Skip to main content

Written Answers

Volume 493: debated on Tuesday 2 June 2009

Written Answers to Questions

Monday 1 June 2009

[Continued from Column 232W]

Children, Schools and Families

Apprentices

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what recent steps his Department has taken to help school leavers between the ages of 16 and 18 years-old find employment through training and apprenticeship schemes. (272683)

We are determined to ensure that as many young people as possible continue their learning beyond the age of 16 to get the qualifications and experience they need to succeed in an increasingly competitive labour market. Many will continue their learning in the workplace through an apprenticeship or work based learning programme.

All 16 and 17-year-olds will be offered a suitable place in education or training under the September Guarantee. We announced in budget 2009 an additional investment to allow 54,400 more young people to take up a place at school, college or with a training provider. This is in addition to plans recently announced to make available an additional 17,500 apprenticeship places for 16 to 18-year-olds across the public and private sectors. Schools, colleges and Connexions services will give young people in Cheshire the advice and support they need to find a suitable opportunity.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many hours a week on average 16 to 18 year-olds spent on apprenticeships in each industrial sector in (a) England, (b) the North East, (c) Teesside and (d) Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland constituency in the latest period for which figures are available. (276624)

Apprenticeships for young people are normally full-time and the hours that each individual spends on their framework each week are a matter for the apprentice and their employer. Some apprentices work part-time. Information about the number of hours that apprentices work and train each week is not collected centrally. We are currently consulting on a specification for apprenticeship standards in England which proposes a minimum number of guided learning hours per year for all apprentices.

The Government are committed to rebuilding apprenticeships. Since 1997 we have witnessed a renaissance in apprenticeships from a low point of 65,000 to a record 225,000 apprenticeship starts in 2007/08.

Cabinet: Glasgow

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many (a) special advisers and (b) officials of his Department accompanied him to Glasgow for the Cabinet meeting on 16 April 2009. (273925)

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families was accompanied by two departmental officials on his visit to Glasgow on 16 April 2009.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what car journeys he took in attending the Cabinet meeting in Glasgow on 16 April 2009. (273926)

The Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families travelled by official Government car to and from the Cabinet meeting. He also travelled by official Government car to visit Crookston Early Years Centre in Glasgow.

Children: Databases

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families pursuant to the answer of 2 April 2009, Official Report, column 1336W, on children: databases, if he will place in the Library a copy of the Framework Agreement. (271472)

A copy of the Business Services Framework Agreement between the Department and Capgemini dated 6 November 2001 has been placed in the House Libraries pursuant to the answer given on 27 February 2009, Official Report, column 1116W.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) what data sources are used to populate the National Register of Unaccompanied Children; (275472)

(2) what discussions his Department had with the Information Commissioner on the (a) design and (b) implementation of the National Register of Unaccompanied Children;

(3) whether a privacy impact assessment was carried out on the National Register of Unaccompanied Children;

(4) what data fields there are in each record on the National Register of Unaccompanied Children;

(5) which (a) persons and (b) bodies have authorisation to access the National Register of Unaccompanied Children directly;

(6) what disclosures of data held on the National Register of Unaccompanied Children have been made to (a) agencies, (b) individuals and (c) researchers without direct access to the Register in each month since its inception.

I have been asked to reply.

Although funding is provided by the United Kingdom Border Agency the National Register of Unaccompanied Children (NRUC) is not administered by central Government. The information sought needs to be obtained from NRUC direct at:

www.nruc.gov.uk

Children: Day Care

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many child care places for children aged four years and under were available in each London local authority area in (a) 1997 and (b) 2007-08. (276181)

Information is not available specifically for children aged four years and under. Available information on children under eight years of age is shown in the table.

Number1 of registered child care places for children under eight years of age, position at 31 March each year

Local authority area

19972

20083

Inner London

Camden

3,100

6,100

City of London

300

500

Hackney

7,400

7,900

Hammersmith and Fulham

1,800

4,800

Haringey

4,900

5,700

Islington

6,600

6,600

Kensington and Chelsea

5,400

4,300

Lambeth

4

8,200

Lewisham

5,600

7,900

Newham

4,500

6,500

Southwark

8,200

9,600

Tower Hamlets

4

4,700

Wandsworth

11,600

9,300

Westminster

6,200

4,700

Outer London

Barking and Dagenham

3,200

3,700

Barnet

7,900

8,700

Bexley

4,900

6,200

Brent

5,000

6,300

Bromley

8,300

10,800

Croydon

8,300

12,100

Ealing

6,500

7,900

Enfield

6,100

7,400

Greenwich

3,900

8,200

Harrow

4,700

5,200

Havering

5,200

5,500

Hillingdon

5,700

6,600

Hounslow

5,600

5,300

Kingston upon Thames

5,500

5,100

Merton

6,600

5,700

Redbridge

6,200

7,100

Richmond upon Thames

9,400

6,900

Sutton

4,300

5,400

Waltham Forest

3,200

7,500

1 Figures have been rounded to the nearest 10 if under 100, and to the nearest 100 if over 100.

2 Data Source: Children’s Daycare Facilities Survey—total includes day nurseries, playgroups and pre-schools, child minders, out of school clubs and holiday schemes.

3 Data Source: Ofsted—total includes full daycare, sessional daycare, child minders, out of school clubs and crèche daycare.

4 Data not available.

Children: Mental Health Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what his most recent assessment is of his Department's progress in meeting its target of having no children placed on adult mental health wards by 2010. (275652)

I have been asked to reply.

Section 31(3) of the Mental Health Act 2007, which the Government are committed to commencing in England by April 2010, places a duty on hospital managers to ensure that under 18s are treated in an environment which is suitable having regard to their age (subject to their needs).

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 18 May 2009, Official Report, column 1238W, where figures were provided for the number of bed-days for under 18s on child and adolescent mental health services and adult psychiatric wards, and these showed that in quarter 3 of 2008-09, the latest quarter for which data are available there were no bed-days for under 16-year-olds in adult psychiatric wards and 2,918 bed-days for 16 to 17-year-olds on adult psychiatric wards. This represents less than 7 per cent. of the total bed-days young people spent on psychiatric wards in this period, a significant reduction from 12 per cent. in 2006-07. We are continuing to monitor progress on this issue.

The National Mental Health Development Unit is currently undertaking a programme of awareness raising, self-assessment and support for trusts on this issue.

Note:

A bed-day is a day during which a person is confined to a bed and in which the patient stays overnight in a hospital.

Children: Protection

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many copies of serious case reviews have been misplaced by Ofsted in each year since 2001; and if he will make a statement. (271242)

This is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 5 May 2009:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for reply.

As responsibility for the evaluation of serious case reviews transferred from the Commission for Social Care Inspection to Ofsted on 1 April 2007, we are not able to provide information preceding this date. Local safeguarding children boards are required, upon completion of serious case reviews, to send a copy of documents to Ofsted for evaluation.

Since April 2007, Ofsted has received documentation for 234 serious case reviews. One set of documents was lost in December 2007, within one of Ofsted's regional offices, and has not been found. I very much regret this. Due to the highly sensitive content of serious case reviews, the matter was thoroughly investigated and a more secure document handling process was implemented across the whole of Ofsted.

There has been no recurrence. However, there have been four incidents when local safeguarding boards have claimed to have sent documents to Ofsted that were not received. Ofsted has a process for recording receipt of post, which is why we know the Derbyshire documents were received in our Midlands regional office and then lost by us. We have no record of documents from these four incidents reaching any of our four offices and in none of these cases could proof of postage be provided. In each case, documents were subsequently provided to Ofsted and evaluated.

A copy of this reply has been sent to Rt Hon Jim Knight MP, Minister of State for Schools and Learners, and will be placed in the library of both Houses.

Citizenship: Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many secondary schools in England employ one or more teachers who have completed initial teacher training courses to become specialist citizenship teachers. (275909)

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many secondary school teachers in England have completed initial teacher training courses to become specialist citizenship teachers in the last (a) 12 months and (b) two years. (275910)

The number of teachers gaining Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) via secondary Initial Teacher Training (ITT) courses in Citizenship for each of the last two years for which data are available is given in the following table.

Teachers gaining QTS Via secondary ITT courses in citizenship

Mainstream

Employment based routes

2005/06

190

40

2006/07

180

40

Notes:

1. Mainstream figures include Universities, other Higher Education Institutions, SCITT and Open University but excludes employment based routes and cases where QTS was granted on assessment-based teacher training.

2. Employment based ITT excludes cases where QTS was granted on assessment-based teacher training.

3. Citizenship includes Citizenship and Business Studies, and Citizenship and History.

4. Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10.

Source:

TDA Performance Profiles.

Class Sizes: Primary Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what steps he is taking to reduce the number of five to seven-year-olds in unlawfully large classes; and if he will make a statement. (276513)

We take breaches of infant class size legislation very seriously. Officials will be following up with the local authorities and schools concerned to ensure remedial action is being taken. Local authorities and schools have a legal responsibility to limit infant class sizes and, if necessary, the Secretary of State has powers to direct them to comply.

Departmental Air Conditioning

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many of his Department's buildings are equipped with air conditioning systems with greater than 250kW of output; how many of these systems have been inspected under the Energy Performance of Buildings (Certificates and Inspections) (England and Wales) Regulations 2007; and if he will place in the Library a copy of the results. (270615)

The Department for Children Schools and Families has three headquarter properties in Sheffield, Darlington and London that have environmental control equipment that require inspection under The Energy Performance of Buildings (Certificates and Inspections) (England and Wales) Regulations 2007.

Inspections of our three properties are being scheduled and the inspection results will be placed in the House Libraries.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much his Department has spent on carrying out inspections of air conditioning systems within its departmental buildings in accordance with the Energy Performance of Buildings (Certificates and Inspections) (England and Wales) Regulations 2007. (270616)

The Department for Children Schools and Families has three headquarter properties in Sheffield, Darlington and London that have environmental control equipment that require inspection under The Energy Performance of Buildings (Certificates and Inspections) (England and Wales) Regulations 2007.

The estimated costs for these inspections are:

Sheffield—£1,859 +VAT

London—£2,080 + VAT

Darlington—£1,859 + VAT.

Departmental Marketing

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much has been spent by his Department on advertising in weekly and regional newspapers in the last five years. (277161)

Since January 2004 the Department, and its predecessor (Department for Education and Skills), has spent £1,478,364 on advertising in weekly and regional newspapers.

Departmental Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much his Department paid in end-of-year performance bonuses to (a) all staff and (b) senior Civil Service staff in 2008-09; and how many such payments were made. (275260)

Information on non-consolidated payments is as follows:

All staff bonuses (below senior civil service): £1.070 million

Senior civil service bonuses: £0.78 million

Number of staff awarded bonuses: 1,403

All of these payments were made from and funded within existing pay bill controls. Payments to senior civil servants are based on recommendations of the Senior Salaries Review Body.

European Co-operation

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what activities have been undertaken by his Department’s Euro Minister in that capacity. (277167)

Ministers from this Department represent the UK at the regular meetings of EU Education and Youth Councils, and at informal meetings of EU Education Ministers.

In 2009, the Under-Secretary of State for Children Schools and Families, my hon. Friend the Member for Portsmouth, North (Sarah McCarthy-Fry) attended Youth Council on 16 February. I attended an informal meeting of EU Education Ministers in Prague on 22-23 March, at which we discussed a Czech presidency paper about the role of education for recovery and long term development; and the issue of fostering stronger links between education institutions and employers.

I also attended EU Education and Youth Council in Brussels on 11-12 May which discussed the future EU Youth Co-operation Framework. We also agreed conclusions on improving partnerships between educational institutions and employers; and on a new strategic framework for co-operation between member states in education and training in Europe in the period up to 2020.

Education Maintenance Allowance

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what his most recent estimate is of the number of children in households with annual income above £30,810 in receipt of education maintenance allowance (EMA) under the EMA guarantee. (277089)

The EMA guarantee was introduced in the current academic year of 2008/09 and relates to entitlement in future years. No young person will receive EMA under the guarantee before academic year 2009/10.

Under the terms of the guarantee, a successful assessment of eligibility based on household income will entitle the learner to up to three years of EMA on the same rate, as long as they enrol on valid provision and keep to their learning contract. Since September 2008, all young people receiving income assessed EMA will be clear what financial support they will be entitled to if they continue in post 16 learning and meet the agreed requirements relating to attendance, behaviour, and progress on their course.

First Aid: Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families if he will make it his policy to ensure that schools provide first aid training to school leavers. (272396)

Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) education already provides children and young people with the knowledge and skills they need to make informed choices in a range of contexts related to health and safety. Children learn about basic and emergency first aid, as well as where and how to obtain health information, how to recognise and follow health and safety procedures and ways of reducing risk and minimising harm in risky situations.

GCE A-Level: Bexley

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many pupils in the London Borough of Bexley completed (a) AS and (b) A-level courses in each of the last three years. (270810)

The information available is given in the table:

16 to 18-year-old candidates who were entered for level 3 qualifications at least equivalent in size to one GCE/VCE A-level

Number

2008

1,303

2007

1,191

2006

1,104

Source:

Achievement and Attainment Tables.

Figures are for the maintained sector only: maintained schools and further education colleges.

Similar reliable data for AS-level figures cannot be provided as the point at which students ‘complete their AS-level’ study is hard to define. The final number of AS-levels recorded will depend on when, or whether, students decide to ‘cash-in’ their AS-levels.

GCSE

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what percentage of pupils have no schools where more than 30 per cent. of pupils achieved five GCSEs at A*-C including English and mathematics in 2008 within (a) two and (b) three miles of their homes. (268483)

The information is as follows:

(a) 128,401 pupils1,2 have no schools3 with more than 30 per cent. of pupils achieving five GCSEs at A*-C including English and mathematics within two miles of their homes. This represents 2.1 per cent. of all pupils1,2 attending maintained mainstream schools.

(b) 52,812 pupils1,2 have no schools3 with more than 30 per cent. of pupils achieving five GCSEs at A*-C including English and mathematics within three miles of their homes. This represents 0.9 per cent. of all pupils1,2 attending maintained mainstream schools.

1 Pupils aged five to 15 years with a valid home postcode attending maintained mainstream schools.

2 Excludes 632,931 pupils who do not have any schools within two miles and 355,329 pupils who do not have any schools within three miles.

