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Written Answers

Volume 494: debated on Monday 22 June 2009

Written Answers to Questions

Monday 22 June 2009

Wales

Departmental Data Protection

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how many breaches of information security there have been in his Department in the last five years. (281095)

There have been no breaches of information security in the Wales Office in the last five years.

Northern Ireland

Antisocial Behaviour

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland whether his Department has made an assessment of the effectiveness of anti social behaviour orders during the last four years. (281461)

The Northern Ireland Office had begun a review of antisocial behaviour orders in Northern Ireland but this was superseded by the 2008 Criminal Justice Inspectorate’s review of antisocial behaviour orders.

The review concluded that there has been a sensible approach to the introduction of antisocial behaviour orders in Northern Ireland. The review also highlighted that antisocial behaviour orders are used as part of a staged approach to tackling antisocial behaviour alongside other interventions such as warnings and acceptable behaviour contracts.

Departmental Billing

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many and what proportion of invoices his Department and its agencies paid within 10 days of receipt in each of the last 12 months; and if he will make a statement. (278829)

The following table shows the number and proportion of invoices paid by the Northern Ireland Office, including the Public Prosecution Service Northern Ireland, and its agencies within 10 days of receipt in each of the last 12 months.

NIO1NIPS2Comp. Agency3FSNI4,6YJA5,7

Invoices

%

Invoices

%

Invoices

%

Invoices

%

Invoices

%

2008

June

291

5.4

626

33.8

32

74.4

July

874

15.3

486

24.4

20

58.8

August

1,981

66.9

759

38.8

29

70.7

September

1,523

45.7

757

36.3

22

56.4

October

2,002

48.0

913

37.5

29

72.5

November

2,542

58.7

896

39.1

21

75.0

86

36.6

December8

2,692

82.5

1,448

80.7

30

85.7

166

46.5

679

93.7

2009

January

3,122

79.0

2,688

76.2

25

92.6

141

57.6

593

76.3

February

3,231

82.6

1,749

85.4

27

100

219

80.2

524

77.6

March

3,611

82.2

2,141

85.8

33

100

254

76.7

759

79.7

April

3,026

83.3

1,109

72.2

31

100

185

69.6

505

65.2

May

3,074

91.6

1,770

89.3

23

95.8

136

69.2

427

80.9

1 Northern Ireland Office including the Public Prosecution Service Northern Ireland. 2 Northern Ireland Prison Service. 3 Compensation Agency. 4 Forensic Science Northern Ireland. 5 Youth Justice Agency. 6 Figures for invoices paid within 10 days of receipt in each of the last 12 months for Forensic Science Northern Ireland are only available from November 2008. 7Figures for invoices paid within 10 days of receipt in each of the last 12 months for Youth Justice Agency are only available from December 2008. 8 The Northern Ireland Office and it agencies revised procedures for the processing and payment of invoices following guidance issued by the Cabinet Office on 17 November 2008 relating to a target to pay invoices within 10 days with effect from 1 December 2008. Prior to December 2008 the Northern Ireland Office and its agencies sought to comply with the “The Better Payments Practice Code” for achieving good payment performance in commercial transactions. Under this Code, the policy was to pay bills in accordance with contractual conditions or, where no such conditions exist, within 30 days of receipt of goods and services or the presentation of a valid invoice, whichever is the later.

Employment Tribunals

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many actions under employment law have been brought against his Department in each of the last three years; how many such actions were brought under each category of action; and how many such actions were contested by his Department at an employment tribunal. (277421)

The following table details the 10 actions brought against the Northern Ireland Office core Department in the last three financial years. Of these, one was withdrawn by the complainant and four were settled prior to hearing. The remaining five cases have not yet reached tribunal stage.

Category of action

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

Total per category

Sex discrimination

1

1

Fair employment discrimination

3

1

4

Equal pay

4

4

Unlawful deduction of wages

1

1

Total per year

4

1

5

10

Police Service of Northern Ireland

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (1) how many (a) Protestant, (b) Roman Catholic and (c) non-determined applicants for the Police Service of Northern Ireland there were in (i) the most recent recruitment competition and (ii) all recruitment competitions since the inception of the 50/50 recruitment process; (281530)

(2) how many (a) Protestant, (b) Roman Catholic and (c) non-determined appointees to the Police Service of Northern Ireland there have been since the inception of the 50/50 recruitment process.

That is an operational matter for the Chief Constable. I have asked him to reply directly to the hon. Member, and a copy of his letter will be placed in the Library of the House.

Police Service of Northern Ireland: Housing

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many residential units owned by (a) the Police Authority for Northern Ireland and (b) the Northern Ireland Prison Service are vacant; and if he will make a statement. (279630)

There are currently no vacant residential units owned by the Northern Ireland Policing Board. The Northern Ireland Prison Service presently have 25 vacant residential units within the grounds of their training college at Millisle. These will be sold as part of the planned sale of the Millisle site upon the completion of the new public sector college at Desertcreat.

House of Commons Commission

Copyright

To ask the hon. Member for North Devon, representing the House of Commons Commission when he expects the internal copyright review to report. (281608)

Democracy Live

To ask the hon. Member for North Devon, representing the House of Commons Commission what recent representations the House of Commons Commission has received on the forthcoming BBC Democracy Live service; and if the Commission will consider enabling the share facility for videos of proceedings in Parliament. (281606)

The Commission has not received any representations on the forthcoming BBC Democracy Live service. I understand that the Administration Committee will shortly be considering a proposal to permit the embedding of video content by end users.

Scotland

Cabinet: Glasgow

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland (1) how many (a) special advisers and (b) officials of his Department accompanied him to Glasgow for the Cabinet meeting on 16 April 2009; (273945)

(2) what car journeys he took in attending the Cabinet meeting in Glasgow on 16 April 2009;

(3) how much expenditure was incurred by his Department in respect of the Cabinet meeting in Glasgow on 16 April 2009;

(4) what expenditure on (a) travel, (b) accommodation and (c) food (i) he and (ii) officials in his Department incurred in connection with the Cabinet meeting in Glasgow on 16 April 2009.

I was accompanied by one official and one special adviser and undertook one car journey when attending Cabinet in Glasgow on 16 April 2009.

For information in relation to the Cabinet and public engagement event held in Glasgow on 16 April I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister on 3 June 2009, Official Report, column 487W.

Demos

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what (a) private meetings and (b) public engagements Ministers in his Department have attended at which representatives from the think-tank Demos were present in the last 12 months; and if he will make a statement. (279492)

Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery. As was the case with previous Administrations, it is not the Government’s practice to provide details of all such meetings.

Departmental Data Protection

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many breaches of information security there have been in his Department in the last five years. (281094)

There have been no breaches of information security at the Scotland Office in the last five years.

The Office would report all significant personal data security breaches to the Cabinet Office and the ICO. Information on any personal data security breaches would be published on an annual basis in the Department’s annual resource accounts as was announced in the Data Handling Review published on 25 June 2008.

Additionally, all significant control weaknesses including other significant security breaches are included in the Statement of Internal Control which is published within the annual resource accounts.

Written Questions: Government Responses

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland when he plans to answer Question (a) 273945, (b) 273946, (c) 273947 and (d) 273948 tabled on 5 May 2009 on the Cabinet meeting in Glasgow. (281413)

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Bees

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will make it his policy to appoint an expert in beekeeping and honey bee health to the funding committee for the Living with Environmental Change programme. (281188)

[holding answer 19 June 2009]: DEFRA and other funders are currently considering whether an independent expert should be invited to join the panel considering research proposals submitted to the Insect Pollinator Initiative being developed under the Living with Environmental Change programme.

Bovine Tuberculosis: Disease Control

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate he has made of the cost to the farming industry of the number of cattle slaughtered as a result of infection with bovine tuberculosis in (a) 2009, (b) 2008, (c) 2007 and (d) 2006. (280028)

[holding answer 15 June 2009]: The cost impacts of bovine tuberculosis (TB) on farm businesses will vary, though we know that for some farmers these costs will be serious. We have made no specific estimates of the effects of the cost to the farming industry of cattle slaughtered as a result of infection with bovine TB.

The Bovine TB Eradication Group have recently discussed ideas to enable farmers affected by bovine TB to maintain their farm businesses, including enhancing trading opportunities for TB restricted herds and options for support for individual farmers.

Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Research: Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many (a) directors, (b) senior managers, (c) specialist and delivery managers and (d) executive support and administration staff there were in each Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Research office in each of the last five years. (280317)

The table provides the requested data. We have included total staff numbers to give an indication of the relative level of management effort, and CEFAS turnover figures to illustrate substantial growth in the volumes of work delivered by the agency over this period. Total staff numbers are average full year figures (as reported in the annual accounts; the detail breakdown reflects the position at financial year end).

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

Total staff

523

508

520

508

522

Turnover (£ million)

37.4

40.4

43.3

47.5

57.1

Directors

7

7

8

3

3

Senior managers

8

7

6

5

5

Specialist and delivery managers

332

326

333

352

343

Executive support and admin.

120

115

112

93

65

Notes:

1. Directors are executive members of the CEFAS management board.

2. Senior managers lead operational management across the organisation, and form part of the CEFAS “Senior Management Team”.

3. Specialist and delivery managers: have an extensive proportion of their time focused on managing/delivering customer projects and are typically professionally qualified. This is an estimated figure based on staff grade.

4. Executive support and administration: provide the “corporate services” function for CEFAS.

Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Research: Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much was paid in bonuses to (a) directors, (b) senior managers, (c) specialist and delivery managers and (d) executive support and administration staff in the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Research in each of the last five years. (280321)

The table provides the requested data. Figures for 2008-09 have not yet been finalised.

The CEFAS “performance related pay” (PRP) scheme has varied in recent years. It comprises a “corporate bonus” payable to all eligible staff as well as an “individual PRP” for a smaller proportion. The table shows percentage corporate and values of individual PRP estimated. The current scheme allows for:

A corporate bonus for all eligible staff of 2.2 per cent. of salary, explicitly linked to achievement of agreed agency targets

A corporate “growth” bonus for all eligible staff of up to 1.3 per cent. of salary self-funded and explicitly linked to generation of additional income from sources other than DEFRA.

An “individual PRP” paid at two levels, 4 per cent. or 8 per cent., for approximately 25 and 15 per cent. of staff respectively. This is assessed on the basis of achievement of personal objectives together with consideration of how these were delivered, the latter taking account of CEFAS values.

Bonus arrangements for four senior civil servants in CEFAS, including the chief executive, form part of wider DEFRA arrangements.

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

“Corporate bonus” (percentage)

1

3

5

5

Individual PRP (£):

Directors

22,780

9,860

19,512

20,860

Senior managers

5,680

3,180

2,833

2,447

Specialist and delivery managers

136,483

73,502

88,184

92,462

Executive support and admin.

42,442

28,639

29,196

21,624

Common Agricultural Policy

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the cost to the public purse of the Common Agricultural Policy integrated administration and control system was in each of the last five years. (278673)

The Integrated Administration and Control System (IACS) under the Common Agricultural Policy provides the system for managing direct payments to farmers (such as the Single Payment Scheme), and those rural development measures which are based on the area farmed or number of animals held by the farmer (such as agri-environment payments and Less Favoured Area payments). The Rural Payments Agency (RPA), Natural England and the Forestry Commission all administer IACS-related schemes in England.

It is not possible to provide the specific costs to these bodies of administering IACS-only schemes in the time available without incurring disproportionate costs, as they do not separately collect such figures.

The table sets out indicative costs to these organisations as follows:

(a) RPA: total running costs for administering around 60 CAP schemes and for Trader schemes payments to traders throughout the UK as well as all its non-CAP functions such as livestock tracing.

(b) Forestry Commission: administration of their ‘land-based’ IACS grant schemes, the English Woodland Grant Scheme together with the legacy Woodland Grant Scheme and Farm Woodland (Premium) Schemes.

(c) Natural England: administration of their RDPE schemes, including agri-environment schemes which are subject to IACS controls.

