (a) jobseeker’s allowance and (b) income support was in each month of the last two years; (242207)

(2) what the average time taken to complete the processing of (a) jobseeker’s allowance and (b) income support claims from when the initial application was received in each month of the last two years, broken down by benefit delivery centre.

The administration of Jobcentre Plus is a matter for the chief executive of Jobcentre Plus. I have asked the acting chief executive, Mel Groves to provide the hon. Member with the information requested.

Letter from Mel Groves:

The Secretary of State has asked me to reply to your questions:

“what the average time between application and payment of (a) jobseeker’s allowance and (b) income support was in each month of the last two years”

“what the average time taken to complete the processing of (a) jobseeker’s allowance and (b) income support claims from when the initial application was received in each month of the last two years, broken down by benefit delivery centre”

This is something which falls within the responsibilities delegated to me as Acting Chief Executive of Jobcentre Plus.

The target for Jobseekers Allowance (JSA) Average Actual Clearance Time (AACT) is 11.5 days. This is calculated from the date of initial contact made by the customer to the date a decision is made on their claim.

The target for Income Support (IS) AACT is 10 days. This is calculated from the date all the evidence requirements are met by the customer to the date a decision is made on their claim.

In other words only JSA clearance times are calculated from the date of initial application date.

Please see attached at annex 1 data that displays the AACT for JSA and IS for each month in the last two years. The data recorded is sometimes to two decimal places as that is how we receive the raw data, when we formally report our targets we round those figures to one decimal place.

Annex 1: JSA and IS AACT for the periods November 2006-October 2007 and November 2007-October 2008

2006

2007

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

JSA AACT

14.03

13.2

13.1

13.4

12.85

12.62

12.49

11.04

11.25

11.47

10.61

10.22

IS AACT

11.35

10.24

9.7

8.93

8.79

9.34

9.84

9.54

9.37

9.62

9.61

9.43

20072008

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

JSA AACT

9.42

9.89

9.79

9.75

9.43

9.94

9.65

9.9

10.19

10.43

10.02

9.94

IS AACT

9.19

9.52

8.93

7.92

8.09

8.4

8.15

8.08

8.14

8.15

8.46

8.65

Annex 2: JSA by BDC for 2006-07

2006

2007

Business delivery centre

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Aberdeen BDC

8.05

7.78

8.86

8.24

7.84

9.66

9.32

8.36

9.71

8 84

8.81

8.61

Barnsley BDC

14.64

12.4

13.02

13.77

15.48

15.61

17.11

1225

12.05

11.02

10.62

9.12

Basildon BDC

20.02

17.58

16.99

16.69

14.88

15.18

13.27

11.33

11.31

12.24

11.74

11.72

Bathgate BDC

11.21

9.96

9.91

11.19

11.63

12.33

14.97

13.71

14.78

14.41

11.03

11.18

Belfast BDC

12.41

12.14

12.75

12.94

12.79

13.47

13.1

12.58

12.87

12.89

11.36

11.09

Birkenhead BDC

14.1

14.11

13.74

12.88

11.42

10.7

10.7

10.18

10.92

11.27

11.04

10.59

Bolton BDC

11.97

11.12

12.35

14.76

15.8

12.17

11.3

10.14

9.32

10.19

10.43

8.61

Bradford BDC

15.38

15.16

16.11

13.86

15.24

15.34

13.78

10.54

10.82

9.61

10.79

11

Bristol BDC

16.03

17.23

15.6

15.14

15.23

15.48

16.37

15.13

12.74

12.27

11.3

9.56

Burnley BDC

10.94

11.8

13.56

14.05

12.31

12.32

11.44

9.18

11.12

13.95

13.74

12.4

Bury St. Edmonds BDC

16.11

16.76

18.07

18.06

14.58

13.99

13.48

11.43

12.48

11.62

13.13

11.19

Caerphilly BDC

10.34

11.41

10.72

11.19

10.66

11.82

11.48

9.31

8.9

10.34

9.22

7.4

Cannock BDC

14.92

13.58

14.2

12.38

12.56

11.35

13.46

12.53

13.8

16.02

13.01

8.86

Canterbury BDC

13.91

9.46

9.69

11.98

13.45

13.63

13.63

11.26

13.37

13.71

10.73

10.27

Carlisle BDC

11.1

10.46

11.12

11.55

10.03

9.5

8.66

9

8.83

8.23

8.2

8.15

Chester BDC

14

13.25

15.71

16.32

14.64

13.48

16.45

13.08

9.66

7.65

7.36

6.68

Chesterfield BDC

13.18

13.3

12.39

13.11

12.47

11.06

10.97

11.31

11.52

11.29

10.76

11.01

Chippenham BDC

11.04

10.85

10.01

9.63

8.48

8.56

9

9.03

8.41

8.32

7.75

7 88

Chorlton BDC

13.61

13.29

13.78

15.32

14.04

12.37

12.36

12.02

11.74

12.17

11.57

10.17

Clyde and Fife BDC

10.17

11.86

12.29

14.3

13.88

15.21

15.83

13.29

15.81

13.26

11.59

11.29

Clydebank BDC

11.05

11.95

11.92

12.08

10.18

10.77

11.81

10.87

12.34

13.15

12.33

10.93

Coatbridge BDC

14.48

13.54

11.25

12.3

13.02

10.15

10.46

10.47

12.14

11.18

11.34

9.04

Cosham BDC

15.66

14.27

13.67

13.62

12.79

12.75

12.28

12.42

12.08

12.44

12.68

15.33

Derby BDC

13.75

14.69

17.18

18.7

17.42

16.39

14.51

13.58

13.43

12.74

11.15

9.54

Doncaster BDC

12.37

10.88

9.8

10.56

10.04

11.19

10.47

9.29

8.1

8.55

8.55

8.38

Exeter BDC

14.06

15.55

18.01

16.93

12.68

12.52

13.18

11 94

9.79

7.91

9.01

10.29

Glasgow BDC (London)