3 Excludes schools reported to be closed in 2007/08 Attainment and Achievement Tables.

Source:

School Census 2008 - Attainment and Achievement Tables 2007/08

The National Challenge programme is supporting all schools below the floor with bespoke packages of support to help schools accelerate their improvements. This will help to increase the number of good school places for pupils, delivering a sustainable transformation of secondary education across the country.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many entries there were for GCSE examinations for pupils from each type of school in each of the last three years. (268492)

The answer is provided in the following table:

Number of full GCSE entries by pupils at the end of Key Stage 4, by school type

Thousand

School type

2008

2007

2006

Comprehensive

4,187.0

3,826.6

3,820.6

Selective

227.4

209.0

207.5

Modern

203.3

185.2

185.7

Other maintained

31.0

16.6

15.2

Independent

385.1

384.7

388.0

Source:

Attainment and Achievement Tables

The figures relate to pupils who were at the end of Key Stage 4 in the given year and include any GCSE attempts by these pupils in previous academic years. Only full GCSEs have been included.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many pupils (a) eligible for and (b) not eligible for free school meals achieved eight or more GCSEs at A or A* grade in each of the last three years. (268497)

The answer is provided in the following table:

Number and percentage of pupils who achieved eight or more GCSEs at A or A* by FSM eligibility

Number

Percentage

Non-FSM

FSM

Non-FSM

FSM

2006

33,497

844

6.5

1.1

2007

34,728

872

6.7

1.1

2008

37,766

890

7.2

1.2

Source:

National Pupil Database.

The figures are based on pupils at the end of key stage 4 and include results in full and double award GCSEs, vocational/applied GCSEs, short courses and intermediate GNVQs.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many and what proportion of pupils attended mainstream secondary schools at which less than (a) 10 per cent., (b) 20 per cent. and (c) 30 per cent. of pupils obtained fewer than five A* to C grades in GCSE including English and mathematics in 2007-08; (271016)

(2) how many and what proportion of children in care with statements of special educational needs attended mainstream secondary schools at which fewer than (a) 10 per cent., (b) 20 per cent. and (c) 30 per cent. of pupils obtained fewer than five A* to C grades in GCSEs including English and mathematics in 2007-08;

(3) how many and what proportion of children in care attended mainstream secondary schools at which fewer than (a) 10 per cent., (b) 20 per cent. and (c) 30 per cent. of pupils obtained fewer than five A* to C grades in GCSEs including English and mathematics in 2007-08.

Information on children in care is usually sourced from the Looked-After Children database but this is not currently matched to attainment data.

Data on pupils in care are also collected via the School Census. However, the School Census may undercount the number of looked-after children in secondary and special schools.

However, data on special educational needs, in care and attainment are currently not matched together in one data extract. Producing that could be done only at disproportionate cost.

The available data extract does, however, combine data on children in care with Achievement and Attainment Table data. In care data from that source is given in the table.

All pupilsPupils in care

Number of pupils at the end of Key Stage 4 attending maintained mainstream schools at which fewer than:

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

10% of pupils achieve fewer than five GCSEs at grade A*-C including English and Maths

23,733

4.0

16

0.4

20% of pupils achieve fewer than five GCSEs at grade A*-C including English and Maths

34,305

5.9

52

1.3

30% of pupils achieve fewer than five GCSEs at grade A*-C including English and Maths

62,888

10.7

125

3.1

Only schools with results published in the Achievement and Attainment Tables have been included in this answer.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what proportion of pupils whose first language was not English achieved five grades A* to C at GCSE including English and mathematics in each year since 1997. (271473)

This information available can be found in the following table:

Number and percentage of pupils1 whose first language is not English2 and are at the end of key stage 4 achieving five or more GCSE's at grade A*-C or equivalent including English and mathematics

Number

Percentage

20043

19,222

437.3

2005

20,690

40.3

2006

22,714

41.7

2007

24,202

43.5

2008

26,328

45.1

1 Only pupils in maintained schools have been counted.

2 First language is either known or believed to be other than English.

3 For 2004, figures are based on pupils ages 15 rather than at the end of key stage 4.

4 Percentages of pupils at end of key stage 4 whose first language is not believed to be English.

Source:

National Pupil Database

Figures prior to 2004 cannot be given on a comparable basis as qualifications equivalent to a GCSE were not included in the calculation of the attainment results.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what proportion of pupils of the relevant age did not gain a GCSE at (a) C grade or above, (b) D grade or above and (c) E grade or above in 2008. (259106)

The information is as follows:

In 2008:

123,542 (20.7 per cent.) pupils at the end of KS4 did not gain a GCSE at grade C or above

66,456 (11.1 per cent.) pupils at the end of KS4 did not gain a GCSE at grade D or above

37,180 (6.2 per cent.) of pupils at the end of KS4 did not gain a GCSE at grade E or above

The figures relate to all pupils in maintained schools; and include full GCSEs and vocational GCSEs.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families in how many schools (a) 75 per cent. or more and (b) 50 per cent. or more of pupils eligible to receive free school meals did not achieve a single GCSE above grade D in 2008. (251048)

The information requested is provided as follows:

(a) The number of maintained mainstream schools1 where 75 per cent. or more of pupils eligible to receive free school meals did not achieve any GCSEs2 above grade D at the end of key stage 4 in 2008 was 29.

(b) The number of maintained mainstream schools1 where 50 per cent. or more of pupils eligible to receive free school meals did not achieve any GCSEs2 above grade D at the end of key stage 4 in 2008 was 621.

1 Schools published in the Secondary School Achievement and Attainment Tables with more than 10 pupils eligible for free school meals.

2 Includes full GCSEs and vocational GCSEs only. GNVQs and other equivalents are not included.

Source:

National Pupil Database.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what proportion of pupils whose first language was not English and who had special educational needs achieved five grades A* to C at GCSE in each year since 1997. (265672)

This information available can be found in the following table:

Number and percentage of pupils1 with special educational needs, whose first language is not English2 and are at the end of key stage 4 achieving five or more GCSE's at grade A*-C or equivalent

Number

Percentage

20043

1,350

414.9

2005

1,815

19.5

2006

2,460

23.0

2007

3,333

27.9

2008

4,519

32.9

1 Only pupils in maintained schools have been counted.

2 First language is either known or believed to be other than English.

3 For 2004, figures are based on pupils ages 15 rather than at the end of key stage 4.

4 Percentages of pupils at end of key stage 4 with special educational needs and whose first language is not believed to be English.

Source:

National Pupil Database

Figures prior to 2004 cannot be given on a comparable basis as qualifications equivalent to a GCSE were not included in the calculation of the attainment results.

Gifted Children

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what proportion of (a) primary and (b) secondary school pupils in (i) each region of England and (ii) Darlington are on gifted and talented programmes. (275751)

The Department does not collect data on pupils participating in gifted and talented programmes. Through the School Census schools are asked to confirm the gifted and talented pupils they have identified. I have placed in the House Libraries a table showing the number and percentage of identified gifted and talented pupils in maintained primary and secondary schools at January 2008, broken down by local authority and region. This shows that the figures for Darlington are 3.7 per cent. (primary) and 13.6 per cent. (secondary), against national figures of 8.1 per cent. and 13.6 per cent. respectively.

Head Teachers

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many (a) primary and (b) secondary schools did not have a permanent head teacher for any period in each of the last 10 years; and if he will make a statement. (276511)

Literacy: Primary Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what funding his Department is providing to projects to improve literacy in primary schools in 2009-10. (275785)

In 2009-10 we expect to spend in the region of £130 million projects to improve literacy in primary schools in 2009-10. This includes funding for schools and local authorities via the standards fund and central delivery costs of the national strategies (including provision of an education field force and free continuing professional development resources for teachers and practitioners), as follows:

£78 million for literacy and mathematics,

£13 million for our communication, language and literacy development programme implementing the recommendations of the 2006 Rose Review of Early Reading,

£30 million for our Every Child a Reader programme,

£8 million for our Every Child a Writer programme.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many children in England have received one-to-one tuition in reading through the Every Child A Reader programme since its national implementation; (275789)

(2) what funding has been allocated to the national implementation of the Every Child A Reader programme;

(3) what the estimated cost per child of the Every Child A Reader programme is; and if he will make a statement.

By the end of this school year, just over 8,000 children will have received one-to-one tuition in reading through the Every Child a Reader programme since its national implementation in September 2008. This is at a cost to Government of approximately £17 million over the academic year 2008/09. The implementation of the Every Child a Reader programme is proving to be very successful, with children who access the intensive elements of these programmes making four to five times the normal rate of progress.

A report by KPMG’s Every Child a Chance Trust, published in January 2009, estimates the cost per child to be £2,609. This figure includes the costs incurred by local authorities as well as the national training and infrastructure co-ordinated through the University of London’s Institute of Education.

This Government are committed to ensuring every child learns to read. For most, this will mean good systematic phonics through the early years and beginning of primary school. For others, extra provision will be necessary—primarily through school-based interventions and our Every Child a Reader programme. We continue to fund local authorities and schools to strike the appropriate balance between whole class teaching and catch-up interventions for those children that need it. We remain committed to rolling out this highly effective programme to reach 30,000 children a year by 2010/11.

Members Correspondence: Learning and Skills Council

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) when he plans to reply to the letter from the hon. Member for Walsall, North of 7 April 2009 on Learning and Skills Council funding; (277482)

(2) when the Chief Executive of the Learning and Skills Council plans to reply to the letter from the hon. Member for Walsall, North of 7 April 2009 on funding.

A response to the letter to the Secretary of State, signed by the Minister for Schools and Learners, was sent to my hon. Friend on 27 May 2009.

The Learning and Skills Council has been focused on resolving allocations for schools, colleges and independent training providers. Letters with revised allocations for 2009/10, including the letter to my hon. Friend will be issued as soon as possible after the period of sensitivity around elections.

National Curriculum Tests

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families if he will place in the Library a copy of all correspondence between the Secretary of State, the Minister of State for Schools and Learners and Mr. Ken Boston between January and December 2008. (271772)

QCA has now placed correspondence between me and Ken Boston, in his role as chief executive of the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA), on their website at:

http://www.qca.org.uk/qca_15838.aspx

That web page also includes correspondence between QCA and other Government Ministers.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) what recent assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of standard assessment tests in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in raising standards of literacy and numeracy; (272951)

(2) what consideration he has given to the replacement of standard assessment tests with a system of assessment by teachers.

Over the last 10 years, National Curriculum testing and assessment has played a vital role in ensuring that more than 100,000 more pupils leave primary school secure in English and maths. The Key Stage 2 tests provide a robust and objective measure of pupils' performance, and a recent survey confirmed that they are greatly valued by parents.

We announced last year that 14-year-olds would no longer be required to sit national Key Stage 3 tests, but would be assessed by ongoing teacher assessment throughout the key stage. At the same time, we established a new Expert Group on assessment to advise the Government on the future of testing and assessment and its role in school accountability. The group published its report on 7 May 2009. The group reported that the Key Stage 2 tests are valuable, vital for public accountability and a key part of giving parents objective information on their children's levels of attainment and progress. The group also made a number of recommendations for strengthening the quality of teacher assessment in primary and secondary schools.

The report and its recommendations, which the Government have agreed to in full, can be viewed on the DCSF website at:

http://publications.dcsf.gov.uk/default.aspx?PageFunction= productdetails&PageMode=publications&Productld=DCSF-00532-2009&

Primary Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) what his most recent estimate is of the number of primary school children expected to transfer to the state sector from the independent sector in the academic year 2009-10; (273859)

(2) what his most recent estimate is of the number of primary school children who will transfer to state education from abroad in the academic year 2009-10;

(3) how many primary school children have (a) transferred to the state sector from the independent sector and (b) transferred to the state sector from abroad in each of the last 10 years.

[holding answer 8 May 2009]: The Department makes no estimate of the number of primary school children expected to transfer to the state sector from the independent sector, or who will transfer to state education from abroad. Nor does the Department collect data on the number of primary school children who have transferred to the state sector from (a) the independent sector or (b) abroad.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what estimate he has made of the number of primary school places required in England as a result of net migration in each local education authority in each of the years 2009-31. (273994)

[holding answer 8 May 2009]: The Department makes no such estimates. Local authorities are responsible for planning the supply of school places in their area and for ensuring sufficient places are available to meet local needs. When projecting future demand for places we expect authorities to take account of factors that will have an impact on future pupil numbers, including net migration.

Pupil Exclusions

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many pupils in each local authority area were excluded for more than (a) five, (b) 10, (c) 15, (d) 20, (e) 25, (f) 30, (g) 35, (h) 40, (i) 45 and (j) 50 days in the last school year for which data are available; (262483)

(2) how many and what proportion of pupils in each local authority area who were eligible for free school meals were excluded for more than (a) five, (b) 10, (c) 15, (d) 20, (e) 25, (f) 30, (g) 35, (h) 40, (i) 45 and (j) 50 days in the last school year for which data are available;

(3) how many and what proportion of primary school pupils in each local authority area were excluded for more than (a) five, (b) 10, (c) 15, (d) 20, (e) 25, (f) 30, (g) 35, (h) 40, (i) 45 and (j) 50 days in the last school year for which data are available;

(4) how many and what proportion of secondary school pupils in each local authority area were excluded for more than (a) five, (b) 10, (c) 15, (d) 20, (e) 25, (f) 30, (g) 35, (h) 40, (i) 45 and (j) 50 days in the last school year for which data are available.

The information available, on pupil enrolments, for 2006/07 has been placed in the House Libraries. A small proportion of pupils have more than one enrolment i.e. if they move school during the year or are registered at more than one school. The analysis is based on the duration of exclusions per enrolment.

Figures are as reported by schools.

It is possible that some permanent exclusions have been miscoded as fixed period exclusions.

I am aware that the statistics show that a number of pupils were excluded for longer than the statutory 45 day limit for fixed period exclusions in any one school year. The Department is concerned that a small number of schools that have not met their legal duties in this regard, and has written to relevant local authorities to remind them of the need to monitor and challenge schools that have acted unlawfully in this respect.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families whether Ofsted has reported to his Department the outcome of its thematic review of how schools and local authorities are meeting their requirements to provide excluded pupils with suitable full-time education. (275995)

Ofsted published ‘Day six of exclusion: the extent and quality of provision for pupils’ on 13 May 2009. The report is available on Ofsted’s website at:

http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/Ofsted-home/Publications-and-research/Browse-all-by/Documents-by-type/Thematic-reports/Day-six-of-exclusion-the-extent-and-quality-of-provision-for-pupils

Pupil Exclusions: Disadvantaged

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many pupils have been given a fixed period exclusion for attacks on (a) pupils and (b) teachers in (i) National Challenge schools and (ii) schools in each decile of area deprivation in each of the last three years. (268486)

The readily available information relates to the number of fixed period exclusions (not the number of pupils) from schools in each decile of area deprivation, where the reason for exclusion was physical assault on a pupil or physical assault on an adult (including, but not only, teachers), and is shown in the table.

