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Written Answers

Volume 489: debated on Friday 20 March 2009

Written Answers to Questions

Friday 20 March 2009

Justice

Coroners

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the longest time taken to conclude a Treasure inquest was in each of the last three years. (265348)

The Ministry of Justice collects statistics on the number of finds under the Treasure Act 1996 reported to coroners in England and Wales during each calendar year, the number of treasure inquests concluded during the year and, of these, the number of verdicts of treasure returned. Information is not collected on the time taken to conduct treasure inquests.

Informal figures are collated by the British Museum, which record the time between the inquest being requested by the British Museum and a verdict being returned. However, these figures only relate to treasure inquests which have been requested since 2006. The figures do not include inquests which were requested in earlier years, and so they do not reveal the longest time taken for treasure inquests which were concluded in each of the last three years. The British Museum figures show that the current longest-running ongoing treasure inquest was requested by them in March 2007.

Family Courts: Fees and Charges

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) when he plans to appoint an independent person to lead the review of the effect of court fees in children protection; and which candidates are being considered for the role; (264384)

(2) when he expects the review of the effects of court fees on child protection to be completed.

The Secretary of State for Justice and Lord Chancellor, my right hon. Friend the Member for Blackburn (Mr. Straw) has appointed Francis Plowden to lead the review. His report is expected in September 2009.

Fraud: Civil Proceedings

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether recourse regarding alleged fraud in entries in (a) deed and (b) title plans is provided through the civil courts. (264420)

Allegations of fraud may lead to proceedings in civil or criminal courts, or both. Fraudulent misrepresentation (or "deceit"), whether or not it leads to a particular entry being made in an individual register or title plan, is a tort. The civil courts have jurisdiction to hear these cases.

In addition, disputes arising out of objections to applications to Land Registry are referred to the Adjudicator to HM Land Registry, an independent tribunal. Such objections may involve, for example, an allegation that a deed was executed as a result of fraudulent misrepresentation. Decisions of the Adjudicator may be the subject of an appeal to the High Court.

HM Inspectorate of Probation: Statistics

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much time was spent by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Probation in assessing ethnic monitoring statistics in (a) 2006, (b) 2007, (c) 2008 and (d) 2009. (264578)

Such figures are not precisely discernible. This information is valuable. HM Inspectorate of Probation considers the regular information produced by NOMS on the ethnicity of offenders as background to each of its individual inspections. HMI Probation is able to segment findings over a whole inspection programme by a number of characteristics including race, but this does not involve any additional inspection resources.

Mentally Incapacitated

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what remit the Court Funds Office has to manage funds on behalf of Court of Protection clients. (264342)

The Court Funds Office provides a banking and investment service to the civil courts in England and Wales, including the Court of Protection. Where the Court of Protection has directed that funds be lodged with the Court Funds Office, or where a deputy appointed to manage funds on behalf of a Court of Protection client has chosen to lodge funds with the Court Funds Office, those funds are dealt with as directed by the deputy, in accordance with the Court of Protection order. The Court Funds Office does not make investment decisions, or deal with funds lodged other than as instructed by the deputy or by way of a direction from the Court of Protection,

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) enduring powers of attorney have been applied for and (b) living wills have been made in each year since the Mental Capacity Act 2005 came into force; and if he will make a statement. (264343)

The Mental Capacity Act 2005 was fully implemented on 1 October 2007. It introduced new Lasting Powers of Attorney (LPAs) to enable people to appoint someone to make decisions on their behalf in relation to their property and affairs and/or their health and welfare.

In addition, Enduring Powers of Attorney (EPAs) made prior to October 2007 remain valid.

EPAs only need to be registered with the Office of the Public Guardian (OPG) once the person to whom they relate has lost capacity.

All LPAs must be registered with the OPG before they can be used. Between October 2007 and September 2008 the OPG received

21,200 applications to register EPAs.

9,600 applications to register health and welfare LPAs

28,500 applications to register property and affairs LPAs

During the period October 2008 to January 2009 the OPG received

8,200 applications to register EPAs.

6,000 applications to register health and welfare LPAs

22,000 applications to register property and affairs LPAs

The Mental Capacity Act 2005 gave statutory force to valid and applicable advance decisions to refuse treatment (previously also sometimes referred to as ‘living wills'). The Ministry of Justice has no information regarding how many advance decisions have been made.

Offenders: Rehabilitation

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much was spent by HM Inspectorate of Probation assessing diversity issues during the delivery of restrictive interventions to offenders in (a) 2006, (b) 2007, (c) 2008 and (d) 2009. (264581)

Precise figures are not discernible. A major element of HM Inspectorate of Probation's inspections is an assessment of the effectiveness of the management of offenders' Risk of Harm to the public, including the delivery of restrictive interventions, in a representative sample of individual cases. While the Inspectorate's assessment of the effectiveness of the delivery of restrictive interventions takes into account any diversity issues, the latter forms only a small—though important—part of that assessment.

Culture, Media and Sport

Big Lottery Fund: Equality

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport with reference to the answer to the hon. Member for Brentwood and Ongar of 25 June 2008, Official Report, column 331W, on regional planning and development: electronic government, how much the Big Lottery Fund has provided for each regional equality and diversity partnership to date; and for what purposes such funds have been provided. (259608)

Information from the DCMS Lottery grants database, which is searchable at:

www.lottery.culture.gov.uk

uses information supplied by lottery distributing bodies and indicates that a grant of £495,933 was paid by the Big Lottery Fund to Equality South West in November 2007. The purpose of this award was to support the development of the organisation's work in training voluntary and community organisations to ensure that equality and diversity are systemic within their work.

Museums and Galleries

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many educational visits have been made to publicly funded museums in each region in each year since 1997. (263144)

Figures are not available for all museums. The Museums, Libraries and Archives Council advises that regional figures for museum visits specifically in regard to the Renaissance programme 2002-08 are as follows.

Table 1: Number of educational visits to Renaissance hub museums

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

North West

62,175

61,750

68,456

78,669

81,456

71,397

North East

92,033

102,821

115,180

115,053

111,780

125,891

Yorkshire and Humberside

110,299

104,318

96,165

96,479

109,792

111,872

West Midlands

116,599

133,618

157,202

157,780

156,132

141,422

East Midlands

114,216

111,278

94,027

89,889

87,691

93,953

East of England

50,310

50,744

56,233

63,814

67,462

81,341

South West

36,976

56,262

62,646

57,133

54,175

59,123

South East

24,650

60,834

105,555

98,743

110,336

115,732

London

69,322

81,181

87,782

78,558

84,905

95,351

Total

676,580

762,806

843,246

836,118

863,729

896,082

Since 2001-02, 181 of DCMS's sponsored museums have collected figures measuring the number of children aged 16 and under attending on and off-site organised educational sessions. DCMS cannot disaggregate the data by region, to provide a regional breakdown, because some institutions who have branches across different parts of the country provide a single return for the organisation. The figures are as follows:

Table 2

Number

2001-02

1,705,634

2002-03

2,256,386

2003-04

2,270,448

2004-05

2,785,155

2005-06

2,722,094

2006-07

2,894,499

2007-08

3,525,037

1 British Museum, Geffrye Museum, Horniman Museum, Imperial War Museum, Museum of London, Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester, National Gallery, National Maritime Museum, National Museums Liverpool, National Museum of Science and Industry, National Portrait Gallery, Natural History Museum, Royal Armouries, Sir John Soane’s Museum, Tate Gallery, Tyne and Wear Museums Service, Victoria and Albert Museum and Wallace Collection.

National Lottery: Coastal Areas

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much Heritage Lottery funding was provided to each of the principal seaside towns in England and Wales from the inception of the Heritage Lottery to date, listed in descending order of amount of funding. (262995)

The Heritage Lottery Fund was founded in 1994. The Heritage Lottery Fund has advised that Heritage Lottery funding as provided to each of the principal seaside towns in England and Wales since that date is as follows.

HLF funding for principal seaside towns in England and Wales since 1994

Town

Total value of project (£)

Barry

1,446,161

Bognor Regis

1,866,292

Bridlington

307,521

Burnham-on-Sea

439,731

Clacton-on-Sea

601,270

Dawlish/Teignmouth

587,368

Deal

355,866

Eastbourne

2,789,531

Exmouth

95,709

Falmouth

22,171,173

Folkestone/Hythe

4,921,621

Great Yarmouth

6,865,010

(Greater) Blackpool

7,933,638

(Greater) Bournemouth

3,774,209

(Greater) Brighton

14,023,150

(Greater) Worthing

2,324,665

Hastings/Bexhill

8,838,763

Ilfracombe

1,537,824

Isle of Wight1

6,755,735

Llandudno/Colwyn Bay

2,691,304

Lowestoft

5,605,289

Minehead

1,091,431

Morecambe

365,624

Newquay

135,960

Penzance

7,576,752

Porthcawl

103,743

Rhyl/Prestatyn

2,854,951

Scarborough

3,890,353

Sidmouth

1,335,159

Skegness

1,883,154

Southend-on-Sea

1,851,142

Southport

5,917,842

St. Ives

781,309

Swanage

3,395,728

Thanet2

7,492,243

Torbay3

9,783,519

Weston-Super-Mare

2,402,646

Weymouth

2,948,901

Whitby

10,586,503

Whitley Bay

492,117

Whitstable/Herne Bay

4,033,126

Grand total

164,854,032

1 Includes only the resorts of Cowes, Ryde, Sandown, Shanklin and Ventnor

2 Includes only the resorts of Broadstairs, Margate, Ramsgate and Westgate

3 Includes only the resorts of Brixham, Paignton and Torquay

Playing Fields: Private Sector

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many playing fields owned by private companies there are; and how many such fields have closed in the last 10 years. (261437)

[holding answer 6 March 2009]: Sport England has advised that as of January 2009 Active Places data show private companies own 391 sites containing 901 (grass) pitches.

At present, Active Places, which was set up in 2004, does not capture historical data on the number of fields owned by private companies which have closed in the last 10 years.

Sport England are in the process of collecting further data on public and privately owned facilities, including closures where possible, and hope to conclude that work by the end of 2009.

Sports: Anti-Semitism

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what steps he is taking to tackle anti-Semitism in (a) football and (b) other sports; what recent representations he has received on the issue; what recent meetings he has had with the Football Association on the issue; and if he will make a statement. (259047)

While I have received no recent representations or held any recent meetings on the issue of tackling anti-Semitism in sport, I remain fully committed to a sporting landscape free from all forms of discrimination. To this end:

(a) Football treats anti-Semitism as an offence under the ground regulations, thereby empowering the clubs and police to take action if abuse occurs. The Football Association also provides funding for the Kick It Out campaign, which tackles anti-Semitism and other forms of discrimination through the Equality Standard for professional clubs. In addition, the Football Association also jointly hosted a seminar on Tackling Anti-Semitism and Islamophobia in April 2008, and the subsequently convened working group will report its findings to the FA board in April 2009.

