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Written Answers

Volume 496: debated on Tuesday 1 September 2009

Written Answers to Questions

The following Justice answers were received for publication on Monday 20 July 2009

Justice

Youth Justice Board: Consultants

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many consultants the Youth Justice Board has employed in each financial year since 2003-04; and how many such consultants were paid (a) between £10,000 and £100,000, (b) between £100,000 and £200,000, (c) between £200,000 and £300,000 and (d) over £300,000 in each such year. (282003)

The Youth Justice Board does not normally hire individual “consultants”. If consultancy services are required for normal youth justice business, specific companies are procured to carry out defined pieces of work. The consultancy firm then decides how many staff they employ to deliver the work and the appropriate pay rates.

However, in specific specialist circumstances the YJB procure the services of named consultants to represent the YJB's interests in specialist matters, and to manage the delivery of specialist work, such as ICT. The table below shows the number of such consultants providing services to the YJB, per year and per amount received by these individuals.

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

£10-100,000

27

27

16

28

69

59

£100-200,000

0

1

2

7

21

21

£200-300,000

0

0

1

1

1

1

£300,000+

0

0

0

0

0

1

Aylesbury Young Offender Institution

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many boys have been physically restrained in Aylesbury Young Offender Institution in each month since January 2009; and whether injuries were sustained by the young offender in each case. (286869)

Restraint is only ever to be used by staff as a last resort, when all other approaches have either not succeeded or would not be appropriate.

Because of violent and sometimes dangerous behaviour, there are occasions on which use of physical restraint is unavoidable. We must consider the interests and safety of everyone in the establishment—other young people, staff and visitors—as well as that of the young person whose behaviour is causing problems.

The number of incidents of control and restraint, together with the number and type of injuries sustained as a result, are set out in the table. The figures have been provided from records held at the establishment.

Number of C and R incidents

Number of injuries as a result of C and R

January

12

1

February

22

1

March

29

1

April

23

2

May

22

5

June

17

0

Total

125

10

Complaints

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many complaints the Office for Legal Complaints dealt with in the last 12 months. (287187)

The Office for Legal Complaints has not considered any complaints in the past 12 months, as it is not as yet fully operational. Under current plans, this is expected to take place later in 2010. Until that time, complaints about the legal profession will continue to be handled by the professional bodies in the first instance with the Office of the Legal Services Ombudsman providing an appeal mechanism.

Convictions: Young Offenders

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) 10 to 12, (b) 13 to 15, (c) 16 to 17 and (d) 18 to 21-year-olds were (i) convicted and (ii) issued with a caution for all offences in each police force area in each year since 1997. (286611)

The number of persons found guilty at all courts and issued with a caution for all offences in England and Wales, by age group and police force area, 1997 to 2007 (latest available) are shown in tables that have been placed in the House Library.

From 1 June 2000 the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 came into force nationally and removed the use of cautions for persons under 18 and replaced them with reprimands and warnings. These data are included in tables 5 to 8.

The Government’s strategy and reforms on youth crime are working; the latest National Statistics on juvenile reoffending show that the level of juvenile reoffending is at its lowest since records for the frequency of reoffending began in 2000, with the juvenile reoffending rate down by almost a quarter between 2000 and 2007.

Cautions and court proceedings data for 2008 will be available in the autumn of 2009.

Departmental Contracts

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many facilities management contracts have been let by his Department in each of the last 12 years. (288374)

The Ministry of Justice (MoJ) was formed in May 2007 by merging the National Offender Management Service from the Home Office with the Department of Constitutional Affairs and the Office of Criminal Justice Reform. Data in respect of the number of facilities management contracts were not therefore held centrally prior to this time, and were not subsequently held centrally prior to June 2009.

However, a data collection exercise which concluded in June 2009 has determined that a total of 227 contracts for managed, hard and soft facilities management services are in existence across the MoJ.