£ million

Financial year

RPA1

Forestry Commission2

Natural England3

2004-05

249.1

4.2

n/a

2005-06

236.5

4.2

n/a

2006-07

229.8

4.2

n/a

2007-08

242.8

5.0

444

2008-09

5

5.0

*38.8

1 Taken from the Agency’s Annual Report and Accounts.

2 Net administration costs

3 Natural England was formed in October 2006. Costs for its predecessor bodies are not available.

4 Includes direct costs incurred by Natural England of £13.6 million, and costs of using DEFRA systems (including depreciation and support/running costs).

5 Not yet available.

Dairy Farmers of Britain: Insolvency

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate he has made of the number of (a) farmers and (b) farm businesses which are at risk of entering administration as a result of Dairy Farmers of Britain being taken into receivership. (281356)

Dairy Farmers of Britain had 1,800 members when they went into receivership on 3 June. The vast majority of those members have succeeded in finding new outlets for their milk. We were informed by the receivers (PwC) at a meeting on 17 June that 190 members have yet to find a new buyer, so PwC are collecting their milk at present.

Demos

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether his Department has any contracts with the think-tank Demos. (279507)

The core-Department's financial system records expenditure in 2008-09 with Demos of £922.87 categorised as Training in People Management Skills.

Departmental Billing

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the average number of days taken to pay an invoice by (a) his Department and (b) each of its executive agencies was in each month since November 2008. (279526)

[holding answer 12 June 2009]: Following the statement by the Prime Minister at PMQs on 8 October 2008, central Government Departments were asked to make payment of SME supplier invoices within 10 days. From information held centrally the 10 day payment performance for all supplier invoices from November 2008 for the core-Department and Executive agencies and NDPBs that utilise core-DEFRA’s financial system is as follows:

Percentage

10 day performance

2008

2009

Organisation

November

December

January

February

March

April

May

Core DEFRA

33.5

77.1

99.8

99.8

99.4

99.7

99.9

Animal Health Agency

25.5

74.6

99.9

100.0

99.9

99.9

100.0

Natural England

99.5

99.4

99.5

99.6

99.9

99.8

99.7

Marine and Fisheries Agency

41.6

84.6

100.0

96.3

100.0

100.0

99.5

Gov. Decon. Service

35.7

67.3

100.0

99.5

100.0

DECC cost centres

28.1

81.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.5

100.0

Note:

GDS merged into FERA from 1 April 2009.

Departmental Official Hospitality

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much his Department spent on hospitality in (a) 2007-08 and (b) 2008-09. (277871)

[holding answer 3 June 2009]: From information held centrally, the core-Department's financial system records expenditure on hospitality in (a) 2007-08 and (b) 2008-09 of £441,259 and £132,414 respectively.

Departmental Press

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what (a) newspapers and (b) periodicals are delivered to the private office of each Minister in his Department; and at what cost in the latest period for which figures are available. (279426)

For the period October 2008 to June 2009, DEFRA Ministers had the following newspapers and periodicals delivered to their offices:

Hilary Benn

Newspapers

Financial Times

Times

Daily Telegraph

Guardian

Independent

Daily Mail

Mirror

International Herald Tribune

Evening Standard

Periodicals

Farmers Weekly

Spectator

New Statesman

Economist

New Scientist

Jane Kennedy

Newspapers

Financial Times

Times

Daily Telegraph

Guardian

Independent

Daily Mail

Periodicals

Farmers Weekly

Farmers Guardian

Fishing News

Lord Hunt

Newspapers

Guardian

Independent

Periodicals

Farmers Weekly

Farmers Guardian

Huw Irranca-Davies

Newspapers

Times

Daily Telegraph

Guardian

The Sun

Daily Mail

Mirror

Evening Standard

Periodicals

Farmers Weekly.

Newspapers were, and continue to be, only delivered Monday-Thursday, with no papers or magazines being delivered through recess periods. Costs for these publications are grouped within a single departmental invoice, so an indicative weekly cost (based on the cover price of each publication) is £109.70, with zero cost during recess periods.

Entec

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the (a) purpose and (b) monetary value is of each contract his Department has with Entec UK environmental consultants. (280352)

The core-Department's financial system records the following expenditure categorisation and values with Entec UK in 2008-09.

Description

Value (£)

Environmental Protection Research and Monitoring

70,254

England Biodiversity Strategy

15,640

Flood and Coastal Defence Research Programme

222,612

Marine Environment Research Programme

7,504

Water Quality and Water Supply Regulation R and D

5,800

Sustainable Water Use and Technical Support

13,444

Air Quality Evidence Base Management

178,033

Sustainable Development Commission Policy

46,070

Floods

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs when his Department plans to publish its next progress report on implementation of the urgent recommendations of the Pitt report on flooding. (281649)

In line with our commitment, the Government will very shortly publish its six-monthly Pitt progress report.

Floods: Bournemouth

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what plans there are to improve sea defences at Hengistbury Head in Bournemouth. (280910)

[holding answer 18 June 2009]: The plans to improve defences at Hengistbury Head will be based on the current policy review for the local Shoreline Management Plan (SMP). This is being led by Bournemouth borough council and is approaching a public consultation stage. The SMP will be adopted later this year and published in June 2010.

Within the SMP the Environment Agency is reviewing the coastal processes and associated risks at Hengistbury Head. Once the SMP policies are determined and published, the Environment Agency has plans to develop a programme to re-evaluate its approach to improve the coastal defences for Poole Bay, including Hengistbury Head.

Floods: Property Development

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) what proportion of local planning authorities have granted planning permission for a development against an Environment Agency flood risk objection in each of the last five years; (279436)

(2) what proportion of planning applications have been granted against Environment Agency advice on flood risk in each of the last five years.

[holding answers 12 and 15 June 2009]: The following table shows the proportion of local planning authorities (LPAs) who have given planning permission for a development against an Environment Agency flood risk objection.

Proportion of LPAs who made decisions against Environment Agency advice

Percentage

2003-04

29.9

2004-05

35.8

2005-06

26.1

2006-07

21.4

2007-08

23.5

The following table shows the proportion of planning applications that were approved against Environment Agency advice on flood risk.

Proportion of decisions against Environment Agency advice

Percentage

2003-04

11.5

2004-05

8.1

2005-06

4.7

2006-07

4.0

2007-08

3.4

Food: Prices

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of the effect of the provisions of the Common Agricultural Policy on food prices in the UK in the latest period for which figures are available. (277099)

The principal market provisions of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP)—Market Price Support (MPS) and the use of tariffs—artificially raise the price of food above global agricultural market prices.

We can calculate an estimate of the UK consumer cost of the Common Agricultural Policy by comparing the difference between UK and world prices for agricultural products and applying the difference to the volume of UK consumption. On that basis our latest estimates suggest that the UK consumer cost of the CAP was approximately £3.48 billion in 2006. This works out as an additional cost per head of UK population of £57.

Great Crested Newts

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate he has made of the number of people qualified to survey land in England for signs of great crested newt activity. (280861)

People with suitable experience and skills can apply to Natural England for a licence to handle/disturb great crested newts. For the year April 2007 to March 2008, Natural England issued 1,074 great crested newt licences, permitting activities for the purpose of science and conservation. Figures cannot be broken down further to indicate how many of these licence holders were engaged in surveying land for signs of great crested newt activity.

Horses: Animal Welfare

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) what recent assessment he has made of the standard of the welfare of (a) horses and (b) racehorses; and if he will make a statement; (278285)

(2) if he will undertake an assessment of the welfare of racehorses, including levels of death and injury; and if he will bring forward proposals to improve their welfare.

[holding answer given 9 June 2009]: All kept horses are protected by the Animal Welfare Act 2006 (“the Act”) which requires owners and keepers to provide for the welfare needs of their animals.

To make owners and keepers more aware of their responsibilities under the Act, DEFRA is preparing a code of practice for the care of horses, ponies, donkeys and their hybrids. Once this is finalised it will be approved by Parliament before being published.

There are no proposals to undertake a welfare assessment of racehorses. Racehorses are protected by the Act which makes it an offence to cause any unnecessary suffering to an animal. In addition, under the Act, it is an offence to fail to provide for the welfare needs of an animal for which owners are responsible.

Anyone can take forward a prosecution under the Act if they consider they have evidence of cruelty or poor welfare, or they can report it to the appropriate authorities, including the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

Horticulture

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) what steps his Department plans to take to support research and development in the production horticulture sector to maintain the UK's competitiveness in this sector; (279476)

(2) what funding his Department has allocated to production horticulture research and development in the last five years;

(3) if he will match-fund the Horticultural Development Company levy for horticulture research and development.

DEFRA funds a significant amount of horticultural research through research programmes on Sustainable Farm Management, Agriculture and Climate Change, Resource Efficient and Resilient Food Chain and Sustainable Water Management. DEFRA plans to continue supporting the horticultural sector through these programmes with research in areas including crop protection, nutrient management, water use and crop genetic improvement for horticulture. The Horticulture LINK research programme is jointly funded with industry and so is able to translate Research & Development into a commercial reality.

DEFRA spent over £7 million on horticulture research in 2008-09. We spent £1.35 million in 2007-08 and again in 2008-09 directly on co-funded research with industry. We are likely to spend a similar amount this financial year. This exceeds the Horticulture Development Company's Research & Development expenditure.

Incinerators

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what auditing of the records of incinerator operators the Environment Agency undertakes to establish compliance with the law in relation to H14 ecotoxicity testing of incinerator bottom ash prior to its disposal. (278403)

[holding answer 9 June 2009]: Hazardous waste legislation requires that the bottom ash arising from municipal waste incinerators is assessed for ecotoxicity (property H14) prior to disposal. The legislation does not require operators to submit the results to the Environment Agency.

Members: Correspondence

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs when he plans to reply to the letter of 31 March 2009 from the right hon. Member for Banff and Buchan on his constituents in Macduff. (280794)

I have been asked to reply.

As the letter concerned policy within BIS's remit I answered the right hon. Member’s letter on 20 April 2009 and will send an additional copy to his office.

Pesticides Safety Directorate: Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many (a) directors, (b) senior managers, (c) specialist and delivery managers and (d) executive support and administration staff there were in each Pesticides Safety Directorate office in each of the last five years. (280607)

In the last five financial years from 2004-05 to 2008-09 the Pesticides Safety Directorate (PSD) was based in a single office in York.

Permanent staff in post expressed as full time equivalents (FTE) at 31 March in each year were:

Number

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

(a) Directors1

4

4

4

4

4

(b) Senior Managers2

15

15

15

14

13

(c) Specialist and delivery managers3

135.9

137.3

126.4

123.2

124.8

(d) Executive support and admin staff4

43.9

42.8

36.7

33

20.3

Total

198.8

199.1

182.1

174.2

162.1

1 Defined here as staff at Senior Civil Service or Grade 6 level.

2 Defined here as staff at Grade 7 level (includes managers in policy, science, technical and administrative areas).

3 Defined here as all staff in grades Executive/Scientific Officer to Senior Executive/Scientific Officer.

4 Defined here as all staff in grades Administrative Officer and Administrative Assistant.

Note:

PSD transferred to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) on 1 April 2008, and merged with other HSE teams to form the Chemicals Regulation Directorate on 1 April 2009.

River Humber

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the eutrophication status of the Humber estuary is; and if he will make a statement. (280778)

The Environment Agency, which surveys waters in England for their eutrophic status, does not consider the Humber to be eutrophic or likely to become eutrophic in the near future.

Seas and Oceans: Pollution

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on what occasions monitoring of (a) fish stocks and (b) other marine wildlife has been instigated following the loss of a harmful cargo into the sea in UK waters since 1985; and what the (i) nature of the cargo, (ii) period of monitoring and (iii) results of that monitoring were in each case. (281611)

The role of DEFRA and the Marine and Fisheries Agency in responding to marine pollution emergencies is described in the National Contingency Plan for Marine Pollution from Shipping and Offshore Installations, which is maintained by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency. Responses to maritime incidents need to be proportionate. Regional or national responses to maritime incidents involve the establishment of an Environment Group, which advises on environmental impacts and may initiate the collection of real time environmental data. If a marine pollution incident is expected to have a significant impact on the marine environment or the shoreline, arrangements are made to monitor and assess the impact in the longer term.