15.89

16.51

15.59

14.89

14.95

11.94

10.93

9.97

9.89

9.28

9

8.33

Gloucester BDC

15.75

16.54

17.44

14.01

14.79

14.57

11.67

8.95

9.57

9.71

10.31

11.74

Greenock BDC

7.68

8.26

9.07

10.82

7.93

8.06

8.59

8.66

11.16

10.73

9.63

8.81

Hackney BDC

9.58

7.94

8.47

8.88

8.72

9.43

9.33

8.74

10.05

10.47

9.69

9.32

Halifax BDC

14.07

13.5

13.85

15.71

18.13

16.91

17.72

14.6

11.35

10.9

8.7

8.28

Handsworth BDC

21.75

18.85

15.8

12.82

12.81

13.35

12.6

11.64

107

13.73

10.87

11.26

Hanley BDC

20.33

17.22

17.25

17.54

17.18

15.33

15.69

13.58

13.09

13.86

13.13

11

Hastings BDC

15.02

14.12

15.89

16.57

17.29

18.86

17.54

14

11.78

11.67

11.79

15.28

Hull BDC

14.32

13.7

12.53

14.49

15.56

15.85

11.97

9.44

9.16

9.77

8.73

9.51

Huyton BDC

10.69

10.74

9.84

10.35

8.98

9.55

9.11

8.48

9.64

9.66

8.51

8.18

Hyde BDC

11.77

11.13

10.4

10.34

9.26

9.42

10.18

9.07

9.8

11.53

11.23

10.33

Ilford BDC

14

11.99

11.32

11.27

10.9

11.03

10.97

10.19

9.57

11.42

11.43

10.92

Kilmarnock BDC

12.75

10.73

10.77

12.5

14.95

12.29

13.44

11.53

10.94

11

10.92

11.17

Leeds BDC

10.33

10.49

11.59

12.14

11.59

12.34

11.58

11.29

12.55

1377

11.63

12.02

Leicester BDC

16.81

15.03

14.81

17.07

17.15

14.61

12.22

10.92

10.17

10.5

9.56

9.45

Lincoln BDC

14.23

14.17

14.1

16.24

15.59

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Llanelli BDC

10.56

9.13

904

8.79

7.91

9.34

8.48

8.07

8.26

8.31

7.57

7.61

Makerfield BDC

16.27

12.31

10.72

10.94

11.26

9.88

10.17

9.24

9.78

9.87

10.25

10.88

Mansfield BDC

11.33

10.47

12.77

13.94

14.7

16.02

12.95

11.89

12.8

13.48

12.29

11.47

Merthyr Tydfil BDC

9.51

8.99

8.95

9.5

7.99

8.45

8.02

7.47

9.36

10.41

10.2

9.43

Newcastle BDC

12.33

12.28

12.73

13.58

12.46

10.32

10.23

9

8.49

8.96

8.57

8.9

Newport BDC

10.32

8.97

9.98

10.63

9.48

9.89

10.16

9.68

9.36

10 31

10.06

9.4

Norwich BDC

22.93

19.16

18.48

18.29

17.04

16.88

16.13

11.68

13.37

13.85

12.13

12.29

Nottingham BDC

18.18

16.09

17.77

17.22

16.93

14.94

15.69

15.6

16.83

15.27

11.86

10.42

Oldham BDC

14.7

14.24

10.77

9.56

9.05

9.31

10.18

8.8

9.28

9.56

9.65

7.76

Peterborough BDC

17.39

15.46

13.87

14.85

14.9

14.75

11.82

10.99

10.74

10.2

10.52

9.3

Plymouth BDC

10.57

9.42

8.81

10.12

9.68

10.28

10.23

11.52

10.09

10.16

9.82

10.22

Preston BDC

10.19

10.93

10.88

11.37

10.39

9.45

10.75

8.93

8.89

9.08

9.34

10.58

Ramsgate BDC

16.6

17.12

16.24

16.21

15.73

14.66

14.7

12.99

12.28

10.72

11.45

9.22

Ravenhurst BDC

18.5

19.18

19.96

17.53

14.37

14.5

14.35

15.3

17.14

16.62

13.73

14.49

Sheffield BDC

13.33

12.63

12.76

12.99

11.88

11.85

11.36

10.17

12.07

11 58

11.65

10.9

St. Austell BDC

14.44

13.49

14.33

13.91

14.59

13.75

15.03

14.01

13.66

12.69

11.56

10.48

St. Helens BDC

10.44

10.01

10.35

11.2

9.2

10.79

12.27

12.01

10.66

9.9

9.73

9.84

Stockton BDC

15.64

14.54

13.03

12.29

11.28

11.04

11.71

10.32

10.33

102

9.24

9.79

Stratford BDC

11.63

10.72

10.37

9.9

9.35

9.54

9.44

9.29

10.96

10.28

10.15

10.13

Sunderland BDC

15.2

14.49

14.7

12.89

11.69

14.35

15.02

9.47

9.11

10.14

9.74

9.56

Totton BDC

14.79

13.87

14.59

13.62

13.95

18.74

18.55

14.09

13.77

13.77

12.4

10.81

Walsall BDC

17.93

15.82

14.34

15.84

11.31

10.77

13.55

12.36

12.81

15.85

12.54

11.39

Watford BDC

19.6

18.66

17.39

19.97

20.25

21.77

16.52

11.8

12.19

11.57

11.13

10.81

Wellingborough BDC

10.66

9.46

10.17

10.05

9.55

9.02

9.59

8.12

7.71

8.37

8.23

7.81

Wolverhampton BDC

14.65

13.39

13.16

11.77

10.07

10.67

10.83

11.15

11.02

11.99

10.63

11.5

Worcester BDC

13.69

11.74

12.41

14.48

13.87

12.76

11.96

12.22

13.42

14.14

12.49

11.05

Worthing BDC

13.27

11.62

13.16

13.43

12.93

12.02

12.25

10.43

9.58

9.6

8.71

8.29

Wrexham BDC

12.94

11.8

10.39

94

8.71

9.09

9.09

8.71

8.51

9.13

8.52

8.19

York BDC

8.84

10.06

11.17

12.69

11.76

12.11

11.44

9.17

9.6

10.11

10.47

9.94

Annex 3: JSA by BDC for 2007-08

2007

2008

Benefit delivery centre

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Aberdeen BDC

9.12

10.71

8.83

8.44

7.67

7.65

8.19

9

8.83

7.27

7.51

8.56

Barnsley BDC

9.03

10.03

9.96

8.96

8.78

10.72

10.05

9.94

9.35

9.99

10.02

9.88

Basildon BDC

10.61

10.1

9.68

9.57

8.91

10.73

10.21

10.12

10.85

10.86

8.79

9.06

Bathgate BDC

9

7.99

7.84

8.56

7.62

7.45

6.98

7.82

8.85

10.74

10.8

10.39

Belfast BDC

9.92

10.93

11.38

11.25

10.08

8.99

9.46

11.79

13.02

11.5

12.82

11.09

Birkenhead BDC

9.8

10.08

9.55

9.6

9.85

10.44

9.63

9.78

9.45

8.76

8.87

9.74

Bolton BDC

7.91

9.3

8.81

10.31

9.38

9.26

8.41

8.72

9.2

10.26

9.9

8.63

Bradford BDC

9.55

9.73

9.68

10.13

11.5

12.74

12.25

10.45

11

10.99

10.96

10.08

Bristol BDC

8.94

9.07

8.91

8.89

9.04

9.63

9.7

10.91

10.79

11.51

11.44

11.57

Burnley BDC

8.47

8.58

8.56

9.46

9.21

9.26

10.48

10.53

9.78

9.64

9.65

10.57

Bury St. Edmonds BDC

11.35

13.42

13.39

11.1

10.78

11.18

12.18

11.65

12.09

13.55

10.13

10.33

Caerphilly BDC

7.69

8.6

7.44

7.97

8.83

8.42

7.99

8.45

9.27

9.37

9.19

8.78

Cannock BDC

7.56

8.09

8.4

8.19

7.79

9.29

8.85

9.71

10.22

11.29

12.01

10.38

Canterbury BDC

9.15

9.04

9.91

10.93

11.1

11.27

10.33

10.81

10.13

11.35

12.48

10.35

Carlisle BDC

7.44

7.79

7.59

8.01

7.91

7.97

7.27

7.09

7.46

8.12

7.55

8.69

Chester BDC

6.99

7.87

9.15

7.11

7.38

8.59

8.83

7.62

8.82

8.73

7.5

7.71

Chesterfield BDC

8.53

9.33

10.05

10.42

10.54

12.29

10.42

8.65

10.85

11.8

11.82

12.47

Chippenham BDC

7.43

8.91

8.78

8.48

8.21

7.91

7.05

7.79

8.39

8.74

8.02

8.24

Chorlton BDC

9.17

9.5

10.15

9.12

9.81

9.63

9.1

9.14

9.33

8.58

9.54

9.38

Clyde and Fife BDC

9.57

10.02

8.74

8.22

7.7

8.88

8.66

9.58

12.05

11.06

11.32

10.33

Clydebank BDC

9.39

10.69

9.46

8.81

8.72

9.72

8.81

8.26

10.73

10.23

10.58

10.26

Coatbridge BDC

8.35

9.19

9.11

8.8

9.45

10.57

9.27

8.9

9.71

8.33

8.06

8.47

Cosham BDC

14.86

13.75

11.38

11.9

12.53

12.68

13.12

14.02

14.05

14.4

11.14

12.82

Derby BDC

10.26

10.78

9.75

10.67

11.56

12.14

10.47

9.82

10.64

11.09

11.32

10.4

Doncaster BDC

6.93

8.62

7.6

9.02

8.16

9.78

11.02

11.19

10.81

10.92

8.91

8.07

Exeter BDC

8.6

9.59

10.9

9.31

7.95

8.83

8.77

8.23

8.87

10.52

9.93

9.21

Glasgow BDC (London)