In 2005/06, data on fixed period exclusions were collected from secondary schools only; therefore, the data is not comparable to other years and has not been provided.

In 2004/05 data were collected via the Termly Exclusions Survey. In 2006/07 data were collected via the School Census for 2006/07. Caution is needed when comparing results from the two sources, which have some differences in scope.

The National Challenge programme was launched on 10 June 2008; schools are being supported under the National Challenge to raise pupil attainment—each according to specific local need, including any problems of exclusion. The latest available data on exclusions is for 2006/07; there were no National Challenge schools at that time and therefore data have not been provided.

Primary, secondary and special schools—number of fixed period exclusions for physical assaults on pupils or adults1—2004/05 and 2006/07—England

2004/052,3,4

2006/075,6

IDACI band of school:

Physical assault on an adult

Physical assault on a pupil

Physical assault on an adult

Physical assault on a pupil

0-10

2,630

8,220

2,940

8,900

10-20

2,570

9,010

2,440

8,370

20-30

2,440

10,500

2,370

9,920

30-40

2,070

9,200

2,040

8,250

40-50

2,010

8,950

1,970

9,090

50-60

1,360

6,820

1,480

7,240

60-70

1,490

8,200

1,620

7,800

70-80

1,420

7,370

1,420

7,760

80-90

1,290

6,680

1,250

6,500

90-100

1,190

5,720

1,060

5,350

Total7

18,490

80,700

18,590

79,180

1 Number of fixed period exclusions where the reason for exclusion was physical assault on a pupil or physical assault on an adult.

2 Excludes city technology colleges and academies.

3 Includes maintained special schools only.

4 Information on fixed period exclusions has been derived from the Termly Exclusions Survey.

5 Includes both maintained and non-maintained special schools, and city technology colleges and academies.

6 Information on fixed period exclusions has been derived from the School Census.

7 Totals for 2004/05 include 73 exclusions where the IDACI band of the school could not be determined.

Note:

Figures have been rounded to the nearest 10.

Source:

Termly Exclusions Survey and School Census.

Pupils: Numbers

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many pupils enrolled in schools in England have been living in the UK for less than two years; and if he will make a statement. (273139)

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what school roll projections were made for (a) primary pupils and (b) secondary schools in (i) the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, (ii) the London Borough of Newham, (iii) the City of Westminster, (iv) Manchester City Council, (v) Birmingham City Council and (vi) Liverpool City Council for each year since 1997; and how many pupils were recorded on school rolls for (A) primary and (B) secondary schools in each such local authority area in each such year. (275997)

[holding answer 15 May 2009]: The Department collects information on current and projected future pupil numbers annually from local authorities, as part of the surplus places survey. The earliest figures available relate to 2003, and the most recent to 2008.

Tables showing the number of pupils on roll and pupil projections for primary and secondary schools that were provided by each of the authorities listed between 2003 and 2008 have been placed in the House Libraries.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what research his Department has conducted on the likely effects on school roll projections in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools of changes in levels of immigration. (276000)

[holding answer 15 May 2009]: National pupil projections take account of several factors, including actual pupil numbers derived from the School Census, expected trends in participation for children outside statutory school ages, and the latest population projections produced by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). The population projections include assumptions about future levels of fertility, mortality and migration. Details of these assumptions are published on the ONS website at:

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/downloads/theme_population/PT129_Long_term_assumptions.pdf

Pupils: Biometrics

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how much expenditure his Department has incurred in facilitating the collection of biometric data in schools to date; (276640)

(2) what steps his Department is taking to ensure the secure holding of biometric data gathered by schools;

(3) how many maintained schools in each region use biometric devices.

No expenditure has been incurred by the Department, this is a decision which is made entirely within each school, and each school finds resources from within existing school budgets.

Schools are responsible for the security of personal data under the Data Protection Act. The lead agency for technology in schools, Becta, has provided data security guidance for schools which emphasises their legal responsibilities.

Data on numbers of schools in each region are not collected centrally, the decision to use biometric devices is left to individual schools, and no central funding is provided.

Pupils: Epilepsy

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what guidance his Department issues to schools on the provision of support for children diagnosed with epilepsy; and what assessment he has made of the extent to which such guidance is complied with. (276664)

There are two different sets of guidance on the provision and support to children diagnosed with epilepsy available to schools. “Managing Medicines in schools and early years settings” was produced in 2005 by the then Department for Education and Skills (DfES) and Department of Health. This guidance explains what epilepsy is and provides schools with medical support and advice on what to do should a child experience a seizure.

“Including Me” was produced in the same year in conjunction with key stakeholders to accompany “Managing Medicines”. This was published to help schools, early years settings and health providers to develop policies and procedures to ensure that children with complex health needs can access education and childcare. This includes an example of a child experiencing severe episodes of epilepsy having a need identified for a trained learning support assistant at school.

We do not collect data centrally on how many schools actively use both sets of guidance.

Pupils: Languages

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many pupils whose first language was not English achieved an A level in a foreign language in each of the last 10 years. (265673)

The information available, which relates to modern foreign languages only, can be found in the following table:

Number of candidates aged 16 to 18 at the end of advanced level study whose first language was not English, achieving an A-level in a modern foreign language

Number

2003

1,360

2004

1,384

2005

1,571

2006

1,302

2007

1,553

2008

1,651

Source:

National Pupil Database

Figures prior to 2003 have not been provided as post-16 attainment matched to pupil characteristics is not available for earlier years.

These figures are for pupils aged 16 to 18 in maintained schools only—pupil characteristics matched to attainment are not available for independent schools or Further Education Colleges.

Pupils: Per Capita Costs

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the average spending per pupil was in (a) mainstream primary schools, (b) mainstream secondary schools, (c) special schools, (d) pupil referral units and (e) academies in each local authority in each year since 1997. (275653)

The average spending per pupil in (a) mainstream primary schools, (b) mainstream secondary schools, (c) special schools and (d) pupil referral units since 1997 is shown in a table, which will be placed in the House Libraries.

The average spending per pupil for academies in each local authority in each year since 1997 is not available for individual local authority areas. However, the national funding per pupil for academies, for financial years currently available are shown in the following table.

Financial year

Per pupil (£)

2003-04

4,294

2004-05

4,469

2005-06

4,203

2006-07

4,600

2007-08

5,001

2008-09

5,344

Notes:

1. Certain elements of funding such as start-up and VAT grants have been omitted to make the figures better comparable with those for maintained schools.

2. For each academy, the largest element of funding (the school budget share) is calculated by using the relevant local authority formula so that funding is equivalent to that received by a maintained school with identical characteristics.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the per capita spend per child in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools was in each local education authority area in England in (i) 1997 and (ii) 2007-08. (276183)

The per capita spend per child in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools for each local education authority area in England for (i) 1997 and (ii) 2007-08 is shown in the following table.

School based expenditure per pupil in local authority maintained primary and secondary schools (1997-98 and 2007-08)

1997-98

2007-08

LA maintained pre-primary and primary schools

LA maintained secondary schools

LA maintained primary schools

LA maintained secondary schools

England

1,740

2,360

3,580

4,620

Barking and Dagenham

1,970

2,650

3,790

5,690

Barnet

1,860

2,640

4,040

5,090

Barnsley

1,560

2,220

3,590

4,440

Bath and NE Somerset

1,720

2,360

3,360

4,150

Bedfordshire

1,750

2,240

3,500

4,090

Berkshire

1,610

2,320

Bexley

1,590

2,350

3,440

4,660

Birmingham

1,940

2,590

3,950

5,230

Blackburn with Darwen

3,580

4,930

Blackpool

3,530

4,420

Bolton

1,750

2,330

3,350

4,660

Bournemouth

1,480

2,210

3,270

4,240

Bracknell Forest

3,230

4,430

Bradford

2,140

1,640

3,740

4,830

Brent

2,030

3,850

4,130

5,690

Brighton and Hove

1,550

2,310

3,240

4,620

Bromley

1,720

2,570

3,300

4,610

Buckinghamshire

1,630

2,290

3,280

4,220

Bury

1,490

2,160

3,250

4,290

Calderdale

1,660

2,510

3,550

4,560

Cambridgeshire pre LGR

1,580

2,270

Cambridgeshire

3,280

4,210

Camden

2,390

3,160

4,960

6,280

Cheshire pre LGR

1,710

2,310

Cheshire

3,390

4,300

City of Bristol

1,810

2,570

3,460

4,990

City of Kingston-upon-Hull

1,680

2,280

3,590

4,770

City of London

3,810

0

6,240

0

City of Nottingham

4,030

5,270

City of Peterborough

3,590

4,960

City of Plymouth

3,400

4,510

Cornwall

1,670

2,320

3,380

4,410

Coventry

1,800

2,500

3,640

4,850

Croydon

1,910

2,700

3,720

4,870

Cumbria

1,860

2,500

3,590

4,510

Darlington

1,420

2,070

3,440

4,610

Derby

1,670

2,550

3,590

4,590

Derbyshire

1,580

2,300

3,340

4,320

Pre LGR Devon

1,630

2,310

Devon

3,390

4,240

Doncaster

1,890

2,460

3,520

4,870

Dorset

1,640

2,120

3,340

4,180

Dudley

1,570

2,190

3,540

4,390

Durham

1,690

2,210

3,740

4,730

Ealing

2,020

2,700

4,020

5,470

East Riding of Yorkshire

1,610

2,300

3,320

4,140

East Sussex

1,670

2,350

3,400

4,370

Enfield

1,900

2,630

4,010

5,080

Essex pre LGR

1,740

2,580

Essex

3,440

4,550

Gateshead

1,700

2,300

3,550

4,590

Gloucestershire

1,640

2,260

3,380

4,270

Greenwich

2,190

2,700

4,440

6,030

Hackney

2,420

3,070

5,230

6,970

Halton

3,680

5,030

Hammersmith and Fulham

2,520

3,400

4,690

6,070

Hampshire

1,700

2,330

3,410

4,320

Haringey

2,360

3,170

4,370

5,870

Harrow

2,140

2,860

3,860

5,540

Hartlepool

1,500

2,150

3,810

4,820

Havering

1,750

2,720

3,550

5,000

Hereford and Worcester

1,660

2,200

Herefordshire

3,470

4,280

Hertfordshire

1,760

2,520

3,310

4,490

Hillingdon

1,730

2,720

3,890

5,250

Hounslow

2,060

2,670

3,910

5,190

Isle of Wight

1,800

2,200

3,830

4,360

Isles of Scilly

2,560

4,570

7,670

0

Islington

2,340

3,170

4,950

6,010

Kensington and Chelsea

2,650

3,410

5,130

6,640

Kent pre LGR

1,700

2,420

Kent

3,290

4,510

Kingston-upon-Thames

1,830

2,480

3,780

4,830

Kirklees

1,650

2,260

3,800

4,600

Knowsley

1,700

2,260

3,600

5,250

Lambeth

2,810

3,290

5,060

6,480

Lancashire pre LGR

1,670

2,400

Lancashire

3,640

4,510

Leeds

1,710

2,370

3,610

4,640

Leicester city

1,740

2,320

3,820

4,920

Leicestershire

1,660

2,290

3,220

4,140

Lewisham

2,340

3,050

4,670

6,270

Lincolnshire

1,680

2,510

3,280

4,420

Liverpool

1,660

2,370

4,020

5,190

Luton

1,700

2,190

3,800

4,930

Manchester

1,620

2,450

3,590

5,150

Medway

3,570

4,600

Merton

2,060

2,490

3,770

4,670

Middlesbrough

1,580

2,390

3,750

5,430

Milton Keynes

1,610

2,090

3,470

4,660

Newcastle-upon-Tyne

1,940

2,480

3,610

4,780

Newham

1,850

2,820

4,500

6,010

Norfolk

1,710

2,450

3,540

4,340

North East Lincolnshire

1,600

2,230

3,600

4,900

North Lincolnshire

1,650

2,260

3,360

4,570

North Somerset

1,690

2,430

3,300

4,260

North Tyneside

1,640

2,270

3,400

4,570

North Yorkshire

1,650

2,340

3,530

4,320

Northamptonshire

1,580

2,250

3,230

4,400

Northumberland

1,620

2,040

3,660

3,970

Nottinghamshire pre LGR

1,720

2,380

Nottinghamshire

3,430

4,400

Oldham

1,650

2,300

3,420

4,870

Oxfordshire

1,630

2,270

3,220

4,410

Poole

1,510

1,820

3,200

4,420

Portsmouth

1,780

2,320

3,630

4,550

Reading

3,450

4,720

Redbridge

1,810

2,610

3,520

4,750

Redcar and Cleveland

1,630

2,270

3,620

4,670

Richmond-upon-Thames

1,940

2,550

3,650

5,160

Rochdale

1,680

2,400

3,660

4,890

Rotherham

1,580

2,180

3,560

4,750

Rutland

1,890

0

3,530

4,370

Salford

1,560

2,330

3,480

5,020

Sandwell

1,850

2,420

3,730

4,830

Sefton

1,590

2,360

3,610

4,690

Sheffield

1,680

2,180

3,440

4,490

Shropshire pre LGR

1,680

2,480

Shropshire

3,250

4,220

Slough

3,560

4,930

Solihull

1,630

2,320

3,210

4,130

Somerset

1,700

2,240

3,410

4,110

South Gloucestershire

1,650

2,440

3,210

4,280

South Tyneside

1,560

2,110

3,600

4,870

Southampton

1,830

2,420

3,640

5,130

Southend

3,580

4,610

Southwark

2,330

3,040

5,140

6,730

St. Helens

1,600

2,270

3,470

4,710

Staffordshire

1,580

2,110

3,270

4,220

Stockport

1,570

2,110

3,350

4,250

Stockton-on-Tees

1,450

2,120

3,380

4,520

Stoke

1,600

2,300

3,370

4,790

Suffolk

1,770

2,290

3,510

4,240

Sunderland

1,660

2,220

3,520

4,750

Surrey

1,780

2,310

3,360

4,300

Sutton

1,870

2,540

3,530

4,570

Swindon

1,580

2,180

3,230

4,210

Tameside

1,590

2,190

3,290

4,340

Telford and Wrekin

3,260

4,550

Thurrock

3,490

4,480

Torbay

3,300

4,530

Tower Hamlets

2,600

3,200

5,500

7,510

Trafford

1,580

2,300

3,110

4,290

Wakefield

1,560

2,150

3,590

4,340

Walsall

1,630

2,240

3,610

4,590

Waltham Forest

2,110

2,780

3,940

5,500

Wandsworth

2,210

2,640

4,540

5,690

Warrington

3,170

4,450

Warwickshire

1,670

2,250

3,260

4,150

West Berkshire

3,390

4,580

West Sussex

1,730

2,360

3,330

4,420

Westminster

2,590

3,050

4,810

6,250

Wigan

1,520

2,310

3,400

4,580

Wiltshire

1,690

2,270

3,260

4,140

Windsor and Maidenhead

3,500

4,550

Wirral

1,600

2,360

3,450

4,820

Wokingham

3,270

4,320

Wolverhampton

1,750

2,500

3,790

5,150

Worcestershire

3,270

4,210

York

1,600

2,350

3,290

4,190

Notes:

1. School based expenditure includes only expenditure incurred directly by the schools. This includes the pay of teachers and school-based support staff, school premises costs, books and equipment, and certain other supplies and services, less any capital items funded from recurrent spending and income from sales, fees and charges and rents and rates. This excludes the central cost of support services such as home to school transport, local authority administration and the financing of capital expenditure.