(b) Other sports receiving Government funding through Sport England and UK Sport for the 2009-13 period will do so on the basis of their compliance with the Equality Standard for Sport. The standard forbids discrimination on the grounds of gender, marital status, race, colour, religion, disability, age, occupation, religion or political opinion.

Swimming

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what provision for water safety will be included in the Free Swimming Programme; and if he will make a statement. (264538)

The Free Swimming Programme will be delivered in pools owned by participating local authorities, on Health and Safety Executive-enforced premises. All operators are required to carry out a suitable and sufficient risk assessment of their operations and to identify necessary control measures. The Health and Safety Executive supplies extensive guidance to help them do this.

Tourism

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport pursuant to the answer of 9 February 2009, Official Report, column 1556W on Tourism, on which dates the Minister for Tourism met heads of Tourism in the nine regional development agencies in the last 12 months. (257022)

I met the South West Regional Development Agency Chair on 8 January 2009 and 11 December 2008. A meeting with all the regional development agency tourism leads has been arranged for April 2009.

Tourism: South West

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much funding his Department has provided in respect of the tourism responsibilities of the South West Regional Development Agency in 2008-09. (264366)

[holding answer 18 March 2009]: In the financial year 2008-09 DCMS allocated £3.5 million to regional development agencies for tourism. The South West of England Regional Development Agency have advised that their allocation was £403,000.

Northern Ireland

Security

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what his most recent assessment is of the security situation in Northern Ireland. (263874)

The level of threat from dissident republicans, as evidenced by attacks at Antrim and Craigavon, continues to be assessed as “Severe”. These are reckless and callous individuals who are seeking to drag Northern Ireland back to the misery of the past. The people of all communities are united in demonstrating that they will not be allowed to succeed.

Police Service of Northern Ireland: Housing

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what estimate he has made of the cost of the Special Purchase for Evacuated Dwellings scheme for police officers in Northern Ireland in 2008-09. (265183)

The Scheme for the Purchase of Evacuated Dwellings (SPED) is a matter for the devolved administration.

House of Commons Commission

Occupational Health

To ask the hon. Member for North Devon, representing the House of Commons Commission if the Commission will assess the adequacy of provision of occupational health and welfare services in the House for (a) hon. Members and their staff and (b) civil servants who work on the Parliamentary Estate. (264699)

The Safety, Health and Wellbeing Service provides a comprehensive occupational health service to hon. Members, Peers, and staff employed by both Houses. Hon. Members are entitled to regular health screening on request and can also self-refer for a consultation with the occupational health adviser or physician, if they believe that their work is having a detrimental effect on their health. There is also an emergency GP service available locally to Members. Given that the House is not the employer of Members' staff, it does not routinely provide occupational health services to them. The Parliamentary Welfare Service is aimed at staff of both Houses and does not formally provide welfare services for Members or their staff; but Members and their staff can ask for informal advice and guidance on the best way to deal with issues of concern. There is no provision for occupational health and welfare services for any civil servants who work on the Parliamentary Estate, as they have adequate access via their own employer.

Leader of the House

Written Questions: Government Responses

To ask the Leader of the House how many questions tabled to each Department for written answer on a named day were (a) answered with a holding answer, (b) answered on the named day, (c) answered later than the named day and (d) not answered in each of the last four years; how many questions tabled to each Department for ordinary written answer were (i) answered within two weeks of tabling, (ii) answered more than two weeks after tabling and (iii) not answered in each such year; and what the (A) average and (B) maximum time taken by each Department to answer such questions was in each such year. (264432)

The information that the hon. Member has requested is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

The statistics for written parliamentary questions tabled to the Leader of the House of Commons for the past four Sessions are detailed in the table.

Session

Percentage of named day questions answered on the specified day

Percentage of ordinary written answered within five working days

Average number of sitting days to answer ordinary written questions

2004-05

100 (14 of 14)

97 (38 of 39)

2.9

2005-06

100 (72 of 72)

100 (189 of 189)

2.8

2006-07

100 (40 of 40)

99 (163 of 165)

2.7

2007-08

100 (40 of 40)

99.5 (201 of 202)

2.9

Defence

Departmental Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many (a) permanent, (b) agency and (c) temporary staff on contracts of (i) up to three months, (ii) between three and six months, (iii) between six and 12 months and (iv) 12 months or more there are in each directorate of his Department. (264313)

The figures for civilian staff, excluding Trading Funds and Locally Employed Civilians, are as follows (at 17 March 2009):

Permanent staff by top level budget (TLB)

Number

Air Command

8,685

Central

16,885

Chief of Joint Operations

343

Commander-in-Chief Fleet

2,396

Defence Equipment and Support

17,114

Defence Estates

2,707

Land Forces

16,437

Science Innovation and Technology

332

Total

64,899

Agency staff by TLB

Number

Air Command

572

Central

274

Chief of Joint Operations

162

Commander-in-Chief Fleet

74

Defence Equipment and Support

438

Defence Estates

204

Land Forces

210

Science Innovation Technology

32

Total

1,966

Temporary staff by TLB

Number

Air Command

0-3 months

0

3-6 months

1

6-12 months

113

12 months plus

44

TLB Sub-Total

158

Central

0-3 months

0

3-6 months

1

6-12 months

54

12 months plus

112

TLB Sub-Total

167

Chief of Joint Operations

0-3 months

0

3-6 months

0

6-12 months

1

12 months plus

10

TLB Sub-Total

11

Commander in Chief Fleet

0-3 months

0

3-6 months

0

6-12 months

16

12 months plus

29

TLB Sub-Total

45

Defence Equipment and Support

0-3 months

2

3-6 months

22

6-12 months

84

12 months plus

55

TLB Sub-Total

163

Defence Estates

0-3 months

0

3-6 months

0

6-12 months

16

12 months plus

8

TLB Sub-Total

24

Land Forces

0-3 months

2

3-6 months

6

6-12 months

206

12 months plus

492

TLB Sub-Total

706

Science Innovation Technology

0-3 months

0

3-6 months

0

6-12 months

1

12 months plus

1

TLB Sub-Total

2

Grand Total

1,276

These figures are derived from the Department’s central system, and it is possible that some engagement of agency staff (who are not employees) may not be recorded where arrangements have been made locally.

USA: Military Alliances

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Lewes of 3 November 2008, Official Report, column 71W, on USA: military alliances, on what date and at which location the next Stocktake meeting between the Government and the US administration under the 1958 Mutual Defence Agreement will take place. (265154)

Arrangements have not been finalised but it is intended that the next Stocktake meeting will take place in early June in the UK.

Welsh Language

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the cost of translation services under his Department's Welsh language scheme was in 2008. (263029)

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what representations were received from the Welsh Language Board during his Department's consultation on its Welsh language scheme. (263030)

We received no representations from the Welsh Language Board during the public consultation on the Welsh Language Scheme. However, during the process of updating the scheme, officials from MOD and the Welsh Language Board met on several occasions as well as having regular exchanges of correspondence.

Work and Pensions

Apprentices

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to the answer of 13 June 2008, Official Report, column 616W, on apprentices, what progress his Department has made towards meeting its share of the Government's commitment to employ over 1,000 apprentices in central Government departments and agencies in 2008-09; and how many apprentices his Department now employs. (256256)

In reply to the questions asked, I refer to the Government Skills cross-Government response recorded on 24 February 2009, Official Report, column 741W.

Child Benefit: Foreigners

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) what checks he requires to be made on the validity of documentation supplied by non-UK EU citizens in the course of child benefit claims; (264450)

(2) what estimate he has made of the number of non-UK EU citizens claiming child benefit; and how many children in respect of whom such benefit is paid are not resident in the UK.

I have been asked to reply.

Any person making a claim for child benefit must provide documentary evidence of the child being claimed for, such as an original birth certificate, adoption certificate or passport. HMRC checks the validity of this document upon receipt. All claims for child benefit are subject to a wide range of checks throughout the life of each claim and it would be inappropriate to disclose a complete list of such checks as to do so may provide assistance to those attempting to defraud the system. Claims by EU migrant workers to family benefits in the UK (child benefit and child tax credit) are subject to additional checks between HMRC and the competent authorities of the other member state on the composition of the worker's family resident in that other state and whether family benefits are in payment there.

I refer my hon. Friend to my reply to him of 13 November 2008, Official Report, column 1306W, for my response to his request for estimates of receipts.

Clear

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to the answer to the hon. Member for Angus of 27 March 2006, Official Report, column 740W, on public relations companies, what payments have been made to the communications consultancy, Clear, since March 2006; for what projects; and at what cost. (250315)

Cycling

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what plans he has to implement Cycle to Work schemes for staff working in his Department and its agencies. (263932)

The Department now has in place arrangements to make financial support available to staff working in the Department and its agencies who wish to cycle to work.

These arrangements make it possible for staff to purchase a cycle and the necessary safety equipment through a salary advance scheme. This arrangement can provide an interest-free advance of their salary so they can purchase the cycle and safety equipment of their choice. In addition staff can also use the Department’s staff benefits scheme, which provides the opportunity for staff to purchase the cycle and safety equipment at a significant discount from a choice of three retail outlets.

These arrangements are comparable to Cycle to Work schemes being operated in a number of organisations and are also viewed as being of better value in support of the Department’s staff who wish to cycle to work.

Departmental Car Allowances

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what mileage allowance (a) his Department, (b) its executive agencies and (c) its non-departmental public bodies pays per mile to its staff. (263558)

[holding answer 13 March 2009]: There are a range of mileage allowances available to staff in DWP, its executive agencies and non-departmental public bodies (NDPBs) who undertake business travel. The rate of mileage allowance payable will depend on the type of vehicle being used and whether the vehicle is privately owned or provided by the Department. The rates are based on the rates set by HMRC under the Approved Mileage Allowance Payments.

Mileage rates paid by DWP and all associated NDPBs

£ per mile

Privately-owned vehicle

Higher standard rate (up to 6,000 miles)

0.40

Lower standard rate (over 6000 miles)

0.25

Vehicle provided by DWP

Private user scheme—petrol

0.15

Private user scheme—diesel

0.13

Private user scheme—LPG

0.08

Motor cycle

0.24

Passenger supplement (per passenger)

0.02

Pedal cycle

0.20

Candidates for civil service posts—motor cars

0.25

Candidates for civil service posts—motor cycles

0.24

In addition, DWP will only pay the higher standard rate to the first 1,000 miles unless the employee has an approved business case, in which case the higher standard rate is paid up to 6,000 miles.