7.84

8.37

8.55

8.82

9.17

8.51

8.32

8.01

7.7

8.11

8

7.59

Gloucester BDC

10.96

10.18

9.83

9.74

8.71

8.77

7.47

7.58

8.55

10.36

9.44

10.53

Greenock BDC

10.81

14.06

11.36

11.12

7.54

6.75

6.24

6.55

7.02

7.46

7.25

7.28

Hackney BDC

8.61

8.37

8.48

8.96

8.71

9.29

8.26

8.93

9.42

9.7

8.55

10.18

Halifax BDC

8.23

8.84

8.57

8.47

9.09

10.08

9.32

10.26

10.85

11.14

10.66

10.11

Handsworth BDC

9.95

8.9

7.95

8.33

8.85

10.97

10.02

9.91

8.43

9.42

7.95

8.16

Hanley BDC

9.92

10.63

10.72

10.81

10.01

10.75

9.97

10.09

11.06

12.74

12.34

14.28

Hastings BDC

17.52

16.65

17.31

14.29

14.21

15.77

15.07

13.91

10.65

10.66

10.46

11.05

Hull BDC

9.21

10.19

9.47

9.01

7.42

7.4

7.63

8.51

9.41

9.04

7.73

7.31

Huyton BDC

7.66

7.85

7.34

7.32

7.87

7.61

7.14

7.18

7.16

7

6.7

6.79

Hyde BDC

8.24

9.54

9.56

9.67

11.19

11.91

8.31

9.16

9.7

9.17

9.55

8.7

Ilford BDC

10.17

10.87

11.31

11.83

12.45

12.64

11.31

11.69

12.69

14.61

12.46

11.21

Kilmarnock BDC

9.82

9.16

8.93

10.43

8.35

8.64

10.16

9.95

10.8

9.89

8.23

8.54

Leeds BDC

12.12

10.78

9.91

10.82

9.76

12.03

11.35

9.29

10.28

10.99

10.52

8.92

Leicester BDC

8.89

11.07

11.08

10,64

10.39

10.8

11.03

9.1

9.35

10.36

9.68

11.27

Llanelli BDC

7.87

7.65

7.04

7.26

6.62

6.66

6.13

5.92

6.6

6.05

6.37

6.59

Makerfield BDC

11.72

12.63

12.78

10.93

11.52

13.51

12.51

11.84

11.11

12.53

11.85

12.66

Mansfield BDC

10.31

10.07

10.5

10.31

10.53

13.21

11.73

10.45

12.15

11.87

11.12

10.87

Merthyr Tydfil BDC

8.45

8.21

8.68

8.39

7.7

6.64

6.79

6.83

7.55

7

6.86

6.55

Newcastle BDC

7.02

7.68

8.13

7.99

7.82

7.58

7.66

8.62

8.84

8.72

9.69

8.19

Newport BDC

8.44

10.82

11.63

12.93

10.94

9.76

8.66

9.02

10.24

11.67

11.34

11.4

Norwich BDC

10.68

10.76

10.76

10.67

10.1

11.89

10.45

11.04

11.76

11.54

10.26

10.89

Nottingham BDC

10.03

11.83

12.4

14.02

13.19

12.84

13.98

13.58

12.61

12.07

12.49

13.2

Oldham BDC

7.93

9.15

9.39

8.74

8.25

10

9.34

10.77

12.92

11.41

10.32

10.48

Peterborough BDC

9.64

10.11

10.63

11.18

10.89

10.61

10.52

10.8

10.45

9.85

9.03

8.22

Plymouth BDC

9.7

10.27

9.75

9.09

9.71

9.1

9.69

10.48

10.88

11.23

9.85

9.69

Preston BDC

8.94

9.81

9.3

9.03

8.79

9.15

8.84

9.39

8.91

9.53

9.29

9.68

Ramsgate BDC

7.55

8.25

8.89

8.35

9.05

11.23

10

8.82

10.39

11.34

10.49

10.05

Ravenhurst BDC

12.96

12.43

14.82

13.83

10.53

11.16

11.99

11.25

10.53

10.58

10.43

11.17

Sheffield BDC

8.87

9.58

9.69

9.97

10.25

11.3

10.05

9.86

9.78

9.69

9.5

8.51

St. Austell BDC

10.26

9.67

9.98

10.75

9.4

9.61

9.86

10.34

11.57

11.99

10.14

10.16

St. Helens BDC

7.49

7.43

7.33

7.65

7.78

7.62

7.39

9.8

9.24

10.26

8.45

8.4

Stockton BDC

8.45

9.52

8.88

8.69

8.44

9

8.88

9.51

9.85

9.71

10.15

9.97

Stratford BDC

9.63

9.57

9.44

8.96

9.53

9.29

10.82

11.43

11.68

11.69

11.53

11.97

Sunderland BDC

8.86

9.25

8.65

8.81

7.84

8.03

7.23

7.53

8.45

8.82

9.43

10.54

Totton BDC

9.52

9.64

10.18

10.95

11.08

11.77

13.11

13.97

10.47

10.22

10.66

11.48

Walsall BDC

7.82

8.15

7.71

7.39

7.13

7.49

6.81

7.76

7.89

8.46

9.7

8.54

Watford BDC

9.56

10.1

9.17

9.17

8.78

9.64

9.31

9.32

10.22

10.18

9.79

10.04

Wellingborough BDC

7.06

7.61

7.68

8.59

8.37

7.91

7.85

8.08

8.13

8.65

6.82

6.68

Wolverhampton BDC

9.96

10.49

10.69

10.53

9.53

10.86

10.83

11.18

10.8

11.68

10.06

10.11

Worcester BDC

7.88

10.46

10.02

9.03

7.91

8.65

8.53

8.39

10.02

11.41

11.63

11.24

Worthing BDC

7.29

7.79

8.54

8.43

8.53

9.22

10.73

11.72

12.11

12.09

12.39

13.76

Wrexham BDC

7.99

8.15

8.04

8.32

8.62

8.74

7.96

7.73

8.43

8.79

8.32

7.96

York BDC

9.4

7.43

7.47

7.56

7.11

9.01

9.47

10.15

10.94

9.54

9.16

10.05

Annex 4: IS by BDC 2006-07

2006

2007

Business delivery centre

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Aberdeen BDC

6.55

6.13

6.46

7.23

6.49

7.4

7.54

7.41

7.18

8.55

8.21

7.62

Barnsley BDC

10.7

6.73

7.15

8.46

8.19

8.59

8.83

8.62

7.92

7.72

7.55

7.64

Basildon BDC

20.74

19.22

13.35

11.16

11.41

11.09

10.78

11.79

9.98

9.66

9.51

10.65

Bathgate BDC

9.6

10.46

9.61

8.49

9.29

8.37

11.31

11.23

9.96

7.97

9.05

8.06

Belfast BDC

12.45

9.43

7.83

6.17

535

6.95

7.02

8.01

9.09

9.26

10.25

11.15

Birkenhead BDC

8.97

8.87

9.76

9.36

8.56

9.79

10.34

10.83

10.33

10.11

10.71

10.98

Bolton BDC

9.86

10.13

9.99

9.34

8.57

7.21

8.44

8.95

7.6

8.06

8.39

9.34

Bradford BDC

9.83

8.83

8.46

7.1

7.71

11.12

12.45

12.37

11.04

13.05

10.19

10.3

Bristol BDC

13.46

14.72

16.57

15.06

9.96

8.01

9.21

8.45

7.51

7.88

7.53

8.42

Burnley BDC

11.41

10.25

11.83

11.16

9.8

9.86

10.11

8.61

10,42

11.68

10.68

12.88

Bury St. Edmonds BDC

27.29

25.5

11.58

9.54

9.88

8.49

16.75

9.8

10.3

10.51

10

10.13

Caerphilly BDC

7.51

8.55

8.08

7.09

7.13

7.21

7.15

5.47

5.85

6.24

5.98

6.12

Cannock BDC

9.35

7.91

7.12

7.85

6.8

6.48

7.25

8.66

12.36

16.24

17.19

11.64

Canterbury BDC

14.42

16.19

15.38

12.35

13.45

12.53

12.52

12.15

11.91

12.25

11.94

10.88

Carlisle BDC

8.45

6.86

6.23

5.71

6.67

6.53

5.97

7.35

7.14

6.65

6.28

5.66

Chester BDC

8.07

8.2

8.19

6.24

6.91

7.78

8.59

9.02

9.14

7.96

10.73

11.54

Chesterfield BDC

10.25

9.54

9.92

8.07

8.62

10.8

9.28

9.72

11.45

13.76

11.7

11.42

Chippenham BDC

7.83

7.62

6.9

6.96

8.44

11.29

9.94

6.75

7.91

7.39

7.05

6.69

Chorlton BDC

9.92

10.22

11.97

10.75

9.79

8.84

10.42

9.51

8.55

9.41

11.24

13.98

Clyde and Fife BDC

9.35

8.74

9

9.32

9.54

10.42

13

13.66

10.71

8.77

8.7

9.5

Clydebank BDC

10.92

11.98

10.38

8.8

7.89

10.01

9.04

8.4

10.17

9.9

13.58

8.05

Coatbridge BDC

7.58

7.02

8.32

8.41

7.88

8.77

9.84

8.09

10.5

8.93

9.01

7.62

Cosham BDC

12.39

9.21

706

6.45

6.33

6.42

11.26

13.11

13.52

15.69

15.88

15.71

Derby BDC

9.48

10.35

11.4

12.23

11.11

9.83

9.91

11.01

9.29

9.97

8.85

10.32

Doncaster BDC

11.84

11.4

10.55

9.14

8.05

9.3

8.74

8.25

6.38

5.6

5.44

6.24

Exeter BDC

6.23

7.51

11.25

8.91

8.49

10.01

7.72

7.03

7.94

8.13

6.72

5.81

Glasgow BDC (London)