2. 1999-2000 saw a change in data source when the data collection moved from the RO1 form collected by the ODPM to the Section 52 form from the DCSF (formerly DFES). 2002-03 saw a further break in the time series following the introduction of Consistent Financial Reporting (CFR) to schools and the associated restructuring of the outturn tables.

3. The calculation for 2002-03 onwards is broadly similar to the calculation in previous years. However, 2001-02 and earlier years includes all premature retirement compensation (PRC) and Crombie payments, mandatory PRC payments and other indirect employee expenses. In 2001-02 this accounted for approximately £70 per pupil. From 2002-03 onwards only the schools element of these categories is included and this accounted for approximately £50 per pupil of the 2002-03 total. Also, for some LAs, expenditure that had previously been attributed to the school sectors was reported within the LA part of the form from 2002-03, though this is not quantifiable from existing sources.

4. Pupil numbers include only those pupils attending maintained establishments within each sector and are drawn from the DCSF School Census adjusted to be on a financial year basis.

5. Local government reorganisation (LGR) took place during the mid to late 1990's and those LAs that did not exist either pre or post LGR are shaded out for those years.

6. Spending in 1997-98 reflects the transfer of monies from local government to central Government for the nursery vouchers scheme. These were returned to local government from 1998-99.

7. Expenditure was not distinguished between the pre-primary and primary sectors until the inception of Section 52 for financial year 1999-2000.

8. School based expenditure in LA maintained nursery schools was not recorded in 2002-03 and comparable figures are not available for 2003-04 onwards.

9. Figures are as reported by local authorities as at 12 May 2009 and are rounded to the nearest £10. 2007-08 data are subject to change by the local authority.

10. Cash terms figures as reported by local authorities as at 12 May 2009.

Qualifications and Curriculum Authority: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the annual accommodation cost of the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority has been in each year since it was established, broken down into expenditure on (a) Qualifications and Curriculum Development Agency and (b) Ofqual; and what premises were used. (254543)

The Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) was established in October 1997. Accounts for the authority during its first six months of operation (1 October 1997 to 31 March 1998) can be provided only at a disproportionate cost and are not included within this response.

The Apprenticeships, Skills, Children and Learning Bill will seek to evolve QCA into a Qualifications and Curriculum Development Agency (QCDA), and establish Ofqual on a statutory basis as the new independent regulator of qualifications and assessment. Ofqual has been established in interim form under existing legislation since April 2008. Until proposed legislation comes into force, both the remaining parts of QCA and Ofqual, in its interim form, jointly occupy premises in London, Coventry and Belfast.

Annual costs of rent, rates and utilities to QCA (including Ofqual) from the period 1 April 1998 to 31 March 2008 are shown in the following table.

Accommodation costs

£ million

2007-08

4.6

2006-07

4.1

2005-06

4

2004-05

4

2003-04

3.3

2002-03

2.9

2001-02

1.5

2000-01

2.2

1999-2000

2.5

1998-99

2.7

Source: Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA): February 2009

Premises occupied by QCA (including Ofqual) from the period 1 April 1998 to March 2008 are as follows:

Properties occupied by QCA since 1998

83 Piccadilly, London, W1J 8QA

Spring Place, Coventry Business Park, Herald Avenue, Coventry, CV5 6UB

Glendinning House, 6 Murray Street, Belfast, BT1

222 Euston Road, London NW1

Unity House, 205 Euston Road, London NW1

Stephenson House, 158-160 North Gower Street, London NW1

Newcombe House, 45 Notting Hill Gate, London W11

Source: Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA): February 2009

Qualifications and Curriculum Development Agency

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what (a) administrative, (b) recruitment, (c) staffing, (d) building, (e) ICT and (f) marketing and advertising costs had been incurred in establishing the (i) Qualifications and Curriculum Development Agency and (ii) Ofqual at the latest date for which figures are available. (275071)

The Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) has begun a transformation programme, with the creation within its existing powers of interim Ofqual in April 2008; the restructuring of the rest of the QCA as it evolves into the Qualifications and Curriculum Development Agency (QCDA); and relocation of QCA to Coventry by early 2010 in line with commitments following Sir Michael Lyons’ Independent Review of Public Sector Relocation. Approximately £3 million was spent in 2008-09 on establishing interim Ofqual and relocating it to Coventry by June 2009. These costs include the costs of recruitment, relocation, restructuring, additional staff reflecting the new approach to regulation, and communications. Over the same period, QCA spent £150,000 on restructuring and communications as it evolves into the QCDA.

Racial Harassment: Barnsley

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many racist incidents involving pupils have been recorded at Wombwell secondary school in Barnsley in the academic year (a) 2006-07, (b) 2007-08 and (c) 2008-09; (276416)

(2) how many racist incidents involving pupils have been recorded at Darton secondary school in Barnsley in the academic year (a) 2006-07, (b) 2007-08 and (c) 2008-09;

(3) how many racist incidents involving pupils were recorded at Barnsley secondary schools in the academic year (a) 2006-07, (b) 2007-08 and (c) 2008-09.

We are unable to provide figures for the number of racist bullying incidents in schools as this information is not collected centrally. Our anti-bullying guidance recommends currently that schools record incidents of racist bullying and report these data to their local authority. It advises schools to use the data to monitor their anti-bullying policies, and local authorities to use the data to identify trends and to evaluate area-wide initiatives.

The Race Relations (Amendment) Act 2000 places a general, enforceable duty on all schools (and other public bodies) to: eliminate unlawful racial discrimination; promote equality of opportunity; and promote good relations between people of different racial groups.

We intend to introduce a new statutory duty on schools to record bullying incidents between pupils early next year, and will specifically consult on whether schools should be obliged to record racist bullying incidents and report these incidents to their local authority.

Schools

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what proportion of pupils in each local authority area live within walking distance as defined by his Department of (a) no, (b) one and (c) two or more (i) primary and (ii) secondary schools. (259100)

A table showing the number and proportion of pupils who in 2008 live within (a) two miles and (b) three miles straight line distance of (a) none, (b) one and (c) two or more (i) primary and (ii) secondary schools, broken down by local authority, has been placed in the House Libraries.

Schools: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much and what percentage of the dedicated schools grant was clawed back by each local authority (a) overall, (b) for spending by the local authority within the schools budgets and (c) for local authority central functions in the last year for which figures are available. (274585)

The dedicated schools grant (DSG) must be used in support of the schools budget, which covers both funding delegated to maintained schools and other provision for pupils. The DSG can be used to fund local authority central functions.

The following table provides details of the schools budget for each local authority in England for the 2008-09 financial year as well as details of the proportion of the schools budget retained centrally by the local authority for spending within the schools budget. Local authority budget data for 2009-10 financial year is currently in the process of being collected and validated by the DCSF.

Of which:

Total schools budget (net budget adjusted to show grants gross)

