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Alcoholic Drinks: Crime

Volume 488: debated on Monday 23 February 2009

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prosecutions have taken place for the offence of selling alcohol to children on more than one occasion since 2003. (249934)

[holding answer 21 January 2009]: For prosecution data for the offence of selling alcohol to children I refer the hon. Member to the answer given on 3 February 2009, Official Report, columns 1025-34W.

The Ministry of Justice publishes statistics on reoffending, but figures are not available for individual offences.

For the offence of persistently selling alcohol to a person under 18 no data are currently available. Section 147A of the Licensing Act 2003 (as amended by the Violent Crime Reduction Act 2006) came into effect in April 2007. Court proceedings data for 2008 will be available in autumn 2009.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what data (a) her Department and (b) police forces collate on (i) knife crime, (ii) youth crime and (iii) crimes and incidents in which alcohol represents a characteristic or motivating factor. (254368)

The police forces of England and Wales will collect data depending on their own operational needs and priorities. The extent of what is collected is likely to be greater than what is requested by the Home Office, and will differ between police forces.

The Home Office collects crime data in two main ways: crimes recorded by the police; and the British Crime Survey (BCS), a victimisation survey covering adults aged 16 and over, living in private households in England and Wales. In January 2009 the BCS was extended to include under-16s. Other data may be collected on an ad hoc basis; this is included where relevant.

Knife Crime

The Home Office receives aggregated recorded crime data from the police forces for a wide range of offences. Since April 2007, the Home Office began to collect data on the numbers of offences where a knife or sharp instrument has been involved for selected offences: attempted murder, robbery and GBH. This was in addition to homicide, where offences including a knife were already covered by the homicide index collection, a more detailed individual record collection from police forces. The knife crime collection was extended in April 2008 to cover the additional offences of threats to kill, ABH, rape and sexual assault.

In addition to these returns, a separate data collection has been established as part of the Tackling Knives Action Programme (TKAP). TKAP is a time limited initiative which aims to tackle the possession of knives and knife related serious violence among young people in 10 police force areas in England and Wales. The programme started in June 2008 and is planned to finish in March 2009. A programme of monitoring has been established to assess progress and recorded crime information on knife and sharp instrument related homicide, attempted murder, threats to kill, GBH, ABH, robbery and possession offences are collected from the ten forces. Other information such as the age of victim and suspect and whether the incident is counted as domestic violence are also collected.

Findings from the TKAP will be published after its completion.

The BCS collects information on weapons, including knives, used in incidents of violent crime. Figures on the proportion of violent incidents involving knives are published regularly in the annual Crime in England and Wales publication.

Copies of these publications are available in the House of Commons Library (the most recent publication is Crime in England and Wales 2007/08).

The Offending, Crime and Justice Survey (OCJS), which ran between 2003 and 2006 and focused on young people aged 10 to 25 living in private households in England and Wales, asked questions on knife carrying. Figures for the proportion of young people aged 10 to 25 who reported carrying a knife in the past year (and further details, including their motivations for doing so) were published regularly in the annual reports on the survey. Annual publications are available on the RDS website at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/offending_survey.html

Youth crime

The BCS has covered only adults aged 16 and over until January 2009 when the BCS was extended to cover 10 to 15 year olds.

The Offending, Crime and Justice Survey (OCJS), which ran between 2003 and 2006 and focused on young people aged 10 to 25 living in private households in England and Wales, asked questions about the experience of young people as both offenders and victims of crime. The results from the surveys have been published in a series of annual publications available on the RDS website at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/offending_survey.html

Police recorded crime does not specifically collect data on youth crime, although age of suspect is recorded in the homicide collection.

Alcohol-related crime

The BCS asks respondents who have been victims of violent crime whether they believed the offender to be under the influence of alcohol at the time of the incident. Figures on the proportion of violent incidents where the victim believed the offender to be under the influence of alcohol are regularly published in the annual Crime in England and Wales publication. Copies of these publications are available in the House of Commons Library (the most recent publication is Crime in England and Wales 2007-08).

Police recorded crime does not specifically collect data on alcohol related incidents, although whether the suspect has been drinking alcohol or not is included in the homicide collection. Furthermore, data on breath tests are collected including how many are positive or refused.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people were charged with each type of alcohol-related offence in (a) the year before and (b) the year following the introduction of the Licensing Act 2003. (254495)

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many convictions for being drunk and disorderly there have been in each of the last 15 years. (254499)

The number of persons found guilty at all courts for being drunk and disorderly in England and Wales, from 1993 to 2007, the latest available, are given in table 1.

Additionally, penalty notices for disorder (PNDs) are available for issue for this offence. The number of PNDs issued to persons aged 16 and over for being drunk and disorderly from 2004, when the scheme was implemented in all 43 police forces in England and Wales, to 2007 are given in table 2.

Table 1: Number of persons found guilty at all courts for drunk and disorderly related offences in England and Wales, from 1993 to 20071,2,3

Number

1993

17,858

1994

19,217

1995

18,828

1996

23,337

1997

27,910

1998

29,974

1999

28,006

20004

26,274

2001

25,632

2002

26,254

2003

27,044

2004

20,420

2005

15,399

2006

14,995

2007

16,767

1 Data are on the principal offence basis.

2 Data include the following offence descriptions and corresponding statutes:

Being found drunk in a highway or other Public place whether a building or not, or a licensed premises.

Licensing Act 1872 sec. 12.

Any person who in any public place is guilty, while drunk, of disorderly behaviour.

Criminal Justice Act 1967 sec.91.

3 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts, and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

4 Staffordshire police force were only able to submit sample data for persons proceeded against and convicted in the magistrates courts for the year 2000. Although sufficient to estimate higher orders of data, these data are not robust enough at a detailed level and have been excluded from the table.

Source:

Court proceedings data held by CJEA—Office for Criminal Justice Reform—Ministry of Justice

Table 2: Number of penalty notices for disorder issued to persons aged 16 and over for offences of being drunk and disorderly1 in England and Wales from 2004 to 20072

Number

2004

29,106

2005

40,176

2006

46,268

2007

49,062

1 Data include the following offence descriptions and corresponding statutes:

Being found drunk in a highway or other public place, whether a building or not, or on licensed premises—Licensing Act 1872, section 12;

Being guilty while drunk of disorderly behaviour—Criminal Justice Act 1967, section 91.

2 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source:

Office for Criminal Justice Reform—Evidence and Analysis Unit.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 16 December 2008, Official Report, columns 713-4W, on alcoholic drinks: crime, how many of those found guilty of refusing to obey an instruction to stop drinking in a designated public place in each of the last five years received a fine of (a) up to £100, (b) £101 to £250 and (c) over £250. (254525)

The number of people fined, and the level of fines received, for refusing to stop drinking and surrender alcohol in a designated public place can be found in the following table.

Number of persons fined for drinking alcohol in a designated public place, by amount, all courts 2007

Up to £100

£101 to £250

Over £250

Total

2003

71

1

1

73

2004

76

2

78

2005

61

2

63

2006

58

1

59

2007

71

4

1

76

Note:

These figures have been drawn from administrative data systems. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system.

Source:

OMS Analytical Services, Ministry of Justice

(2003-2006) Ref: AHA378-08 (15 October 2008)

(2007) Ref: Sent (OMSAS) 025-09 (4 February 2009)

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people in the Chelmsford division of the Essex police force area were charged with alcohol-related offences in the year (a) before and (b) following the introduction of the Licensing Act 2003; and with which offences such people were charged. (254836)