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Strokes: Milton Keynes

Volume 494: debated on Friday 19 June 2009

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many cases of stroke there were in (a) males and (b) females in each age group in Milton Keynes in each year since 1999. (280875)

The following table and notes show how many finished admission episodes for stroke in Milton Keynes primary care trust broken down by age group and sex for the years 1999-2000 to 2007-08.

Count of finished admission episodes for a primary diagnosis of stroke1 in Milton Keynes PCT, broken down by age group and sex, for the years 1999-2000 to 2007-08. Activity in English NHS hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector

Sex

Age group

2007-08

2006-07

2005-06

2004-05

2003-04

2002-03

2001-02

2000-01

1999-2000

Male

0-9

*

0

0

*

*

*

0

0

0

10-19

0

*

0

0

0

0

0

*

*

20-29

*

*

*

*

*

0

*

0

0

30-39

*

*

*

*

8

*

*

*

*

40-49

9

*

13

17

12

15

13

6

6

50-59

13

10

21

29

27

28

17

8

37

60-69

34

12

35

19

38

29

33

28

16

70-79

17

*

36

31

36

38

50

26

43

80-89

30

12

30

41

34

33

34

26

21

90+

*

*

*

*

9

6

*

*

0

Total male

114

49

144

147

173

157

155

106

127

Female

0-9

0

0

0

*

0

0

0

0

*

10-19

0

0

0

*

*

*

0

*

0

20-29

*

0

*

*

*

0

0

*

0

30-39

*

*

*

9

*

*

*

*

*

40-49

7

*

*

12

8

11

10

12

*

50-59

17

8

17

11

10

12

*

12

10

60-69

13

8

24

20

28

21

13

14

13

70-79

32

7

45

29

26

34

56

42

39

80-89

49

21

43

52

43

69

79

50

51

90+

18

*

27

9

13

21

10

14

6

Total female

140

54

169

147

138

172

178

149

130

Total

254

103

313

294

311

329

333

255

257

Notes:Ungrossed data Figures have not been adjusted for shortfalls in data (i.e. the data are ungrossed). Finished admission episodes A finished admission episode is the first period of inpatient care under one consultant within one health care provider. Finished admission episodes are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of inpatients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year. This table does not provide a total number of cases of stroke since those dying before reaching hospital or not being admitted to hospital will not be counted. As well as this, anyone suffering from a stroke whilst already admitted to hospital will not be included in the count. Primary diagnosis The primary diagnosis is the first of up to 20 (14 from 2002-03 to 2006-07 and seven prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data set and provides the main reason why the patient was admitted to hospital. 1 The following ICD-10 codes have been used: 160 Subarachnoid haemorrhage 161 Intracerebral haemorrhage 162 Other nontraumatic intracranial haemorrhage 163 Cerebral infarction 164 Stroke, not specified as haemorrhage or infarction Data quality HES are compiled from data sent by more than 300 NHS trusts and primary care trusts (PCTs) in England. Data is also received from a number of independent sector organisations for activity commissioned by the English NHS. The NHS Information Centre for health and social care liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data via HES processes. While this brings about improvement over time, some shortcomings remain. PCT7 strategic health authority (SHA) data quality PCT and SHA data was added to historic data years in the HES database using 2002-03 boundaries, as a one-off exercise in 2004. The quality of the data on PCT of treatment and SHA of treatment is poor in 1996-97, 1997-98 and 1998-99, with over a third of all finished episodes having missing values in these years. Data quality of PCT of general practitioner (GP) practice and SHA of GP practice in 1997-98 and 1998-99 is also poor, with a high proportion missing values where practices changed or ceased to exist. There is less change in completeness of the residence-based fields over time, where the majority of unknown values are due to missing postcodes on birth episodes. Users of time series analysis including these years need to be aware of these issues in their interpretation of the data. Assessing growth through time HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. The quality and coverage of the data have improved over time. These improvements in information submitted by the NHS have been particularly marked in the earlier years and need to be borne in mind when analysing time series. Some of the increase in figures for later years (particularly 2006-07 onwards) may be due to the improvement in the coverage of independent sector activity. Changes in NHS practice also need to be borne in mind when analysing time series. For example, a number of procedures may now be undertaken in outpatient settings and may no longer be accounted for in the HES data. This may account for any reductions in activity over time. Small numbers To protect patient confidentiality, figures between 1 and 5 have been suppressed and replaced with “*” (an asterisk). Where it was possible to identify numbers from the total due to a single suppressed number in a row or column, an additional number (the next smallest) has been suppressed. 2006-07 data There is a decline in 2006-07 compared to previous years. This is due to an error made by Milton Keynes PCT when submitting their data for this year. Their submission was split into two parts, but unfortunately the second submitted file for the year overwrote the first, giving approximately half as many records as there should have been. For this reason it is advised not to compare this year to other years. Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), the NHS Information Centre for health and social care.