Delegated to schools

Retained centrally by the local authority for spending within the schools budget

Local authority name

£

£

Percentage of schools budget

£

Percentage of schools budget

England

35,387,808,000

31,338,078,000

88.6

4,049,729,000

11.4

Barking and Dagenham

167,893,000

151,763,000

90.4

16,130,000

9.6

Barnet

244,574,000

219,816,000

89.9

24,758,000

10.1

Barnsley

148,340,000

135,686,000

91.5

12,655,000

8.5

Bath and NE Somerset

112,972,000

95,983,000

85.0

16,989,000

15.0

Bedfordshire

284,944,000

257,248,000

90.3

27,696,000

9.7

Bexley

187,490,000

167,024,000

89.1

20,466,000

10.9

Birmingham

928,471,000

858,423,000

92.5

70,048,000

7.5

Blackburn and Darwen

124,443,000

110,693,000

89.0

13,750,000

11.0

Blackpool

94,557,000

80,818,000

85.5

13,739,000

14.5

Bolton

207,738,000

186,960,000

90.0

20,777,000

10.0

Bournemouth

91,023,000

80,426,000

88.4

10,598,000

11.6

Bracknell Forest

70,326,000

59,405,000

84.5

10,921,000

15.5

Bradford

414,661,000

378,096,000

91.2

36,565,000

8.8

Brent

237,660,000

214,983,000

90.5

22,676,000

9.5

Brighton and Hove

144,093,000

123,466,000

85.7

20,627,000

14.3

Bromley

224,310,000

193,044,000

86.1

31,267,000

13.9

Buckinghamshire

346,776,000

297,149,000

85.7

49,627,000

14.3

Bury

123,618,000

109,985,000

89.0

13,633,000

11.0

Calderdale

158,813,000

142,789,000

89.9

16,024,000

10.1

Cambridgeshire

347,173,000

303,684,000

87.5

43,489,000

12.5

Camden

157,452,000

132,777,000

84.3

24,675,000

15.7

Cheshire

453,482,000

400,028,000

88.2

53,453,000

11.8

City of Bristol

225,042,000

194,242,000

86.3

30,800,000

13.7

City of Kingston-upon-Hull

174,768,000

151,751,000

86.8

23,018,000

13.2

City of London

2,185,000

1,588,000

72.7

597,000

27.3

City of Nottingham

195,892,000

160,635,000

82.0

35,257,000

18.0

City of Peterborough

133,794,000

117,858,000

88.1

15,936,000

11.9

City of Plymouth

179,164,000

154,726,000

86.4

24,437,000

13.6

Cornwall

333,945,000

282,132,000

84.5

51,813,000

15.5

Coventry

236,634,000

211,873,000

89.5

24,761,000

10.5

Croydon

236,261,000

206,619,000

87.5

29,642,000

12.5

Cumbria

318,049,000

289,135,000

90.9

28,914,000

9.1

Darlington

65,305,000

57,346,000

87.8

7,959,000

12.2

Derby

173,682,000

159,190,000

91.7

14,492,000

8.3

Derbyshire

489,376,000

431,482,000

88.2

57,894,000

11.8

Devon

413,573,000

375,787,000

90.9

37,786,000

9.1

Doncaster

213,048,000

194,088,000

91.1

18,960,000

8.9

Dorset

253,532,000

220,663,000

87.0

32,868,000

13.0

Dudley

216,621,000

196,440,000

90.7

20,181,000

9.3

Durham

343,057,000

318,309,000

92.8

24,748,000

7.2

Ealing

235,678,000

208,413,000

88.4

27,265,000

11.6

East Riding of Yorkshire

212,120,000

188,062,000

88.7

24,058,000

11.3

East Sussex

304,368,000

260,982,000

85.7

43,387,000

14.3

Enfield

264,121,000

235,877,000

89.3

28,245,000

10.7

Essex

919,055,000

817,036,000

88.9

102,019,000

11.1

Gateshead

129,613,000

114,752,000

88.5

14,860,000

11.5

Gloucestershire

379,747,000

330,161,000

86.9

49,586,000

13.1

Greenwich

225,415,000

196,953,000

87.4

28,462,000

12.6

Hackney

179,196,000

147,317,000

82.2

31,879,000

17.8

Halton

91,504,000

82,442,000

90.1

9,062,000

9.9

Hammersmith and Fulham

105,793,000

91,130,000

86.1

14,664,000

13.9

Hampshire

771,188,000

655,707,000

85.0

115,481,000

15.0

Haringey

196,506,000

175,748,000

89.4

20,759,000

10.6

Harrow

148,306,000

133,669,000

90.1

14,636,000

9.9

Hartlepool

72,568,000

65,123,000

89.7

7,446,000

10.3

Havering

173,371,000

154,369,000

89.0

19,003,000

11.0

Herefordshire

101,908,000

89,871,000

88.2

12,037,000

11.8

Hertfordshire

784,762,000

701,626,000

89.4

83,136,000

10.6

Hillingdon

203,900,000

187,392,000

91.9

16,508,000

8.1

Hounslow

191,262,000

169,587,000

88.7

21,675,000

11.3

Isle of Wight

88,712,000

77,915,000

87.8

10,797,000

12.2

Isles of Stilly

2,439,000

2,127,000

87.2

312,000

12.8

Islington

145,909,000

122,412,000

83.9

23,497,000

16.1

Kensington and Chelsea

73,711,000

64,935,000

88.1

8,776,000

11.9

Kent

972,054,000

854,203,000

87.9

117,851,000

12.1

Kingston-upon-Thames

103,715,000

94,431,000

91.0

9,283,000

9.0

Kirklees

298,207,000

263,192,000

88.3

35,015,000

11.7

Knowsley

115,962,000

98,920,000

85.3

17,043,000

14.7

Lambeth

201,652,000

170,248,000

84.4

31,404,000

15.6

Lancashire

771,672,000

692,908,000

89.8

78,765,000

10.2

Leeds

499,525,000

458,167,000

91.7

41,358,000

8.3

Leicester City

226,578,000

194,209,000

85.7

32,368,000

14.3

Leicestershire

417,379,000

365,870,000

87.7

51,509,000

12.3

Lewisham

206,951,000

176,586,000

85.3

30,365,000

14.7

Lincolnshire

459,678,000

409,245,000

89.0

50,433,000

11.0

Liverpool

361,438,000

314,426,000

87.0

47,012,000

13.0

Luton

152,145,000

136,816,000

89.9

15,330,000

10.1

Manchester

341,607,000

297,295,000

87.0

44,311,000

13.0

Medway

199,127,000

179,361,000

90.1

19,766,000

9.9

Merton

108,106,000

91,738,000

84.9

16,368,000

15.1

Middlesbrough

94,913,000

83,672,000

88.2

11,240,000

11.8

Milton Keynes

183,901,000

166,873,000

90.7

17,028,000

9.3

Newcastle upon Tyne

179,033,000

159,920,000

89.3

19,112,000

10.7

Newham

295,363,000

260,611,000

88.2

34,752,000

11.8

Norfolk

503,342,000

453,901,000

90.2

49,441,000

9.8

North East Lincolnshire

102,773,000

90,576,000

88.1

12,197,000

11.9

North Lincolnshire

106,752,000

91,530,000

85.7

15,222,000

14.3

North Somerset

125,073,000

110,657,000

88.5

14,416,000

11.5

North Tyneside

131,289,000

122,713,000

93.5

8,577,000

6.5

North Yorkshire

388,723,000

349,675,000

90.0

39,049,000

10.0

Northamptonshire

458,999,000

386,823,000

84.3

72,176,000

15.7

Northumberland

225,067,000

192,079,000

85.3

32,988,000

14.7

Nottinghamshire

509,791,000

468,675,000

91.9

41,116,000

8.1

Oldham

188,084,000

165,305,000

87.9

22,780,000

12.1

Oxfordshire

375,858,000

326,615,000

86.9

49,243,000

13.1

Poole

83,938,000

75,321,000

89.7

8,618,000

10.3

Portsmouth

113,816,000

103,369,000

90.8

10,447,000

9.2

Reading

81,566,000

68,139,000

83.5

13,427,000

16.5

Redbridge

224,776,000

204,044,000

90.8

20,732,000

9.2

Redcar and Cleveland

103,824,000

91,521,000

88.2

12,303,000

11.8

Richmond-upon-Thames

100,169,000

85,879,000

85.7

14,291,000

14.3

Rochdale

160,867,000

144,289,000

89.7

16,578,000

10.3

Rotherham

211,127,000

187,787,000

88.9

23,340,000

11.1

Rutland

21,799,000

19,315,000

88.6

2,483,000

11.4

Salford

146,929,000

128,409,000

87.4

18,519,000

12.6

Sandwell

221,236,000

200,523,000

90.6

20,713,000

9.4

Sefton

194,401,000

175,655,000

90.4

18,747,000

9.6

Sheffield

354,638,000

293,489,000

82.8

61,150,000

17.2

Shropshire

180,827,000

147,943,000

81.8

32,884,000

18.2

Slough

112,826,000

101,456,000

89.9

11,370,000

10.1

Solihull

142,536,000

127,511,000

89.5

15,024,000

10.5

Somerset

312,300,000

268,107,000

85.8

44,193,000

14.2

South Gloucestershire

168,581,000

148,320,000

88.0

20,261,000

12.0

South Tyneside

107,971,000

99,629,000

92.3

8,342,000

7.7

Southampton

127,519,000

113,262,000

88.8

14,257,000

11.2

Southend

127,799,000

112,468,000

88.0

15,331,000

12.0

Southwark

189,960,000

164,156,000

86.4

25,804,000

13.6

St. Helens

125,228,000

111,191,000

88.8

14,037,000

11.2

Staffordshire

539,822,000

483,675,000

89.6

56,148,000

10.4

Stockport

166,913,000

146,106,000

87.5

20,807,000

12.5

Stockton-on-Tees

132,046,000

121,274,000

91.8

10,771,000

8.2

Stoke

164,827,000

141,135,000

85.6

23,692,000

14.4

Suffolk

427,824,000

384,381,000

89.8

43,443,000

10.2

Sunderland

191,581,000

177,874,000

92.8

13,707,000

7.2

Surrey

648,839,000

567,897,000

87.5

80,942,000

12.5

Sutton

153,426,000

135,500,000

88.3

17,926,000

11.7

Swindon

124,344,000

108,391,000

87.2

15,952,000

12.8

Tameside

157,679,000

137,424,000

87.2

20,254,000

12.8

Telford and Wrekin

111,618,000

100,073,000

89.7

11,545,000

10.3

Thurrock

103,067,000

87,464,000

84.9

15,603,000

15.1

Torbay

86,060,000

74,502,000

86.6

11,559,000

13.4

Tower Hamlets

277,047,000

241,730,000

87.3

35,316,000

12.7

Trafford

160,750,000

144,001,000

89.6

16,749,000

10.4

Wakefield

218,515,000

201,950,000

92.4

16,565,000

7.6

Walsall

218,357,000

197,972,000

90.7

20,385,000

9.3

Waltham Forest

193,876,000

177,230,000

91.4

16,646,000

8.6

Wandsworth

178,802,000

168,674,000

94.3

10,128,000

5.7

Warrington

135,537,000

120,412,000

88.8

15,126,000

11.2

Warwickshire

331,654,000

297,016,000

89.6

34,638,000

10.4

West Berkshire

116,277,000

104,897,000

90.2

11,379,000

9.8

West Sussex

464,413,000

407,730,000

87.8

56,683,000

12.2

Westminster

110,860,000

94,696,000

85.4

16,164,000

14.6

Wigan

211,854,000

196,606,000

92.8

15,248,000

7.2

Wiltshire

290,460,000

255,322,000

87.9

35,138,000

12.1

Windsor and Maidenhead

91,688,000

80,177,000

87.4

11,511,000

12.6

Wirral

235,220,000

211,867,000

90.1

23,353,000

9.9

Wokingham

105,411,000

93,964,000

89.1

11,447,000

10.9

Wolverhampton

194,588,000

179,303,000

92.1

15,285,000

7.9

Worcestershire

345,353,000

311,064,000

90.1

34,289,000

9.9

York

103,824,000

91,032,000

87.7

12,791,000

12.3

Notes:

1. Total schools budget is drawn from local authorities Children, Schools and Families Financial Data Collection Budget Statements (table 1) submitted to the DCSF. This is calculated as the gross elements of any grants plus the net elements of the remainder of the schools budget.

2. The total amount delegated to schools includes the individual schools budget for local authority maintained nursery, primary, secondary and special schools as well as any revenue grants and support for schools in financial difficulty delegated to those schools.

3. Cash figures are rounded to the nearest £1,000 and, therefore, may not sum due to rounding.

4. Cash terms figures as reported by local authorities as at 7 May 2009.

Schools: Playing Fields

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what criteria he uses to assess whether the playing field of an (a) existing and (b) closed school is surplus to the needs of the local community; and if he will make a statement. (275633)

When considering an application to dispose of school playing fields Ministers take into account any authorised community use of the land in question. Where any authorised community users would be displaced if the application were to be approved, we expect the application to include a full account of the effect on those users, particularly whether their activities can realistically be moved to an alternative site on terms which do not adversely affect the users. They must also be fully consulted about any proposal to dispose of the school playing fields.

Any potential future community use of former school playing fields falls within the remit of the local planning process; Sport England is a statutory consultee in that process.

Schools: Sports

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families whether all contracts for school sport are open to tender; and what the procedure is for potential bidders to apply. (275952)

[holding answer 15 May 2009]: Work in connection with the delivery of the PE and sport strategy for young people is carried out by a range of delivery partners on behalf of the Government under grant aid and contractual arrangements. Potential bidders for any contract advertised follow the normal Official Journal of the European Union or UK procurement procedure, whichever is applicable.

Schools: Standards

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families which schools have been in special measures for (a) up to two years, (b) between two and three years, (c) between three and four years and (d) more than four years. (275807)

The following two tables show the information requested. They are based on the most recent data published by Ofsted for 31 December 2008. No schools had been in special measures for three or more years.

Schools in special measures for up to two years, 31 December 2008

School

Local authority

Date of inspection

Number of months in category

Monteagle Primary School

Barking and Dagenham

5 June 2008

6

Dearne Goldthorpe Primary School

Barnsley

22 October 2008

2

Lansdown Tuition Centre

Bath & NE Somerset

2 October 2008

2

Barnehurst Junior (Foundation) School

Bexley

9 December 2008

0

Pelham Primary School

Bexley

13 February 2008

10

Bexleyheath School

Bexley

3 October 2007

14

Eastcote Primary School

Bexley

14 September 2007

15

Foundry Primary School

Birmingham

6 June 2008

6

Jervoise Junior & Infant School

Birmingham

21 May 2008

7

Primrose Hill Community School

Birmingham

8 February 2008

10

Yorkmead Junior & Infant School

Birmingham

18 January 2008

11

Yardley Wood Community Primary School

Birmingham

31 January 2008

11

Conway Primary School

Birmingham

22 November 2007

13

William Cowper Primary School

Birmingham

7 June 2007

18

St. Aiden’s CE Primary School

Blackburn

28 September 2007

15

SS Simon and Jude CE Primary School

Bolton

4 April 2008

8

Westhoughton Parochial CE Primary

Bolton

20 June 2007

18

Buttershaw Primary School

Bradford

24 September 2008

3

Queensbury School

Bradford

22 May 2008

7

Fearnville Primary School

Bradford

8 November 2007

13

Chalkhill Primary School

Brent

6 December 2007

12

Braintcroft Primary School

Brent

22 November 2007

13

James Dixon Primary School

Bromley

30 April 2008

8

Stewart Fleming Primary School

Bromley

15 February 2008

10

Burwood School

Bromley

19 September 2007

15

Buckingham School

Buckinghamshire

5 March 2008

9

Wingrave CE Combined School

Buckinghamshire

4 February 2008

10

Mount Pellon Junior & infant School

Calderdale

6 December 2007

12

Wistaston Green Primary and Nursery School

Cheshire

22 September 2008

3

St. John's CE Primary School

Cheshire

24 January 2008

11

Saighton CE Primary School

Cheshire

5 December 2007

12

Ecclesbourne Infant School

Croydon

26 November 2008

1

Ashburton Infant School

Croydon

24 September 2008

3

Castle Hill Primary School

Croydon

25 September 2008

3

Oughterside Primary School

Cumbria

11 July 2008

5

West Cumbria Learning Centre

Cumbria

23 June 2008

6

Millom School

Cumbria

28 November 2007

13

The Alfred Barrow School

Cumbria

12 October 2007

14

Ulverston Victoria High School

Cumbria

31 October 2007

14

Ravensdale Junior School

Derby City

16 October 2008

2

Boulton Primary School

Derby City

12 December 2006

24

Tupton Primary School

Derbyshire

11 December 2008

0

Parkside Junior School

Derbyshire

15 May 2008

7

Deincourt Community School

Derbyshire

31 January 2008

11

Caen Community Primary School

Devon

5 June 2008

6

Willowbrook Primary School

Devon

4 March 2008

9

Bridgerule CE Primary School

Devon

29 February 2008

10

Colyton Primary School

Devon

2 November 2007

13

Highftelds Primary School

Doncaster

18 November 2008

1

North Doncaster Technology College

Doncaster

21 May 2008

7

Shaftsbury CE Primary School

Dorset

12 December 2007

12

Headlands School and Community Science College

East Riding

21 February 2008

10

Hillcrest School

East Sussex

9 October 2008

2

Bishops Park College

Essex

11 October 2007

14

Alderman Blaxill School

Essex

24 May 2007

19

Blaydon West Primary School

Gateshead

5 October 2007

14

Arthur Dye Primary School

Gloucestershire

5 June 2008

6

Cam House School

Gloucestershire

5 February 2008

10

Charlotte Turner Primary School

Greenwich

18 November 2008

1

Daubeney Primary School

Hackney

6 June 2008

6

Grazebrook Primary School

Hackney

13 March 2008

9

Weston Primary School

Halton

2 October 2008

2

Simms Cross Primary School

Halton

25 April 2007

20

Canberra Primary School

Hammersmith and Fulham

11 July 2008

5

Winklebury Junior School

Hampshire

6 June 2008

6

The Bridge Education Centre

Hampshire

21 May 2008

7

Buriesdon Junior School

Hampshire

7 February 2008

10

Waite End Primary School

Hampshire

2 November 2007

13

Woodcot Primary School

Hampshire

28 September 2007

15

Grangeside (formerly Basingstoke School Plus)

Hampshire

7 December 2006

24

The Arc PRU

Havering

5 December 2007

12

Broadlands Primary School

Herefordshire

22 October 2008

2

Clehonger CE Primary School

Herefordshire

22 November 2007

13

Francis Bacon School

Hertfordshire

15 May 2008

7

Bushey Hall School

Hertfordshire

13 March 2008

9

Sheredes School

Hertfordshire

15 March 2007

21

Edward Pauling Primary School

Hounslow

7 December 2007

12

Hersden Community Primary School

Kent

27 November 2008

1

Raynehurst Primary School

Kent

12 March 2008

9

Lydd Primary School

Kent

27 March 2008

9

Hall Road Primary School

Kingston upon Hull

9 December 2008

0

David Lister School

Kingston upon Hull

3 July 2008

5

Highfield School

Knowsley

4 July 2007

17

North Cliffe School

Lancashire

18 March 2008

9

Shuttleworth College

Lancashire

28 February 2008

10

Fleetwood Flakefleet Primary School

Lancashire

23 January 2008

11

Sabden Primary School

Lancashire

7 December 2007

12

Kingsfold Primary School

Lancashire

25 April 2007

20

City of Preston High School

Lancashire

27 March 2007

21

Hameldon Community College

Lancashire

22 February 2007

22

Allerton Bywater Primary School

Leeds

20 May 2008

7

South Leeds High School

Leeds

7 June 2007

18

Elmete Wood

Leeds

31 January 2007

23

Fulhurst Community College

Leicester City

4 December 2008

0

Braunstone Frith Junior School

Leicester City

18 April 2008

8

Fosse Primary School

Leicester City

23 April 2008

8

Marriott Primary School

Leicester City

30 January 2008

11

Queensmead Community Primary School

Leicester City

31 January 2007

23

Student Support Service PRU

Leicestershire

13 November 2008

1

Morton Trentside Primary School

Lincolnshire

4 July 2008

5

Hartsholme Primary School

Lincolnshire

2 November 2007

13

Belton Lane Community Primary School

Lincolnshire

25 June 2007

18

The Bardney CE & Methodist Primary School

Lincolnshire

24 May 2007

19

Blueberry Park

Liverpool

11 June 2008

6

Parklands High School

Liverpool

10 April 2008

8

St. John's Catholic Primary School

Liverpool

27 September 2007

15

Buglawton Hall School

Manchester

7 October 2008

2

Crab Lane Primary School

Manchester

17 April 2008

8

Moston Fields Primary School

Manchester

31 October 2007

14

Parrs Wood High School

Manchester

31 October 2007

14

Medway Community College

Medway

6 December 2007

12

Hillcross Primary School

Merton

6 February 2008

10

St. Theresa's Catholic Primary School

Merton

10 October 2007

14

The Radcliffe School

Milton Keynes

31 January 2008

11

Throckley Primary School

Newcastle

14 May 2008

7

Westgate Hill Primary School

Newcastle

6 December 2006

24

Richard Rose Central Academy (Cumbria)