8.86

7,03

6.44

6.17

7.38

6.43

6.41

6.88

7.14

7.16

7.06

6.82

Gloucester BDC

11.2

11.75

10.67

9.73

13.5

12.9

12.28

10.68

7.94

8.83

9.71

8.52

Greenock BDC

3.81

4.07

3.82

4.71

5.9

5.91

7.4

3.84

5.43

7.26

7.52

8.17

Hackney BDC

14.26

14.2

15.09

10.41

8.59

11.07

11.65

11.82

11.63

10.73

10.28

13.01

Halifax BDC

16.7

14.9

14.52

12.26

12.17

14.65

12.27

10.54

9.29

10.65

9.39

9.36

Handsworth BDC

14.56

14

14.69

8.51

9.01

12.29

10.52

10.33

9.67

9.48

12.79

9.31

Hanley BDC

12.24

11.22

11.38

11.01

10.78

10.63

11.04

11.79

9.92

10.6

10.94

10.78

Hastings BDC

15.88

11.87

14.82

16.36

15.68

18.48

16.95

17.73

21.05

23.2

19.76

14.08

Hull BDC

10.56

9.51

11.45

8.76

10.02

14.77

14.6

9.06

8.6

9.65

8.77

7.32

Huyton BDC

10.17

8.45

7.94

9.96

7.85

9.71

11.39

11.3

11.3

11.91

12.12

10.59

Hyde BDC

9.5

8.11

7.45

7.07

7.09

7.02

7.55

7.71

8.62

10.09

9.73

10.25

Ilford BDC

10.16

7.99

6.85

6.69

6.89

7.28

8.95

8.91

8.13

8.72

9.28

10.1

Kilmarnock BDC

10.05

9.85

11.12

11.95

8.92

10.78

9.96

9.74

11.01

10.58

10.83

11.12

Leeds BDC

10.92

9.93

8.36

8.86

7.58

10.01

9.97

8.86

8.13

8.89

9.49

10.13

Leicester BDC

11.11

7.71

7.76

7.38

8.27

10.57

11.15

10.69

9.84

8.97

8.95

8.32

Lincoln BDC

12.62

7.75

7.71

11.52

13.56

12.76

13.66

12.23

10.42

8.35

8.14

6.4

Llanelli BDC

8.14

7.09

10.39

8.52

5.45

5.43

7.09

8.78

8.53

8.54

7.62

6.84

Luton BDC

16.58

12.9

9.51

7.77

7.21

8.51

7.1

7.75

10.8

10.37

10.72

8.87

Makerfield BDC

14.51

11.3

9.56

8.77

8.06

9.11

9.83

9.43

9.65

10.2

10

11.57

Mansfield BDC

11.16

11.32

10.2

9.96

10.53

14

12.78

14.49

12.57

12.41

10.86

10.72

Merthyr Tydfil BDC

10.32

9.27

8.54

7.28

6.7

6.58

8.33

8.22

6.82

6.75

7.9

7.07

Newcastle BDC

6.79

8.15

6.85

5.31

4.24

5.48

6.13

5.07

6.09

5.52

4.93

5.09

Newport BDC

10.89

9.58

12.31

9.76

10.82

11.29

11.52

11.72

11.87

13.11

13.89

12.05

Norwich BDC

16.16

14.73

11.33

10.66

11.61

11.34

14.23

13.07

15.11

12.74

12.76

8.93

Nottingham BDC

11.2

9.98

7.16

6.44

6.59

7.24

9.17

10.73

10.72

9.8

10.09

10.42

Oldham BDC

11.26

7.62

8.41

7.08

7.8

7.78

8.55

8.7

8.97

8.75

8.36

9.4

Peterborough BDC

19.21

11.88

11.82

9.68

9.53

10.6

10.74

10.87

10.42

10.17

10.65

11.4

Plymouth BDC

12.14

11.92

11.81

12.52

14.45

14.81

14.5

12.72

10.03

6.59

7.29

7.48

Preston BDC

11 37

10.24

7.91

8.01

9.29

9

9.91

9.36

9.55

8.93

10.47

10.84

Ramsgate BDC

10.28

11.78

8.7

10.01

8.32

10.37

7.88

6.69

6.43

6.21

6.18

7.17

Ravenhurst BDC

15.56

15.04

13.73

11.44

10.65

12.03

12.24

12.13

12.49

16.2

11.91

10.09

Sheffield BDC

1026

7.51

8.16

9.63

8.44

8.7

9.5

8.93

7.88

7.73

7.56

8.4

St. Austell BDC

10.82

10.44

10.96

10.73

8.97

10.86

10.76

11,79

10.21

9.52

8.11

9.65

St. Helens BDC

8.9

8.98

7.78

8.86

7.2

8.29

8.49

7,34

6.66

8.04

6.16

6.49

Stockton BDC

11.01

9.12

8.37

7.75

9.02

8.17

8.83

8.89

7.9

8.03

7.17

6.83

Stratford BDC

7.75

7.63

7.72

7.95

7.47

9.99

9.64

7.41

8.53

9.15

9.54

8.39

Sunderland BDC

7.94

7.71

6.73

5.92