On 20 January 2007, the MSC Napoli was beached in Lyme Bay. The vessel was loaded with 2,318 containers (159 of which were classified as ‘International Maritime Dangerous Goods’) and approximately 3,500 tonnes of Intermediate Fuel Oil and 152 tonnes of Marine Diesel Oil on board. It is estimated that approximately 302 tonnes of oil leaked out of the vessel and dispersant was used to disperse the oil. The proportion of containers that went overboard and the proportion of oil spilled was relatively small. The Environment Agency augmented their routine water quality monitoring programme both by adding additional stations to improve the data coverage and by implementing a screening procedure for chemicals in the water. In addition, DEFRA funded the Plymouth Marine Laboratory to undertake a survey of the waters across Lyme Bay to assess the levels of hydrocarbon contamination in subsurface waters and the surface microlayer. CEFAS and the Marine and Fisheries Agency also instigated a programme of sampling commercial shellfish (crabs, scallops and mussels). Natural England organised necropsies of a proportion of the oiled seabirds and organised two benthic surveys looking at the effect on the benthos (including the pink sea fans). Apart from the birds that died there has been no measured long term effect on the marine environment. Full details can be found at:

www.mfa.gov.uk/environment/oil/mscnapoli.htm

On 1 February 2006, the MV Ece, laden with 10,000 tonnes of phosphoric acid, sank following a collision with another vessel approximately 30 miles northwest of Guernsey. Phosphoric acid (phosphate) is an essential nutrient for phytoplankton (microscopic marine algae on which the entire marine food chain relies). Release of “additional” phosphate into the sea may intensify blooms of toxic phytoplankton species and/or lead to oxygen loss from the seawater, both of which are lethal to marine organisms. As there was the possibility of a potential spill from the vessel, a research study was carried out to evaluate the “Ferrybox” as an appropriate monitoring system for the marine environment using the wreck of the MV Ece as a test case. One of the samples taken contained a concentration higher than background levels, demonstrating that this system of monitoring was capable of identifying phosphate leakage from the wreck. Full details of the report can be found at:

http://randd.defra.gov.uk/Document.aspx?Document:= ME3208_3714_FRP.pdf

On 3 September 2005, MV Anglian Sovereign (Coastguard ETV) hit rocks close to the entrance to Scalloway Harbour in Shetland. It had 84 tonnes of gas oil on board plus the usual hydraulic and lubricating oils. A good deal of oil was lost to the sea but much of the rest was recovered by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency response. Monitoring was undertaken for a number of months when it was found that farmed salmon and wild shellfish in the area was contaminated.

On 29 June 2003, the Jambo, carrying 3,300 tonnes of sphalerite ore ran aground on rocks off the Summer Isles North West of Ullapool. Sphalerite is mainly composed of zinc sulphide and contains traces of other metals such as lead, cadmium and arsenic. Monitoring included testing water, sediments and shellfish for zinc, toxicity testing and measuring the solubility of metallic elements in the sphalerite ore. It showed that measured levels of zinc in the water were mostly very low. Toxic impacts of zinc to water column animals are therefore considered very unlikely. Measured levels of zinc in sediments are very low except in the immediate vicinity of the wreck (-100 metres) so toxic and smothering impacts to benthic (seabed) animals are therefore expected to be similarly localised. There is no evidence to suggest that the discharged cargo from the Jambo has resulted in persistent elevated levels of zinc, cadmium or arsenic in scallop or crab tissues. It is concluded that eating shellfish from the area around the Jambo incident does not raise any food safety concerns for consumers. The final report of the Jambo Environment Group to the Secretary of State’s representative was published in July 2004 and can be obtained from the Maritime and Coastguard Agency at:

http://www.mcga.gov.uk/c4mca/environment_group_report-5.pdf

On 31 October 2000, the levoli Sun was abandoned and later sunk approximately 11 miles North West of Alderney. The vessel carried a mixed cargo of 4,000 tonnes styrene, 1,000 tonnes methyl ethyl ketone and 1,000 tonnes isopropyl alcohol. More than 1,000 tonnes styrene was lost to sea during the incident. Analysis of edible tissues from crabs recovered one week later from pots laid very close to the wreck prior to the incident demonstrated only low-level styrene contamination that posed no risk to humans. The remainder of the styrene and the ship’s main bunker fuel were recovered from the wreck on the seabed. Full details are provided in R.J. Law, C. Kelly, P. Matthiessen and J. Aldridge (2003) The loss of the chemical tanker levoli Sun in the English Channel, October 2000. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 46: 254-257.

In February 1996 the Sea Empress ran aground in the entrance to Milford Haven releasing more than 72,000 tonnes of oil. Monitoring of affected wildlife began almost immediately and was mostly completed by 19981. Some studies continued in subsequent years and a number of reports and scientific papers have been published in the 10 years following the spill. The long term effects of the spill were evaluated in a report published in 20062. In addition, a review of the ecological effects of the clean up following the spill was published in 20063. The studies found that almost all known impacts to marine wildlife and marine and coastal habitats from the Sea Empress oil spill had disappeared within five years.

On 5 January 1993, MV Braer, an oil tanker, ran aground at the southern tip of Shetland, releasing around 85,000 tonnes of oil. Monitoring began immediately and monitoring for some direct effects continued for around a year. Background monitoring that could be used to assess some effects started in the 1970s and have continued to the present. In general, very few effects other than immediate ones were found, probably due to light and easily dispersible nature of the oil spilled4,5. It took one species of seabird one to five years to recover to pre-spill levels6, and others may have taken longer.

1 SEEEC, 1998. The Environmental Impact of the Sea Empress Oil Spill. Final Report of the Sea Empress Environmental Evaluation Committee. London: The Stationery Office. ISBN: 0 11 702156 3.

http://www.archive.official-documents.co.uk/document/seeec/impact/seaemp.htm

2 Moore, J.J. 2006. State of the Marine Environment in South West Wales, 10 years after the Sea Empress Oil Spill. A report to the Countryside Council for Wales from Coastal Assessment, Liaison and Monitoring, Cosheston, Pembrokeshire. CCW Monitoring report No 21. 30pp.

3 Little, A.E., Moore, J.J. and Dyrynda P.E.J. 2006. Ecological Impacts of Shoreline Clean-up during the Sea Empress Oil Spill. A Report to the Countryside Council for Wales by Cordah Ltd. 131pp.

4 Ritchie, W. And O’Sullivan, M (eds.) 1994. The Environmental impact of the wreck of the Braer. Scottish Office, Edinburgh. 207pp.

5 Davies, J.M. and Topping, G. (eds) 1997. The impact of an oil spill in turbulent waters: the Braer. Scottish Office, Edinburgh.

6 Heubeck, M. 2000. Population trends of kittiwake Rissa tridactyla, black guillemot Cepphus grylle and common guillemot Uria aalge. Atlantic Seabirds 1: 43-47.

Waste Disposal: Newcastle upon Tyne

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what discussions he has had with Newcastle City Council on its decision not to pursue the incineration option for its disposal of waste. (281428)

DEFRA Ministers have had no such discussions. The choice of waste management technology for Newcastle is a matter for the city council.

Transport

Air Passenger Duty

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what estimate he has made of the likely effect of the proposed Air Passenger Duty charges on the number of passengers travelling on each Air Passenger Duty band. (280134)

A sensitivity test for the proposed new Air Passenger Duty (APD) bands and rates was included in the Department for Transport's “UK Air Passenger Demand and C02 Forecasts” report, published in January 2009. The report is available at:

http://www.dft.gov.uk/pgr/aviation/atf/co2forecasts09/

Table 2.12 (page 48) reports the effect of this sensitivity test (rounded to the nearest five million passengers).

The breakdown of the change in 2030 demand from moving to the new APD bands and rates is shown in the following table.

Change in 2030 forecast from central case

New APD band

Passengers (million)

Band A

-1.4

Band B

0.0

Band C

0.0

Band D

0.0

APD exempt

-0.1

Total

-1.5

Notes: Results are rounded to nearest 0.1 million passengers. Difference in total impact from that reported in “UK Air Passenger Demand and C02 Forecasts” January 2009, is due to differences in rounding.

As explained in “UK Air Passenger Demand and C02 Forecasts”, January 2009, paragraphs 2.28 to 2.29 (page 21), the Department's central demand forecasts assume that aviation will meet its climate change costs. It is assumed these will be met by APD, plus an additional cost equal to the difference between APD and aviation's climate change costs per passenger journey (if positive). This assumption reduces the impact of changes to APD on the demand forecasts.

No assessment of the impact of the proposed new APD bands and rates without this assumption is available.

Aviation

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport how many passes to his Department have been issued to employees of (a) BAA, (b) British Airways, (c) Virgin and (d) other airlines in each of the last five years. (279121)

Bus Services

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what recent research his Department has (a) commissioned and (b) evaluated on the supply and demand of local bus services. (280735)

The Department for Transport (DfT) has recently commissioned a number of research projects on buses which are relevant to the supply and demand of local bus services.

A recently commissioned project on the determinants of bus patronage focuses on the importance of softer factors in influencing patronage growth and modal shift. We are expecting this work to be published by autumn 2009.

On concessionary travel, the Department has commissioned research which focuses on the impact of concessionary travel on demand for local bus services and costs, though the work will also cover general bus demand and bus costs. We are expecting this work to be published by the end of 2009.

On bus modelling, the Department has commissioned the development of a bus model which is able to forecast bus patronage changes and bus service levels for different types of interventions. A completed bus model is expected by autumn 2009.

It is intended that DfT's most recent regional and local research strategy is published this summer, which will provide details on local and regional transport research.

Demos

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport whether his Department has any contracts with the think-tank Demos. (279491)

Departmental Carbon Emissions

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what estimate he has made of the volume of carbon dioxide emissions from offices in his Department in (a) 2006-07 and (b) 2007-08 (i) in total and (ii) per full-time equivalent member of staff. (280963)

The Department for Transport reports its carbon dioxide emissions from offices figures through the annual Sustainable Development in Government (SDiG) report. The figures for 2006-07 and 2007-08 are as follows:

Carbon dioxide from offices

Tonnes

Total

Per FTE1

2006-07

24,326

1.239

2007-08

26,098

1.395

1 FTE stands for ‘full time equivalent’ (member of staff).

Departmental Data Protection

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport how many departmental identity cards or passes have been reported lost or stolen by staff in (a) his Department and (b) each of its executive agencies since July 2008. (279414)

The Department for Transport is comprised of the central Department, a Shared Service Centre and seven Executive agencies. The information available regarding identity cards or passes reported lost or stolen since July 2008 is as follows:

For the central Department the number of staff passes reported as replaced is 431. The records available do not distinguish between passes replaced due to loss or theft and those replaced for other reasons. Lost or stolen passes are estimated to account for approximately 45 per cent. of all replacement passes issued.

For the Department's Shared Service centre the number of staff passes reported as lost or stolen is five.

For the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency the number of staff passes reported as lost or stolen is 70.

For the Highways Agency the number of staff passes reported as lost or stolen is 35.

The Government Car and Despatch Agency have no record of passes reported as lost or stolen.

The Vehicle Certification Agency have reported three staff passes as lost.

The Vehicle Operator Services Agency (VOSA) reported seven warrant cards as lost or stolen. In addition it reported that two headquarters building passes were reported lost and two were replaced but the reason was not recorded. VOSA does not centrally record staff building passes reported lost or stolen as each building manager handles requests for replacements on an individual basis. The number for passes lost or stolen for the whole agency could be provided only at a disproportionate cost.

The Driving Standards Agency has had 13 permanent staff passes reported as lost or stolen. In the same period, two driving examiner warrant cards were reported as lost or stolen.

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency do not centrally record the number of staff passes reported as lost or stolen as cases are dealt with individually and not recorded in an aggregated form. This information could be provided only at a disproportionate cost.