The Pensions Protection Fund, Independent Living Fund and Health and Safety Executive pay at the above rates with the exception that the higher standard rate is paid for the first 10,000 miles.

Remploy pay the higher standard rate for the first 4,000 miles and the lower standard rate for any mileage above 4,000. Company car users receive £0.20 per mile regardless of total mileage.

Departmental Scientists

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what his Department's budget for scientific advice and research is in 2008-09; for what purposes the equivalent budget for 2007-08 was used; and how many people employed in his Department have a science or engineering degree. (260767)

The Department does not undertake research into science, technology, engineering or mathematics as usually defined. The only advice which partly requires scientific input comes from the Industrial Injuries Advisory Council. Its budget for 2008-09 was £70,932; it has been similarly funded by DWP and predecessor Departments since its creation in 1948. The secretariat includes one post for which a scientific degree qualification is required. No information is held on other people employed in the Department with a science or engineering degree as it is not a requirement for holding other posts.

Discrimination: Disabled

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions pursuant to the answer of 27 January 2009, Official Report, column 436W, on discrimination: disabled, which stakeholders he held meetings with; when each meeting was held; and if he will place in the Library a copy of the minutes of each meeting. (254962)

[holding answer 9 February 2009]: I met with a number of stakeholders at the largest consultation event, which was held in London on 11 December. I provided an introduction to the event and answered questions from the floor.

My officials held four consultation events, three in London and one in Edinburgh. The London events were held on 4, 11 and 15 December; the Edinburgh event was held on 9 December. Stakeholders were invited to attend and the consultation events were also publicised through the Office for Disability Issues website, the Office for Disability Issues newsletter (which reaches approximately 2,000 people), and via charities who raised the profile of the consultation through their own emails and websites. Following is a list which gives a selection of organisations which attendees came from. Notes were taken at each event and a summary will be included in the Government's response to the consultation, which is currently being prepared. A copy of the response will be placed in the Library on publication.

Informal meetings between officials and stakeholder groups have also taken place. Those stakeholder organisations with which informal discussions were held included the Equality and Human Rights Commission and the Disabilities Charity Consortium (DCC). The DCC is an informal coalition of charities made up of Leonard Cheshire Disability, Mencap, Mind, RNIB, RNID, RADAR, Scope, The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association and Sense. Minutes of these meetings were not taken due to their informal nature.

Alzheimer's Society

British Dyslexia Association

Cheshire Constabulary

Disability Voice Bromley

Equality 2025

Equality and Human Rights Commission

Guide Dogs for the Blind Association

Hearing Dogs for Deaf People

Independent

Leonard Cheshire Disability

London borough of Ealing

London borough of Hounslow

National AIDS Trust

National Deaf Children's Society

National Housing Federation

Public and Commercial Services Union

RADAR

Spinal Injuries Association

Techmobility

Trade Union Disability Alliance

UNISON

Unite The Union

IDS Employment Law Brief

Discrimination Law Association

Russell Jones and Walker

Wandsworth and Merton Law Centre

Addleshaw Goddard

Coventry Law Centre

The Law Society

Disability Law Service

Skill

One Essex Court Chambers

Birmingham Law Centre

London Probation

KPMG UK LLP

Goldsmiths, University of London

Future Inclusion

National Landlords Association

Employers' Forum on Disability

Disability Forward Limited

CBI

Health Professions: Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what discussions he has had with the Secretaries of State for Health, Children Schools and Families and Innovation, Universities and Skills on workforce planning for the allied health professions. (263614)

Ministers and civil servants meet many people as part of the process of policy development and advice. It is not the usual practice of Government to disclose details of such meetings.

Housing Benefit

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people in each constituency have received housing benefit based on local reference rents in each of the last four years. (265352)

Incapacity Benefit

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people have claimed incapacity benefit in (a) Jarrow constituency, (b) South Tyneside, (c) the North East and (d) the UK in each year since 1997. (263832)

The information is in the following table.

Number of incapacity benefit/severe disablement allowance claimants in each year since August 1997

Great Britain

North East Government office region

South Tyneside local authority

Jarrow parliamentary constituency

August

1997

2,829,000

196,000

12,200

5,800

1998

2,759,900

186,600

11,500

5,700

1999

2,721,500

185,240

11,600

6,080

2000

2,745,460

185,790

11,520

5,940

2001

2,794,330

189,050

11,680

6,070

2002

2,800,130

188,710

11,760

6,090

2003

2,807,290

187,160

11,430

5,930

2004

2,804,980

182,790

11,020

5,680

2005

2,755,460

176,190

10,550

5,450

2006

2,712,850

170,250

10,320

5,290

2007

2,671,210

163,600

10,020

5,120

2008

2,620,420

156,290

9,540

4,810

Note:100 per cent. figures are rounded to the nearest 10, 5 per cent. figures are rounded to the nearest 100 and have been uprated to be consistent with Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study data. Source: Data pre-1999: Department for Work and Pensions, Information Directorate, 5 per cent. sample and Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study data. Data from 1999 onwards: Department for Work and Pensions Information Directorate 100 per cent. Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study.

Performing Arts

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions whether his Department has engaged any (a) actors, (b) musicians and (c) other performers to support its initiatives over the last five years. (264052)

The Department and its agencies have engaged actors, musicians or other performers from time to time, however details of any such engagements are not collated centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Duchy of Lancaster

Christmas

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (1) whether it is the Cabinet Office's policy to offer staff (a) additional leave entitlement for Christmas shopping and (b) Christmas bonus payments; (262802)

(2) whether it is the policy of the Prime Minister's Office to offer staff (a) additional leave entitlement for Christmas shopping and (b) Christmas bonus payments.

Crime Prevention: Internet

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (1) what assessment he has made of levels of public awareness of the Get Safe On-line website; what assessment he has made of the website’s effectiveness in reducing levels of online crime; and how much he plans to spend on promoting awareness of the website in 2009-10; (264032)

(2) if he will make potential threat information received from the National Fraud Reporting Centre available on the Get Safe On-line website.

Get Safe Online is a joint public and private sector initiative to raise awareness of internet safety. Its work includes not only a website but community events, educational publicity campaigns, roundtable discussions and conferences as well as general PR and marketing activity to reach a broad audience and help inform general internet users of how to go online safely and with confidence. Research carried out in November 2008 showed that 22 per cent. of people were spontaneously aware of Get Safe Online. www.getsafeonline.org currently has over 291,000 links on the Internet compared to its US counterpart www.staysafeonline.info which has 11,000 links. The research also highlights an improvement in steps people are taking to prevent themselves falling victim to online crime such as a decrease in the number of people opening e-mail attachments from unknown sources and an increase in those updating their software, although it is difficult to directly attribute this to the campaign activity.

The Cabinet Office has sponsored Get Safe Online for the past four financial years. Budgets for 2009-10 are yet to be determined in relation to my Department’s sponsorship of Get Safe Online. Get Safe Online has agreed to promote relevant internet fraud alerts from the National Fraud Reporting Centre.

Death

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (1) how many death certificates included the words (a) smoking, (b) knife injuries, (c) obesity, (d) anorexia, (e) bulimia and (f) influenza in the cause of death section in each of the last five years; (264116)

(2) how many death certificates included the words (a) legionnaires' disease, (b) self-harm, (c) cataract, (d) tuberculosis, (e) measles, (f) mumps and (g) rubella in the cause of death section in each of the last five years.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your recent questions asking:

1) How many death certificates included (a) smoking, (b) knife, (c) overweight, (d) anorexia, (e) bulimia and (f) influenza in the cause of death section in each of the last five years. (264116)

2) How many death certificates included (a) Legionnaires' disease, (b) self-harm, (c) cataract, (d) tuberculosis, (e) measles, (f) mumps and (g) rubella in the cause of death section m each of the last five years. (264117)

The accurate reporting of deaths by specific causes depends on the complete recording of all relevant causes of death by medical practitioners and coroners. Medical practitioners are required to complete the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death (MCCD) to the best of their knowledge and belief. Internationally accepted guidance from the World Health Organisation requires only those conditions that contributed directly to death to be recorded, and medical practitioners and coroners are not supposed to record all of the diseases or conditions present at or before death. Whether a condition contributed is a matter for their clinical judgment. The MCCD is not designed to collect information on risk factors or exposures related to the development of disease, such as smoking behaviour.

The tables attached provide the number of deaths where:

1) (a) Mental and behavioural disorders due to use of tobacco (b) contact with sharp object, (c) obesity, (d) anorexia nervosa, (e) bulimia nervosa, (f) influenza, or

2) (a) Legionnaires' disease, (b) intentional self-harm, (c) cataract, (d) tuberculosis, (e) measles, (f) mumps and (g) rubella were mentioned on the death certificate, in England and Wales, for 2003 to 2007 (the latest year available).

The number of deaths due to (1) (a) mental and behavioural disorders due to use of tobacco is not the same as the number of deaths attributable to smoking. The cause of death recorded in the great majority of cases where smoking was a causal factor would be the specific disease, such as lung cancer or ischaemic heart disease, which led to death.

Although there are codes for contact, assault and intentional self-harm by sharp object, there are no specific codes for 'knife1, so these figures are likely to exceed the actual number of deaths involving (1) (b) knives.

Figures for (2) (b) self-harm are likely to be an underestimate, as they exclude any deaths where intent could not be ascertained. These figures do not correspond directly to the statistics published by ONS on suicides.

Table 1. Deaths where certain named causes were mentioned on the death certificate1, England and Wales2, 2003-073

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Mental and behavioural disorders due to use of tobacco

676

622

614

719

596

Contact with sharp object

160

182

171

164

160

Obesity

888

901

993

1,150

1,203

Anorexia nervosa

26

19

30

35

29

Bulimia nervosa

3

3

3

3

5

Influenza

80

51

57

25

37

Legionnaires' disease

30

38

24

37

38

Intentional self-harm

3,286

3,453

3,316

3,332

3,165

Cataract

19

11

15

15

9

Tuberculosis

641

606

627

633

561

Measles

3

5

0

2

1

Mumps

4

2

1

2

1

Rubella

1

0

0

0

0

1 Cause of death was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). The specific causes of death categorised in Table 1, and their corresponding ICD-10 codes, are shown in the box below. Deaths were included where one of these causes was mentioned anywhere on the death certificate.