6.71

5.92

6.85

7.41

6.75

6.61

6.72

6.8

Totton BDC

8.31

7.06

7.04

6.61

6.06

5.71

5.85

5.48

6.38

6.17

6.01

7.46

Walsall BDC

10.98

9.27

6.93

6.67

6.62

6.11

6.65

7.1

8.06

8

7

7.56

Watford BDC

11.01

8.12

7.79

7.27

7.47

8.67

11.08

11.09

10.68

10.96

9.78

10.9

Wellingborough BDC

11.18

8.28

6.9

5.7

5.95

6.33

6.16

5.97

8.43

9.47

8.83

8.44

Wolverhampton BDC

9.94

10.54

8.77

6.97

7.1

6.99

6.63

7.7

7.62

8.91

10.43

12.27

Worcester BDC

18.15

10.55

11.41

12.37

11.89

11.32

11.16

11.66

13.16

14.3

9.88

7.35

Worthing BDC

13.05

10.99

10.33

10.75

10.06

9.84

10.46

9.65

10.55

12.77

13.69

14.01

Wrexham BDC

9.12

9.46

9.16

10.2

9.65

8.48

10.01

8.6

8.11

7.74

6.65

7.38

York BDC

12.13

12.78

9.98

8.19

7.31

9.61

9.97

7.18

7.4

8.34

8.57

10.17

Annex 5: IS by BDC 2007-08

2007

2008

Benefit delivery centre

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Aberdeen BDC

7.63

7.89

7.67

8.14

9.51

9.63

8.83

6.26

5.52

5.24

5.38

5.22

Barnsley BDC

6.88

8.16

9.08

8.46

7.88

7.71

7.03

7.45

8.11

8.06

8.1

7.81

Basildon BDC

11.69

10.39

8.51

7.88

7.32

7.55

8.09

9.1

7.84

8.58

8.73

9.37

Bathgate BDC

7.35

7.56

7.71

7.09

7.18

7.61

7.09

7.89

7.72

6.89

7.58

5.38

Belfast BDC

10.94

10.51

11.41

9.77

9.11

9.75

8.23

7.98

8.06

9.24

9.92

8.73

Birkenhead BDC

9.44

9.81

9.16

8.05

8.28

8.21

9.13

9.37

9.27

9.34

9.25

8.47

Bolton BDC

7.11

6.79

5.61

6.56

6.74

6.47

6.79

6,59

6.4

7.06

8.24

11.44

Bradford BDC

7.8

7.83

7.8

6.91

6.85

6.9

9.13

9

7.79

8.27

9.34

9.6

Bristol BDC

8.1

10.07

8.65

8.32

8.92

9.98

11.13

10.84

9.03

8.98

10.46

9.87

Burnley BDC

11.73

10.35

9.77

6.48

7.02

6.91

6.61

6.95

8.56

9.94

9.08

8.25

Bury St. Edmonds BDC

10.46

10.54

9.68

10.34

8.34

6.97

9.88

9.57

9.88

9.85

10.03

10.93

Caerphilly BDC

5.31

6.61

5.09

5.27

6.44

5.44

5.93

5.77

5.69

6.54

6.61

7.38

Cannock BDC

11.2

11.82

12.07

9.86

10.72

10.57

10.39

10.32

10.17

7.79

8.8

10.18

Canterbury BDC

13.99

12.21

9.72

9.86

12.94

11.86

3.51

5.46

8.46

10.09

11.11

11.55

Carlisle BDC

6.48

6.62

5.78

6.28

7.85

7.27

6.4

7.38

7.17

9.77

10.08

9.01

Chester BDC

13.43

13.05

9.74

7.44

7.37

8.9

9.16

8.54

9.87

9.25

8.32

8.86

Chesterfield BDC

10.23

8.57

7.55

7.93

7.29

6.8

6.38

6.63

6.38

6.63

6.66

6.98

Chippenham BDC

5.43

6.72

7.18

7.37

7.65

7

7.03

7.6

8.45

7.99

7.38

7.78

Chorlton BDC

13.88

15.07

9.41

7.96

7.45

8.36

10.48

10.59

11.43

10.05

11.88

12.1

Clyde and Fife BDC

8.88

9.99

8.91

7.74

8.12

9.37

8.19

8.86

9.95

8.2

6.81

8.19

Clydebank BDC

6.56

6.87

7.85

7.96

6.37

6.21

6.96

5.57

6.69

6.34

8.51

6.08

Coatbridge BDC

6.19

7.68

8.1

5.97

6.27

5.43

5.28

5.85

6.18

4.88

5.64

5.25

Cosham BDC

16.34

16.68

14.96

10.35

12.32

11.58

11.48

8.23

10.15

11.82

10.44

12.56

Derby BDC

9.51

10.91

10.59

9.42

8.45

8.79

8.91

8.36

7.55

7.13

7.59

8.58

Doncaster BDC

5.67

5.44

5.71

5.39

4.53

5.6

5.48

5.63

4.84

5.59

5.78

5.02

Exeter BDC

5

6.68

6.53

7.27

8.66

8.36

7.36

6.86

7.69

8.58

8.44

9.14

Glasgow BDC (London)

