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Sentencing

Volume 493: debated on Monday 1 June 2009

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) cautions and (b) penalty notices for disorder were issued for (i) burglary, (ii) theft and (iii) other offences in each of the last three years; and if she will make a statement. (276244)

I have been asked to reply.

Data on the number of offenders issued with (a) a caution for (i) burglary (ii) theft and (iii) other offences for England and Wales in each year from 2007 (latest available), are shown in table 1.

Data on the number of penalty notices for disorder issued for the offence of retail theft and other offences included in the PND scheme for England and Wales in each year from 2005 to 2007 are shown in table 2. The disposal is not available for issue for burglary or for any other category of theft offence.

Cautions and PND data for 2008 will be available in the autumn of 2009.

Table 1: Number of offenders issued with a caution by offence type, and the offence stealing from shops and stalls (shoplifting), in England and Wales, 2005 to 20071

Offence type/Offence

2005

2006

2007

Burglary

6,451

7,687

6,972

Theft and handling stolen goods

67,619

72,369

72,790

of which:

Stealing from shops and stalls (shoplifting) (Theft Act 1968, Sec 1)2

44,012

45,054

44,747

Violence against the person

51,020

57,273

52,334

Sexual offences

1,761

1,922

1,966

Robbery

622

712

614

Fraud and forgery

6,936

8,024

8,587

Criminal damage

7,246

9,018

8,813

Drug offences

34,390

37,426

43,050

Other indictable offences

6,889

9,378

9,972

Summary offences (excluding motoring)

116,011

146,168

157,797

Total

298,945

349,977

362,895

1 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. 2 The data for this offence are also included in the offence type of theft and handling stolen goods. Source: Evidence and Analysis Unit—Office for Criminal Justice Reform, Ministry of Justice.

Table 2: Number of penalty notices for disorder issued to all persons aged 16 and over, by offence, England and Wales 2005 to 20071

Number issued

Offence code and description

2005

2006

2007

£80 tickets issued

Wasting police time

2,525

3,933

3,966

Misuse of public telecommunications system

405

909

1,193

Giving false alarm to fire and rescue authority

92

106

96

Causing harassment, alarm or distress

64,007

82,235

77,827

Throwing fireworks

642

682

649

Drunk and disorderly

37,038

43,556

46,996

Sale of alcohol to under 18

2,058

3,195

3,583

Purchasing alcohol for under 18

170

407

555

Purchasing alcohol for under 18 for consumption on premises

83

60

64

Delivery of alcohol to under 18

209

297

431

Criminal Damage (under £500)

12,168

20,620

19,946

Theft (retail under £200)

21,997

38,772

45,146

Breach of fireworks curfew

33

53

39

Possession of category 4 firework

13

28

22

Possession by a person under 18 of adult firework

47

76

106

Sale of alcohol to drunken person

32

47

81

Supply of alcohol to person under 18

3

60

54

£50 tickets issued

Trespass on a railway

220

1,042

1,527

Throwing stones at a train/railway

20

15

25

Drunk in a highway

3,138

2,712

2,066

Consumption of alcohol in public place

712

1,061

1,544

Depositing and leaving litter

737

1,169

1,374

Consumption of alcohol by under 18 on relevant premises

84

75

85

Allowing consumption of alcohol for under 18

27

14

11

Buying alcohol by under 18

21

73

158

Total all offences

146,481

201,197

207,544

1 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. Source: Office for Criminal Justice Reform Evidence and Analysis unit..