2 Figures for England and Wales include deaths of non-residents.

3 Figures are for deaths registered in each calendar year.

Box 1. Causes of death codes used—International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10)

Cause of death

ICD-10 code(s)

Mental and behavioural disorders due to use of tobacco

F17

Contact with sharp object

X78. X99, Y28

Obesity

E66

Anorexia nervosa

F50.0, F50.1

Bulimia nervosa

F50.2

Influenza

J10-J11

Legionnaires' disease

A48.1

Intentional self-harm

X60-X84

Cataract

H25-H26

Tuberculosis

A15-A19

Measles

BOS

Mumps

B26

Rubella

B06

Departmental Internet

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many members of staff (a) employed by the Cabinet Office and (b) seconded from other departments have responsibility for the Real Help Now website. (259747)

The Real Help Now website brings together information about the range of support available during the economic downturn and makes it easier for people and businesses to access that support.

The development work on the website took less than two weeks and was overseen by the existing Cabinet Office website team, supported by one member of staff on part-time secondment from another government department. One member of the Cabinet Office web team has ongoing responsibility for updates to the website as part of their existing duties.

Departmental Reorganisation

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what change there will be as a result of the restructuring of the Cabinet Office Communications Directorate in (a) the number of the directorate’s staff and (b) the directorate’s aggregate staff wage bill. (258712)

The overall staff costs are not anticipated to increase due to changes in the grading of staff. The reorganisation will deliver substantial efficiency savings and will reduce the overall cost of the unit by approximately £500,000.

The current funded number of staff is 41 full time equivalents, which include four staff provided by the Central Office of Information on a repayment basis. The current plans for restructuring Cabinet Office Communications will see the overall number rise to 45.5 FTE.

The restructuring of Cabinet Office Communications is intended to better align staff resources with the Department’s objectives.

Electoral Register: Northern Ireland

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many and what proportion of people were registered to vote in each local authority area in Northern Ireland in each of the last 10 years. (264186)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated March 2009:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your question asking how many and what proportion of people were registered to vote in each local authority area in Northern Ireland in each of the last 10 years. (264186)

Table 1 shows the number of people who were registered to vote in Local Government elections for each District in Northern Ireland for 1998 to 2007. Table 2 shows the number of people who were registered to vote as a proportion of the resident population aged 18 and over for the same years. The latest year for which estimates of the usually resident population are available by Local Authority is mid-2007.

These proportions should not be interpreted as registration rates as not everyone who is usually resident is entitled to vote, people who have more than one address may register in more than one place and electoral registration officers vary in how quickly they remove people from the registers after they have moved away from an area or died.

Table 1: Number of people registered to vote in local government elections in each district in Northern Ireland, 1998 to 2007

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Antrim

31,981

32,379

32,440

32,159

28,215

28,857

27.620

31,589

29,808

31,658

Ards

52,492

53,097

53,569

53,272

48,875

48,561

47,388

52,373

49,231

51,167

Armagh

37,735

38,019

38,135

38,065

35,685

36,257

35,672

39,187

37,184

39,179

Ballymena

42,906

43,010

43,212

43,210

40,191

40,310

39,860

43,350

40,427

42,635

Ballymoney

18,453

18,686

18,914

19,139

18,248

18,392

18.420

20,291

19,170

20,379

Banbridge

28,646

29,149

29,511

29,652

27,899

28,279

27,947

30,731

29,207

30,690

Belfast

190,972

188,921

186,440

181,224

153,870

153,063

144.567

166,483

147,246

158,425

Carrickfergus

26,468

26,606

26,911

26,599

24,014

24,237

23,278

26,050

24,620

25,595

Castlereagh

48,795

48,667

48,361

47,648

42,851

42,367

40.878

44,707

41,387

42,864

Coleraine

38,349

38,570

38,437

38,114

35,087

34,782

34.148

37,425

34,737

36,154

Cookstown

22,590

22,681

22,577

22,687

21,547

21,668

2L150

23,538

21,802

23,347

Craigavon

55,120

55,494

55,737

55,560

51,670

52,104

5L500

56,707

53,950

56,586

Derry

68,322

69,456

69,521

68,790

61,677

61,586

60.012

68,454

61,840

66,422

Down

43,200

43,704

44,025

44,082

40,895

41,068

40,284

44,597

41,783

44,248

Dungannon

33,841

34,150

34,235

34,385

32,121

32,220

31,353

35,040

32,800

34,668

Fermanagh

40,823

41,198

41,275

41,360

39,067

39,482

38,387

42,739

40,169

42,258

Larne

22,645

22,834

22,813

22,362

20,303

20,234

19,814

21,978

20,723

21,472

Limavady

20,506

20,691

20,833

20,935

19,569

19,800

19,507

21,361

19,762

20,825

Lisburn

74,043

74,298

74,327

73,505

65,617

65,177

64,816

72,914

67,699

72,180

Magherafelt

27,012

27,359

27,479

27,538

26,399

26,769

26,218

28,665

27,095

28,656

Moyle

10,972

11,095

11,077

11,044

10,211

10,394

10,297

11,359

10,553

11,159

Newry and Mourne

59,506

60,142

60,561

60,637

55,045

55,848

54,829

61,790

57,389

61,342

Newtownabbey

56,977

57,402

57,490

56,909

50,720

51,211

48,905

54,774

51,141

53,193

North Down

55,446

55,492

55,263

54,873

49,484

49,276

47,734

52,994

49,282

51,501

Omagh

32,356

32,629

32,713

32,441

30,767

30,697

29,232

33,322

30,744

32,934

Strabane

26,241

26,599

26,716

26,526

24,622

24,615

23,855

26,575

24,542

26,154

Source:

Electoral Office for Northern Ireland.

Table 2: Number of people registered to vote in local government elections in each district in Northern Ireland as a proportion of the resident population aged 18, 1998 to 20071

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Antrim

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.8

0.8

0.8

0.8

0.8

0.8

Ards

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.8

0.9

0.8

0.9

Armagh

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.9

1.0

0.9

0.9

Ballymena

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

Ballymoney

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

Banbridge

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

Belfast

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.8

0.7

0.8

Carrickfergus

1.0

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.8

0.8

0.8

0.9

0.8

0.8

Castlereagh

1,0

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.8

0.8

0.8

0.9

0.8

0.8

Coleraine

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.8

0.8

0.8

0.9

0.8

0.8

Cookstown

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

Craigavon

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.8

0.9

0.8

0.9

Derry

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.8

0.8

0.8

0.9

0.8

0.8

Down

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.8

0.9

0.8

0.9

Dungannon

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

Fermanagh

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.9

1.0

0.9

0.9

Lame

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.8

0.9

0.9

0.9

Limavady

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.8

0.8

0.8

0.9

0.8

0.8

Lisburn

0.9

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.8

0.8

0.8

0.9

0.8

0.9

Magherafelt

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

Moyle

1.0

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.8

0.9

0.8

0.9

Newry and Mourne

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

Newtownabbey

1.0

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.8

0.8

0.8

0.9

0.8

0.8

North Down

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.8

0.8

0.8

0.9

0.8

0.8

Omagh

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.8

0.9

0.8

0.9

Strabane

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.9

1 The proportions have been calculated using the mid-year population estimates for local authorities in Northern Ireland of those age 18 and above, and the number of people registered to vote in local government elections on 1 December.

Source:

Electoral Office for Northern Ireland and Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency.

Government Departments: Information and Communications Technology

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (1) how many and what proportion of new Government IT software procurements have been of (a) open source and (b) proprietary software (i) in total and (ii) in each department in each year since 2004; and if he will make a statement; (264154)

(2) how many and what proportion of Government IT systems used (a) open source and (b) proprietary software (i) in total and (ii) in each department as at the end of each of the last 10 years; and if he will make a statement.

Details of individual software procurements across Government and of software used in individual Government IT systems are not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Higher Civil Servants: Retirement

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster which permanent secretaries will reach standard retirement age in the next five years. (255040)

Of permanent secretaries in post as at 30 September 2008, three will reach the age of 65 (the mandatory retirement age for senior Civil Servants) on or before 6 February 2014.

Ministers: Domestic Visits

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many visits have been made by Cabinet Ministers to each English region in the last 12 months. (264977)

The information requested is not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Official Residences

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster whether any former Minister occupies a ministerial residence. (262770)

Project Scope

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what the cost of Project Scope was on the latest date for which figures are available; and if he will make a statement. (265058)

In respect of information requested concerning the costs associated with the SCOPE programme, I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Beaconsfield (Mr. Grieve) on 4 November 2008, Official Report, columns 360-1W.

Public Sector: Public Consultation

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster if he will place in the Library a copy of the background data for the Delivery Index provided by IPSOS MORI to the Cabinet Office on the public's attitude to and experience of public services relating to the last four quarters. (249963)

The Cabinet Office does not routinely receive any additional Delivery Index data from IPSOS Mori beyond that available on their website; the underlying data can be found here:

http://ipsosmori.com/content/government-delivery-index9.ashx

Copies have been placed in the Libraries of the House.

Unemployment: Young People

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (1) how many people aged between 16 and 24 years were unemployed in (a) Braintree constituency, (b) Essex and (c) England in each year since 1997; (264443)

(2) what proportion of those claiming jobseeker's allowance in (a) Braintree constituency, (b) Essex and (c) England were female in each of the last five years.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated March 2009:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Questions asking how many people aged 16-24 were unemployed in (a) Braintree constituency (b) Essex and (c) England in each year since 1997; and what proportion of those claiming Jobseeker's allowance in (a) Braintree constituency (b) Essex and (c) England were female in each of the last 5 years. (264443, 264445)

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) compiles unemployment statistics for local areas from the Annual Population Survey (APS) and its predecessor the annual Labour Force Survey (LFS) following International Labour Organisation (ILO) definitions.

Table 1 shows the number of people aged 16-24, resident in Braintree constituency, Essex and England who were unemployed in each year since 1997. Estimates for Braintree parliamentary constituency and for Essex, for the majority of the periods requested, can be derived from APS and annual LFS at the level of geography requested. However, due to the small sample sizes at this level of detail, the estimates are considered too unreliable for practical purposes and have not been provided.

Estimates for July 2007 to June 2008 have also been provided as this is the most recent for which figures are available.

Table 2 shows the percentage of people claiming Jobseeker's Allowance who were female in January of each of the last five years for the geographies requested.

Table 1. Number of unemployed persons aged 16-24 resident in Braintree constituency, Essex and England

Thousand

12 months ending:

Essex

England

February 1998

504

February 1999

468

February 2000

448

February 2001

435

February 2002

417

February 2003

14

449

February 2004

455

March 2005

460

March 2006

522

March 2007

564

March 2008

553

June 20081

***14

*563

‘—’ = Figures are disclosive or statistically unreliable.

1Coefficients of Variation have been calculated for the latest period as an indication of the quality of the estimates. See Guide to Quality below.