Departmental Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice with reference to the answer of 26 November 2008, Official Report, column 1662W, on departmental manpower, how many (a) special advisers and (b) press officers were employed by his Department in (i) 2007-08 and (ii) 2008-09. (285321)

The Ministry of Justice (MoJ) was formed in May 2007. The number of press officers employed by the MoJ in 2007-08 (as at 31 March 2008) was 33. The number employed in 2008-09 (as at 31 March 2009) was 40. This includes a member of staff on maternity leave. The MoJ press office operates 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, dealing with all media relations for the department and the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) from the international, national and regional media. The MoJ is one of the largest Departments in Government. It is right that the public know and understand the work of the MoJ and its agencies and how taxpayers' money is being spent. Communications, including the work of the press office, is an important element of this. The rise in the number of press officers is attributable to the need to increase the capability of the press office to deal with the expanded remit of the work undertaken by the MoJ, compared to its previous incarnations, and to fill vacancies.

Between April 2007 and July 2007, two special advisers were employed. These changed with the change of Secretary of State, so that between August 2007 and March 2008, two different special advisers were employed. The same two continued to be employed throughout 2008-09 and remain in post.

Departmental Security

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many breaches of security have been reported at (a) HM Courts Service, (b) the Land Registry, (c) the National Offender Management Service, (d) the National Archives, (e) the Office of the Public Guardian and (f) the Tribunals Service in the last five years; and what procedures each agency follows when a breach of security involves the disclosure of personal data. (276954)

Ministry of Justice (MOJ) records as incidents any breach of security rules or events that have resulted in or had the potential to result in the loss of, damage to or harm to assets. The total number of centrally recorded security breaches/incidents occurring within the last five reporting years for the agencies/offices requested are broken down as follows:

2008-09

2007-08

2006-07

2005-06

2004-05

HM Courts Service

744

940

1,010

641

295

Land Registry

77

82

76

92

77

National Offender Management Service

8,538

8,800

8,621

8,740

8,419

National Archives

0

0

1

1

1

Office of the Public Guardian

3

0

0

0

0

Tribunals Service

224

215

164

1

1

1 Agency not created.

98 per cent. of the incidents occurred in prisons and courts. This needs to be put into the context of the challenges faced with work in the high-risk prison environment.

The Ministry of Justice is applying the Government’s Security Policy Framework to effectively, efficiently and reliably control risks across its organisation.

This comprises the requirement for all areas to apply procedures for reporting security incidents robustly, including the identification and investigation of the departure, however minor, from all security procedures.

The outcome is an evidently effective security management regime which in 2008-09 saw the lowest number of escapes from prisons to date; abscond performance is good and improving.

Where incidents involve the inadvertent disclosure of personal data these include the requirement to involve managers and Senior Civil Servants within an hour of any potential disclosure being identified. The circumstances surrounding each potential incident are investigated and where appropriate disciplinary action is taken.

These figures differ from those provided by me in a written answer to the hon. Member for Beaconsfield (Mr. Grieve) on 29 April 2009, Official Report, columns 1327-28W. I will be writing to the hon. Member for Beaconsfield and will issue a corrected answer to be printed in the Official Report.

The figures in this answer include an additional 4,507 security incidents/breaches relating to operational breaches of security in prison establishments. These mostly relate to the smuggling of drugs into prisons.

Drugs misuse as measured by random mandatory drug testing has decreased by 63 per cent. since 1996-97, principally as a result of an effective offender management and prisoner support regime, combined with prison governors deploying a comprehensive range of robust security measures to detect contraband and prevent its importation into prisons.

Director of Offender Management

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice when he expects the appointment of the Director of Offender Management in each region in England and Wales to be complete. (286582)

Appointments were made in eight of the nine regions in England and the one in Wales. The successful candidates took up post in late March and during April 2009.

There is currently an interim appointment in place in the north east. This post is due to be advertised in September with a view to filling it substantively by the end of the calendar year.

Drugs: Prisons

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what quantity of drugs of each type has been confiscated from prisoners in each prison in each of the last five years; and if he will make a statement. (286491)

To compile the data requested requires a lengthy and detailed interrogation of a National Offender Management Service (NOMS) database such that to answer this question would exceed the cost limit.

NOMS is currently part-way through the roll-out of Prison-NOMS Information System and this is due to be completed in 2010. Although this new system will not be updated with old data, any new drugs incidents in prisons will be entered onto it, meaning requests for information such as this will in future be possible to answer within the cost limit and with relative ease.