Departmental Energy

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport how much (a) electricity and (b) gas was used (i) on his Department’s estate and (ii) by his Department’s agencies in each year from 2004-05 to 2008-09. (280522)

The Department for Transport gas and electricity consumption figures are as follows:

kWh

Area

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

Electricity

Central Department

8,073,203

9,189,266

8,039,848

7,522,567

Driving Standards Agency

3,397,953

3,967,843

4,337,092

3,555,589

Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency

14,698,167

14,106,404

15,658,681

16,460,063

Government Car and Despatch Agency

757,036

831,151

821,805

Highways Agency

4,092,816

3,615,533

3,602,937

4,393,721

Maritime and Coastguard Agency

5,708,513

6,901,183

6,831,677

5,813,369

Vehicle Certification Agency

65,069

153,608

136,804

200,423

Vehicle and Operator Services Agency

7,194,512

6,640,513

6,914,649

6,992,162

Total

43,230,233

45,331,386

46,352,839

45,759,699

Gas

Area

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

Central Department

1,183,339

1,743,451

893,005

970,130

Driving Standards Agency

2,836,153

7,135,920

3,942,059

3,095,886

Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency

14,665,348

28,442,576

26,254,520

31,470,328

Government Car and Despatch Agency

733,428

638,352

1,909,513

Highways Agency

2,418,204

2,170,079

1,769,332

2,049,947

Maritime and Coastguard Agency

3,283,979

4,308,427

3,508,140

2,796,924

Vehicle Certification Agency

119,626

130,536

109,035

90,245

Vehicle and Operator Services Agency

6,850,996

5,427,891

5,652,612

6,882,232

Total

31,357,645

50,092,308

42,767,055

49,265,205

There are no figures reported for the Government Car and Despatch Agency for 2004-05 as they did not become part of the Department for Transport until 2005-06.

The figures for 2008-09 are not yet available as they are currently being collated for the latest Sustainable Development in Government report.

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport how much was spent on energy efficiency measures for his Department’s estate in each year from 2004 to 2009; what assessment has been made of the effectiveness of that expenditure; and what plans he has for future energy efficiency measures. (280545)

It is not possible to provide spend data on energy efficiency measures undertaken by the Department for Transport as the majority of these works were part of larger building projects and were not costed separately. The following is a list of some of the energy efficiency measures that have been carried out at various sites across the Department for Transport estate:

Carbon Management Energy Efficiency Report;

Installation of Savawatt controllers;

Improved lighting control systems;

Installation of double glazing;

Reducing the operating temperatures of heating and cooling systems;

“Switch off” campaigns;

Installation of thermal blinds;

Smart metering and sub-metering programmes;

Upgrades to Building management Systems to reduce energy consumption;

Replacement of boilers with improved energy efficiency ratings;

Improvements to air handling units to improve efficiency;

Automatic PC shutdown at designated time.

The Department reports its energy figures annually as part of the Sustainable Development in Government report and monitors its sustainability data quarterly. As part of the Carbon Management Energy Efficiency report mentioned above the Department reports periodically to the Carbon Trust the savings, in terms of emissions and cost that have been achieved as a result of the measures implemented from the report.

Energy efficiency measures for the future include:

Benchmarking of some sites to determine where efficiencies are required and to allow assessment of the effectiveness of energy efficiency installations;

Further installation of Smart meters and sub-metering;

Installation of new more energy efficient lifts;

Implementation of a “thin client” IT solution;

Participation in the Carbon reduction Commitment;

Achievement of the Carbon Trust Standard;

Adoption of BREEAM Excellent or Very Good ratings for all new build and major refurbishments;

Working towards achievement of an accredited EMS in all departmental organisations;

Full utilisation of a second CHP plant at our Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency site at Morrison.

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport which official is responsible for the energy efficiency of his Department's estate. (280557)

The Department for Transport has, in addition to the central Department, seven executive agencies that report performance under the Sustainable Operation on the Government Estate targets. Those agencies account for in excess of 85 per cent. of the entire departmental estate. The chief executive of each agency is therefore responsible for the energy efficiency of their estate, while Richard Hatfield, Director General of International Networks and Environment, is the Board level champion whose role includes the promotion of sustainability across the entire Department for Transport family.

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what estimate he has made of the energy consumed per full-time equivalent member of staff in his Department in (a) 2006-07 and (b) 2007-08. (280964)

The Department for Transport reports its energy consumption figures through the annual Sustainable Development in Government (SDiG) report. The figures for 2006-07 and 2007-08 are as follows:

Energy usage

kWh

Total

Per FTE1

2006-07

100,104,264

5,098

2007-08

99,082,036

5,297

1 FTE stands for ‘full time equivalent’ (member of staff).

Departmental Public Consultation

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what consultations have been carried out by his Department since July 2007; and at what cost. (279344)

Details of the Department for Transport's consultations carried out since July 2007 have been placed in the Libraries of the House. Information about the cost of each consultation is not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Departmental Waste

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what estimate he has made of the amount of waste arising from his Department in (a) 2006-07 and (b) 2007-08 (i) in total and (ii) per full-time equivalent member of staff. (281010)

The Department for Transport reports its waste arisings figures through the annual Sustainable Development in Government (SDiG) report. The figures for 2006-07 and 2007-08 are as follows:

Waste arisings

Tonnes

Total

Per FTE1

2006-07

3,878

0.197

2007-08

3,711

0.198

1 FTE stands for ‘full time equivalent’ (member of staff).

Departmental Water

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what estimate he has made of the water consumption on his Department's estate in (a) 2005-06 and (b) 2006-07, (i) in total and (ii) per full-time equivalent member of staff. (280962)

The Department for Transport reports its water consumption figures through the annual Sustainable Development in Government (SDiG) report. The scope for water consumption changed from offices only in 2005-06 to the entire estate in 2006-07. As a result of this change in scope, the Department reset its baseline for water consumption. Therefore the water consumption figures for 2005-06 and 2006-07 are now as follows:

Water consumption

Total m3

m3 per FTE1

2005-06

174,921

10.1

2006-07

205,091

10.4

1 Full-time equivalent (member of staff).

The above figures represent the whole estate. To break these figures down to office and non-office data would incur disproportionate costs.

M25

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what estimate his Department has made of the number of jobs which would be created by (a) widening and (b) applying hard shoulder running on (i) section 2 and (ii) section 5 of the M25. (279579)

The number of jobs which would be created for these two projects has not been assessed because the schemes have yet to be designed in enough detail to determine the resources required.

Motor Vehicles: Foreigners

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport pursuant to his answer of 11 June 2009, Official Report, column 959W, on motor vehicles: foreigners, what steps his Department takes to enforce compliance with the requirement to re-register foreign-registered cars after six months of using UK roads. (281398)

[holding answer 19 June 2009]: The Department for Transport operates a strategy of education, warning and direct enforcement to help compliance with the requirement to re-register foreign vehicles after six months using UK roads. Education activities have involved presentations to community leaders, articles in the media, the issue of information leaflets and warning notices placed on vehicle windscreens. At the point a warning is delivered the vehicle details will be recorded. This allows the length of time a vehicle is likely to have been circulating in the UK to be calculated. If a foreign registered vehicle is believed to have been in the UK for more than six months, the police or local authorities with devolved authority or NSL Ltd. have the power to wheel clamp and impound unlicensed vehicles.

Motorways: Repairs and Maintenance

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport how much his Department and its agencies have spent on preparatory work on uncompleted projects for conventional widening of the (a) M1, (b) M6 and (c) M62. (279601)

The cost of preparatory work for uncompleted conventional widening projects on (a) the M1 is £47 million (b) the M6 is £10 million, and (c) M62 is £1.6 million.

This includes consultant costs for preliminary design, traffic modelling, aerial surveys, hard shoulder surveys, environmental assessment, air quality measurements and production of model, public exhibitions and consultation with key stakeholders.

Information gathered from a number of these activities remains pertinent to the project irrespective of its mode of delivery and will be utilised wherever possible.

In relation to the M1 this covers three schemes of approximately 104 miles length in total, dating back to July 2003.

Parking: Disabled

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what guidance his Department issues on the percentage of parking spaces in public car parks to be made available for disabled drivers. (281395)

[holding answer 19 June 2009]: The Department for Transport's "Inclusive Mobility" document provides guidance on established best practice on access for disabled people to the pedestrian and transport environment. Section 5 covers car parking and recommends the following spaces for disabled motorists:

(i)For car parks associated with existing employment premises: 2 per cent. of the total car park capacity, with a minimum of one space.

Spaces for disabled employees must be additional to those recommended above; reservations could be ensured, for example, by marking a space with a registration number.

(ii) For car parks associated with new employment premises: 5 per cent. of the total parking capacity should be designated (to include both employees and visitors).

(iii) For car parks associated with shopping areas, leisure or recreational facilities, and places open to the general public: A minimum of one space for each employee who is a disabled motorist, plus 6 per cent. of the total capacity for visiting disabled motorists.

The numbers of designated spaces may need to be greater at hotels and sports stadiums that specialize in accommodating groups of disabled people.

Railways

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport whether his Department has targets for the proportion of domestic freight and passenger transport made by rail. (281427)

The Department for Transport does not set such targets, but it is Government policy to encourage the development of sustainable passenger and freight transport.

The Department is taking full account of the potential for freight modal shift from road to rail in its ongoing work to consider future investment and other priorities for key national network corridors. It is also an important consideration in the development of the Department's Carbon Reduction Strategy.

Railways: Electrification

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport if he will assess the likely effect on levels of carbon dioxide emissions of electrifying the entire rail network. (280730)

Rail currently emits about 1.9 million tonnes of carbon dioxide directly from diesel consumption and is indirectly responsible for about 1.4 million tonnes of carbon dioxide produced by the electricity generating sector. Electrifying the rail network would remove carbon emissions associated with diesel consumption, but increase emissions from power stations. The net effect would be a reduction in rail related emissions of about 0.5 million tonnes of carbon dioxide.

Railways: Finance

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport how much funding the Government provided to each train operating company franchise per passenger mile in 2008-09. (281234)

Government spending on the railway for the year ending 31 March 2009 is currently being audited. Subsidy paid along with premiums received from Train Operating Companies for the year 2007-08 is published in National Rail Trends (NRT) which also sets out the amount of subsidy per passenger kilometre. The next National Rail Trends yearbook will be published by the Office of Rail Regulation later in the year and will include the data requested. Copies of the latest version are available in the Libraries of the House.

Railways: Franchises

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport how many franchise agreements with train operating companies in force in (a) 2008-09 and (b) 2009-10 contained revenue support clauses. (280075)

All franchise agreements let from 2003 onwards have revenue support/revenue share clauses in Schedule 8 of the National Rail Franchise Terms. The Train Operating Companies with these provisions are:

Cross Country

East Midland Trains

First Capital Connect

First Great Western

London Midland

London Southeastern Railway

National Express East Anglia

National Express East Coast

Northern Rail

Virgin West Coast.

This list will include the new Southern Franchise when it begins on 20 September 2009.

Full details of revenue support/revenue share can be found on the Department for Transport's website's Public Register of Franchise Agreements:

http://www.dft.gov.uk/pgr/rail/passenger/publicregister/

Reading Station: Repairs and Maintenance

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what his most recent estimate is of the likely cost of works to Reading station; and how much of this cost will result from the payment of compensation to train operating companies. (278401)

[holding answer 8 June 2009]: The Reading scheme is a five-year project, with a total value of some £800 million, increasing capacity and improving performance at a key railway junction on the Great Western Main Line.

The whole project is still being finalised by Network Rail and the detailed specification is likely to be agreed with that company in the near future.

Network Rail is aware of the outputs required by Government, in terms of additional capacity and sustained performance, but importantly the need to deliver these within the financial resources determined by the Office of Rail Regulation. The Department for Transport is also working with the railway industry to minimise any adverse impact on the operational railway during the construction phases and the need to make compensation payments to operating companies.

Roads

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what his most recent assessment is of the capacity of the existing road network for (a) car and (b) freight usage. (281098)

The Department for Transport published forecasts of traffic and associated congestion, journey times and emissions for the English road network in December 2008. The report is available at:

http://www.dft.gov.uk/pgr/economics/ntm/roadtransport forcasts08/

and copies have been placed in the Libraries of the House.