Guide to Quality:

The Coefficient of Variation (CV) indicates the quality of an estimate, the smaller the CV value the higher the quality. The true value is likely to lie within +/- twice the CV—for example, for an estimate of 200 with a CV of 5 per cent. we would expect the population total to be within the range 180-220.

Key Coefficient of Variation (CV) (%) Statistical Robustness

* 0 = CV<5 Estimates are considered precise

** 5 = CV <10 Estimates are considered reasonably precise

*** 10 = CV <20 Estimates are considered acceptable

**** CV 20 Estimates are considered too unreliable for practical purposes

Source:

Annual Population Survey/Annual Labour Force Survey

Table 2: Percentage of persons claiming jobseeker's allowance who were female

Percentage

As at January each year

Braintree

Essex

England

2004

33

29

25

2005

31

29

26

2006

32

29

26

2007

30

29

27

2008

32

30

27

2009

28

28

26

Source:

Jobcentre Plus administrative data

Health

Abortion

To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will include information on (a) counselling and (b) possible alternatives to abortion on the National Health Service webpage entitled Abortion: know your options; and if he will make a statement. (264613)

The NHS Choices web page ‘Abortion: know your options' at:

www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Sexualhealth/Pages/Abortionyouroptions.aspx

does include information on counselling. It includes links to several sources of further information, including pages from the Family Planning Association's website which cover both counselling and alternatives to abortion at:

www.fpa.org.uk/Information/Readourinformationbooklets/Pregnantanddontknowwhattodo

Alcoholic Drinks: Misuse

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the rate of admissions for alcohol-related incidents per 1,000 admissions for 18 to 21 year-olds was for (a) university hospitals, (b) other hospitals and (c) all hospitals in each of the last 10 years. (264150)

Data for all hospitals on the rate of alcohol-related finished hospital admissions per 1,000 admissions in England for 18 to 21-year-olds are set out in the following table. The data are only available for the period 2002-03 to 2007-08.

Data by university and non-university hospitals are not available.

Finished alcohol-related admissions of patients aged 18 to 21, England 2002-03 to 2007-08

Alcohol-related admissions of patients aged 18 to 21

Admissions of patients aged 18 to 21

Rate of alcohol-related admissions of patients aged 18 to 21 per 1,000 admissions of patients aged 18 to 21

2002-03

13,207

408,782

32

2003-04

15,188

422,802

36

2004-05

17,243

441,861

39

2005-06

19,524

470,296

42

2006-07

21,758

478,128

46

2007-08

23,054

494,483

47

The number of alcohol-related admissions is based on the methodology developed by the North West Public Health Observatory (NWPHO). Following international best practice, the NWPHO methodology includes a wide range of diseases and injuries in which alcohol plays a part and estimates the proportion of cases that are attributable to the consumption of alcohol. Details of the conditions and associated proportions can be found in the report Jones et al. (2008) Alcohol-attributable fractions for England: Alcohol-attributable mortality and hospital admissions.

Cancer: Surgery

To ask the Secretary of State for Health which NHS trusts performed (a) between one and nine, (b) between 10 and 39 and (c) over 40 cancer-related (i) prostatectomies and (ii) cystectomies in 2007-08. (263987)

The information is not available in the format requested. A table which shows the count of finished consultant episodes for cancer-related prostatectomy, cystectomy and cystoprostatectomy in 2007-08 by trust has been placed in the Library.

Children: Health Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) if he will make it his policy to provide timely, high quality and effective care in the home for children with long-term complex health needs; and if he will make a statement; (263959)

(2) what steps his Department is taking to provide packages which co-ordinate health, social care and education to meet the needs of children with long-term complex health needs and their families; and if he will make it his policy to improve co-ordination between hospital and community services;

(3) if he will increase the funding his Department provides for community children's nurses to work specifically with children with long-term complex health needs; and if he will make a statement.

Both the Child Health Strategy, ‘Healthy Lives, Brighter Future’, published recently a copy of which has been placed in the Library, and the ‘National Service Framework for Children, Young People and Maternity Services’, published in 2004, have reiterated our policy of providing coordinated support, as close to home as possible, for children with complex health needs and their families. A copy of the framework has already been placed in the Library. The Children's Continuing Care Framework, which we hope to launch at the end of May, will provide local partners with the tools to provide tailor made packages of care, involving health, social care and education components. We are taking forward a discrete project looking at the benefits and opportunities arising from investment in community children's nursing services.

Dentistry: Registration

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what meetings Ministers in his Department have had with the General Dental Council on the annual registration fee for dental care professionals in the last 12 months; (264394)

(2) what evidence his Department evaluated prior to its endorsement of the General Dental Council's annual fee registration requirement.

The General Dental Council is responsible for setting its fees and the Department has no role in the approval or endorsement of these fees.

There have been no meetings about registration fees for dental care professionals in the past 12 months between the Department's Ministers and the General Dental Council.

Dentistry: Training

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent research he has (a) commissioned and (b) evaluated on the efficacy of the requirement on (i) dentists and (ii) other dental care professionals to undertake continuing professional development; and if he will make a statement. (264393)

The General Dental Council (GDC) has introduced a requirement for dentists and dental care professionals to undertake regular continuing professional development (CPD) to maintain their registration. We have not commissioned research in respect of CPD, but we expect the GDC's requirement to develop into a revalidation scheme where by health professionals would be required to keep up to date with advances in medical and dental science. The White Paper Trust Assurance and Safety—The Regulation of Health Professionals in the 21st Century stated:

"In the traditional system for regulating health professionals, once people had qualified and demonstrated that they were fit to practise with patients, their names were placed on the relevant professional register and remained there unless a definite reason came to light for their removal. Public and professional opinion has moved on in the course of this debate, from a position where trust alone was sufficient guarantee of fitness to practise, to one where that trust needs to be underpinned by objective assurance. Public opinion surveys suggest that people expect health professionals to participate in the revalidation of their registration and that many believe this takes place every year."

Departmental Publications

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many articles appearing in healthcare publications and journals in the last five years have been funded in whole or in part by (a) his Department and (b) its agencies. (264447)

To identify the number of articles appearing in healthcare publications and journals in the last five years that have been funded in whole or in part by the Department and its agencies would incur a disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much (a) his Department and (b) its agencies have spent on articles appearing in healthcare publications in the last five years. (264449)

To identify the amount of expenditure by the Department and its agencies on articles appearing in healthcare publications and journals in the last five years would incur a disproportionate cost.

Food: Contamination

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many contaminated food incidents have been reported in each year since 1997. (265059)

The number of reported food-borne outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease in England and Wales (1997 to 2007) is provided in the following table.

Number of food-borne outbreaks1

1997

256

1998

152

1999

130

2000

133

2001

109

2002

92

2003

87

2004

74

2005

89

2006

86

2007

49

Total

1,257

1 Data include food-borne outbreaks caused by Salmonella, Campylobacter, E. coli 0157, Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Cryptosporidum, Bacillus spp., Giardia lamblia, norovirus, astrovirus and scrombrotoxin. Data include all settings, including all restaurant premises, hotels, shops, residential, schools, hospitals and private establishments. Source: Health Protection Agency (Centre for Infections).

Human Papilloma Virus

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) if he will commission research into the effectiveness of implementing human papilloma virus testing as a follow-up test for women with borderline and abnormal smear test results and following treatment for cervical abnormalities; and if he will make a statement; (263847)

(2) if he will increase (a) the amount of funding available for the human papilloma virus sentinel sites implementation project and (b) the number of areas in which triage testing will be made available.

Work on the implementation phase of human papilloma virus (HPV) triage for women with borderline and low-grade abnormalities using HPV testing has begun in six sentinel sites. Decisions on expenditure, further roll-out and evaluation will be made once the results from these sites are known at the end of December 2009.

Influenza: Vaccination

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the proportion of people over 60 years who received a vaccination against influenza in 2007-08. (265327)

Uptake of the influenza vaccine is collected for those aged 65 and over and those aged under 65 in a clinical at risk group. The Department is unable to provide a figure for the proportion of people aged over 60 years who received the vaccine.

In 2007-08, 73.5 per cent. of people aged 65 and over received the influenza vaccine.

These figures only cover those who received the vaccine as part of the national health service influenza programme. It does not cover those who receive the vaccine privately.

Khat

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what research his Department has (a) evaluated, (b) commissioned and (c) undertaken on the effects on health of the regular use of khat. (264904)

In March 2005 the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) was asked by the then Home Office Minister, my right hon. Friend the Member for Don Valley (Caroline Flint) to assess the extent of the harm posed by khat use in the United Kingdom, to the individual, their communities and to society as a whole.

The ACMD reported in January 2006 and continues to monitor the situation in relation to khat through its Technical Committee.

Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the findings of the report of the Healthcare Commission on the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust; and if he will make a statement. (264838)

I refer the hon. Member to the oral statement given by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health on 18 March 2008, Official Report, columns 909-11.

Multiple Sclerosis: Research

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department has spent on research into multiple sclerosis in each of the last 10 years. (264403)

The information requested is shown in the following table.

Expenditure on multiple sclerosis research

£ million

Department of Health

Medical Research Council

1998-99

0.6

n/a

1999-2000

0.5

n/a

2000-01

0.5

1.5

2001-02

0.6

2.1

2002-03

0.1

1.8

2003-04

0.1

1.1

2004-05

0.1

1.4

2005-06

0.8

1.9

2006-07

0.01

3.1

2007-08

0.8

3.6

n/a = Not available

The departmental figures relate to national research programme and, from 2007-08, National Institute for Health Research expenditure. They do not include expenditure in the areas of human health concerned from the research and development allocations made annually over the last 10 years to national health service providers. That information is not held centrally.

The Medical Research Council (MRC) is one of the main agencies through which the Government support biomedical research. The MRC is an independent body funded by the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills.

NHS: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Health when he expects to publish the National Programme Budgeting Data for 2007-08. (264367)

The 2007-08 programme budgeting data are being checked prior to their publication shortly on the Department’s website.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what plans he has to ensure that trusts which are receiving funding at a level (a) 1 to 5 per cent. and (b) more than 5 per cent. (i) above and (ii) below target funding are (A) appropriately supported and (B) where underfunded, compensated for being underfunded; (265433)

(2) at what rate trusts which have NHS funding (a) 1 to 5 per cent. and (b) over 5 per cent. (i) above and (ii) below target funding will be brought towards target funding over the next five financial years; and if he will make a statement.

Primary care trusts' (PCTs) target revenue allocations are made on the basis of a fair funding formula, recommended by the independent Advisory Committee on Resource Allocation, that directs funding towards areas of greatest need.