Fraud: Forgery

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people have been (a) investigated, (b) cautioned, (c) tried and (d) convicted for offences relating to fraud and forgery in each year since 1997. (286981)

The number of persons cautioned, proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts, for offences relating to fraud and forgery, in England and Wales, 1997 to 2007 (latest available) is shown in the table.

The cautions statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been cautioned for two or more offences at the same time the principal offence is the more serious offence.

Proceeded against and found guilty data are on the principal offence basis. The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offence for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences, the offence selected is the one for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

Information on the number of people who have been investigated for offences relating to fraud and forgery is not held by my Department.

Court proceedings data for 2008 will be available in the autumn of 2009.

The number of persons cautioned, proceeded against at magistrates' courts and found guilty at all courts, for selected offences relating to fraud and forgery in England and Wales, 1997 to 20071,2,3,4,5,6

Cautioned

Proceeded against

Found guilty

1997

7,156

24,114

17,006

1998

7,401

27,418

19,753

1999

7,204

28,434

20,303

2000

6,180

26,881

19,222

2001

5,764

25,764

18,282

2002

5,335

25,014

18,141

2003

5,484

24,739

18,019

2004

6,033

23,552

18,140

2005

6,936

23,110

18,449

2006

8,024

22,705

18,186

2007

8,587

24,170

19,932

1 The offence group of Fraud and Forgery includes ‘Indictable only’ and ‘triable-either way offences’, it does not include summary offences. ‘Indictable only’ are the most serious breaches of the criminal law and must be dealt with at the Crown Court. ‘Triable-either-way offences’ may be tried at either the Crown Court or at magistrates courts.

2 From 1 June 2000 the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 came into force nationally and removed the use of cautions for persons under 18 and replaced them with reprimands and final warnings. These figures have been included in the totals.

3 The cautions statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been cautioned for two or more offences at the same time the principal offence is the more serious offence.

4 Fraud and Forgery includes the following offence classes:

Fraud by Company Director etc.

False Accounting

Other Fraud

Bankruptcy Offence

Forgery etc. of Drug Prescription

Other Forgery etc.

5 The statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences the principal offence is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

6 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces (police forces only for cautions though). As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source:

OCJR—E&A: Office for Criminal Justice Reform—Evidence and Analysis Unit, Ministry of Justice

Grants

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many grants have been made by the Office for Criminal Justice Reform in the last 12 months; and what the total amount of those grants is. (287130)

During 2008-09, OCJR made 174 grants totalling £49.9 million. Of this, £37.0 million was funding to Victim Support for nationwide services to victims and witnesses.

National Offender Management Service

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to paragraph 9.21 of the UK Strategy for Countering International Terrorism, Cm 7457, how many Muslim chaplains have received training from the National Offender Management Service (NOMS); where they are based; what estimate he has made of the size of the population they serve; what other NOMS staff have received further such training; where they are based; and at what cost to his Department the training has been provided. (286111)

As part of the National Offender Management Service's programme of work to address the risks associated with violent extremism and radicalisation, a series of briefings, written material, and training events have been delivered at both national and local level to a range of operational and non-operational staff working across prisons and probation, including Muslim chaplains. At present, there is no single central point for management information relating to training for staff across NOMS. Given the range of people employed directly by NOMS in public service prisons and in national and regional offices, as well as those employed directly by probation areas and trusts, obtaining information on associated costs to the Ministry of Justice would involve identifying and contacting sources across numerous locations and prove disproportionately expensive.

Muslim chaplains, working as part of the prison's chaplaincy team, work with the entirety of the prison population, including staff, not just with Muslim prisoners, although figures show that as of March 2009 the Muslim population of the prisons estate stood at 9,930.

National Offender Management Service: Consultants

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much the National Offender Management Service spent on consultants in financial year 2008-09; and how much was spent on consultants specifically for training and development purposes. (278560)

Expenditure on external consultants by the National Offender Management Service in the financial year 2007-08 (latest available figures) was £6.9 million of which £3.5 million relates to HM Prison Service.