Roads in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are a matter for the devolved Administrations.

Roads: Construction

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what recent assessment he has made of (a) the effect of whisper concrete on roads and (b) its future use. (280871)

The Highways Agency, an executive agency of the Department for Transport is currently carrying out research on the acoustic performance of quieter surfaces over time. A section of the trunk road network with whisper concrete is included as part of this research. The results of the research and the conclusions are expected to be finalised by early 2010. There is no plan at present for the reintroduction of whisper concrete on the trunk road network.

Shipping

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport (1) what incidents where (a) chemicals and (b) radioactive material were lost overboard (i) in UK waters and (ii) elsewhere from UK-registered ships took place in each year since 1985; and what the (A) location, (B) chemicals or materials involved and (C) amount subsequently recovered was in each case; (281612)

(2) on how many occasions (a) court actions and (b) fines have resulted from incidents where (i) chemicals and (ii) radioactive material have been lost overboard in (A) UK waters and (B) elsewhere from UK-registered ships since 1985; and what (1) type of conviction and (2) level of fine there was in each case in respect of which legal proceedings have been completed.

Details of incidences of hazardous material (including chemicals) being released from ships in the UK pollution control zone are given in annual reports produced by the Advisory Committee on Protection of the Sea. Recent reports are available on the website of the Maritime and Coastguard Agency.

There have been no reported incidences of radioactive material being lost overboard since 1985.

Since 1989 the Department for Transport has sponsored reports on events involving the transport of radioactive material in the UK. These reports will include details of any known incidents where radioactive material was lost during transport by sea. Copies have been placed in the House Libraries and more recent ones are available via the DFT website at the following address:

http://www.dft.gov.uk/pgr/freiqht/dgt1/road/quidance/guidance/guidance7class/theradiologicalimpactofthetr1178

Southern: Railway Stations

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what definition of station deep cleans is stipulated in the South Central franchise. (280379)

Within the London area, the station deep clean specification was agreed by the Department for Transport and Transport for London before the franchise specification was published in November 2008. Bidders were obliged to meet these minimum standards as part of their bid which will be assessed via a Mystery Shopping Exercise to be conducted by Transport for London. The specification covers all areas of the station that are under the control of the train operator. This specification will be published alongside the other various franchise documents once commercial elements of the agreement have been discussed with the train operator.

Outside London, the bidder offered a station deep clean package, which was not a requirement of our specification. The exact specification of this programme will be agreed between the Department and GoVia, the winning bidder in the next few months.

Southern: Standards

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what (a) enhancements and (b) investments stipulated in the South Central franchise were stipulated as part of the 2007 High Level Output Statement. (280384)

The High Level Output Specification specifies increased levels of demand that must be accommodated on the network. In the case of South Central this relates to London Victoria and London Bridge. The South Central invitation to tender set out a minimum increase in vehicle arrivals at the London terminals (morning peak) and departures (evening peak) that make use of the lengthened platforms that Network Rail will provide.

Overall the invitation to tender required a 10 per cent. increase in morning peak capacity. The winning bidder exceeds this requirement, with a 14 per cent. increase in morning peak capacity by December 2013.

Transport

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what recent research his Department has (a) commissioned and (b) reviewed on (i) the efficacy of local transport plans and (ii) other methods for improving transport services and infrastructure at (A) local and (B) regional level. (280734)

The Department for Transport (DfT) commissioned a long-term process and impact evaluation of the Local Transport Plan policy following its introduction in the 1998 Transport White Paper. The research project ran from December 2001 to April 2007—the final report is available at:

http://www.dft.gov.uk/pqr/reqional/ltp/research/

The research identified that the Government's approach to local transport planning and delivery since the White Paper had been successful and represented value for money in terms of the investment made.

The Department commissions a wide range of other research to help improve transport services and infrastructure at a local and regional level. Examples include research recently commissioned on programme and risk management for local authorities; research on the importance of “soft factors” in delivering bus passenger growth and modal shift from cars, and a study on how local authorities access information on best practice. It is intended that DfT's most recent regional and local research strategy is published this summer, which will provide details on local and regional transport research.

Transport: Devon

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what estimate his Department has made of the average number of journeys per day by each mode of transport between London and (a) the Torbay area, (b) the South Devon area and (c) Devon. (280731)

The requested information is not available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Justice

Probation : Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether he plans to recruit new staff to monitor the new monthly targets for the London Probation Service. (280502)

This will be undertaken using existing resources both within London probation and the London director of offender management's team.

Crimes of Violence: Reoffenders

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the answer of 11 June 2009, Official Report, columns 954-55W, on crimes of violence: reoffenders, what the conviction rate was for persons charged with murder who were notified to the National Offender Management Service in each year since 2006-07. (280837)

Further to my answer of 11 June 2009, the Offender Management Caseload Statistics 2007, published on 30 October 2008 record that, for 2006-7, 74 offenders who were under the supervision of the Probation Service were convicted of murder, and for 2007-8, 47. These figures, together with those provided in my earlier answer, show that, at the time OMCS 2007 was published, murder convictions as a proportion of serious further offence notifications for murder were 57 per cent. for 2006-7 and 4 per cent. for 2007-8. However, at the time of publication, not all cases had gone to trial.

The Offender Management Caseload Statistics 2008, which are scheduled for publication on 31 July 2009, will contain serious further offence convictions and other outcomes for 2008-9 and updated figures for 2007-8.

Crimes of Violence: Sentencing

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how long on average a person in (a) Essex and (b) Castle Point convicted of (i) grievous bodily harm and (ii) violent disorder was sentenced to serve in custody in the most recent 12 month period for which figures are available. (280599)

The data provided in the following table show the average custodial sentence length (ACSL) for offenders in the Essex police area force, for grievous bodily harm and violent disorder. Data are not available for Castle Point. The data are for the offences of grievous bodily harm or violent disorder where such an offence was the principal offence for which the offender was sentenced. Where an offender has been sentenced for more than one offence the principal offence is the one for which the heaviest sentence was imposed, where the same sentence has been imposed for two or more offences the principal offence is the one for which the statutory maximum is most severe.

Average custodial sentence length1 (months) for grievous bodily harm and violent disorder, Essex police force area, 2007

Number/months

Number of immediate custodial sentences—grievous bodily harm2

73

Average custodial sentence length

27.0

Number of immediate custodial sentences—violent disorder3

0

Average custodial sentence length

4

1 Excludes indeterminate and life sentences. 2 Offences of: wounding with intent to do grievous bodily harm; causing explosion or casting corrosive fluids with intent to do grievous bodily harm; malicious wounding; racially aggravated malicious wounding or GBH; religiously aggravated wounding or GBH, racially or religiously aggravated wounding or GBH. 3 Public Order Act 1986. 4 Not applicable. Note: These figures have been drawn from administrative data systems. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system. Source: OMS Analytical Services, Ministry of Justice.

Debt Collection: Fees and Charges

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment he has made of the appropriateness level of costs charged by bailiffs in the execution of duties ordered by (a) the courts and (b) local authorities. (281112)

The current fee system for enforcement agents is complex, each enforcement power bringing with it a different fee structure. The Tribunals, Courts and Enforcement Act (the Act) 2007 will introduce a unified fee regime, which will ensure that bailiffs are adequately and fairly remunerated for the work they actually do. We are assessing the current level of costs for all the different debt types to inform the new fee structure which includes the courts and local authorities.

Departmental Buildings

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much his Department spent on works and refurbishment to offices allocated to Ministers in his Department's buildings in the last 12 months. (252369)

The amount spent by the Ministry of Justice in the last 12 months on works and refurbishment to offices allocated to Ministers is £279,235.00.

Of this amount £104,656.00 related to interior works (including partition work, ceilings, doors, ironmongery, redecorations, floor finishes and mechanical); £128,868.00 related to associated electrical work; £1,445.00 for other minor adjustments and £44,266.00 related to fees.

The incremental costs include works directly attributable to the formation of the Ministry of Justice. Specifically, the appointment of a fifth junior Minister and the creation of an appropriate secure environment for the Secretary of State and his security advisers.

The timing of these decisions required the works to be undertaken subsequent to the initial planned building refurbishment.

Departmental Electricity

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate he has made of the percentage of electricity used by his Department which was derived from renewable sources in (a) 2006-07 and (b) 2007-08. (280925)

The Ministry of Justice was created in May 2007, this answer gives the figure for 2007-08. The Ministry of Justice is unable to provide the percentage of electricity derived from renewable sources for 2006-07 without incurring disproportionate costs.

The estimate made of the percentage of electricity derived from renewable sources used by the Ministry of Justice in 2007-08 was 8 per cent.

Departmental Energy

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate he has made of the energy consumed per full-time equivalent member of staff in his Department in (a) 2006-07 and (b) 2007-08. (280924)

The Ministry of Justice was created in May 2007, this answer gives the figure for 2007-08. The Ministry of Justice is unable to provide the energy consumed for 2006-07 without incurring disproportionate costs.

The energy consumed per full-time equivalent member of staff in 2007-08 was 17,996 kWh based upon total energy consumption of 1,680,602,541 kWh and 93,385 FTEs (includes MoJ core estate plus executive agencies). Please note that the total energy consumption figure includes energy consumed by prisoners within HM Prison Service and visitors within HM Courts Service.

Departmental ICT

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much his Department spent upgrading its IT in 2008-09. (276430)

Details of significant expenditure incurred on upgrading IT in the 2008-09 financial year are as follows:

The Criminal Justice System Exchange infrastructure—expenditure for 2008-09 was £6.7 million.

The NOMIS Programme to upgrade IT across the National Offender Management Service is providing Her Majesty's Prison Service and national probation service staff with improved access to information to support end-to-end offender management processes. Expenditure for 2008-09 was £91 million, which included the main costs of developing and implementing new applications, infrastructure costs and supporting the live services.

In addition, the Ministry of Justice's other main IT services are provided through contracts with external suppliers. These contracts include provision for regular maintenance and upgrade of the infrastructures and applications to keep systems up to date and to improve business efficiency. The costs of upgrades are included in the overall contract expenditure and could not be identified separately without incurring disproportionate cost.

Departmental Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much (a) his Department and (b) its agencies paid in end-of-year performance bonuses to (i) all staff and (ii) senior Civil Service staff in 2008-09; and how many such payments were made. (275250)

The information requested is as follows.

Staff on core Ministry of Justice terms and conditions (including HMCS, Tribunals Service and MoJ HQ)

Payments of non-consolidated performance pay are paid to high performing staff to reflect their individual contribution during the previous performance year. In the Ministry of Justice, the performance year runs from 1 April to 31 March. Therefore, 2007-08 was the relevant performance year for the payments made during the financial year 2008-09

For grades below the SCS, non-consolidated performance pay is paid to those staff who have been judged to have consistently exceeded their objectives throughout the performance year under the Ministry's performance management system.

During 2008-09 1,676 staff were paid £2,011,200 in non-consolidated performance pay.

Staff employed in the NOMS Agency (including Public Sector Prisons)

In the HMPS, the performance year runs from 1 April to 31 March. Therefore, 2007-08 was the relevant performance year for the payments made during the financial year 2008-09

For grades below the SCS end of year end performance bonuses are paid to staff who have consistently exceeded their objectives throughout the performance year.

During 2008-09 5,332 staff were paid £1,325,952 in non-consolidated performance pay.

We are unable to ascertain performance payments made for Probation HQ staff who now fall within NOMS (but were within the Home Office during the reporting period) as figures for this group were not separated from the Home Office total.

Senior Civil Service

For Senior Civil Servants in the Ministry of Justice and agencies (whose pay terms are set by the Ministry of Justice) end of year payments of non consolidated performance pay are allocated by the Departmental Pay Committee in accordance with guidelines issued by Cabinet Office each year following the Senior Salaries Review Body recommendations.