We are committed to moving all PCTs towards their target allocations as quickly as possible, but this must be balanced with the need to ensure that all PCTs are appropriately supported with stable funding that both supports existing commitments and allows long-term planning, as well as recognising the unavoidable cost pressures that all PCTs face.

The allocations for 2009-10 and 2010-11 achieve this by ensuring that:

average PCT growth is 5.5 per cent. each year;

minimum growth is 5.2 per cent. in 2009-10 and 5.1 per cent. in 2010-11;

no PCT will be more than 6.2 per cent. under target by the end of 2010-11; and

no PCT will move further under target as a result of above average population growth in 2010-11.

Further, we have ensured that the most under-target PCTs will benefit from the highest increases in funding. At the start of 2009-10, the most under-target PCT will be 10.6 per cent. below its target allocation. Over the next two years, that PCTs' allocation will grow by more than 17 per cent. and it will end 2010-11 only 6.2 per cent. below target. This is a significant achievement by historic standards: in 2003-04, the most under-target PCT was 22 per cent. below target.

The rate at which PCTs will move towards their target allocation in future years will need to be considered in light of a number of factors including population changes, cost pressures and the resources available to the national health service.

Compensation for PCTs that have received under-target allocations in the past would be difficult to determine as targets vary over time. It would effectively mean re-opening those allocation rounds, which would undermine stability of NHS funding and so long-term planning. Further, it could be funded only by reducing resources for other PCTs, which may result in painful cuts to services.

Smoking: Yorkshire and the Humber

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the cost to the NHS of treating smoking-related diseases in (a) Barnsley and (b) Doncaster in each of the last five years. (264547)

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people in (a) Barnsley and (b) Doncaster have received assistance from the NHS to stop smoking in each of the last five years. (264548)

The information is not available in the format requested. However, data on the number of people setting a quit date and successfully quitting through the National Health Service Stop Smoking Services are available for Barnsley primary care trust (PCT) and Doncaster PCT in 2006-07 and 2007-08 and for Barnsley PCT, Doncaster Central PCT, Doncaster East PCT and Doncaster West PCT for 2004-05 to 2006-07.

Information for 2007-08 is available from the annual Statistics on “NHS Stop Smoking Services in England, April 2007 to March 2008”. This information can be found in table 3.5 on page 28.

Information for 2006-07 is available for both the old and new strategic health authority (SHA) and PCT from the annual Statistics on “NHS Stop Smoking Services in England, April 2006 to March 2007”. This information can be found in table 2.12 (old SHA and PCT configuration) and table 5.4 (new SHA and PCT configuration) on pages 19 and 65 respectively.

Information for 2005-06 is available for both the old SHA and PCTs from the annual Statistics on “NHS Stop Smoking Services in England, April 2005 to March 2006”. This information can be found in table 4.12 on page 38.

Information for 2004-05 is available for both the old SHA and PCTs from the annual “Statistics on NHS Stop Smoking Services in England, April 2004 to March 2005”. This information can be found in table 19 on page 54.

All of the publications have already been placed in the Library.

Notes:

1. The Information Centre for health and social care collects data from the NHS Stop Smoking Services as part of the NHS Stop Smoking Services quarterly monitoring returns forms, undertaken since 2005 on behalf of the Department.

2. On the basis that the clinical viewpoint tends to be that a client should not be counted as a ‘failure’ if he/she has smoked in the difficult first days after the quit date, a client is counted as having successfully quit smoking if he/she has not smoked at all since two weeks after the quit date. The four-week follow-up (and Carbon Monoxide (CO) validation, if appropriate) must be completed within six weeks of the quit date. Persons not contacted within this time are treated as lost to follow-up for evaluation purposes.

3. Only people who set a quit date through the NHS Stop Smoking Services are included in the quarterly monitoring returns, those who attend the service but do not set a quit date are not included.

Strokes: Health Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent assessment he has made towards ensuring that patients with suspected trans ischaemic attacks are scanned with magnetic resonance imaging within 24 hours as referred to in the National Stroke Strategy. (263464)

High quality imaging of the brain and blood vessels is a key part of a successful stroke service and the Department issued ‘Implementing the National Stroke Strategy—an imaging guide’ in May 2008 to support local improvement. A copy has been placed in the Library. The 2008 National Sentinel Stroke Audit notes that providing access to magnetic resonance imaging within 24 hours to high risk patients will require a major reorganisation of imaging facilities. The Stroke Improvement Programme (part of NHS Improvement) has been established to support providers and commissioners in implementing the necessary changes to achieve these standards.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Anti-Semitism

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs which Minister signed the Final Declaration of the London conference on combating anti-Semitism; and if he will make a statement. (264676)

My right hon. Friends the Prime Minister and the Foreign Secretary signed the London Declaration on combating anti-Semitism in their capacity as parliamentarians.

The London Declaration was signed by 125 parliamentarians from 40 countries.

The Government are committed to combating anti-Semitism wherever and whenever it occurs.

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs pursuant to the Answer of 9 March 2009, Official Report, column 41W, on anti-Semitism, what steps the Government plans to take to monitor and tackle anti-Semitism overseas; and if he will make a statement. (264677)

The recent London Conference on combating anti-Semitism, organised by the Inter-parliamentary Coalition for Combating Anti-Semitism and co-hosted by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, called for the establishment of an international task-force of internet specialists to measure racism and anti-Semitism online and propose international responses.

It also called for the exposure and isolation of governments and politicians engaging in hate against Jews, and urged the EU to address the issue of combating anti-Semitism.

We will work with the Inter-parliamentary Coalition and other partners on follow-up to the London Conference.

Brasilia

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many visits were made by Ministers to Brasilia in the financial year 2007-08. (264568)

Our records indicate that in the period running from the 1 April 2007 to the 31 March 2008, there were four visits by Government Ministers to Brasilia. These were the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, the Secretary of State for Transport, the Minister of State at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, and the Secretary of State for Health.

Departmental Temporary Employment

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what his Department’s policy is on the renewal of the contracts of (a) temporary and (b) agency staff. (264301)

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO)’s policy on the renewal of temporary contracts follows the Civil Service Commissioners Recruitment Code. Information can be found on their website:

http://www.civilservicecommissioners.org/Reference_Documents/Recruitment_Code_Reference/

The use and renewal of temporary agency staff is devolved to FCO directorates. They use agency staff when there is a pressing short-term operational need and there are no permanent members of staff available. There is central internal guidance available to directorates on using temporary agency staff.

Exercise

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what methodology his Department uses to assess progress towards the target of getting two million people more active by 2012; on which date such assessment began; to which age groups the target is applied; on what basis a person may be classified as more active; and whether the target is applied to people with (a) mental health problems, (b) physical disabilities and (c) learning disabilities. (264437)

I have been asked to reply.

The Government's 2012 legacy action plan, published in June 2008, sets a cross-Government target to get two million more adults active through sport and physical activity by 2012. The Department of Culture Media and Sport (DCMS) and Sport England lead on getting one million people doing more sport. A range of Government Departments will deliver programmes that will increase wider physical activity. These programmes are outlined in the Department of Health's new Physical Activity Plan “Be Active, Be Healthy” published on 11 February 2009. A copy has been placed in the Library.

Sport England's Active People survey will be the measure for the two million target. The baseline for the target will be established using the 2007-08 Active People survey, the results of which were published on 11 December 2008. The target is based on those adults aged 16 and over achieving three sessions of at least 30 minutes of at least moderate intensity activity per week. The target will also be informed by additional data collected on dance, active conservation and gardening from January 2009. A newly established Physical Activity Programme Board, chaired jointly by the Department and DCMS, will oversee the delivery of programmes against the Legacy Action Plan (LAP) target.

The LAP target applies to all adults aged over 16 and “Be Active, Be Healthy” recognises that people with disabilities, ranging from physical and neurological to sensory impairments and learning disabilities are at particular risk from inactivity.

Kenya: Elections

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what representations he has made to the government of Kenya on the role of the International Criminal Court in investigations of post-election violence in Kenya. (264591)

[holding answer 19 March 2009]: The Government have made clear, both privately and publicly through the media, their support for the recommendations made by the independent Commission of Inquiry into Post-Election Violence. The creation of a Special Tribunal to prosecute those responsible for the violence will be an important step in efforts to end impunity and foster healing and reconciliation in Kenya.

Our support for a local independent tribunal is in line with the views of Kofi Annan, the Inquiry’s recommendations and the Kenyan government’s adoption of the recommendations. Such a tribunal, with an international prosecutor and judges and strong witness protection systems, could help rebuild confidence in Kenya’s judiciary and would be a good route to justice for the victims of that violence, and to stopping it from re-occurring. The International Criminal Court in The Hague is another route for seeking justice and would be an alternative option if the creation of a local tribunal failed. But a local solution would be of greater benefit to Kenya in the long term.

Our high commissioner to Kenya has discussed this subject with Kenyan ministers, including the President and Prime Minister, and with MPs and civil society groups.

Redundancy

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs with reference to the Answer of 25 November 2008, Official Report, columns 1208-10W, on redundancy, how many staff left his Department under staff exit schemes with a severance package worth (a) between £100,000 and £125,000, (b) between £125,001 and £150,000, (c) between £150,001 and £200,000, (d) between £200,001 and £250,000, (e) between £250,001 and £500,000, (f) between £500,001 and £1,000,000 and (g) over £1,000,000 in each year since 2005-06. (264300)

My answer of 25 November 2008, Official Report, columns 1208-10W, provided a breakdown of total lifetime costs to the Department of early retirements between April 2005 and March 2009. The figures do not represent the value of sums received by staff, which will be lower.

The number of early retirement settlements over the past four years broken down into the categories listed above according to lifetime cost to the Department is:

(a) 30

(b) 23

(c) 46

(d) 29

(e) 63

(f) 2

(g) 0

Torture

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will establish a judicial inquiry into allegations of UK complicity in torture overseas and extraordinary rendition. (263763)

[holding answer 17 March 2009]: I refer the hon. Member to my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s statement of 18 March 2009, Official Report, column 55WS, in which he addressed these allegations and outlined the steps being taken in response to them.

UN World Conference against Racism

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent reports he has received of the decision of the Italian government to withdraw from the United Nations Durban 2 conference; and if he will make a statement. (264330)

Italian Foreign Minister Franco Frattini announced on 5 March 2009 that Italy would not participate in negotiations on the draft outcome document for the Durban Review Conference.

Italy would, however, continue to follow the process and reconsider its position if EU red lines were respected.

The Government have on several occasions expressed its view on the Durban Review Conference, the follow-up to the 2001 World Conference Against Racism. We want the conference to forge a collective will to fight against racism in all its forms, in all countries in the world. It should not be seen as an opportunity to press unrelated political interests and issues.