The information requested for how much was spent on consultants specifically for training and development purposes is not held centrally and would involve a manual trawl of each unit responsible for this work at a disproportionate cost.

National Offender Management Service: Expenditure

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the outturn expenditure on (a) the National Offender Management Service Head Office and (b) the Probation Service was in (i) 2007-08 and (ii) 2008-09. (282855)

The information requested is set out as follows:

Financial year 2007-08

National Offender Management Service headquarters

The Resource outturn expenditure for the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) headquarters in 2007-08 as published in the Ministry of Justice Resource Accounts was £1,114 million.

Although the expenditure heading in the published accounts is called NOMS headquarters, the £1,114 million expenditure does not solely represent the administration costs of running NOMS headquarters. The figures in the following table show that the majority of the expenditure related to centrally managed front line services, including electronic monitoring, prisoner escort services and prison and probation property. Other services at the centre of NOMS such as the prison and probation ombudsman, HM Inspector of Prisons and Public Protection are directly related to front line services.

NOMS headquarters expenditure for 2007-08

£ million

Administration costs

76

Prison and probation property, estates and capacity planning

557

Electronic monitoring

84

Prisoner escort services (including Operation Safeguard)

212

Other programme expenditure

185

Total resource expenditure

1,114

The administration costs of running NOMS headquarters in 2007-08 were £76 million; or £151 million if HM Prison Service's administration costs are included. This is 1.6 per cent. or 3.2 per cent. respectively of the total NOMS resource expenditure.

The £557 million expenditure on prison and probation property, estates and capacity planning relates to costs associated with the custodial and probation estate including: capital charges; estate management including major maintenance; and, where applicable, rent, rates, insurance and utilities.

The Probation Service

The resource outturn expenditure for the Probation Service in 2007-08 was £845 million as published in the National Probation Service Consolidated Accounts 2007-08.

Financial Year 2008-09

The information cannot be provided because the National Offender Management Service Agency Resource Accounts for 2008-09, and the National Probation Service Consolidated Accounts for 2008-09, have not yet been finalised and audited by the National Audit Office prior to their sign-off by the agency's director general.

Police

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what reports he has received of allegations of the systematic gathering of information by the States of Jersey police on elected members of the States of Jersey. (286124)

I have received updates about the allegations referred to. This is currently a matter under investigation by the Wiltshire Constabulary at the request of the Government of Jersey. It would not be appropriate for me to comment further at this time.

Political Parties

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what discussions he has had with HM Revenue and Customs on the implementation of the new provisions in the Political Parties and Elections Bill on non-resident donors. (288089)

Officials from my Department have had a number of discussions with officials from HM Revenue and Customs on the taxation status provisions in the Political Parties and Elections Bill.

My officials will continue discussions with HM Revenue and Customs, political parties and the Electoral Commission on implementation issues prior to bringing the new restriction into force.

Prison Accommodation

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) male and (b) female prisoners are being held on their own in cells designed for more than one prisoner. (287886)

The data requested are not held centrally and would be available only at a disproportionate cost.

Prison Service: Meat

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what guidance his Department provides to HM Prison Service on the procurement of halal meat; and whether that guidance differentiates between stunned and pre-stunned meat. (287723)

All Halal denoted products provided via national NOMS supply contracts to prison establishments are accredited by a certifying Islamic body.

There is no agreed national or international standard for Halal products. Additionally differing views in regard to interpretations of Islamic Law, in particular to stunning and mechanical slaughter issues, further compound the difficulty of fully ensuring consumer confidence among all Muslim prisoners when providing meals.

The NOMS Muslim adviser, together with some Muslim chaplains, has consulted widely on the issue of Halal meat. The work culminated in the introduction of a NOMS Halal Standard which has been agreed by senior Muslim scholars from across all the different Muslim schools of thought. It has also been acknowledged by a senior official at the English Beef and Lamb Executive (EBLEX) as an example of best practice. The Halal Standard together with comprehensive commodity specifications helps ensure that all Muslim prisoners are provided with assured, quality products. Since 1 April 2009, all Halal raw poultry products have been accredited and supplied to this new standard.

