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Dementia

Volume 488: debated on Wednesday 25 February 2009

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the evidential basis is for the statement that the level of diagnosis and treatment of people with dementia is generally low in the UK and that there is a 24-fold variation between primary care trusts, as referred to on page 17 of the national dementia strategy; and if he will place in the Library a copy of such evidence. (257558)

The source of the statement referred to on page 17 in the Dementia Strategy publication “Living well with dementia: A National Dementia Strategy” is from the Dementia UK report, published in 2007 by the Alzheimer’s Society. A copy of the Dementia UK report has been placed in the Library.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how the £150 million he has allocated to fund the National Dementia Strategy will be allocated to each year of the strategy; and how much will be allocated to (a) resource and (b) capital expenditure in each year; (257562)

(2) from which budget the £150 million he has allocated to fund the National Dementia Strategy will be taken; and by what mechanism it will be allocated to the NHS;

(3) how the £150 million he has allocated to fund his National Dementia Strategy will be broken down between each of the 17 objectives in the strategy.

The £150 million is revenue, not capital expenditure. It is being made available as part of primary care trusts’ (PCTs) overall general allocations. These are increasing by 5.5 per cent. in each of 2009-10 and 2010-11, a total increase of £8.6 billion over the two years of which the dementia funding is part. PCTs have flexibility over the use of these resources in line with the operating framework. Total expenditure in each year on dementia, and on each of the 17 objectives that are not central budgets, will therefore be determined by the national health service locally. National estimates of expenditure on each objective are set out in the impact assessment published on the Department’s website alongside the National Dementia Strategy. This information is contained with “Living well with dementia: A National Dementia Strategy”, which has already been placed in the Library.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many dementia advisers there are; how many he plans to recruit in each year; and by what date he plans to complete the proposed complement of additional advisers; (257567)

(2) what estimate he has made of the average annual cost of a dementia adviser.

The role of dementia advisor will be an entirely new one. As such, the role will be piloted in the first year of the strategy. Subsequent decisions about the nature, number and funding of dementia advisers will be made locally by primary care trusts, depending on local circumstances.