Non maintained

11 December 2008

0

RNIB Sunshine House Northwood (Hillingdon)

Non-maintained

12 December 2007

12

Aslacton Primary School

Norfolk

26 November 2008

1

Morley CE Primary School

Norfolk

5 June 2008

6

Attleborough Junior School

Norfolk

9 January 2008

11

Mundford CE Primary School

Norfolk

22 November 2007

13

Costessey High School

Norfolk

31 October 2007

14

Terrington St. Clement Community School

Norfolk

27 June 2007

18

Buxton Primary School

Norfolk

28 June 2007

18

Central Area PRU

Norfolk

16 May 2007

19

Earlham High School

Norfolk

16 May 2007

19

Swaffham Junior School (ex. South Greenhoe VC CE Middle School

Norfolk

2 March 2007

21

West Earlham Community Junior School

Norfolk

9 March 2007

21

Humberston Comprehensive School

North East Lines

10 December 2008

0

Scalby School

North Yorkshire

11 November 2008

1

Risedale Sports and Community College

North Yorkshire

30 April 2008

8

The Wensleydale School

North Yorkshire

17 January 2008

11

Mill Hill Community Primary School

North Yorkshire

15 March 2007

21

Rushden Community College

Northamptonshire

4 December 2008

0

Warwick Primary School

Northamptonshire

2 October 2008

2

Henry Gotch Primary School

Northamptonshire

9 July 2008

5

St. Mary's CE Primary Sschool

Northamptonshire

15 July 2008

5

Bellinge Primary School

Northamptonshire

6 June 2008

6

St. Gregory's Catholic Primary School

Northamptonshire

11 March 2008

9

Unity College

Northamptonshire

12 February 2008

10

Vernon Terrace Primary School

Northamptonshire

3 October 2007

14

Queen Eleanor Primary School

Northamptonshire

4 October 2007

14

Abington Vale Primary School

Northamptonshire

17 October 2007

14

Sunnyside Primary School

Northamptonshire

18 October 2007

14

Avondale Junior School

Northamptonshire

26 June 2007

18

Blackthorn Primary School

Northamptonshire

25 January 2007

23

Cragside CE Cont Primary School

Northumberland

11 November 2008

1

Blyth Horton Grange First School

Northumberland

21 November 2007

13

West Sleekburn Middle (Sec) School

Northumberland

1 February 2007

22

Newgate Lane Primary School

Nottinghamshire

4 December 2008

0

Sutton Road Primary School

Nottinghamshire

22 October 2008

2

Magnus C of E School

Nottinghamshire

16 May 2008

7

Ethel Wainwright Primary School

Nottinghamshire

25 January 2008

11

Oak Tree Primary School

Nottinghamshire

5 December 2007

12

Thameside Primary School

Oxfordshire

18 January 2008

11

Dashwood School

Oxfordshire

29 November 2007

13

St John Fisher RC School

Peterborough

30 April 2008

8

Winyates Primary School

Peterborough

7 November 2007

13

Canford Heath Middle School

Poole

13 March 2008

9

Learning Support Service

Poole

31 October 2007

14

Cottage Grove Primary School

Portsmouth

19 November 2008

1

Battle Primary School

Reading

30 January 2008

11

Pathways Special School

Redcar and Cleveland

14 March 2007

21

Hollin Primary School

Rochdale

6 November 2008

1

Balderstone Technology College

Rochdale

23 November 2007

13

St. Paul's CE Primary School

Salford

19 June 2008

6

Marlborough Road Primary School

Salford

13 February 2008

10

Deepcar St. John's CE Junior School

Sheffield

8 October 2008

2

Handsworth Grange School

Sheffield

23 September 2008

3

Newfield Secondary School

Sheffield

26 June 2008

6

Bankwood Community Primary School

Sheffield

11 March 2008

9

Highley Community Primary School

Shropshire

4 December 2008

0

The Grange Junior School

Shropshire

27 November 2007

13

Bosworth Wood Primary School

Solihull

23 May 2007

19

Knights Templar CE Methodist Community School

Somerset

21 November 2008

1

The Priory School

Somerset

6 December 2006

24

Newlands Primary School

Southampton

15 May 2008

7

Townsend Primary School

Southwark

15 October 2008

2

Goose Green Primary School

Southwark

4 March 2008

9

Alma Primary School

Southwark

7 November 2007

13

Eveline Lowe Primary School

Southwark

22 February 2007

22

St. James' CE Primary School

St Helens

20 February 2008

10

Merton Bank Primary School

St Helens

25 June 2007

18

Burton Learning Centre

Staffordshire

11 June 2008

6

Billingham Campus School

Stockton on Tees

31 October 2007

14

Sandon Business and Enterprise College

Stoke on Trent

22 October 2008

2

Stoke Minster CE Aided Primary School (was Bishop Stamer CE)

Stoke on Trent

29 January 2008

11

Castle Hill Junior School

Suffolk

19 June 2008

6

Kirkley Middle (Sec) School

Suffolk

6 December 2007

12

Elm Tree Middle (Sec) School

Suffolk

10 May 2007

19

Hylton Red House Primary School

Sunderland

25 June 2008

6

Epsom and Ewell High School

Surrey

20 November 2008

1

St John's CE Community Primary

Surrey

11 September 2007

15

Egerton Park Arts College

Tameside

17 May 2007

19

Southall School

Telford and Wrekin

28 February 2008

10

Chadwell St Mary Primary School

Thurrock

3 July 2007

17

The Grays School Media Arts College

Thurrock

29 June 2007

18

Upton St James CE Primary School

Torbay

15 November 2007

13

The Ruiz Centre

Walsall

2 December 2008

0

Brownhills West Primary School

Walsall

11 March 2008

9

Dariaston Community Science College

Walsall

28 November 2007

13

St Thomas of Canterbury Catholic Primary School

Walsall

21 June 2007

18

Ainslie Wood Primary School

Waltham Forest

10 October 2008

2

The Beaumont School

Waltham Forest

9 January 2007

23

Smallwood Primary School and Language Unit

Wandsworth

24 June 2008

6

Hillbrook School

Wandsworth

23 January 2008

11

Bewsey Lodge Primary School

Warrington

20 November 2008

1

Stockton Heath Primary School

Warrington

30 April 2008

8

Bruche Community Primary School

Warrington

13 September 2007

15

All Saints CE Primary School & Nursery

Warwickshire

24 April 2007

20

John Rankin Junior School

West Berkshire

4 December 2008

0

Denefield School

West Berkshire

4 December 2008

0

The Winchcombe School

West Berkshire

7 February 2008

10

Nyewood C of E Junior School

West Sussex

15 October 2008

2

St Mary's Catholic Primary School, Worthing

West Sussex

17 September 2008

3

Out of School Learning Service, Area B

West Sussex

13 February 2008

10

Landgate School, Bryn

Wigan

4 December 2008

0

Beech Hill Community Primary School

Wigan

16 April 2008

8

Montrose

Wigan

31 January 2008

11

Upavon Primary School

Wiltshire

17 January 2008

11

St Michael's CE Aided Primary School

Wiltshire

10 July 2007

17

Wingfield CE Primary School

Wiltshire

13 June 2007

18

Lickhill Primary School

Worcestershire

4 December 2008

0

Evesham, Simon de Montford Middle School

Worcestershire

15 November 2007

13

Elgar Technology College

Worcestershire

22 February 2007

22

Schools in special measures between two and three years, 31 December 2008

School name

LA Area

Date of inspection-

Number of months in category

Horton Grange Primary School

Bradford

30 November 2006

25

St. Catherine’s Catholic High School

Calderdale

14 September 2006

27

Maidenhill School

Gloucestershire

23 November 2006

25

Cherryfield Primary School

Knowsley

17 October 2006

26

St. James CE VA Primary School

Northamptonshire

30 November 2006

25

Science: GCE A-Level

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many people took one or more science A-levels in (a) England, (b) the North East, (c) Tees Valley district and (d) Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland constituency in each of the last five years. (249848)

The information is given in the following table:

Number of pupils entered for at least one Science A level

2003/04

2004/05

2005/06

2006/07

2007/08

Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland

221

205

225

220

241

Tees Valley District

672

667

644

619

701

North East

2,455

2,461

2,308

2,337

2,419

England

56,386

58,167

56,072

56,570

58,976

Notes: 1. Figures relate to 16 to 18-year-olds (age at start of academic year, i.e. 31 August) in all maintained schools and colleges. 2. Figures include achievements in Biological, Human Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Single Award Science, Electronics, Environmental Science, Geology and Applied Science. Source: School and College Achievement and Attainment Tables data.

Secondary Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many secondary schools do not have specialist status; and if he will make a statement. (241633)

There are currently 234 maintained secondary schools which are not specialist and which are eligible to apply to join the specialist schools programme.

Special Educational Needs

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families pursuant to the answer of 24 February 2009, Official Report, columns 755-56W, on special educational needs, what the names are of the four schools referred to in the answer. (260245)

Information on the four schools referred to in the answer is shown in the following table.

Maintained nursery, primary and secondary schools1, 2 schools with more than 20 per cent. of pupils with statements of special educational needs3 position as at January 2008

Name of school

Local authority

Number of pupils with statements of special educational need3

Percentage of pupils with statements of special educational need3

Foresters Primary School

Sutton

50

20.6

The Mailing School

Kent

90

22.0

The Grange Primary School

Sefton

60

22.5

Pinewood Infant School

Hampshire

20

23.3

1 Includes middle schools as deemed.

2 Excludes City Technology Colleges and Academies.

3 Excludes dually registered pupils.

Pupil numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10.

Source:

School Census.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what proportion of pupils with statements of special educational needs consequent upon behavioural, emotional and social difficulties attended (a) special schools and (b) mainstream schools in each year since 1997. (271829)

The available information is provided in the table. Information on pupils with statements of SEN and their main or primary need and, if appropriate, their secondary need was collected for the first time in 2004.

Proportion of pupils1 with a statement of SEN for behavioural, emotional and social difficulties (BESD)2 attending special schools3 and mainstream schools4, as at January each year, England

Percentage of pupils with BESD attending:

Special schools

Mainstream schools

2004

37.3

62.7

2005

37.8

62.2

2006

39.0

61.0

2007

41.3

58.7

2008

42.4

57.6

1 Excludes dually registered pupils. 2 Pupils with a statement of SEN provide information on their primary need and, if appropriate, their secondary need, information on primary need only is given here. 3 Includes maintained and non-maintained special schools. Excludes general hospital schools. 4 Includes maintained nursery, primary, and secondary schools, city technology colleges and academies. Source: School Census.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families which special schools (a) he and (b) Ministers in his Department have visited since June 2007; and on what date each such visit took place. (273285)

[holding answer 7 May 2009]: The following table shows special schools visited by Ministers at the Department for Children, Schools and Families since June 2007 to date.

Ministers have also visited special schools in their capacity as constituency MPs. In addition some of the mainstream schools they have visited also had excellent specialist units to support children with special educational needs.

Date

Schools visited

Ed Balls

3 April 2008

Michael Tippett School, London

23 October 2008

Lyndale School, Wirral

11 May 2009

Two Rivers High School, Tamworth

Beverley Hughes

12 June 2008

New Woodlands Special School, Bromley

Jim Knight

7 May 2008

Wilson Stuart Special School, Birmingham

3 July 2008

Springfield Special School, Oxford

10 September 2008

Brislington Enterprise College, Bristol

23 April 2009

The Orchards School, Greenfold School, Bolton

Sarah McCarthy-Fry

22 October 2008

New Bridge School, Oldham

9 February 2009

Treehouse School, London

18 March 2009

Linden Lodge School, London

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families pursuant to the answer of 2 April 2009, Official Report, columns 1352-54W, on special educational needs, how many of the pupils in schools in special measures were in (a) primary schools, (b) secondary schools and (c) schools in each local authority area. (274770)

This is a matter for Ofsted. HM chief inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply has been placed in the House Libraries.

Special Educational Needs: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families pursuant to the answer of 7 May 2009, Official Report, column 414W, on special educational needs, what funds have been allocated to each stream for 2009-10; what formulae are used to attribute funds to non-maintained special schools from each stream; by what means non-maintained special schools became eligible for the School Travel Grant; and how many non-maintained special schools are eligible for the School Travel Grant. (275389)

Details of estimates of amounts to be paid to non-maintained special schools in respect of funding streams for the 2009/10 financial year, together with the formulae and/or calculations used have been placed in the House Libraries. All NMSSs are eligible for a School Travel Plan grant on the condition that an approved travel plan has been submitted and quality assured by their local school travel adviser. In the 2008/09 financial year school travel grant was paid to four NMSSs.

Special Educational Needs: GCSE

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) at which mainstream schools attended by pupils with statements of special educational need no such pupils achieved five A* to C grades at GCSE in 2008; (271481)

(2) pursuant to the answer of 20 April 2009 to question 265674, what the names of the 43 schools are; and in which local authority area each is.

The previous answer explained that there were 43 maintained mainstream schools with 10 or more pupils with statements of SEN at the end of key stage 4, where no pupils with statements of SEN achieved five or more GCSEs at grades A*-C or the equivalent in 2008.