If any prisoner has any doubt about the credibility of the Halal menu option offered, despite the introduction of these standards, there is always an option to choose a vegetarian or vegan option as an alternative.

All contracted suppliers are required to comply with Food Quality Standards provided by the authority. This includes the standard for Halal, a copy of which has been placed in the House Library.

The Halal Standard states:

“the animal may be stunned, anaesthetised or otherwise rendered wholly or partially insensible before slaughter.”

Prisoners

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how long on average a prisoner spent in (a) production workshops, (b) education and (c) rehabilitation in each month in the last five years. (285262)

The average time a prisoner has spent in (a) production workshops, (b) education and (c) rehabilitation in each month in the last five years is set out in the following table.

Month

(a) Average hours per prisoner per month in workshops

(b) Average hours per prisoner per month in education

(c) Average hours per prisoner per month in rehabilitation

April 2004

2.7

6.2

1.3

May 2004

2.9

6.5

1.3

June 2004

3.2

6.9

1.4

July 2004

3.1

6.8

1.5

August 2004

3.0

6.4

1.3

September 2004

3.3

6.9

1.4

October 2004

3.2

6.9

1.4

November 2004

3.3

6.9

1.5

December 2004

2.7

6.0

1.2

January 2005

3.1

6.9

1.5

February 2005

3.1

7.0

1.5

March 2005

2.8

6.6

1.4

April 2005

2.9

6.7

1.3

May 2005

2.9

6.7

1.4

June 2005

3.2

7.1

1.6

July 2005

3.2

7.1

1.6

August 2005

3.0

6.6

1.5

September 2005

3.2

7.2

1.5

October 2005

3.1

7.0

1.5

November 2005

3.1

7.2

1.6

December 2005

2.7

6.2

1.3

January 2006

3.0

7.1

1.5

February 2006

3.1

7.3

1.5

March 2006

3.1

7.5

1.5

April 2006

2.8

6.8

1.4

May 2006

2.9

7.1

1.5

June 2006

3.0

7.3

1.6

July 2006

3.0

7.2

1.6

August 2006

2.8

6.9

1.6

September 2006

2.9

7.3

1.6

October 2006

2.9

7.2

1.6

November 2006

3.0

7.3

1.7

December 2006

2.5

6.2

1.4

January 2007

2.9

7.3

1.9

February 2007

2.9

7.3

1.7

March 2007

2.8

7.4

1.7

April 2007

2.9

6.9

0.9

May 2007

2.9

6.8

0.9

June 2007

3.2

7.5

0.9

July 2007

3.2

7.5

0.9

August 2007

2.9

6.6

0.8

September 2007

3.2

7.3

0.9

October 2007

3.1

7.3

0.9

November 2007

3.2

7.3

1.0

December 2007

2.6

6.2

0.8

January 2008

3.1

7.4

1.0

February 2008

3.1

7.4

1.0

March 2008

2.9

7.0

0.9

April 2008

3.0

7.3

0.9

May 2008

2.7

6.9

0.9

June 2008

2.9

7.4

0.9

July 2008

2.8

7.2

0.9

August 2008

2.7

6.9

0.9

September 2008

2.8

7.2

0.9

October 2008

2.8

7.3

0.9

November 2008

2.8

7.2

0.9

December 2008

2.2

6.0

0.7

January 2009

2.8

7.4

0.9

February 2009

2.7

7.3

0.9

March 2009

2.8

7.6

0.8

There is a clear drop in the level of activity from 2007-08 onwards. This is in part attributable to the existence of fewer activities following a review of the collation of data as well as their use to monitor and manage prisoner activity.

Prisoners on Remand

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many prisoners on remand in each financial year from 2005-06 to 2008-09 were found not guilty of the charges on which they were remanded to prison; and how many days on remand were served on average by such prisoners in each of those years; (285831)

(2) how many prisoners on remand in each financial year from 2005-06 to 2008-09 who were found guilty of the charges on which they were remanded to prison did not return to prison because their period on remand equalled or exceeded the terms of imprisonment that they would have been due to serve on conviction; and how many days on remand on average were served by such prisoners in each of those years.