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what reports he has received of the withdrawal of governments from the United Nations Durban 2 Conference; and if he will make a statement. (264675)

Canada and Israel have formally withdrawn from the Durban Review Conference. The United States and Italy announced that they would not take part in negotiations on the draft document that was under negotiation, and set conditions for their re-engagement.

This document has now been superseded by an updated version, which was issued on 17 March 2009.

The Government have expressed a consistent view on the Durban Review Conference. We want the conference to forge a collective will to fight against racism in all its forms, in all parts of the world. It should not be seen as an opportunity to press unrelated political interests and issues.

Zimbabwe: Sequestration of Assets

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make an assessment of the merits of seizing overseas assets of the Zimbabwean Government in order to pay the pensions of former employees of the Southern Rhodesian Government and other Zimbabwean pensioners. (264598)

The Government do not consider seizure of the overseas assets of the Government of Zimbabwe an appropriate means of obtaining funds for the payment of pensions of former employees of the Southern Rhodesian Government and other Zimbabwean pensioners. We continue to make representation to the Government of Zimbabwe reminding them of their legal obligations to meet pension liabilities.

Children, Schools and Families

Children: Social Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the projected expenditure on the integrated children's system is in each of the next five years. (264873)

The planned expenditure on the Integrated Children's System (ICS) for 2009-10 is £8.7 million. This consists of £5 million for capital grants to local authorities and £3.7 million to cover project costs. ICS investment beyond 2009-10 will be subject to the outcomes of the 2009 Spending Review. Our plans will be informed by the conclusions of the feasibility study of ICS recommended by Lord Laming in his report earlier this month on progress on the protection of children in England.

Children’s Centres

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many new Sure Start children's centres are planned by local authorities to be completed between January 2009 and March 2010. (264942)

Local authorities are responsible for planning and delivering their Sure Start Children's Centre programmes so that by March 2010 there will be at least 3,500 centres offering access to services for all children under five and their families. The Department's delivery partner, Together for Children, is working with authorities to support them in finalising and delivering their plans for the final phase of the roll-out of centres. The exact number of centres to be delivered between January 2009 and March 2010 is therefore subject to change as local authorities confirm their plans. At 23 February 2009 there were 2,925 designated Sure Start Children's Centres. Local authorities are on track to meet the target for 3,500 centres by March 2010.

Grammar Schools: Kent

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many pupils from each neighbouring council to Kent have been offered grammar school places in Kent in each of the last 10 years. (264836)

As these arrangements are determined and administered locally, we do not hold data centrally on the number of pupils offered such places.

Parents: Advisory Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how the effectiveness of the Parent Know How programme is measured; and what assessment has been made of that effectiveness; (264943)

(2) how many people have used the Parent Know How programme websites in each quarter since they were established;

(3) how many people have used the Parent Know How (a) instant messaging and (b) SMS service in each quarter since each was established;

(4) how many calls there have been to each Parent Know How helpline in each quarter since their establishment.

An independent evaluation of the Parent Know How programme was commissioned last year to look at the effectiveness of the telephone helpline and the pilot new services under the programme. The evaluation will support decisions we make about which of the pilot services we will continue to fund beyond June 2009. A full report will be published in the late spring.

The information requested about how many people have used the Parent Know How website, instant messaging and SMS services, and how many calls there have been to each helpline, in each quarter since the launch of the programme last year are as follows. Information about the quarter January-March 2009 will not be available until late April:

(i) Websites:

Quarter

April-June 2008

July-September 2008

October-December 2008

Total

Services: Got a teenager, thecoupleconnection, Contact a Family, Dad Talk, Dad's Space, Dad's Team, One Space, Netmums, Parent Supporters

26,417

80,215

187,146

293,778

(ii) Instant messaging and SMS services:

Quarter

April-June 2008

July-September 2008

October-December 2008

Total

Instant messaging services1: Live Talk

0

209

289

498

SMS services: Ask ACE Relate SMS

434

489

724

1,647

1 Service launched in July 2009

(iii) Telephone helplines

Calls made to telephone helplines

April-June 2008

July- September 2008

October- December 2008

Total

Advisory Centre for Education

33,395

10,669

14,783

58,847

Children's Legal Centre

4,978

6,752

7,070

18,800

Contact a Family

4,361

6,598

4,575

15,534

Family Rights Group

6,498

5,560

4,211

16,269

Gingerbread

2,544

2,923

2,434

7,901

ParentlinePlus

47,033

40,140

39,266

126,439

YoungMinds

2,501

1,985

2,437

6,923

Total

101,310

74,627

74,776

250,713

Primary Education: Sanitation

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) what plans he has to issue guidance to primary schools on the design of school toilets; (264434)

(2) what guidance his Department offers primary schools who wish to redesign and rebuild their school toilets and drinking water facilities.

In answer to the first question, the Department offers guidance on the design of toilets in primary schools in the following publications:

The Education (School Premises) Regulations 1999, SI No. 2 1999, state the numbers of toilets that should be provided in schools.

Building Bulletin 99 Briefing Framework for Primary School Projects outlines key issues on toilet design.

Primary Ideas, Projects to Enhance Primary School Environments includes a number of ‘design principles' for toilet design.

Building Bulletin 102: Designing for Disabled Children and Children with Special Educational Needs includes guidance on accessible toilets for mainstream and special schools.

Standard Specifications, Layouts and Dimensions SSLD 3: Toilets in Schools sets out standards of performance for toilet facilities and shows how they might be delivered through design examples. The standards were developed for secondary schools and aspects of the guidance apply equally to primary schools.

In answer to the second question, the Department has no plans to issue further guidance on this subject.

The Department offers the following guidance on drinking water provision:

The Education (School Premises) Regulations 1999 (S11999 No 2), require that ‘A school shall have a wholesome supply of water for domestic purposes including a supply of drinking water' (Part iv, Regulation 22).

The joint DFES/Department of Health's publication National Healthy Schools Status—a Guide for Schools 2005, recommends easy access to free clear palatable drinking water (Section 2, part 2, Healthy eating).

The Department's Building Bulletin No 87: Guidelines for Environmental Design in Schools has a section on hot and cold water supplies.

Pupils: Diabetes

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) what recent assessment his Department has made of the provision of healthcare for children with diabetes in (a) primary schools and (b) secondary schools; (243012)

(2) what recent assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of provision of care for children with diabetes (a) in schools and (b) on school trips;

(3) what estimate he has made of the number of children of school age whose diabetic conditions (a) prevent and (b) reduce their attendance at school;

(4) what guidance his Department provides to schools on in school healthcare for children with diabetes;

(5) what recent discussions his Department has had with the Department of Health on healthcare for children with diabetes when in school;

(6) what estimate he has made of the number of children with diabetes who were unable to participate in school trips owing to a lack of healthcare provision during such trips in the last 12 months.

It is for schools and local authorities to support children with medical conditions at schools. The Department has issued guidance to schools to help them support their pupils. Our guidance to schools, “Managing Medicines in Schools and Early Years Settings”, issued jointly with the Department of Health in 2005, specifically addresses what schools can do to support pupils with medical needs such as diabetes. It encourages schools and local authorities to develop policies on the management of pupil’s medicines and on supporting pupils with medical needs, taking account of local resources and their various responsibilities. We produced sister guidance in the same year, entitled “Including me: managing complex health needs in schools and early years settings”.

We are taking a number of steps to ensure that pupils with long term medical conditions have access to the help they need to enable them to attend school and participate in school activities.

In April 2007, the Department of Health published a report entitled “Making Every Young Person with Diabetes Matter”, and has convened a group to support the implementation of best practice as set out in the report. The Department for Children, Schools and Families is represented on that group, and also on the sub-group set up to look specifically at support in schools.

Since September 2007 schools have a duty to promote the well-being of all pupils, including those with long term medical conditions. This duty defines well-being as the five outcomes of Every Child Matters, including being healthy and staying safe.

Most recently, the “Child Health Strategy, Better Health: Brighter Futures”, published on 12 February this year, announced that we will be revising the guidance to schools on managing medicines which will include clear statements of expectations of those involved in supporting pupils with medical conditions, such as schools and PCTs. Our intention is that this work will be done in consultation with expert organisations, such as Diabetes UK, and will be supported with an awareness raising campaign.

Teachers: Enfield

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many teaching staff from Enfield local education authority area have attended the National College of School Leadership. (263917)

The National College for School Leadership began recording such data centrally in 2003. Since then 547 members of school staff from the Enfield local authority have engaged with the college. 122 of these did not provide information about the nature of their role within their school and although we cannot be certain that they have a teaching role, it is likely that most of them do.

International Development

Afghanistan: Roads

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what the Government’s (a) current and (b) anticipated contribution to road building and maintenance in Afghanistan is by (i) cost and (ii) manpower in each of the next three years; and whether UK armed forces will be involved on this work. (263431)

On 3 March, I announced a £50 million increase in funding to Afghanistan, including £32 million for infrastructure projects in Helmand.

The UK currently supports the construction and maintenance of roads through the infrastructure component of the Afghan Government’s Helmand Agricultural and Rural Development Programme (HARDP). The Department for International Development (DFID) contributes £30 million to support HARDP (2006-07 to 2008-09).

These programmes are delivered by the Afghan Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development in close co-ordination with the International Security Assistance Forces (which include UK forces) and Afghan military forces.

The design phase for DFID’s continued support to rural development in Helmand is under way, including an impact assessment of infrastructure projects completed under HARDP. Until this assessment is completed we cannot predict what shape future support to the infrastructure sector will take.

DFID has four staff involved with the infrastructure elements of HARDP programming.

Democratic Republic of Congo: Overseas Aid

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what recent assessment he has made of the effects of the security situation in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) on the delivery of humanitarian assistance in the DRC. (262739)

[holding answer 11 March 2009]: The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) remains in the grip of a severe and prolonged humanitarian crisis, with 1.2 million people displaced by conflict in the east of the country, millions remaining food insecure and vulnerable to disease and natural disasters. However, the overall security situation in eastern DRC has improved over recent months. The end of hostilities and the integration into the national army of the CNDP militia (predominantly Rwandan militia group) since January has reduced barriers to humanitarian access in large areas of North Kivu, in turn allowing aid to reach those most in need. The longer-term humanitarian impact of joint DRC and Rwandan army operations against another militia group, the FDLR (former Rwandan Hutu forces) remains uncertain and the humanitarian community remains prepared to deal with any consequences that arise.

In the north of DRC, in Province Orientale, an ongoing joint DRC/Ugandan military operation which started in December against the Ugandan Lords Resistance Army (LRA) rebels has provoked widespread reprisals against the population by the LRA. This has generated humanitarian and protection needs for the population. MONUC have increased their military presence in the area in order to mitigate the humanitarian impact.

