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Cancer

Volume 487: debated on Thursday 5 February 2009

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many incidents of (a) lung and (b) cervical cancer there were (i) in the North West and (ii) on average in all other regions in each year since 2004; and what steps have been taken in the North West (A) to prevent cancer, (B) to inform the public about the causes of cancer, (C) to provide equipment and services to treat cancer and (D) to provide palliative care for patients who are terminally ill since 2004. (253415)

The information is not available in the format requested. However, the following table shows registrations of newly diagnosed cases of lung and cervical cancer in the Government office for the north-west region compared with the average of all other regions in England from 2004 to 2006.

200420052006

North-west

Others

North-west

Others

North-west

Others

Lung cancer

Males

3,046

1,927

2,984

1,915

2,939

1,883

Females

2,241

1,302

2,365

1,355

2,373

1,344

Cervical cancer

Females

306

244

347

240

374

243

Notes:

1. Lung cancer is coded to C34 and cervical cancer is coded to C53 in the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10).

2. ‘Others’ is the average of all other regions in England.

3. Before the 2006 volume of Cancer Statistics, the rates in the government office regions table were crude rates.

4. In 2006, the north-west had the highest number of registrations for both lung and cervical cancer.

5. However, as there are differences in both the age profile of cancer patients between geographical areas and the population size and age profile of the nine regions in England, the unbiased way to compare cancer incidence between different regions is to calculate directly age-standardised incidence rates. Such rates, by region, are given in table five of the annual reference volume Cancer Statistics: Registrations Series MB1, available on the National Statistics website:

www.statistics.gov.uk/StatBase/Product.asp?vlnk=88438&Pos=&ColRank=l&Rank=272

This shows that the north-west region has the second highest rate for lung cancer and the fourth highest rate for cervical cancer.

Source:

Office for National Statistics

The Cancer Reform Strategy, published in December 2007, sets out guidance to the local national health service on how to improve cancer prevention, speed up the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, reduce inequalities, improve the experience of people living with and beyond cancer, ensure care is delivered in the most appropriate settings and ensure patients can access effective new treatments quickly. It is for primary care trusts (PCTs) to use the funds made available to them and work in partnership with strategic health authorities, local services, cancer networks and other local stakeholders to deliver these aims. Information on the work being done in the north-west can be obtained from the individual PCTs directly.

Through the Cancer Reform Strategy’s National Awareness and Early Diagnosis Initiative, the Department, in partnership with Cancer Research UK, is co-ordinating a programme to support local interventions to increase cancer symptom awareness, and encourage people to seek help early.