During 2008-09, 159 members of the Senior Civil Service were awarded end of year performance pay. The amount paid was £1,648,000.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many non-pensionable bonuses were awarded to members of staff in his Department in 2008-09; and what the total cost of such bonuses was; (279228)

(2) how many non-pensionable bonuses were awarded to members of staff in his Department in 2008-09; and what the cost was of such bonuses.

In year payments of non-consolidated performance pay may be made to recognise one off contributions made by individuals or teams. Information regarding the number and cost of bonus payments is set out as follows.

Staff on core Ministry of Justice terms and conditions (Including HMCS, Tribunals Service, and MoJ HQ)

Payment of non-consolidated performance pay to staff below the SCS may be either ‘end of year’ payments or ‘in year’.

‘End of year’ payments of non-consolidated performance pay are made as part of the annual pay award to staff to staff who have performed at a level beyond that which would normally be expected throughout the performance year.

1,676 staff received non-consolidated performance pay during 2008-09 and the amount paid was £2,011,200 (excluding employer’s national insurance contributions). This represented approximately 0.4 per cent. of the overall paybill.

‘In year’ payments of non-consolidated performance pay are ‘one off’ payments made to recognise outstanding individual performance on specific occasions during the year.

4,094 staff were awarded ‘in year’ non-consolidated performance pay for the 2008-09 financial year and the amount paid was £2,105,719 representing 0.4 per cent. of the paybill.

The NOMS Agency

Payment of non-consolidated performance pay to staff below the SCS may be either ‘end of year’ payments or ‘in year’. End of year performance pay is paid to staff who have consistently exceeded their objectives throughout the performance year.

In HMPS, the performance year runs from 1 April to 31 March. Therefore, 2007-08 was the relevant performance year for end of year payments made during the financial year 2008-09.

During 2008-09, 5,332 HMPS staff below SCS were paid £1,325,952 in ‘end of year’ non-consolidated performance pay (excluding employer’s national insurance contributions). This represented 0.3 per cent. of the relevant paybill.

We are unable to ascertain performance payments made for Probation HQ staff who now fall within NOMS (but were within the Home Office during the reporting period).

6,198 HMPS staff received ‘in-year’ non-consolidated performance pay, amounting to £2,855,812. (Excluding employer’s national insurance contributions). This represented approximately 0.22 per cent. of the paybill.

Six payments of ‘in-year’ non-consolidated performance pay were made to chief executives of the Probation Trusts. The amount paid was £26,477. (excluding employer’s national insurance contributions).

The Senior Civil Service

For senior civil servants in the Ministry of Justice and agencies including the NOMS Agency whose pay terms are set by the Ministry of Justice end of year payments of non-consolidated performance pay are allocated by the Departmental Pay Committee in accordance with guidelines issued by Cabinet Office each year following the Senior Salaries Review Body recommendations.

During 2008-09, 159 members of the senior civil service were awarded ‘end of year’ performance pay. The amount paid was £1,648,000. (excluding employer’s national insurance contributions). This represents 8.4 per cent. of the overall paybill for these staff.

As described above, we will have comprehensive details of ‘in year’ payments of non-consolidated performance pay for the 2008-09 financial year in early June and will write to you with these details.

Departmental Recycling

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what (a) volume and (b) percentage of waste his Department recycled in (i) 2006-07 and (ii) 2007-08. (281047)

The Ministry of Justice was created in May 2007, this answer gives the amount of waste recycled for the year 2007-08. The Ministry of Justice is unable to provide the volume and percentage of waste recycled for 2006-07 without incurring disproportionate costs.

The volume of waste the Ministry of Justice recycled in 2007-08 was 15,635.6 tonnes and the percentage recycled was 22 per cent. This information was published in the seventh annual “Sustainable Development in Government Report (SDiG)”:

http://www.sd-commission.org.uk/sdig2008/

Departmental Training

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much his Department spent on health and safety training for its staff in each of the last two years. (278143)

The expenditure on Health and Safety Training by the Ministry is stated as follows:

£

2008-09

Ministry of Justice HQ

47,366

HM Courts Service

286,805

Tribunals Service

21,523

Office of the Public Guardian

500

Total

356,194

2007-08

Ministry of Justice HQ

60,441

HM Courts Service

293,552

Tribunals Service

19,810

Office of the Public Guardian

500

Total

374,303

The expenditure incurred is for external training courses, conducted by approved Health and Safety training consultants.

To supplement these external courses, internal Health and Safety training is provided across the Ministry by in-house staff. To obtain an accurate figure for this would incur disproportionate cost.

The National Offender Management Service employs over 50,000 staff in more than 140 locations. At present, there is no single central point for management information relating to health and safety training for staff. To obtain the information requested would involve identifying and contacting sources of information in many different locations and would thus incur disproportionate costs.

Departmental Waste

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate he has made of the amount of waste arising from his Department in (a) 2006-07 and (b) 2007-08 (i) in total and (ii) per full-time equivalent member of staff. (281046)

The Ministry of Justice was created in May 2007, this answer gives the figure for 2007-08. The Ministry of Justice is unable to provide the estimate of waste arising in 2006-07 without incurring disproportionate costs.

The estimate made of total waste arising from the Ministry of Justice in 2007-08 was 71,060 tonnes. The amount per full-time equivalent member of staff in 2007-08 was 0.76 tonnes based upon 93,385 full-time equivalent members of staff (Ministry of Justice core estate plus executive agencies). This includes waste generated by prisoners within HM Prison Service and visitors within HM Courts Service.

Departmental Water

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate he has made of the water consumption on his Department's estate in (a) 2005-06 and (b) 2006-07, (i) in total and (ii) per full-time equivalent member of staff. (280922)

The Ministry of Justice was created in May 2007. The Ministry of Justice is unable to provide the information on water consumption for 2005-06 and 2006-07 without incurring disproportionate costs.

Drugs: Misuse

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) probation staff and (b) staff work for the Interventions and Substance Misuse Department. (280830)

Of 157 staff currently in post in the National Offender Management Service's Interventions and Substance Misuse Group 10 are probation staff.

Prior to the NOMS Agency being formed in 2008, the Prison Service tended to manage interventions centrally whereas the probation service managed interventions regionally. Hence ISMG, being a central headquarters function, has largely been formed from existing groups that were previously part of HM Prison Service.

Homicide: Sentencing

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the average sentence was for offenders convicted of attempted murder or conspiracy to murder in each of the last five years. (280842)

The requested information is shown in the following table. The data show the number of persons sentenced in the last five years, for attempted murder or soliciting or conspiracy to murder and the average custodial sentence length (ACSL). ACSL excludes the growing number of indeterminate sentences.

These are given to the most serious offenders and may cause ACSL to appear lower in recent years.

Number of persons sentenced, number of indeterminate sentences and Average Custodial Sentence Length (ACSL)1, for attempted murder2 or conspiracy to murder3, 2003-07

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Attempted murder

Total number sentenced

94

96

66

79

87

Total indeterminate sentences

14

14

9

37

44

ACSL (years)

11.3

11.3

11.8

11.8

13.4

Soliciting or conspiracy to murder

Total number sentenced

29

10

13

13

21

Total indeterminate sentences

9

0

0

5

10

ACSL (years)

10.4

10.8

8.6

12.0

6.6

1 Excludes life/indeterminate sentences

2 Common law

3 Offences Against the Person Act 1861 S.4

Note:

These figures have been drawn from administrative data systems. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system

Source:

OMS Analytical Services, Ministry of Justice

These data are based on the principal offence. Where an offender has been sentenced for more than one offence, the principal offence is the one for which the heaviest sentence was imposed. Where the same sentence has been imposed for two or more offences, the principal offence is the one for which the statutory maximum is most severe.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many offenders prosecuted for (a) attempted murder and (b) conspiracy to murder (i) were found guilty, (ii) received a caution, (iii) received a fine, (iv) received a community sentence, (v) were placed in immediate custody, (vi) received a suspended sentence and (vii) received another disposal in the latest period for which figures are available. (280844)

Information showing the number of persons cautioned, proceeded against, found guilty, and sentenced (broken down by outcome) for attempted murder and conspiracy to murder for 2007 (latest available) is shown in the table. 2008 data will be available in the autumn of 2009.

Number of persons cautioned1, proceeded against at magistrates' courts, found guilty at all courts, sentenced, broken down by outcome, or attempted murder2 and conspiracy to commit murder3, England and Wales, 20074,5

Outcome of sentence

Offence

Cautioned

Proceeded against

Found guilty

Sentenced

Fine

Community sentence

Suspended sentence

Immediate custody

Other disposals

Attempted murder

333

87

87

1

2

74

10

Conspiracy to commit murder

3

33

21

21

21

1 From 1 June 2000 the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 came into force nationally and removed the use of cautions for persons under 18 and replaced them with reprimands and warnings. These figures have been included in the totals.

2 Includes Attempted Murder, under Common Law.

3 Includes Conspiracy or soliciting etc; to commit murder under Common Law.

4 The statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences the principal offence is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

5 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source:

Evidence and Analysis Unit - Office for Criminal Justice Reform.

Legal Aid

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much legal aid has been granted to parents seeking access rights to children in each of the last five years. (279196)

The Legal Services Commission is unable to identify the amount of legal aid granted solely to parents for contact applications from its case management system, as these applications can also be made by wider family members, such as grandparents or older siblings. These proceedings can also include other issues as well as contact, such as residence, parental responsibility and specific issue orders, and these costs will be included in the certificate costs.

In the past five financial years the following amounts have been paid in closed certificates that involve contact issues.

Financial year

£ million

2004-05

78

2005-06

86

2006-07

92

2007-08

103

2008-09

124

A small proportion of the increase in 2008-09 is due to the Legal Services Commission undertaking an exercise to close dormant certificates.

The figures do not include the costs of initial legal advice on contact provided under the controlled Family Help Scheme, as this information is not recorded.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what proportion of legal aid spending was incurred for lawyers' attendance at (a) police stations, (b) magistrates courts and (c) Crown courts in each of the last five years. (280335)

The question cannot be answered in the format requested since amounts spent on actual attendance cannot be separately identified. Information is available for 2004-05 to 2007-08 only.

The following table gives the proportions of total legal aid expenditure for police stations, magistrates courts and the Crown court for attendance related work and includes work done in preparation for attendance. Work which is clearly not related to attendance such as police station telephone advice has been excluded. Expenditure not related to police stations, magistrates courts and the Crown court, such as representation for prisoners at prison disciplinary hearings has also been excluded.

Overall legal aid expenditure is made up of criminal and civil legal aid. The Legal Services Commission's annual reports show the spend each year between the two schemes.

Proportions of overall legal aid expenditure

Percentage

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

Police stations

8.1

8.7

9.7

8.2

Magistrates courts

14.4

14.7

15.4

12.1

Crown court

33.5

34.2

32.5

34.2

Prisons: Mental Health Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the costs of the Dangerous and Severe Personality Disorder Programme have been in each year since it began. (279066)

The Ministry of Justice and Department of Health have worked together to establish a range of pilot services for dangerous offenders with severe personality disorder in prisons, high and medium secure national health service (NHS) facilities and the community. The programme was announced in 2001 as a commitment to provide at least an extra 300 places for offenders who fell into the dangerous and severe personality disorder category.

The total capital investment for the programme has been £128 million. This expenditure resulted in three high secure units (two in hospitals and one in a prison), three medium secure units and two NHS hostels. It is estimated that across the NHS and the National Offender Management Service in each year between 2003-04 and 2005-06 the revenue expenditure incurred was £40 million and since 2006-07, £60 million, reflecting the increase in the available places over that period. The costs include the provision of assessment and treatment, a research and evaluation programme, and for the central team responsible for the development and management of the programme.

Probation: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how the speedy recall processes to be introduced in the London Probation Service will be funded. (280503)

London Probation is already required to complete and submit recall breach reports within the national target of 24 hours. The intention is that existing processes will be improved to ensure compliance with the target and that this work will be undertaken within existing resources. London Probation is committed to working closely with its partner agencies, the Metropolitan police and the National Offender Management Service Public Protection Casework Section, to improve the efficiency of the recall process from the initiating of recall by London Probation through to the arrest by the police. This work is being monitored by the London Criminal Justice Board and the London Director of Offender Management.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the budget was for each probation area in each year since 1997. (280784)

The resource budget allocations to individual probation areas from 2001-02 are given in the table. Prior to 2001-02 probation services were delivered through local probation committees which were partly funded by local authorities and were organised on a slightly different basis.

