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Speed Limits: Cameras

Volume 487: debated on Wednesday 4 February 2009

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many charges for speeding offences were discontinued because the location of the speed camera failed to comply with the guidance in each of the last five years; (253021)

(2) how many charges for speeding offences were discontinued because of a breach of the guidance on co-located signs in each of the last five years;

Charging data are not held by my Department. Prosecutions data are normally provided in lieu.

The number of proceedings at the magistrates court for speeding offences, and the number discontinued, for 2003 to 2007 (latest available) are given in the following table.

Statistical information collected centrally on the number of persons proceeded against for offences of contravening speed limits does not identify the reason why the proceedings are discontinued.

The number of proceedings at the magistrates court for speeding offences1 and the number discontinued, England and Wales, 2003-07 2, 3, 4

Number of offences

Proceeded against

Proceedings discontinued

2003

165,495

1,465

2004

172,327

1,540

2005

192,238

1,809

2006

180,630

1,759

2007

177,917

1,753

1 Offences under the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 ss. 16, 81, 84, 86, 88 7 89; Motor Vehicles (Speed Limits on Motorways) Regs. 1973; Parks Regulation (Amendment) Act 1926—byelaws made thereunder.

2 It is known that for some police force areas, the reporting of court proceedings in particular those relating to summary motoring offences, may be less than complete.

3 Volumes of convictions for camera detected speed limit offences cannot be accurately established because in many cases the method of detection is not identified in the court data. It is not known exactly in how many cases it was in fact a camera or a visual detection by a police officer.

4 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source:

Office for Criminal Justice Reform—Evidence and Analysis unit.