7.43

6.9

6.99

5.94

5.77

6.13

6.53

6.67

7.35

7.36

8.04

8.23

Gloucester BDC

10.64

11.87

7.93

6.99

8.04

9.06

10.5

8.78

8.35

9.73

8.68

9.33

Greenock BDC

8.88

7.77

7.42

5.1

5.41

5.18

5.34

5.02

6.15

6.74

6.75

4.91

Hackney BDC

10.13

11.6

12.22

11.38

7.33

8.49

7.85

9.27

9.97

8.33

9.96

12.67

Halifax BDC

9.28

10.06

8.63

7.97

7.25

8.57

7.44

6.45

7.48

7.58

7.21

7.47

Handsworth BDC

7.76

6.86

7.54

4.89

5.33

7.39

8.69

8.78

8.88

8.35

8.22

7.92

Hanley BDC

9.82

10.89

10.57

8.83

8.79

12.71

9.67

7.27

8.78

7.96

7.77

9.5

Hastings BDC

11.99

11.79

11.83

11.54

11.47

10.21

10.04

9.68

9.42

9.07

12.29

13.08

Hull BDC

6.06

6.27

6.01

5.78

5.7

5.5

5.5

6.18

5.28

5.33

5.6

5.83

Huyton BDC

5.43

6.72

6.61

5.71

6.77

7.6

9.07

10.03

7.16

7.1

8.7

8.94

Hyde BDC

10.04

9.83

10.28

8.54

9

8.73

9.66

9.03

9.19

8.07

7.41

8.36

Ilford BDC

10.28

11.63

11.1

9.74

9.98

8.9

8.25

9.56

10.54

11.06

10.04

9.39

Kilmarnock BDC

10.64

9.23

7.43

7.19

6.64

8.68

8.69

8.44

7.86

8.2

7.74

8.1

Leeds BDC

9.21

8.77

8.46

8.54

7.94

7.5

6.46

6.28

6.52

6.85

6.74

7.42

Leicester BDC

7.91

8.79

7.55

8.05

8.28

9.48

10.49

9.9

9.26

8.22

9.4

9.13

Lincoln BDC

6.08

8.21

7.28

7.19

8.09

8.07

8.88

9.3

8.69

8.23

8.88

7.62

Llanelli BDC

6.36

7.45

6.16

5.86

5.66

5.81

6.18

6.36

5.64

5.66

6.88

5.92

Luton BDC

9.88

10.46

9.87

9.54

8.69

10.39

10.07

10.21

8.93

9.12

8.23

9.69

Makerfield BDC

10.9

11.68

11.8

8.66

9.32

9.49

10.13

9.94

9.35

8.87

9.07

9.14

Mansfield BDC

9.56

10.56

10.64

9.05

8.34

7.07

9.02

9.9

10.14

9.2

9.08

10.78

Merthyr Tydfil BDC

5.95

7.64

6.35

6.55

6.75

6.25

6.46

7.51

5.65

5.99

6.17

6.67

Newcastle BDC

5.94

5.91

5.32

5.87

5.71

5.48

4.85

5.42

5.29

4.7

4.67

5.42

Newport BDC

9.9

11.63

10.19

8.23

8.34

9.78

11.33

10.94

10.86

10.42

11.51

7.66

Norwich BDC

8.72

10.12

11.2

9.95

11.67

11.12

8.8

7.21

7.13

7.07

7.03

7.6

Nottingham BDC

9.53

10.27

10.05

10.85

9.91

11.27

7.33

6.92

6.12

7.91

10.19

11.09

Oldham BDC

8.4

9.51

10.16

8.5

8.67

9.55

9.1

10.34

8.22

9.27

9.3

8.96

Peterborough BDC

9.72

8.6

8.25

6.53

7.81

8.38

8.78

8.43

8

7.92

8.84

7.81

Plymouth BDC

8.45

10.95

11.19

8.85

8.97

10.46

9.84

10.43

9.1

9.8

9.75

9.1o

Preston BDC

10.17

9.46

9.61

9.86

10.55

10.66

10.44

8.53

8.1

7.4

7.63

8.32

Ramsgate BDC

6.27

5.67

4.82

5.19

5.57

5.51

6.84

6.62

7.74

7.97

6.91

7.51

Ravenhurst BDC

12.28

11.94

11.15

9.53

10.79

10.61

10.06

12.3

12.47

7.17

8.1

10.23

Sheffield BDC

7.35

6.85

4.98

4.67

4.54

5.15

5.24

5.17

4.47

4.96

6.04

6.52

St. Austell BDC

9.69

10.01

9.85

8.78

8.06

8.42

8.9

9.58

10.4

11.01

8.02

7.6

St. Helens BDC

6.13

4.66

5.08

5.3

5.21

5.64

6.57

6.69

6.71

6.49

7.54

8.33

Stockton BDC

6.51

7.84

8.13

6.62

6.47

7.95

8.61

8.53

7.33

8.69

9.04

10.5

Stratford BDC

8.27

8.39

8.64

7.25

7.06

7.77

7.6

7.55

7.63

8.28

8.06

7.46

Sunderland BDC

6.48

7.4

6.47

6.18

6.59

6.74

6.58

6.23

6.76

6.58

7.64

7.54

Totton BDC

8.15

8.13

7.46

7.33

7.05

6.64

6.93

6.92

6.38

821

9.22

10.07

Walsall BDC

7.59

10.29

8.75

7.9

8.67

9.73

8.66

7.86

6.73

7.09

7.61

8.94

Watford BDC

10.89

10.65

10.81

10.56

10.48

9.37

9.71

9.38

9.87

9.83

9.56

9.93

Wellingborough BDC

8.31

8.25

8.16

6.83

8.22

7.33

6.5

6.24

6.86

6.71

8.28

6.94

Wolverhampton BDC

12.24

11.42

9.26

8.98

9.54

9.48

9.88

10.63

10.68

10.02

11.42

9.74

Worcester BDC

8.04

9.03

9.39

9.09

8.88

9.33

10

9.91

9.61

9.94

7.74

8.57

Worthing BDC

13.13

15.25

14.03

9.04

13.04

11.52

9.66

8.91

8.54

10.84

12.4

13.78

Wrexham BDC

7.4

8.27

6.59

6.24

6.54

7.34

6.49

6.86

7.69

7.78

7.59

6.8

York BDC

10.68

10.35

9.96

9.13

7.53

9.72

9.59

7.92

7.99

6.96

7.28

7.47

Poverty: Children

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what definition his Department uses of child poverty; when this was last amended; what recent discussions he has had with Ministerial colleagues on the definition; what recent representations he has received on the definition; and if he will make a statement. (241164)

The Department uses three indicators to monitor levels of child poverty; they were established in 2003 following a lengthy period of consultation.

Absolute low income measures whether the poorest families are seeing their income rise in real terms. The threshold is fixed as equal to the relative low income threshold for the baseline year of 1998-99 expressed in today’s prices.

Relative low income measures whether the incomes of the poorest families are keeping pace with the growth of incomes in the economy as a whole. This indicator measures the number of children living in households below 60 per cent. of contemporary median equivalised income. This is the indicator which is used to measure performance against the public service agreement target to halve child poverty by 2010-11.

Material deprivation and low income combined provides a wider measure of people’s living standards. This indicator measures the number of children living in households that are both materially deprived and have an income below 70 per cent. of contemporary equivalised median income. More details can be found in the consultation conclusion document, Measuring Child Poverty, available in the Library.