Departmental Bank Services

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development with which banks his Department has or has had contracts for the provision of financial advice, for the financial year 2008-09. (262756)

The Department for International Development (DFID) has not held contracts for the provision of financial advice with any banks for the financial year 2008-09.

Departmental Conditions of Employment

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development if he will place in the Library a copy of his Department's guidance on remuneration and terms of employment for locally-engaged staff; and if he will make a statement. (264102)

A copy of the Department for International Development's (DFID's) local Pay Determination Guidance, together with a copy of the Minimum Employment Standards for locally engaged staff (known as Staff Appointed in Country), will be placed in the Library.

Both documents are currently under review following a recent agreement between DFID and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) to bring the pay scales and other terms and conditions of service of our respective locally engaged staff into greater alignment.

Departmental Consultants

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development on how many occasions people his Department had formerly directly employed were retained by the Department on a consultancy basis in the last financial year for which figures are available; and how much was paid to such people in that year. (263977)

The Department for International Development (DFID) does not retain a central record of contracts awarded to former DFID employees on a consultancy basis. To provide this information would incur disproportionate cost. DFID has strict rules and guidance on the engagement of former DFID employees as consultants.

Departmental Databases

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what categories of information are included on his Department's inSight system; and if he will make a statement. (265185)

The Department for International Development's (DFID) intranet, known as InSight, contains a wide range of information for staff. Information is grouped under the following categories:

About DFID;

Policy and strategy;

Peoplesight (HR policies, processes and systems);

Learningsight (staff learning and development);

Rules and guidance;

Travel; Office facilities;

Information Resources.

Departmental ICT

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what the (a) dates of employment, (b) salary, (c) other costs of employment, (d) job description and (e) work outputs were of the temporary tester for information systems in his Department which his Department funded through Allegis Group Ltd. under procurement reference 200708220. (263723)

The Department for International Development (DFID) contracted Allegis to provide a temporary tester from the 13 to 30 November 2007.

DFID cannot comment on the salary costs as the temporary tester was not an employee. The value of the contract was £4,690, inclusive of management service fees. There were no other costs of employment payable under this contract.

The Terms of Reference for this engagement included drafting test scripts, conducting testing and report writing for a number of projects and desktop packages.

The temporary tester produced a range of outputs which included, test scripts, documentation of test results and test reports.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what the (a) dates of employment, (b) salary, (c) other costs of employment, (d) job description and (e) work outputs of the ARIES systems accountant retained by his Department via IT Works Recruitment were. (263981)

The Department for International Development (DFID) contracted IT Works Recruitment to provide a Systems Accountant from 6 August 2007 to 31 March 2008.

DFID cannot comment on the salary costs as the Systems Accountant was not an employee. The initial contract value was £91,450. However, the contract was reviewed after three months and it was agreed that the remainder of the work would be undertaken in-house. The actual date of the appointment was 20 August to 30 November. The total cost over this period was £25,250 plus £4,927 expenses.

The Terms of Reference for the appointment included developing coexistence procedures and error handling mechanisms between legacy systems and the new ARIES system. The Systems Accountant documented coexistence procedures, reconciliation procedures, error reporting and took investigative/corrective action to resolve data quality issues.

Departmental Internet

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the Answer to the hon. Member for Welwyn, Hatfield of 10 February 2009, Official Report, column 1879W, on the departmental internet, how many hits each of the websites maintained by his Department received in each of the last 12 months. (262838)

The information requested is as follows:

Research for development (R4D) (http://www.research4development.info)

Month

Page views

Unique visitors

February 2009

41,639

26,608

January 2009

39,772

24,635

December 2008

32,646

19,895

November 2008

39,504

26,765

October 2008

34,251

20,586

September 2008

35,525

21,831

August 2008

36,429

20,576

July 2008

42,994

27,453

June 2008

34,934

20,483

May 2008

29,323

15,670

April 2008

28,008

16,315

March 2008

26,648

15,823

Developments (http://www.developments.org.uk)

Month

Page views

Unique visitors

February 2009

23,841

10,546

January 2009

23,393

10,225

December 2008

17,014

7,429

November 2008

25,358

10,405

October 2008

31,224

11,410

September 2008

21,447

8,256

August 2008

19,678

6,684

July 2008

27,959

7,483

June 2008

18,535

7,387

May 2008

21,301

8,483

April 2008

28,687

9,646

March 2008

34,814

4,771

Departmental Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the Answer of 9 March 2009, Official Report, column 17W, on departmental personnel, whether his Department’s director of human resources is an employee of his Department; and what the (a) salary and (b) other employment costs of the director of human resources are. (263725)

The current Human Resources Director is a full-time employee of the Department for International Development (DFID). He receives a salary within the range prescribed by the Cabinet Office (£81,600 pa to £160,000 pa) for staff filling posts at director level.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 9 March 2009, Official Report, column 17W, on departmental personnel, for what reason his Department hired an interim human resources manager from 7 April to 31 October 2008; and if he will make a statement. (263726)

The appointment of an Interim HR Manager, using a professional agency, meant that the appointment could be made at very short notice. It provided professional leadership during a period of restructuring, and also allowed the Department time to make a permanent appointment through a high quality search and selection process.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the Answer of 9 March 2009, Official Report, column 17W, on departmental personnel, what the career background and experience of the interim human resources manager hired from 7 April to 31 October 2008 was; and if he will make a statement. (263727)

The interim human resources (HR) manager had extensive professional experience in a range of senior positions in private sector organisations, including financial services, retail and pharmaceutical companies.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what the (a) location of employment, (b) dates of employment, (c) total days worked, (d) salary and (e) other costs of employment were for the commercial development and growth specialist employed by his Department via the Enterprise Partnership Ltd. in 2007. (263973)

The Commercial Development and Growth Specialist (CDGS) was not an employee of DFID. A contract for this work was awarded to Enterprise Partnership Ltd. for the period 1 May 2007 to 31 October 2008. The CDGS worked 156 days in 2007 at a cost of £65,470, which includes fees and reimbursable expenses.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what the (a) dates of employment, (b) salary, (c) other costs of employment, (d) job description and (e) work outputs of the Economic Adviser to the EC Delegation in Kigali, Rwanda funded by his Department in August 2007 were. (263974)

The Economic Adviser to the EC was a consultant funded by the Department for International Development (DFID) and located in the EC Delegation Rwanda.

(a) The dates of the contract were July 2007 to December 2008.

(b) The total fees for the full 17-month contract were £103,563.

(c) Other total costs for the contract period were £23,139.

(d) The job description was to contribute to the effective implementation of EC budgetary support and related economic programmes and to the sustainable creation of capacity to manage these programmes in future.

(e) The work outputs related to budget support management, policy dialogue, economic management, and aid harmonisation.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what the (a) dates of employment, (b) salary, (c) other costs of employment, (d) job description and (e) work outputs of the project manager—DFID laptop refresh funded by his Department in August 2007 were. (263975)

The Department for International Development (DFID) contracted Allegis to provide a project manager for the Laptop Refresh project from 6 August 2007 to the 31 March 2008.

DFID cannot comment on salary costs as the project manager was not an employee. The value of the contract was £72,000 plus £5,000 expenses.

The Terms of Reference for this engagement included management of the project to replace DFID's existing laptops.

The project manager produced standard project management documentation which included project brief, project initiation document, project plan and regular progress reports. Other outputs included a fully tested laptop that represented value for money.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what the (a) dates of employment, (b) salary, (c) other costs of employment, (d) job description and (e) work outputs of the Business Analyst 2007 funded by his Department via Allegis Group Ltd. in August 2007 were. (263976)

The Department for International Development (DFID) contracted Allegis to provide an interim Business Analyst from 13 August 2007 to 30 September 2008.

DFID cannot comment on salary costs as the Business Analyst was not an employee. The initial contract value was £46,750. A further extension took the total value to £105,226 inclusive of management service fees. There were no other costs of employment payable under this contract.

The Terms of Reference for this engagement included business analysis, benefits realisation, information needs analysis, business process definition, requirements capture and promotion of industry best practice.

The Business Analyst produced a range of outputs which included Requirements documentation, Use Case and Workflow Diagrams, Test Scripts and associated project management documentation.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what the (a) dates of employment, (b) salary, (c) other cost of employment, (d) job description and (e) work outputs of Alexander Bohr were for the duration of the funding by the Department of his work on information on EU development assistance in Nicaragua. (263986)

Mr. Bohr was contracted by the Department for International Development (DFID) for the period 15 September 2007 to 2 May 2008 to carry out work on the project titled "Information on EU Development Assistance". The total cost of this contract was £46,229. The key objectives were to produce an EU Blue Book, accompanying CD Rom and an interactive, online tool to collect data on EU development assistance.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many (a) permanent, (b) agency and (c) temporary staff on contracts of (i) up to three months, (ii) between three and six months, (iii) between six and 12 months and (iv) 12 months or more there are in each directorate of his Department. (264298)

Details of staff employment at the Department for International Development are published in the Department’s Annual Report which is available in the Library of the House and online:

www.dfid.gov.uk

Departmental Ministerial Policy Advisers

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what the (a) location of, (b) dates of, (c) purpose of, (d) number of visitors to and (e) total cost of his Department’s Health and Education Advisers retreat funded via HLSP Ltd in February 2007 was. (263972)

The Department for International Development’s (DFID) 2007 Health and Education Advisers retreat was:

(a) held at the Robinson Executive Centre, Wyboston Lakes, Wyboston, Bedfordshire;

(b) it took place from 6 to 9 February 2007;

(c) the retreat brought together DFID health and education advisers, and development academics, for professional development and to agree forward policy and operational priorities in health, education and HIV/AIDS, including in relation to DFID’s 2006 White Paper “Eliminating world poverty: making governance work for the poor”;

(d) there were approximately 85 attendees and 17 speakers and guests;

(e) and the total costs that were funded via HLSP were £57,700

Departmental Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the Answer of 9 March 2009, Official Report, column 17W, on departmental personnel, how many of his Department’s staff received remuneration, including bonuses, of more than £100,000 in 2007-08. (263887)

The Department for International Development paid nine members of staff more than £100,000 (including non-consolidated performance pay) in 2007-08.

Departmental Public Expenditure

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much his Department spent on (a) economy class flights, (b) business class flights, (c) first class flights, (d) accommodation and (e) other expenses for (i) Ministers and (ii) officials to attend the Accra High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness in September 2008. (264103)

The cost of one Minister and 10 officials attending the Accra High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness in September 2008 was £50,072. This comprises:

£

Business class flights

44,484

Accommodation

3,035

Other expenses

2,553