The budget figures shown for 2009-10 may be subject to further change.

Since 2001-02 there have been changes to the budget allocation methodology, plus machinery of government changes and accounting methodology changes that make it difficult to compare figures over a long period.

Probation areas end-year budgets—at 16 June2009

£000

Revenue

Areas

2009-10

2008-09

2007-08

2006-07

2005-06

2004-05

2003-04

2002-03

2001-02

Avon and Somerset

20,300

20,727

20,661

19,771

18,273

16,851

15,612

14,891

15,856

Bedfordshire

9,556

9,571

8,863

8,499

8,180

7,182

6,517

6,196

5,526

Cambridgeshire

10,092

10,341

9,727

9,273

8,895

7,375

6,835

6,168

6,365

Cheshire

15,133

15,571

14,715

15,688

15,393

13,427

11,692

10,012

8,984

Cumbria

8,626

8,376

8,217

7,897

7,466

6,241

6,279

5,710

5,288

Derbyshire

14,042

15,168

13,490

12,891

12,166

11,088

10,335

9,516

8,534

Devon and Cornwall

20,306

21,037

20,225

19,638

18,184

15,646

15,667

13,967

12,740

Dorset

9,067

9,408

8,522

8,277

7,989

7,338

7,307

6,876

5,761

Durham

10,615

11,148

10,720

10,245

9,513

8,697

7,820

7,431

5,975

Essex

19,325

20,319

19,977

18,922

17,839

16,220

14,849

14,502

13,700

Gloucestershire

7,677

7,858

7,379

6,959

6,524

5,975

5,874

5,102

4,943

Hampshire

24,868

25,614

24,338

23,057

21,872

20,026

18,427

18,079

13,841

Hertfordshire

11,468

11,750

11,265

10,569

9,618

8,691

8,409

8,654

7,034

Humberside

17,377

18,380

17,187

16,130

14,964

13,010

12,422

11,090

9,414

Kent

21,449

21,798

20,993

20,340

19,052

16,760

16,322

15,116

13,673

Lancashire

24,516

24,406

22,979

21,394

20,251

18,837

18,600

16,859

14,307

Leicestershire

15,237

15,668

14,402

13,805

13,071

11,778

11,086

9,911

8,774

Lincolnshire

9,436

9,794

9,292

9,038

8,446

7,469

7,134

6,127

5,606

Norfolk

11,582

11,980

11,168

10,608

10,205

8,477

7,927

7,171

6,543

Northamptonshire

9,389

9,673

9,116

8,816

8,149

7,158

6,920

6,018

5,131

North Yorkshire

9,827

10,350

10,236

9,478

8,998

7,937

7,486

6,877

5,701

Nottinghamshire

19,303

19,686

19,057

18,117

17,190

14,861

14,232

13,220

11,658

Staffordshire

16,885

17,260

16,393

15,913

14,361

12,319

11,769

10,930

9,586

Suffolk

10,018

10,243

9,643

9,445

8,771

7,583

7,361

6,889

6,268

Surrey

10,249

10,953

10,396

10,081

9,421

7,779

7,784

7,523

6,881

Sussex

18,074

18,388

17,373

16,991

15,677

14,033

12,789

11,367

10,396

Teesside

13,408

13,715

13,606

13,052

12,178

10,954

10,613

9,523

9,805

Thames Valley

25,776

26,614

25,405

24,373

23,421

20,795

19,787

18,463

20,831

Warwickshire

7,177

7,538

6,937

6,743

6,492

5,698

5,452

4,749

4,368

West Mercia

15,217

15,692

15,445

13,642

13,197

11,774

11,188

10,057

9,251

Wiltshire

8,064

8,214

7,874

7,720

7,224

5,964

5,510

4,874

4,606

Greater Manchester

51,577

52,798

48,309

47,532

45,645

40,985

38,521

34,479

31,731

Merseyside

31,729

32,756

29,263

28,820

28,643

25,798

24,621

22,410

23,062

Northumbria

29,109

29,801

27,646

26,964

26,005

22,999

22,113

18,459

16,641

South Yorkshire

24,977

25,511

24,282

24,058

23,041

20,858

20,381

18,191

16,153

West Midlands

56,913

59,331

55,055

53,377

50,140

44,076

41,932

38,581

37,865

West Yorkshire

41,080

42,982

40,036

38,193

36,226

33,366

30,986

28,062

26,931

London

150,384

153,617

143,404

137,416

132,637

107,888

110,390

106,612

94,328

Dyfed Powys

8,417

8,960

8,295

8,058

7,541

6,478

5,784

5,162

4,579

Gwent

11,172

11,404

11,252

10,930

10,018

8,938

8,029

7,197

5,215

North Wales

12,244

12,530

11,786

11,696

11,027

10,067

9,044

8,223

6,774

South Wales

24,624

25,566

25,226

24,402

23,098

20,917

19,328

18,104

17,062

Total

886,285

912,496

860,172

828,817

786,995

690,312

661,130

609,348

557,686

Probation: Sick Leave

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps his Department is taking to reduce the level of sickness absence in the Probation Service in (a) London and (b) the London Borough of Lewisham. (280505)

London Probation has put in place a number of measures to tackle the levels of sickness in the whole area as well as in Lewisham and Greenwich. These include pro-active measures such as close monitoring by managers and return to work interviews, as well as a range of preventative measures such as health screens and stress management.

Probation: Training

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether any specific funding is to be provided for the prioritised training ordered for the London Service. (280501)

There will be no additional funding provided for London Probation by National Offender Management Service. London Probation will fund this work from within their existing budget.

Rape: Convictions

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many and what proportion of those convicted of rape since 2006 were aged (a) 10 to 15, (b) 16 to 18, (c) 19 to 25, (d) 26 to 30 and (e) over 30 years old. (280668)

The number of defendants found guilty for rape (of a female and male) at all courts, by age group, England and Wales 2006 to 2007 can be viewed in the table.

The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offence for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences, the offence selected is the one for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

Data for 2008 will be available in the autumn of 2009.

Number of defendants found guilty of rape1 at all courts, by age group, England and Wales 2006 and 20072,3

2006

2007

Age group

Found guilty

Percentage of total convictions

Found guilty

Percentage of total convictions

10 to 15 years

31

4

34

4

16 to 18 years

63

8

57

7

19 to 25 years

142

19

148

19

26 to 30 years

72

10

82

11

Over 30 years

446

59

456

59

Total

754

100

777

100

1 Includes rape of a female and rape of a male offences, but not attempted rape of a male or female.

2 The statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences the principal offence is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

3 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source:

OCJR - Evidence and Analysis Unit

Sentencing

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will publish the sentencing guidelines for offences related to (a) child abuse, (b) child neglect and (c) sexual abuse of children. (281345)

Sentencing guidelines are issued to the courts by the independent Sentencing Guidelines Council, not by the Government. In April 2007, the Sentencing Guidelines Council published a definitive guideline on the Sexual Offences Act 2003 and in February 2008, they published a definitive guideline on the Overarching Principles: Assaults on Children and Cruelty to a Child.

These and all other published guidelines can be viewed at:

www.sentencing-guidelines.gov.uk

Sexual Offences: Reoffenders

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what the re-offending rate was for offenders convicted of sex offences who received (a) a community sentence, (b) a prison sentence of less than 12 months, (c) a prison sentence of between 12 months and two years, (d) a prison sentence of between two and four years and (e) a prison sentence of over four years in the latest period for which figures are available; (280838)

(2) what the re-offending rate was for offenders convicted of violent crimes who received (a) a community sentence, (b) a prison sentence of less than 12 months, (c) a prison sentence of between 12 months and two years, (d) a prison sentence of between two and four years and (e) a prison sentence of over four years in the latest period for which figures are available;

(3) what the re-offending rate was for offenders convicted of burglary who received (a) a community sentence, (b) a prison sentence of less than 12 months, (c) a prison sentence of between 12 months and two years, (d) a prison sentence of between two and four years and (e) a prison sentence of over four years in the latest period for which figures are available;

(4) what the re-offending rate was for offenders convicted of robbery who received (a) a community sentence, (b) a prison sentence of less than 12 months, (c) a prison sentence of between 12 months and two years, (d) a prison sentence of between two and four years and (e) a prison sentence of over four years in the latest period for which figures are available;

(5) what the re-offending rate was for offenders convicted of theft who received (a) a community sentence, (b) a prison sentence of less than 12 months, (c) a prison sentence of between 12 months and two years, (d) a prison sentence of between two and four years and (e) a prison sentence of over four years in the latest period for which figures are available.

Tables 1 and 2 show the one-year adult reoffending rates for offenders in England and Wales released from custody or commencing a court order in the first quarter (1 January to 31 March) of 2007, for offenders convicted of sex offences (with sexual offences against children as a separate group), violent crimes, burglary (with domestic and non-domestic as separate groups), robbery and theft. The tables also show the proportion of offenders who committed at least one further offence and the frequency of offences per 100 offenders. It is important to note that a reoffence does not mean the offence is in the same category as the index offence. So an offender whose index offence was sexual who committed a number of reoffences, may have committed no more sexual offences.

Table 1: One-year reoffending rates, offenders commencing a court order or released from custody in quarter 1 2007by offence group

Offence group/disposal

Number of offenders

Actual reoffending rate

Number of offences per 100 offenders

Court orders1

Violence

10,301

28.8

75.4

Sexual

294

22.1

51.7

Sexual (child)

209

12.0

32.1

Domestic burglary

842

50.8

162.2

Other burglary

1,082

57.6

207.1

Robbery

144

36.1

94.4

Theft

5,627

59.1

251.6

Custody

Violence

2,922

40.8

155.4

Sexual

213

28.2

128.6

Sexual (child)

377

6.9

16.2

Domestic burglary

778

49.6

198.5

Other burglary

504

67.9

318.7

Robbery

672

35.6

123.7

Theft

2,001

75.6

468.2

1 Court orders include pre-CJA 2003 community sentences, new community orders and suspended sentence orders.

Table 2: One-year reoffending rates, offenders released from custody in quarter 1 2007 by offence group and sentence length

Offence group/disposal

Number of offenders

Actual reoffending rate

Number of offences per 100 offenders

Less than 12months

Violence

1,772

52.8

212.0

Sexual

90

45.6

225.6

Sexual (child)

53

3.8

1

Domestic burglary

180

62.2

300.6

Other burglary

367

75.7

372.2

Robbery

236

266.7

2236.1

Theft

1,868

79.5

495.2

12 months to less than 2 years

Violence

482

25.3

76.1

Sexual

237

232.4

2151.4

Sexual (child)

78

11.5

235.9

Domestic burglary

227

50.2

181.1

Other burglary

89

56.2

188.8

Robbery

120

45.0

164.2

Theft

86

26.7

112.8

2 years to less than 4 years

Violence

383

23.5

62.9

Sexual

241

27.3

1

Sexual (child)

113

5.3

29.7

Domestic burglary

301

44.5

165.8

Other burglary

243

230.2

2155.8

Robbery

299

32.8

112.7

Theft

238

210.5

234.2

4 years and over

Violence

285

16.1

61.8

Sexual

245

28.9

226.7

Sexual (child)

133

6.8

214.3

Domestic burglary

70

37.1

132.9

Other burglary

1

1

1

Robbery

217

29.0

97.7

Theft

1

1

1

1 Data removed as extremely low numbers (less than or equal to 10 offenders or 10 offences) make the data unreliable for interpretation. 2 Greater than 10 and less than 50 offenders or offences—treat the data with caution.