Since 1998 progress has been made against all of the indicators. 600,000 children have been lifted out of relative low income between 1998-99 and 2006-07, a shift from 3.4 million children to 2.9 million children. The number of children living in absolute low income has halved from 3.4 million to 1.7 million. Between 2004-05, the first year data was available, and 2006-07 the number of children in the UK defined as poor using the combined indicator of relative low income and material deprivation fell by 200,000 from 2.2 million to 2.0 million on the particular material deprivation threshold that was chosen.

Low income is not the only dimension to poverty and a child’s quality of life, including access to health care, education and a safe environment, are critical. The three indicators are therefore underpinned by the broader Opportunity for all indicators. Opportunity for all is the Government’s report on poverty and social exclusion which includes a wide range of poverty and social exclusion indicators for children and young people (as well as working age adults, older people and communities) including health, education and housing. Details can be found on the Opportunity for all website at:

www.dwp.gov.uk/ofa

While we have made substantial progress in tackling child poverty we are not complacent. Despite the scale of the challenge the Government’s commitment is stronger than ever. The Prime Minister’s recent announcement of our intention to legislate on child poverty gives us renewed impetus.

The Secretary of State meets regularly with Cabinet colleagues and others on the issue of child poverty. The Child Poverty Unit was established at the end of 2007 to put a sharper focus on cross-Government working to develop a truly integrated approach to tackling child poverty. The Government are committed to working with stakeholders to develop a strategy and move forward with legislation.

Social Security Benefits: Lone Parents

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what estimate he has made of the average sum to be lent under the Lone Parent Transition Loans in the next 12 months; what assessment he has made of the effect on this figure of changes to the eligibility rules for income support; and if he will make a statement. (246907)

No such estimate has been made. However, we have now decided to amend social fund crisis loan directions to enable lone parents to receive payment of a transition loan of up to 100 per cent. of their personal allowance rather than 75 per cent. as is the case with existing crisis loans.

Unemployment Benefits

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what guidance has been issued to staff at Jobcentre Plus on whether claimants should be awarded employment and support allowance or jobseeker’s allowance; and if he will make a statement. (246130)

The administration of Jobcentre Plus is a matter for the acting chief executive of Jobcentre Plus, Mel Groves. I have asked him to provide the hon. Member with the information requested.

Letter from Mel Groves:

The Secretary of State has asked me to reply to your question asking what guidance has been issued to staff at Jobcentre Plus on whether claimants should be awarded Employment and Support Allowance or Jobseeker’s Allowance. This is something which falls within the responsibilities delegated to me as Acting Chief Executive of Jobcentre Plus.

Jobcentre Plus has provided its business delivery areas, i.e. Contact Centres, Jobcentres and Benefit Delivery Centres, with detailed guidance that clearly sets out the criteria and conditionality for claiming and awarding Employment and Support Allowance, and the administrative procedures for dealing with these claims.

Corresponding guidance on other benefits such as Jobseeker’s Allowance has been revised to reflect the introduction of Employment and Support Allowance to provide clarity and consistency across benefits, which enables staff to identify potential entitlement to the appropriate benefit, and advise customers accordingly.

Solicitor-General

Crime: Offensive Weapons

To ask the Solicitor-General if she will make a statement on recent trends in rates of prosecution of knife crime in (a) Northamptonshire and (b) England. (248589)

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) holds no comprehensive record covering all offences in which a knife was a factor. Relevant offences may be prosecuted under a range of legislation, and cannot be distinguished as a discrete body of information.

CPS records do provide a count of the number of offences of possession of an offensive weapon, including knives and other bladed articles, in respect of which a prosecution commenced. Figures for the last three calendar years are summarised on the table below. The figures also include offences of possession of weapons other than knives and bladed articles, but CPS records do not allow these proceedings to be identified separately. Figures are shown separately for CPS Northamptonshire, for England, and for England and Wales in total.

The level of prosecutions for these offences in total has risen somewhat over the last three years. In Northamptonshire the number of offences in which a prosecution commenced rose by 25, or 12.3 per cent. between 2006 and 2008, although there was no change between 2007 and 2008. In England, prosecutions rose over the three year same period by 1,648 (7.2 per cent.), and in England and Wales they increased by 1,656 (6.9 per cent.).

Offences of possession of a knife or bladed weapon which reached a hearing in magistrates' courts

Table (a): CPS Northamptonshire

2006

2007

2008

Criminal Justice Act 1988 S139 (possession of a bladed weapon in public)

98

115

118

Criminal Justice Act 1988 S139A (possession of a bladed weapon in schools)

0

0

3

Prevention of Crime Act 1953 { 1(1)} (possession of "any offensive weapon." These figures may include some offences relating to bladed weapons, but these cannot be identified separately.)

106

114

108

Total offences

204

229

229

Table (b): England

2006

2007

2008

Criminal Justice Act 1988 S139 (possession of a bladed weapon in public)

10,556

10,620

12,567

Criminal Justice Act 1988 S139A (possession of a bladed weapon in schools)

174

174

233

Prevention of Crime Act 1953 { 1(1)} (possession of "any offensive weapon." These figures may include some offences relating to bladed weapons, but these cannot be identified separately.)

12,103

11,544

11,681

Total offences

22,833

22,338

24,481

Table (c): England and Wales

2006

2007

2008

Criminal Justice Act 1988 S139 (possession of a bladed weapon in public)

11,118

11,185

13,205

Criminal Justice Act 1988 S139A (possession of a bladed weapon in schools)

188

179

240

Prevention of Crime Act 1953 { 1(1)} (possession of "any offensive weapon." These figures may include some offences relating to bladed weapons, but these cannot be identified separately.)

12,846

12,263

12,363

Total offences

24,152

23,627

25,808

Defence

Afghanistan: Peacekeeping Operations

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much has been spent on ammunition for operations in Helmand province in each month since 2001; and if he will make a statement. (245682)

Operation Herrick (Afghanistan) costs are prepared and audited on an annual basis for the whole of the operation and do not identify separately information on the cost of ammunition used in Helmand Province, where UK operations began in 2006-07. The un-audited internal data on the consumption of ordnance-related stock for the whole operation in 2006-07 and 2007-08 is:

£ million

Afghanistan

2006-07

2007-08

Guided weapons, missiles and bombs

47

57

Armament Stores

69

121

Total

116

178

Notes:

1. These costs include the use of ammunition expended during pre-deployment training.

2. Armament stores mainly relate to ammunition and shells but can also include such items as the issue of small arms.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what his most recent estimate is of the cost to the public purse of UK military intervention in Afghanistan in each year since it began. (248734)

The total annual audited cost of operations in Afghanistan are set out in the following table:

Afghanistan

£ million

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

Total to date

Resource costs

187

236

36

58

148

560

1,071

1,511

3,807

Capital costs

34

75

10

9

51

178

433

807

1,597

Total

221

311

46

67

199

738

1,504

2,318

5,404

MOD identifies the costs of operations in terms of the net additional costs it has incurred. The costs that would have been incurred regardless of the operation taking place, such as wages and salaries, are not included. Savings on activities that have not occurred because of the operation—such as training exercises—are taken into account in arriving at the net figures.

Note: The figures for 2008-09 are unaudited estimates reflected in the Winter Supplementary Estimates published in November.