The 43 schools were:

School name

Local authority

Abbeydale Grange School

Sheffield

Ashford Christ Church, Church of England Maths and Computing Specialist College

Kent

Axton Chase School

Kent

Babington Community Technology College

Leicester

Bishopsgarth School

Stockton-on-Tees

Bristnall Hall Technology College

Sandwell

Corby Community College

Northamptonshire

Crown Hills Community College

Leicester

Filton High School

South Gloucestershire

Grange Technology College

Bradford

Hampton Community College

Richmond upon Thames

Hamstead Hall Community Learning Centre

Birmingham

Heston Community School

Hounslow

Highgate Wood Secondary School

Haringey

Holywells High School

Suffolk

Honiton Community College

Devon

Houghton Kepier Sports College: A Foundation School

Sunderland

Kingsford Community School

Newham

Knutsford High School

Cheshire

Lincoln Christ's Hospital School

Lincolnshire

Littlehampton Community School, The

West Sussex

Longcroft School

East Riding of Yorkshire

Middlefield School of Technology

Lincolnshire

New College Leicester

Leicester

New Line Learning Academy

Kent

Newsome High School and Sports College

Kirklees

Oxford School

Oxfordshire

Parkfield High School

Wolverhampton

Sandown High School

Isle of Wight

Sedgehill School

Lewisham

Stantonbury Campus

Milton Keynes

Sudbury Upper School and Arts College

Suffolk

Swanlea School

Tower Hamlets

The Kingstone School

Barnsley

The Voyager School

Peterborough

Thomas Clarkson Community College

Cambridgeshire

Trinity C of E High School

Manchester

Ullswater Community College

Cumbria

Unity City Academy

Middlesbrough

Vermuyden School

East Riding of Yorkshire

Weavers School

Northamptonshire

Westbourne Sports College

Suffolk

Wreake Valley Community College

Leicestershire

There are many more schools with less than 10 pupils with statements of SEN where no pupils with statements of SEN achieved five or more GCSEs A*-C. We have used a standard cut-off of 10 pupils with statement of SEN in relation to attainment data to prevent possible disclosure of personal information.

Specialised Diplomas

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many (a) schools, (b) academies, (c) further education colleges and (d) sixth form colleges participated in consortia responsible for diploma courses in (i) 2007-08 and (ii) 2008-09. (273517)

The information is available on an academic year basis starting in September 2008 with delivery of the first phase of diplomas. The latest information provided by consortia is that: 1,382 secondary schools, 56 academies, 124 further education colleges and 51 sixth form colleges were involved in the delivery of diplomas from September 2008.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families which (a) schools and (b) consortia in each local authority are offering at least one diploma course to students. (274376)

We do not have information centrally on which schools are offering the Diploma to their learners. Information on which consortia in each local authority were approved to offer the diploma from September 2008 is as follows:

Consortia approved for a 2008 start through Gateway1

Eastern England

Local authority

Consortium name

Cambridgeshire

Cambridge 14-19 Area Partnership

Cambridgeshire

HSEP

Hertfordshire

Dacorum SAPG

Hertfordshire

North Herts SAPG

Hertfordshire

SE Herts SAPG

Luton

Campus Luton Partnership

Norfolk

Extended Rural Norfolk Federation

Norfolk

Norwich city (Open Opportunity)

Southend-on-Sea

Southend

Suffolk

North Suffolk

1 Since Gateway 1 a number of consortia have merged or changed names. This list is derived from the original applications.

East Midlands

Local authority

Consortium name

Derby

Derby City 14-19 Partnership

Derbyshire

Ripley and Heanor Learning Consortia

Leicestershire

Melton and Belvoir

Leicestershire

Melton and South Charnwood

Leicestershire

North West Leics

Lincolnshire

Boston

Lincolnshire

Grantham Partnership

Lincolnshire

Lincs East Partnership

Lincolnshire

Sleaford

Lincolnshire

South Holland

Lincolnshire

Wolds

Northamptonshire

East Northamptonshire

Northamptonshire

Kettering

Northamptonshire

Northampton Town

Nottingham City

Nottingham City

Nottinghamshire

Ashfield District

Nottinghamshire

Bassetlaw

Nottinghamshire

Mansfield Learning Partnership

Nottinghamshire

Newark and Sherwood ASG

Rutland

Rutland 14-19 Partnership

London

Local authority

Consortium name

Barking and Dagenham

Barking and Dagenham

Bromley

The Bromley 14-19 Collaborative

Croydon

Borough Wide Consortium

Ealing

West London Consortium

Hackney

Hackney Diploma 2009 Consortium

Hammersmith and Fulham

Hammersmith and Fulham

Haringey

Haringey 14-19 Partnership

Harrow

Harrow Collegiate

Hillingdon

Hillingdon Consortium

Hounslow

Hounslow 14-19 Partnership

Islington

Islington 14-19 Partnership

Lambeth (joint Southwark)

7 Schools LCM The Lambeth Consortium

Lewisham

Lewisham

Newham

Newham 14-19 Partnership

Southwark

Southwark 14-19 Partnership

Tower Hamlets

The Hub

Waltham Forest

London Borough of Waltham Forest

Wandsworth

Wandsworth 14-19 Partnership

North East

Local authority

Consortium name

Durham

Derwentside Consortium

Gateshead

Gateshead 14-19 Partnership

Hartlepool

Hartlepool 14-19 Partnership

Middlesbrough

Middlesbrough Learning Partnership

Newcastle Upon Tyne

Newcastle City Consortium

North Tyneside

North Tyneside 14-19 Learning Partnership

Sunderland

Sunderland 14-19 Partnership

North West

Local authority

Consortium name

Blackburn with Darwen

Blackburn with Darwen 14-19 Partnership

Bolton

Bolton LA

Bury

Bury Learning Partnership

Cheshire

Crewe and Nantwich

Cheshire

East Cheshire 14-19 Diploma Consortium

Cheshire

Vale Royal Diploma Consortium

Cumbria

Furness

Cumbria

Furness 14-19 Partnership

Halton

Halton 14-19 Strategic Partnership

Knowsley

Knowsley 14-19 Collegiate Partnership

Lancashire

Burnley Pendle

Lancashire

Chorley and South Ribble

Lancashire

Hyndebum, Rossendale and Ribble Valley

Lancashire

Lancaster and Morecambe

Liverpool

Liverpool

Manchester

Manchester 14-19 Team

Oldham

OLLP Business

Rochdale

Rochdale Consortium

Salford

Salford 14-19 Partnership

Sefton

North Sefton

St. Helens

St. Helen's

Tameside

Tameside 14-19

Trafford

Trafford

Warrington

Warrington 14-19 Partnership

South East

Local authority

Consortium name

Buckinghamshire

Wycombe Consortium

East Sussex

Eastbourne and Hailsham Federation

East Sussex

Hastings and Rother Local Area

East Sussex

Lewes Rural Local Area Partnership Board

East Sussex

Lewes Rural Local Area Partnership

East Sussex

Wealden Local Area Partnership Board

Medway

Medway

Milton Keynes

Milton Keynes

Oxfordshire

East Oxon 14-19 Consortium

Reading

Reading

Surrey

Elmbridge 14-19 Consortium

Surrey

Guildford 14-19 Partnership

Surrey

Spelthorne

West Sussex

WS Area B

Brighton and Hove

Brighton and Hove 14-19 Partnership Board

East Sussex

Lewes Rural Local Area Partnership Board

East Sussex

Western Coastal Local Area Partnership Board

Hampshire

Basingstoke 14-19 Consortium

Hampshire

Eastleigh Consortium

Hampshire

Rushmoor and Hart

Kent

Dartford Wilmington

Kent

Dover Deal and Sandwich

Kent

Gravesham 14-19 Consortium

Kent

Thanet 14-19 Consortium

Oxfordshire

North Oxfordshire 14-19 Partnership

Reading

Reading

Surrey

Surrey Heath

Surrey

Woking Federation

West Sussex

WS Area A

West Sussex

WS Area B

South West

Local authority

Consortium name

Cornwall

Cornwall Collegiate

Dorset

Central Dorset Partnership

Dorset

Chesil

Dorset

North Dorset

Gloucestershire

Cheltenham

North Somerset

North Somerset Consortium

Plymouth City

City of Plymouth 14-19 Diploma Partnership

Somerset

Sedgemoor

South Gloucestershire

Kingswood

Swindon

Swindon 14-19 Partnership

Torbay

Torbay 14-19 Learning Partnership

Wiltshire

West Wiltshire Federation

West Midlands

Local authority

Consortium name

Birmingham

Birmingham South West Collegiate: Lordswood Girls

Birmingham

Central Network

Birmingham

North Area Network

Birmingham

South Network

Coventry

North East Federation

Coventry

North West Federation

Dudley

The Halesowen Education Trust

Shropshire

NW Shropshire

Solihull

Solihull Consortium

Staffordshire

Chase Collegiate

Staffordshire

E Staffs 14-19 Collegiate

Staffordshire

Tamworth

Staffordshire

Tamworth Partnership

Stoke on Trent

Stoke on Trent

Walsall

WALCON

Wolverhampton

Wolverhampton

Worcestershire

CONTINU

Worcestershire

FORWARD Consortium

Yorkshire and the Humber

Local authority

Consortium name

Barnsley

Barnsley Diploma Consortium

Bradford

Bradford Confederations

Calderdale

Campus Calderdale

Hull (Kingston Upon)

Hull 14-19 Partnership

Kirklees

Kirklees Collegiates

Leeds

Central Leeds Construction

Leeds

Leeds Diploma Consortium

North East Lincolnshire

North East Lincolnshire Partnership

North Yorkshire

Ryedale Area Learning Partnership

Rotherham

Rotherham

Sheffield

Sheffield 14-19 Partnership

Sheffield

Sheffield CYPD

Wakefield

Wakefield

York City

City of York Partnership

Teachers: Males

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families at how many and what proportion of maintained (a) primary and (b) secondary schools fewer than (i) 1 per cent., (ii) 10 per cent., (iii) 20 per cent. and (iv) 30 per cent. of the fully qualified teaching staff were male in each year since 1997. (271479)

The information cannot be provided for all the years requested on the grounds of disproportionate cost. 1997 and 2008 figures are provided within the following table.

The following table shows how many and what proportion of local authority maintained primary and secondary schools in England employed fewer than 1 per cent., 10 per cent., 20 per cent. and 30 per cent. qualified full-time equivalent male teachers, January 1997 and 2008.

Number and proportion of maintained nursery/primary and secondary schools with fewer than 1 per cent., 10 per cent., 20 per cent. and 30 per cent. full-time equivalent qualified male teachers, January 1997 and 2008, England

1997

2008

Nursery/Primary

Secondary1

Nursery/Primary

Secondary1

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

Less than 1 per cent.

5,280

27.9

0

0.0

4,670

26.5

2

0.1

Less than 10 per cent.

6,760

35.7

2

0.1

6,800

38.5

10

0.3

Less than 20 per cent.

11,920

63.0

80

2.1

12,390

70.2

70

2.2

Less than 30 per cent.

16,210

85.6

280

7.9

15,930

90.2

360

11.0

1 Excludes academies. 2 Between one and four schools. Note:Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.

Source: School Census

Teachers: Redundancy

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many (a) full-time and (b) part-time teaching staff have been made redundant in each of the last 10 years. (272653)

Teachers: Training

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what recent discussions he has had with representatives of (a) teachers' professional bodies and (b) industry in respect of teachers' continuing professional development. (274705)

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families regularly meets with representatives of teachers' professional bodies and industry to discuss a range of issues. Most recently this has included attending the conferences of ASCL, ATL, NAHT and NASUWT; and meetings with Agony Aunts and Kids in the Middle; Franklin Covey and the Association of Colleges.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what percentage of graduates enrolling on a postgraduate certification of education course held a (a) first, (b) upper second, (c) lower second and (d) third class first degree in each of the last 10 years; and if he will make a statement. (275040)

The following tables show the number of first year trainees for each academic year between 1998/99 and 2006/07 by the classification of their first degree for:

1. Postgraduate ITT trainees

2. Employment Based Routes (EBR) trainees.

Information relating to the qualifications on entry to mainstream ITT courses is only available from 1998/99 onwards. The same information for trainees on employment based routes was only collected from 2001/02 onwards. Figures relating to 2007/08 will be available in July 2009.

Proportion of postgraduate trainees in their first year of mainstream ITT courses by classification of first degree1,2, 1998/99 to 2006/07, England

Percentage

1998/99

1999/2000

2000/01

2001/02

2002/03

2003/04

2004/05

2005/06

2006/07

1st

5.4

5.5

5.8

5.7

6.4

7.0

7.7

8.1

8.1

2:1

45.9

45.8

46.4

47.3

48.5

49.0

49.8

50.7

50.7

2:2

36.8

37.4

36.7

36.7

35.7

35.3

33.8

32.7

33.8

3

4.0

4.4

4.3

4.0

3.7

3.8

3.6

3.5

3.4

Pass

4.0

3.1

3.4

3.1

3.4

3.1

2.5

2.4

2.0

Total with 2:1 and above

51.3

51.3

52.2

53.0

54.9

56.0

57.5

58.8

58.8

Total with 2:2 and above

88.0

88.7

88.9

89.7

90.6

91.3

91.4

91.5

92.6

Class not known/undefined

4.0

3.9

3.4

3.2

2.3

1.8

2.6

2.6

2.1

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Total number of first year trainees on postgraduate ITT courses3

16,680

16,740

18,200

19,790

21,240

23,510

23,580

23,240

22,320

1 Includes universities and other higher education institutions, SCITT and Open University but excludes employment based routes and cases where QTS is granted on assessment without a course of ITT.

2 Those training through the Fast Track programme (which ran between 2001/02 and 2005/06) are included.

3 Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10.

Source:

TDA's Performance Profiles

Proportion of postgraduate trainees in their first year of employment based routes to ITT by classification of first degree1 1998/99 to 2006/07, England

Percentage

1998/99

1999/2000

2000/01

2001/02

2002/03

2003/04

2004/05

2005/06

2006/07

1st

n/a

n/a

n/a

6.2

8.3

7.2

8.5

8.6

9.3

2:1

n/a

n/a

n/a

32.8

40.2

40.1

41.0

44.2

47.6

2:2

n/a

n/a

n/a

28.5

32.0

35.2

34.5

34.0

31.7

3

n/a

n/a

n/a

5.0

5.5

5.5

5.9

5.7

4.9

Pass

n/a

n/a

n/a

5.9

9.1

8.0

10.1

7.5

6.5

Total with 2:1 and above

n/a

n/a

n/a

39.0

48.5

47.4

49.5

52.8

56.9

Total with 2:2 and above

n/a

n/a

n/a

67.6

80.5

82.5

84.0

86.8

88.6

Class not known/undefined

n/a

n/a

n/a

21.6

4.9

4.0

0.0

0.1

0.0

Total

n/a

n/a

n/a

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Total number of first year trainees on postgraduate ITT courses2

n/a

n/a

n/a

2,740

3,560

4,940

4,970

5,250

5,230

n/a = not available

1 Excludes universities and other higher education institutions, SCITT and Open University and cases where QTS is granted on assessment without a course of ITT.