Further information on the one-year rates of reoffending can be found at:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/reoffendingofadults.htm

Young Offenders: Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the answer of 10 June 2009, Official Report, column 894W, on young offenders: education, how much the Youth Justice Board was allocated for expenditure on education in each year since 1999. (280235)

Funding was not allocated in 1999-2000, as 2000-01 was the first year in which the Government provided funding to the Youth Justice Board for expenditure on education.

The following table therefore shows for each year from 2000-01 to 2008-09, (A) the total funding which the YJB has allocated for expenditure on education from its Ministry of Justice (and previously Home Office) grant; and, (B) the amount of DCSF (previously DFES and DFEE) funding allocated to the YJB for education expenditure.

£ million

Financial year

MoJ/HO funding allocated for expenditure on education by the YJB

DCSF/DFES/DFEE funding allocated to the YJB for expenditure on education

2000-01

12

5

2001-02

14

10

2002-03

16

10

2003-04

18

12

2004-05

18

15

2005-06

21

19

2006-07

22

22

2007-08

24

22

2008-09

26

23

Home Department

Antisocial Behaviour Orders

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Romsey of 11 May 2009, Official Report, column 519W, on anti-social behaviour orders, on what date data for anti-social behaviour orders 2007 will be published. (279621)

The publication date for the antisocial behaviour order (ASBO) 2007 data has yet to be confirmed.

Bail

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department on how many occasions pre-charge bail conditions were imposed by the police in (a) 2006, (b) 2007, (c) 2008 and (d) 2009; in how many cases the subject of the conditions applied to the police for variation of the conditions in each of those years; how many such applications were unsuccessful; in how many of those cases the subject of the conditions appealed to a magistrates' court; and in how many such cases the bail conditions were (i) varied and (ii) overturned. (279745)

Departmental Contracts

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 24 March 2009, Official Report, columns 289-90W, on departmental contracts, what the (a) purpose and (b) cost of the contracts awarded to each of the other organisations and bodies including named individuals was in (i) 2007-08 and (ii) 2008-09. (269250)

The tables, based on centrally held management information, provide the (a) purpose and (b) cost of research contracts let by the Research, Development and Statistics group within the Home Office, awarded to organisations and bodies not funded by the higher education funding councils in 2007-08 and 2008-09. This includes contracts awarded to individuals who, whilst employed by an institute supported by the higher education funding councils, undertake work in a private capacity. The purpose is taken from the project title held centrally. The values of contracts are classified in the year the contracts were let; some of the costs for the contract would be for future years, as in the case of the largest contract listed—the £15 million for the British Crime Survey of which the majority of costs will be spread over three years. The costs of each contract represent the estimated cost at the time the contract was let and not on the actual costs incurred.

Table 1: Contracts awarded by the Research, Development and Statistics group within the Home Office to organisations and bodies, including named individuals, not funded by higher education councils in 2007-08

Organisation

Title of project

Cost (£)

Analytica

Analysis of IPCC and Biometrics Registration Code of Practice Consultations

59,000

BMRB

British Crime Survey

15 million

Dr. F. MacDonald

Fish Welfare (Animal Procedures Committee)

<10,000

Dr. Ronald Clarke

I-phones—research on he impact that the launch of the i-phone on crime levels and patterns in the USA

<10,000

Eurasylum

The use and effectiveness of automated passenger border entry and exit systems: learning from experiences in other countries to inform BIA’s automated clearance strategy

90,000

Evidence Led Solutions

Neighbourhood Policing—BCU Process Evaluation; and, A worked anonymised example of a strategic assessment

<10,000

Garry Robbins

Quality Assurance of the Missing Data

<10,000

Geoff Berry Associates

Neighbourhood Policing—BCU Process Evaluation

<10,000

HVR Consulting

Quality Assure the Crime Reduction Modelling Methodology

15,000

ICPR, Kings College

Evaluation of the Licensing Act 2003

<10,000

Independent Social Research

Evaluation of neighbourhood policing: the experience of black and minority ethnic residents in the first year of implementation

11,000

Institute for Employment Studies

Understanding the perspective of potential sponsors on Points Based System (PBS) sponsorship arrangement

21,000

Ipsos MORI

Exploration of Regional Variation in Uptake of Powers used to Tackle Anti-Social Behaviour

40,000

Mark Underhill

Consultancy Services to Home Office Forensic Science Regulation Unit

80,000

Matrix

Protective Service Evaluation (2 projects); and, Routes of Trafficking

489,000

Morgan Harris Burrows

Neighbourhood Policing—BCU Process Evaluation

<10,000

MVA Consultancy

Analysis of IPCC and Biometrics Registration Code of Practice Consultations

90,000

NatCen

Extension of Use of FIP System; and, Evaluation of Intensive Family Intervention Projects

47,000

ORC International

Home Office Staff Survey

67,000

Perpetuity Research and Consultancy

TGAP—research on a variety of projects and interventions to tackle gangs and gang related crime.

50,000

Professor Anthony Culyer

Economic Strategy Panel

<10,000

Professor C. Dustmann

Economic Strategy Panel

<10,000

Professor C. Godfrey

Economic Strategy Panel

<10,000

Professor C. Hale

Economic Strategy Panel

<10,000

Professor Clive Smee

Economic Strategy Panel

<10,000

Professor M. Waterson

Economic Strategy Panel

<10,000

Professor R. Vickerman

Economic Strategy Panel

<10,000

Professor S. Machin

Economic Strategy Panel

<10,000

Professor S. Pudney

Economic Strategy Panel

<10,000

RED Scientific

Big Picture Plant—Whole System Modelling

20,000

Risk Solutions

An Evaluation of Alcohol Arrest Referral Schemes

150,000

Robert Bramley

Expert advisor to the Forensic Science Regulator Unit

13,000

Transparency Research Ltd.

Voluntary Assisted Return and Reintegration Programme (VARRP): a process and impact assessment

70,000

York Consulting

A review of theoretical and practical issues in the conceptualisation and measurement of labour shortages, skill shortages and skills gaps

15,000

Table 2. Contracts awarded by the Research, Development and Statistics group within the Home Office to organisations and bodies, including named individuals, not funded by higher education councils in 2008-09

Organisation

Purpose (title of project)

Cost)

Alex Hirschfield

Regional Team Advisors to the Regional Research and Analysis Team

<10,000

Evidence Led Solutions

Regional Team Advisors to the Regional Research and Analysis Team (RRAP) and Senior Advisor Extension

<10,000

Geoff Berry

Regional Team Advisors to the Regional Research and Analysis Team

<10,000

Ipsos MORI

Neighbourhood Policing—Phase 2 (2 projects); The migrant survey: a feasibility study; and, Business Crime Survey scoping exercise: Methodological work to consider the scope and feasibility of developing a new survey to measure commercial victimisation.

229,000

Julia Wickson

Regional Team Advisors to the Regional Research and Analysis Team

<10,000

Mike Maguire

Regional Team Advisors to the Regional Research and Analysis Team

<10,000

Morgan Harris Burrows

Regional Team Advisors to the Regional Research and Analysis Team

<10,000

ORC International

2007 Staff Survey (Amendment 2)

64,000

UCL Consultants

Senior Advisor Extension

<10,000

Energy Supply: Security

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what work the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure (a) has undertaken and (b) plans to undertake in relation to the energy sector. (280351)

The Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure (CPNI) is the Government authority that provides protective security advice to owners and operators across the national infrastructure.

CPNI works closely with the national infrastructure organisations within the energy sector, in conjunction with the sector sponsor department, in order to identify vulnerabilities and help improve protection against national security threats. This includes delivery of an extensive programme of security enhancements at critical energy sites working with operators such as National Grid.

For reasons of national security it would not be appropriate to disclose details of work carried out on such programmes.

Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what reports he has received of allegations that a British resident, Mrs Balasingham, was involved in terrorist activities on behalf of the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam. (280682)

We are aware that allegations have been made against a British resident of involvement with the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam. The investigation and prosecution of such allegations are operational matters for, respectively, the police and the Crown Prosecution Service.

Offenders: Deportation

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what his policy is on the automatic deportation of foreign prisoners convicted of (a) illegal gun possession and (b) drug dealing. (279616)

We are targeting the most harmful first. We have met the Prime Minister’s commitment to remove those that come to the UK and use guns or sell drugs. All Foreign Nationals who are sentenced to 12 months or more for offences relating to violence, sex or drugs are considered for deportation by UKBA. Foreign criminals from outside the EEA found guilty of serious drug and gun offences who receive a custodial sentence will also now be considered for deportation, regardless of length of sentence. Non-EEA nationals sentenced to 12 months or more will now be automatically considered for deportation.

Police: Greater Manchester

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the policing pledge in Greater Manchester. (279774)

It is for individual police forces and authorities to drive implementation of the Policing Pledge and assess its benefits for the public in their area. The Government will hold forces to account for progress through the single top-down targets we have set them to improve public confidence that crime and antisocial behaviour issues are being tackled locally, and in the light of inspection work by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC).

HMIC are currently assessing the progress that each police force in England and Wales is making on delivering the Policing Pledge. They published a report on their early findings from an initial scoping of seven forces on 9 June. The more detailed inspections of the Pledge commenced on 14 April and will conclude by 31 October 2009.

Terrorism

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 7 May 2009, Official Report, column 373W, on terrorism, how many people have been trained under Project Argus; and what the cost of the Project has been to date. (278446)

The police National Counter Terrorism Security Office (NaCTSO) advise that over 900 Project Argus events have been held since January 2007 with attendance at each event falling in the range 20 to 120. NaCTSO estimate that the cost of developing the various versions of Project Argus to date is about £380,000. Project Argus events are generally hosted by the business which requested it, and are delivered by police Counter Terrorism Security Advisers (CTSAs) who also perform other protective security functions.

United Kingdom Human Trafficking Centre

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) children and (b) women over 18 years of age have been referred to the United Kingdom Human Trafficking Centre since the introduction of the national referral mechanism. (277123)

As at the end of April there have been a total of 35 referrals to the competent authorities based in UKHTC and UKBA. Of these 27 were female with nine referrals being of people under the age of 18.

Vetting

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) whether national guidance has been issued to police forces on information which should be included in Criminal Records Bureau disclosures; (279867)

(2) what criteria are used by police forces in deciding whether to (a) include and (b) exclude information in relation to a Criminal Records Bureau disclosure.

Section 114 B (4) of Part V of the Police Act 1997 requires that in addition to criminal record information from the Police National Computer (PNC), Enhanced Disclosures should include any other information which a chief police officer considers might be relevant to the job application in question.

This is usually non-conviction information deriving from local force records and is referred to as ‘approved information'; chief officers are obliged to provide such information for Enhanced Disclosures under the Act. Where disclosed, information of this nature is considered by the police to represent a factual record of previous events that an employer in the most sensitive type of occupation should be aware of in making an employment decision affecting the most vulnerable groups of people.

Factors that would be taken into consideration when making decisions to disclose would include, but not be restricted to, the position the individual is currently applying for, the age of the information, whether the information might be directly relevant to the assessment of the person's suitability to work with children and whether it is reasonable to disclose the information, bearing in mind the human rights of the individuals concerned.

In making such assessments, the chief officers follow guidelines including, Home Office circular 5 / 2005— “Criminal Records Bureau: Local Checks by Police Forces for the Purpose of Enhanced Disclosure” and this has been augmented by a process known as the Quality Assurance Framework. The circular makes clear that consideration has been given to a person's right to privacy under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights. In this regard there is a section in the circular which details what factors should be considered in determining relevancy.

The Quality Assurance Framework (QAF) is a standardised approach to processing local intelligence information relating to a Disclosure application held by Police Force Disclosure Units. QAF provides a step-by-step process framework that ensures that information is considered consistently and in the same way every time. searches performed on local systems using the QAF Framework and document set produce an audit trail that can be used for quality assurance and to assure QAF compliance.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) disclosures were issued for those (a) working with children, (b) applying for an alcohol licence, (c) applying to work as a licensed minicab driver, (d) working with vulnerable adults and (e) subject to a CRB check for another reason in each police force area in each of the last 10 years; (279869)

(2) how many Criminal Records Bureau disclosures were issued in each police force area in each of the last 10 years.