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Mental Health Services

Volume 493: debated on Friday 12 June 2009

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department allocated to cognitive behavioural therapy treatments in NHS facilities in each of the last three years. (279565)

The Department does not allocate funding to specific treatments in national health service facilities and so does not have this information. However, throughout the last three years, the Government have been running the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme, which is helping the NHS implement National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidance for the treatment of common mental health problems and over the next few years will make cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) more widely available than ever before. This is because CBT is one of the key treatments recommended by NICE.

In 2006-07, the programme launched two pilot projects in Newham and Doncaster, to which it allocated a total of £3 million.

In 2007-08, the programme also ran 11 smaller pilots, to which it allocated a further £2 million.

In 2008-09, a national roll-out of NICE-compliant psychological therapies began with the creation of services in 35 primary care trusts (PCTs) costing a total of £33 million. This involves a training programme for 3,600 new therapy workers over three years. Initially, the training for this workforce has focused on CBT because this is where the biggest shortage lies and it supports the NHS in delivering the NICE treatment guidelines.

This investment is continuing to increase substantially, with a further 80 services coming on stream in the autumn bringing the total to £103 million in 2009-10, and every PCT beginning to establish these new services in 2010 when the investment will rise to £173 million.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health which mental health conditions are treated by cognitive behavioural therapy available on the NHS; and what the average waiting time between diagnosis and commencement of a course of treatment was in each primary care trust in the latest period for which figures are available. (279566)

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence recommends the national health service to offer cognitive behavioural therapy as a treatment for: antenatal and postnatal mental health problems; anti-social personality disorder; anxiety; attention deficit hyperactivity disorder; bipolar disorder; borderline personality disorder; dementia; depression in adults, children and young people; drug misuse; bulimia; obsessive compulsive disorder; post-traumatic stress disorder; schizophrenia; self-harming; and violence. The actual use of this treatment is recorded in individual patient records and not held centrally. No data are held centrally on the average waiting time between diagnosis and the start of treatment. However, one of the central aims of the improving access to psychological therapies programme is to ensure that people needing to access these treatments are able to do so more rapidly by providing them in primary and community settings, such as general practitioner surgeries.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the average waiting time between diagnosis and the commencement of a course of cognitive behavioural therapy was for persons diagnosed with schizophrenia in each primary care trust area in the latest period for which figures are available. (279567)

Data about the waiting time between diagnosis and the start of a course of cognitive behavioural therapy for people with schizophrenia are not held centrally.