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NHS Trusts: Mental Health

Volume 495: debated on Wednesday 1 July 2009

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what (a) funding and (b) facilities his Department has provided to NHS trusts for the treatment of patients with bipolar disorder in the last 12 months; (282905)

(2) how many people have been diagnosed with bi-polar disorder in (a) England, (b) the North East, (c) Teesside and (d) Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland constituency in the last 10 years.

Decisions about the funding and provision of local services, including those for bi-polar disorder are for local national health service trusts.

Since 2001-02, real terms investment in adult mental health services increased by 44 per cent. (or £1.7 billion) putting in place the services and staff needed to transform mental health services. The national health service spent £5.53 billion on these services in 2007-08 (£3.844 billion in 2001-02).

Information on the number of people diagnosed with bi-polar disorder in England is not collected centrally.

The following table shows counts of finished consultant episodes for the period 1998-99 to 2007-08 for selected strategic health authorities in the north east and England as a whole for national health service hospitals and national health service commissioned activity in the independent sector where the primary diagnosis was bipolar affective disorder.

Counts of finished consultant episodes (FCEs) where primary diagnosis was bipolar affective disorder (ICD-10 Code= F31): Activity in English national health service hospitals and English national health service commissioned activity in the independent sector. Data years 1998-99 to 2007-08

Selected strategic health authorities

England

1998-991

865

12,767

1999-20001

675

12,980

2000-011

652

12,996

2001-021

842

13,727

2002-031

617

14,422

2003-041

844

13,839

2004-051

765

14,179

2005-061

658

12,993

2006-072

860

12,871

2007-082

324

12,716

Notes:

Finished Consultant Episode (FCE)

A finished consultant episode (FCE) is defined as a continuous period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one health care provider, FCEs are counted against the year in which they end. The figures do not represent the number of different patients, as a person may have more than one episode of care within the same stay in hospital or in different stays in the same year.

Selected strategic health authorities (SHAs)

1 Counts for SHAs include patients whose SHA of residence was Northumberland, Tyne and Wear Strategic HA and County Durham and Tees Valley Strategic HA for each year between 1998-99 and 2005-06.

2 Counts for SHAs include patients whose SHA of residence was North East Strategic HA for each year between 2006-07 and 2007-08.

Primary care trust (PCT)/SHA data quality

PCT and SHA data was added to historic data years in the HES database using 2002-03 boundaries, as a one-off exercise in 2004. The quality of the data on PCT of treatment and SHA of treatment is poor in 1996-97, 1997-98 and 1998-99, with over a third of all finished episodes having missing values in these years. Data quality of PCT of general practitioner (GP) practice and SHA of GP practice in 1997-98 and 1998-99 is also poor, with a high proportion missing values where practices changed or ceased to exist. There is less change in completeness of the residence-based fields over time, where the majority of unknown values are due to missing postcodes on birth episodes. Users of time series analysis including these years need to be aware of these issues in their interpretation of the data.

Data quality

Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) are compiled from data sent by more than 300 national health service trusts and PCTs in England. Data are also received from a number of independent sector organisations for activity commissioned by the English national health service. The National Health Service Information Centre for health and social care liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data via HES processes. While this brings about improvement over time, some shortcomings remain.

Assessing growth through time

HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. The quality and coverage of the data have improved over time. These improvements in information submitted by the national health service have been particularly marked in the earlier years and need to be borne in mind when analysing time series.

Some of the increase in figures for later years (particularly 2006-07 onwards) may be due to the improvement in the coverage of independent sector activity.

Changes in national health service practice also need to be borne in mind when analysing time series. For example, a number of procedures may now be undertaken in outpatient settings and may no longer be accounted for in the HES data. This may account for any reductions in activity over time.

Source:

Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), The National Health Service Information Centre for health and social care