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Alcoholic Drinks: Misuse

Volume 491: debated on Thursday 30 April 2009

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many alcohol-related hospital admissions of (a) men and (b) women aged (i) under 10 years, (ii) between 10 and 16 years, (iii) between 17 and 21 years, (iv) between 22 and 26 years and (v) over 26 years there were in each of the last 10 years; and if he will make a statement. (271049)

The information requested is given in the following table. Data are only available from 2002- 03 to 2007-08.

Number of finished admissions in England of patients with an alcohol-related condition, by age, sex and year

Age

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

Male

Under 10

109

107

105

103

77

79

10 to 16

3,580

3,792

4,008

4,214

4,340

3,986

17 to 21

9,890

11,042

12,270

13,940

14,677

15,026

22 to 26

9,990

11,127

12,646

14,375

15,047

15,332

Over 26

289,419

325,053

369,709

423,744

464,939

502,942

Female

Under 10

55

61

68

56

58

49

10 to 16

3,948

4,472

4,869

5,255

5,214

5,408

17 to 21

7,979

8,695

9,772

11,729

11,856

13,007

22 to 26

7,873

8,444

9,470

11,237

11,634

12,132

Over 26

177,330

196,625

221,267

250,859

271,276

295,296

Notes:

1. Includes activity in English National Health Service Hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector.

2. Alcohol-related admissions: The number of alcohol-related admissions is based on the methodology developed by the North West Public Health Observatory. Following international best practice, the NWPHO methodology includes a wide range of diseases and injuries in which alcohol plays a part and estimates the proportion of cases that are attributable to the consumption of alcohol. Details of the conditions and associated proportions can be found in the report Jones et al. (2008) Alcohol-attributable fractions for England: Alcohol-attributable mortality and hospital admissions. Figures for under 16s only include admissions where one or more alcohol-specific conditions were listed. This is because the research on which the attributable fractions are based does not cover

under 16s. Alcohol-specific conditions are those that are wholly attributed to alcohol—that is, those with an attributable fraction of one. They are:

Alcoholic cardiomyopathy (142.6)

Alcoholic gastritis (K29.2)

Alcoholic liver disease (K70)

Alcoholic myopathy (G72.1)

Alcoholic polyneuropathy (G62.1)

Alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing's syndrome (E24.4)

Chronic pancreatitis (alcohol induced) (K86.0)

Degeneration of nervous system due to alcohol (G31.2)

Mental and behavioural disorders due to use of alcohol (F10)

Accidental poisoning by and exposure to alcohol (X45)

Ethanol poisoning (T51.0)

Methanol poisoning (T51.1)

Toxic effect of alcohol, unspecified (T51.9)

3. Number of episodes in which the patient had an alcohol-related primary or secondary diagnosis: These figures represent the number of episodes where an alcohol-related diagnosis was recorded in any of the 20 (14 from 2002-03 to 2006-07 and seven prior to 2002-03) primary and secondary diagnosis fields in a Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) record. Each episode is only counted once in each count, even if an alcohol-related diagnosis is recorded in more than one diagnosis field of the record.

4. Ungrossed data: Figures have not been adjusted for shortfalls in data (i.e. the data are ungrossed).

5. Finished admission episodes: A finished admission episode is the first period of inpatient care under one consultant within one health care provider. Finished admission episodes are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of inpatients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year.

6. Primary diagnosis: The primary diagnosis is the first of up to 20 (14 from 2002-03 to 2006-07 and seven prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in the HES data set and provides the main reason why the patient was admitted to hospital.

7. Secondary diagnosis: As well as the primary diagnosis, there are up to 19 (13 from 2002-03 to 2007-08 and six prior to 2002-03) secondary diagnosis fields in HES that show other diagnoses relevant to the episode of care.

8. Data quality: HES are compiled from data sent by more than 300 NHS trusts and primary care trusts in England. Data are also received from a number of independent sector organisations for activity commissioned by the English NHS. The NHS Information Centre for health and social care liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data via HES processes. While this brings about improvement over time, some shortcomings remain.

9. Assessing growth through time: HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. The quality and coverage of the data have improved over time. These improvements in information submitted by the NHS have been particularly marked in the earlier years and need to be borne in mind when analysing time series. Some of the increase in figures for later years (particularly 2006-07 onwards) may be due to the improvement in the coverage of independent sector activity. Changes in NHS practice also need to be borne in mind when analysing time series. For example, a number of procedures may now be undertaken in outpatient settings and may no longer be accounted for in the HES data. This may account for any reductions in activity over time.

10. Assignment of episodes to years: Years are assigned by the end of the first period of care in a patient's hospital stay.

Source:

Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), The NHS Information Centre for health and social care

To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Bolton North East of 10 February 2009, Official Report, column 1923W, on alcoholic drinks: misuse, when he expects figures for alcohol-related admissions to hospital for 2007-08 to be available. (271414)

Figures for 2007-08 for alcohol-related admissions to hospital are shown in the following table.

Number of alcohol-related finished hospital admissions in England from 2003-04 to 2007-08, the latest year for which figures are available.

Number of alcohol-related finished hospital admissions in England

2003-04

569,418

2004-05

644,184

2005-06

735,512

2006-07

799,118

2007-08

863,257