Aircraft Carriers

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what fuel will be used to power the new aircraft carriers; and what their home port will be. (248692)

The Future Aircraft Carriers (HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales) will be powered using marine diesel fuel. Their home port will be Her Majesty's Naval Base Portsmouth.

Armed Forces: Housing

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the most recent estimate is of the number of (a) single living accommodation and (b) service families accommodation units containing asbestos. (248657)

Although information on asbestos in accommodation is available, it is not held centrally or in a consistent form and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many complaints were made to Modern Housing Solutions on the quality of repairs undertaken on service families accommodation in the last 12 months. (248660)

A total of 508 complaints were received by Modern Housing Solutions (MHS) between 1 January and 31 December 2008 specifically about the standard of workmanship.

MHS is responsible for the maintenance and repair of approximately 45,000 service family accommodation properties in England and Wales.

Armed Forces: Internet

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) whether (a) the Army and (b) his Department has received (i) complaints from members of the public and (ii) communications from police forces about content posted on internet social networking sites by serving Army personnel; (248688)

(2) what measures (a) the Army and (b) his Department have in place to monitor content posted on internet social networking sites by serving Army personnel; how many instances of sectarian or racist postings by soldiers have been identified; and whether any Army personnel have been disciplined as a consequence of such activities.

While certain websites are monitored to gauge opinion in response to events, neither the Army nor the Ministry of Defence has procedures routinely to monitor material posted by Army personnel on internet social networking sites.

There are no records of the Army or the Ministry of Defence having received communications from police forces about content on such sites, but during 2008, the Ministry of Defence received a very small number of complaints from members of the public regarding postings allegedly by serving Army personnel. Of those, only two cases were found actually to involve serving personnel and alleged sectarian or racist behaviour. In both cases, following thorough investigations, formal disciplinary action was deemed inappropriate.

Armed Forces: Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the (a) required and (b) actual trained strength of each (i) regular infantry and (ii) Royal Marine battalion is. (248693)

Figures for Infantry battalions are shown in the following table:

Division

Unit

Required strength

Actual strength

Guards

1 Grenadier Guards

541

480

1 Coldstream Guards

535

489

1 Scots Guards

605

464

1 Irish Guards

541

473

1 Welsh Guards

535

480

Scots

1 Scots

541

543

2 Scots

535

474

3 Scots

539

446

4 Scots

608

460

5 Scots

556

458

Queens

1 Princess of Wales Royal Regiment

608

524

2 Princess of Wales Royal Regiment

533

460

1 Royal Regt Fusiliers

605

491

2 Royal Regt Fusiliers

533

419

1 Royal Anglian

577

590

2 Royal Anglian

539

495

Kings

1 Lancs

577

548

2 Lancs

524

503

1 Yorks

539

458

2 Yorks

533

400

3 Yorks

605

466

PoW

1 Mercian

539

430

2 Mercian

533

493

3 Mercian

576

514

1 Royal Welsh

533

452

2 Royal Welsh

605

487

Rifles

1 Rifles

533

542

2 Rifles

533

534

3 Rifles

533

541

4 Rifles

577

557

5 Rifles

605

600

RI

1 Royal Irish

554

448

Para

1 Para

349

497

2 Para

556

506

3 Para

556

507

In addition to the battalions shown in the previous table there are three incremental Guards companies which are primarily for public duties but which can also be used to augment the other Guards battalions as required:

Unit

Required strength

Actual strength

N Coy Grenadier Guards

101

101

7 Coy Coldstream Guards

101

84

F Coy Scots Guards

101

97

Figures for Royal Marine Commandos units are shown in the following table:

Unit

Required strength

Actual strength

40 Cdo RM

703

546

42 Cdo RM

703

701

45 Cdo RM

703

825

Armed Forces: Training

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many personnel at each grade or rank are working within his Department and the armed services on the delivery of the defence training contract awarded to Metrix. (247065)

The number of Defence personnel who are employed in the Defence Training Review (DTR) Package 1 Integrated Project Team to deliver the DTR Package 1 contract are as follows:

Military Personnel:

Brigadier x one

Captain RN x one

Commander x one

Wing Commander x one

Lt Colonel x two

Major x one

Warrant Officer two x two

Lt Commander x two

Squadron Leader x one

Ministry of Defence Police Chief Inspector x one

Civil Service Personnel:

Bl x two

B2 x three

Cl x l0

C2 x five

D x four

El x two

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what revisions have been made to the timetable and the budget for the delivery of package 1 of the defence training contract awarded to Metrix; and if he will make a statement. (247066)

No further revisions have been made to the timetable and budget for defence training review package 1 since my statement on 9 October 2008, Official Report, column 453.

The Metrix consortium's revised proposals have been received and are being evaluated. Only once the evaluation process has concluded can any definitive judgment be made for the future programme.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the requirements are that form the basis of the request his Department has made to Metrix to submit a revised plan for package 1 of the defence training contract. (247067)

The requirements of the request to Metrix were to formally establish an affordable package 1 and confirm that the project can be delivered, and is commercially and technically compliant. The request did not seek a full resubmission of the Metrix bid, but instead asked for responses to a number of key project issues across work streams that have changed since the Preferred Bidder announcement and have the potential to affect the project's performance, cost or timetable.

Armoured Fighting Vehicles

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what assessment he has made of the effect of the Warrior Fightability and Lethality Improvement Programme on the Defence Support Group; and what partnering arrangements are being considered; (247775)

(2) what procurement arrangements have been made for the Warrior Fightability and Lethality Improvement Programme; and if he will make a statement.

The Warrior Fightability and Lethality Improvement Programme is part of the wider Warrior Capability Sustainment Programme (WCSP), which will upgrade the Warrior Infantry Fighting Vehicle to meet the current and future requirements of the British Army. The programme is in the early stages of its Acquisition Cycle and, as it progresses into its Assessment Phase, it is planned that bidders will develop hardware demonstrators of their turret proposals, along with supporting technical and commercial submissions for further consideration. As the programme has not yet passed the Initial Gate approval point, I am unable to comment further on the proposed procurement arrangements or on the programme's effect on the Defence Support Group at this time.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the reasons were for the decision to restructure the Future Rapid Effects System programme. (248363)

I refer the hon. Member to the Equipment Examination written ministerial statement given on 11 December 2008, Official Report, column 65WS.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what representations he has received on commercial conditions affecting General Dynamics UK's ability to procure the Piranha V contract; and if he will support General Dynamics UK in bidding for the contract. (248365)

The withdrawal of General Dynamics (UK)'s provisional preferred bidder status for the Future Rapid Effect System (FRES) Utility Vehicle Design was announced to this House by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State on 11 December 2008, as part of a statement outlining the results of the Equipment Examination. This decision followed a period of intensive negotiations with GD (UK), including correspondence with the company, to address a number of commercial issues, during which it became clear to both parties that it would not be possible to reach agreement on the commercial conditions required to enable further progress on the basis of the current procurement strategy. The Department will now consider how and when to reset the Utility Vehicle competition to ensure we provide Defence with the best possible capability at the best value for money. General Dynamics (UK) will have an opportunity to compete in any future Utility Vehicle competition.

Charities

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence to which (a) charities and (b) voluntary organisations his Department has provided funding in the last five years; and how much funding was provided to each. (247363)