2 Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10.

Source:

TDA's Performance Profiles

Teachers: Vacancies

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the school teacher vacancy rate was in each of the last five years; and if he will make a statement. (275039)

Full-time vacancy rates in local authority maintained schools in each of the last five years can be found in Table 6 of the Statistical First Release “School Workforce in England (including pupil: teacher ratios and pupil: adult ratios), January 2009 (Provisional)”. This can be accessed from the following link:

http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000844

Truancy

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many school days were lost to truancy in the last 12 months for which figures are available. (272969)

Information is collected on authorised and unauthorised absence.

Unauthorised absence is absence without leave from a teacher or other authorised representative of the school. This includes all unexplained or unjustified absences, such as lateness, holidays during term time not authorised by the school, absence where reason is not yet established and truancy. Information collected by the Department on absence is a more comprehensive measure of children’s missed schooling. Our focus is on reducing all forms of absence, not just a small subset. The issue is not whether the pupil had permission to be absent; it is how much absence the pupil has.

The number of days lost due to absence is shown in the following table.

Primary, secondary and special schools1, 2, number of days of absence3, 2007/08, England

Number of days

Absence rate

Authorised absence

50,057,570

5.28

Unauthorised absence

9,627,620

1.01

Overall absence

59,685,190

6.29

Total possible days

948,908,914

1 Includes city technology colleges and academies.

2 Includes maintained and non-maintained special schools. Excludes general hospital schools.

3 Includes pupils age five to 15 who were on roll for at least one session from the start of the school year up until 23 May 2008, excluding boarders.

Note:

Figures have been rounded to the nearest 10.

Source:

School Census.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many parents in (a) Lancashire and (b) England have appeared in court on charges related to unauthorised absences from school of their children in the last (i) six, (ii) 12 and (iii) 24 months. (277439)

The Ministry of Justice collects data for England and Wales on prosecutions brought against parents under the Education Act 1996 for the offence under s444(1) of failing to secure their child’s regular attendance at school; and for prosecutions under s444(1A), the aggravated offence of knowing that their child is failing to attend school regularly. It is possible, because of the way courts record data that some data are collected under the more general heading of various offences under the Education Act 1996.

The information on the number of parents prosecuted by local authorities in England and Lancashire for failing to secure their children’s regular school attendance between 2006 and 2007 (latest available data) is detail in the following table.

Number of persons proceeded against at magistrates courts for offences under the Education Act 1996 S.444, in the Lancashire police force area, and England, 2006 to 20071,2

Lancashire police force area

England

Statute

Offence description

2006

2007

2006

2007

Education Act 1996 S.444 (1)(8)

Failure to secure regular attendance at school.

182

249

4,437

5,903

Education Act 1996 S.444(8)(la)(8a) added by Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000 S.72.

Parent knows that their child is failing to attend school regularly and fails without reasonable justification to cause him or her to attend school.

46

43

1,559

1,840

1 The statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences the principal offence is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

2 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source:

Evidence and Analysis Unit—Office for Criminal Justice Reform, Ministry of Justice

Young People: Voluntary Work

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families pursuant to the Answer of 11 May 2009, Official Report, columns 598-9W, on young people: voluntary work, what his most recent estimate is of the average cost of a placement as part of the Entry to Employment programme. (276103)

Funding for the Entry to Employment programme will be administered by the Learning and Skills Council (LSC). As the information requested is with regard to an operational matter for the LSC, I have asked Geoffrey Russell, the acting LSC chief executive, to write to the hon. Member with the information requested. I will arrange for a copy of his letter to be placed in the House Libraries.

Young People’s Learning Agency

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families when he expects the Young People’s Learning Agency to be set up; and what mechanisms there will be for the agency to co-operate with specialist independent post-16 institutions. (275806)

Independent Specialist providers of post-16 education and training play an important role in providing education for learners with learning difficulties and disabilities, often with very specific needs and requirements. We recognise the value of having a diverse mix of high quality providers that ensures that our young people are able to access the right course or provision to help them realise their goals and ambitions. We do not feel it is appropriate to centrally guarantee funding streams for particular institutions. Local authorities will need to work in partnership with each other, providers and young people and their families to assess the level of demand in their area and to commission suitable provision that meets young people’s needs.

Provision has been made in clause 40 of the Apprenticeships, Skills, Children and Learning (ASCL) Bill to require local authorities, when commissioning provision, to take account of the quality of provision being secured and encourage diversity in the range of education and training on offer to support learner choice. In addition, in deciding whether education and training is suitable to meet young people’s reasonable needs, local authorities will be required to have regard to any learning difficulties the persons may have.

We believe that the transfer to local authorities will have significant benefits in terms of a more informed and integrated commissioning of their services leading to better outcomes for learners. Arrangements are being developed, in consultation with stakeholders, that recognise that independent specialist colleges will often work across local authority boundaries and nationally, and consideration is being given to the need to minimise bureaucracy for these and other learning providers. These arrangements will feed into the statutory guidance being developed for local authorities in respect of their commissioning responsibilities which the Young People’s Learning Agency (YPLA) will publish when it comes into being in April 2010, subject to the passage of the ASCL Bill.

We do not expect the YPLA to be involved in the commissioning of learning provision in the vast majority of cases, although there may be some circumstances where it may need to commission provision directly, for instance:

where a local authority is failing or looks likely to fail in fulfilling its duties under clauses 40 and 47 of the Bill to commission suitable education or training;

with a small number of national providers for whom it may be appropriate to commission at a national rather than local level; and

where the sub regional group (SRG) identifies that they are not yet ready to take on the role.

In those cases, the YPLA will need to engage those providers, including specialist colleges, to ensure that they are commissioned effectively in response to the needs of young people.

Written Answers to Questions

Tuesday 2 June 2009

International Development

Departmental Public Expenditure

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development on what projects money was spent under his Department’s bilateral programme in each of the last five years in each country where expenditure under the programme was under £50,000 in 2007-08; how much was spent on each project; and if he will make a statement. (276903)

Detailed information on individual DFID projects is publicly available through two international portals: AiDA—the Development Gateway and the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC). Each portal can be accessed through the following links:

AiDA:

http://aida.developmentgateway.org/index.do

DAC:

http://stats.oecd.org/qwids/

Further information on DFID funded projects, including spend, will be made available on the DFID website later this year.

Developing Countries: HIV Infection

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the procurement of antiretroviral drugs through the Global Fund and other mechanisms is timely and efficient. (276323)

The Department for International Development (DFID) is aware that some countries supported by the Global Fund are at risk from health facility stores temporarily running out of essential antiretroviral drugs (stock-outs). DFID officials have spoken to the fund's Secretariat about this, including recently at the Global Fund's Executive Board (5-6 May 2009). Formally, the UK supported a resolution made at the board meeting which obliges the fund's Secretariat to address this issue urgently, to report on whether its existing procedures are adequate, and to propose solutions which would minimise the risks of disruptions to treatment both in the short term and on an ongoing basis. In developing countries such as Zimbabwe, DFID is also assisting, where possible, in the provision of drugs while problems in Global Fund supported programmes are being addressed.

Developing Countries: Young People

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what account his Department’s forthcoming White Paper will take of (a) the number of children and young people in developing countries and (b) the relationships between the needs of children and young people in developing countries and (i) women, (ii) families, (iii) disabled people and (iv) others in those countries. (274681)

The Department for International Development (DFID) has recently commissioned analysis of the impacts of the current economic crisis including food, fuel and financial aspects on women, families, young people and the disabled in developing countries. This analysis will help inform the narrative in the forthcoming White Paper.

DFID recognises that children and young people are the majority population in many developing countries and that they have a vital role in helping achieve the millennium development goals. The White Paper will take these issues fully into account.

Overseas Aid: Nutrition

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what spending priority areas his Department’s Nutritional Task Team have established for 2009-10. (277137)

As a result of the findings of the Nutrition Task Team, the Department for International Development (DFID) is strengthening its capacity and setting up permanent capacity, in London and in selected country offices, to help respond to the ongoing global nutrition crisis. We will be publishing a new nutrition strategy in the autumn. Key priorities will be to: build international support, co-ordination and coherence; scale-up programmes in selected partner countries; strengthen DFID capacity to increase and track nutrition impact and spend; and build evidence and demonstrate results.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what budget his Department has allocated to its nutrition task team for 2009-10. (277138)

The nutrition team for 2009-10 is being put in place now. We expect two full-time staff to start work shortly in London, supported by staff from country offices allocating a proportion of their time. We will ensure that the team has the resources it needs to develop a sound strategy. This will help provide the basis for making further resource allocation decisions.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development which countries his Department's nutrition task team has worked with in 2009 to date. (277145)

We will work with countries where the burden of malnutrition is most severe, and where the Department for International Development (DFID) has comparative advantage within a division of labour with other donors. Initial work is under way in India and Bangladesh where we have focal advisers in place and leading nutrition agendas.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development which contribution his Department's nutrition task team is making to the achievement of Goal 1 of the Millennium Development Goals. (277146)

Nutrition is a foundation for the attainment of all the Millennium Development Goals. We recognise that progress towards the MDG 1c indicator to halve the rates of under-nutrition in children under five years by 2015 remains severely off-track. Our work on nutrition is directly aimed to help focus the Department's efforts on MDG 1c.

Overseas Aid: Water

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps he is taking to promote the Global Framework for Action for water and sanitation to his counterparts in countries with bilateral agencies. (276573)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to the right hon. Member for Gordon (Malcolm Bruce) on 12 May 2009, Official Report, column 661W, which highlights our collaboration with the Netherlands. I can confirm that I will be shortly contacting other European Union bilateral agencies to encourage their support for the Global Framework for Action.

Sri Lanka: Overseas Aid

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps his Department plans to take to assist refugees in the (a) northern and (b) eastern provinces of Sri Lanka. (276855)

I refer the hon. Member to the written statement made on 21 May 2009, Official Report, column 86WS, regarding the internally displaced in the northern and eastern provinces of Sri Lanka.

Northern Ireland

AccessNI

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what assessment has been undertaken of the performance of AccessNI; and if he will make a statement. (277257)

Since mid-December 2008 AccessNI has continued to meet its service standards. Latest information on service standards is published each week on the “latest news” section of its website:

www.accessni.gov.uk

Police Service of Northern Ireland: Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what the salary of the Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland is. (276794)

The salary of the Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland is £183,954 per year with effect from 1 September 2008.

Robbery: Firearms

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many cash in transit robberies have taken place in Northern Ireland in each of the last five years; and how many of these involved (a) firearms and (b) imitation firearms. (277324)

That is an operational matter for the Chief Constable. I have asked him to reply directly to the hon. Member, and a copy of his letter will be placed in the Library of the House.

Leader of the House

Members: Allowances

To ask the Leader of the House whether it is the Government's policy that hon. Members who are married to or in a civil partnership with a member of the House of Lords will be eligible for a second home allowance. (277699)

By tradition the two Houses of Parliament have made separate financial provisions for their Members. The Government believe that all MPs' and peers’ pay, allowances and pensions should be set, administered, monitored and audited by an independent Parliamentary Standards Authority.

House of Commons Commission

Members: Allowances

To ask the hon. Member for North Devon, representing the House of Commons Commission if the House of Commons Commission will place in the Library a copy of internal notes made at its meetings between 3 July 2008 and 1 April 2009 relating to hon. Members' expenses and the resolutions of the House of 3 July 2008. (276857)

Scotland

Economic and Monetary Union

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what activities have been undertaken by his Department’s Euro Minister in that capacity. (277172)

Euro Ministers are responsible for euro preparations in their Department and attend Euro Ministers Steering Group meetings. Meetings are held only when necessary to discuss practical preparations to ensure a smooth changeover.

Culture, Media and Sport

Advertising: Internet

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport if he will make an assessment of the implications for the revenue of the British media market of Google’s share of the online advertising market; and if he will make a statement. (276978)

The Government recognise the increasing importance of online advertising revenues to the UK’s media markets. It represents the fastest growing advertising medium in the UK. While the impact of this growth is principally a matter for the market, the Government, through their Creative Economy Strategy, continues to encourage the development of a strong and competitive advertising sector. The strategy, published in 2008, sets out a range of initiatives, such as encouraging advertisers to recruit from a more diverse range of backgrounds and disciplines, that will help ensure the continued success of the UK’s advertising industries as a whole.

Arts: Apprentices

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what funding his Department has allocated for the creation of 5,000 apprenticeships in the creative industries as outlined in Creative Britain: new talents for the new economy. (277133)

My Department is working with the Department for Children, Schools and Families and the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills to influence the funding of over £1 billion allocated to delivering apprenticeships across England. Since the publication of Creative Britain, my Department has also worked with the sector skills councils and the Arts Council England to increase apprenticeships across the creative industries with over 150 employers signed up to offer places. My Department is currently developing a programme of activity to help support the creation of apprenticeships for the creative industries.

Employment Tribunals Service

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many actions under employment law have been brought against the (a) Arts Council England, (b) Museums, Libraries and Archives Council, (c) Sport England, (d) UK Sport, (e) English Heritage, (f) Heritage Lottery Fund and (g) Big Lottery Fund in each of the last three years; how many such actions were brought under each category of action; and how many were contested at an employment tribunal. (277449)

Each of our non-departmental public bodies has their own HR function and have their own procedures and processes in place. The Department does not collect information on actions brought against our non-departmental public bodies.

Olympic Games 2012

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many officials in (a) his Department, excluding the Government Olympic Executive, (b) UK Sport and (c) Sport England are working on matters connected with the London 2012 Olympics. (277271)

[holding answer 1 June 2009]: The 2012 Olympics and Paralympics have an impact on the work of a great many staff working in the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and our non-departmental public bodies (NDPB's). We do not collect data centrally on this.

Pay Television

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport when he expects Ofcom to publish the remedies determined as a result of its investigation into the pay television market. (277438)

[holding answer 1 June 2009]: The pay-TV market investigation is the responsibility of Ofcom. Ofcom expect to make a statement on their progress and current findings by the end of June.

Pay Television: Sports

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what recent representations he has received on choice of sports pay television providers. (277440)

Royal Parks Agency: Security

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many breaches of security have been reported at the Royal Parks Agency in the last five years; and what procedures the agency follows when a breach of security involves the disclosure of personal data. (276948)

The following information has been provided by the Royal Parks Agency.

There have been eight known breaches of security within the past five years, none involving the loss of personal data.

Any loss of personal data would be handled in accordance with Cabinet Office procedures.