The estimated number of defendants remanded in custody by all courts in England and Wales for the years 2005, 2006 and 2007 (latest available) who were subsequently acquitted or not proceeded against was 14,500, 12,800, and 11,400 respectively.

The estimated number of defendants remanded in custody by all courts in England and Wales for the years 2005, 2006 and 2007 (latest available) who were subsequently found guilty and sentenced to immediate custody was 41,300, 39,700 and 38,800 respectively. From information held on the Court Proceedings Database, it is not possible to determine how many of these defendants did not return to custody because they had already served their sentence on remand.

These data include those held in custody at any stage during proceedings and relate to the final outcome of the court proceedings. They are taken from the ‘Criminal Statistics, England and Wales' publications, 2005-07 which is published annually and presents data by calendar year.

Data from Offender Management Caseload Statistics indicate that during 2007 the average length of time served on remand was 55 days. This figure relates to all defendants and it is not possible to provide separate figures for those defendants who were subsequently acquitted and those subsequently found guilty.

Prisoners: Assaults

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) prisoner on prisoner and (b) prisoner on prison officer assaults have been recorded in each prison in each month of 2009 to date; and if he will make a statement. (286487)

The information requested is compiled on an annual basis.

The figures for 2009 will be available in early 2010. However, I refer the hon. Lady to the latest information covering the years 2004 to 2008 that I have placed in the Libraries of the House.

Violence in prisons is not tolerated. The National Offender Management Service is working with the police and the Crown Prosecution Service to ensure that perpetrators of violence in prisons are dealt with through the courts where is appropriate to do so.

Prisons: Drugs

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much was spent on drug testing in prisons in each financial year from 2002-03 to 2008-09. (285884)

Many prison officers responsible for the mandatory drug testing (MDT) process do not work exclusively on the testing of prisoners. The cost of MDT staff resources cannot be disaggregated from the overall prison running costs.

Probation

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the ratio of offenders to probation service staff in the Hampshire probation area was in each of the last five years. (281377)

The information requested is shown the following table. A data validation exercise is currently taking place on the area work force information for 2008.

Hampshire

2004

10.5

2005

10.1

2006

10.3

2007

10.6

Probation Officers: Essex

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) probation service officers and (b) probation officers there were in the Essex probation area in each of the last five years. (286535)

The number of probation service officers (PSOs) and probation officers (POs) in Essex probation area in each of the last five years is shown in the table.

Financial year

POs

PSOs

Total frontline

2004-05

78

168

246

2005-06

94

191

285

2006-07

90

183

273

2007-08

81

194

275

2008-09

68

205

273

The trend towards employing larger numbers of PSOs and fewer POs is one that has occurred in many counties and recognises that there are many tasks that can be undertaken by PSOs that historically were completed by POs. In Essex probation area this change was completed as part of a planned staff restructuring process and was undertaken following full consultation with the local trade unions.

Probation: West Midlands

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the average change in caseload for trained probation officers in West Mercia between 2002 and 2007 was. (282643)

The average case load per qualified probation officer was 15 orders in 2002 and 23 orders in 2007.

Prosecutions: Metals

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people have been prosecuted for offences under the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 1964 in England and Wales in each of the last five years. (288248)

The number of persons proceeded against at magistrates' courts for offences in relation to the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 1964, in England and Wales for the years 2003 to 2007 (latest available) is shown in the following table. From information held by my department it is not possible to separately identify prosecutions for specific offences detailed within the Act.

These data are on the principal offence basis. The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offence for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences, the offence selected is the one for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

Court proceedings data for 2008 will be available in the autumn of 2009.

Number of persons proceeded against at magistrates' courts, offences under the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 1964 England and Wales, 2003-071, 2

Proceeded against

2003

5

2004

5

2005

7

2006

5

2007

5

1 The statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences the principal offence is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

2 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source:

Office for Criminal Justice Reform, Evidence and Analysis Unit, Ministry of Justice

Reoffenders: Manchester

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many offenders from Greater Manchester were charged with each category of violent offence while under supervision by the Probation Service in each of the last five years. (282041)

The National Offender Management Service holds information on the number of offenders charged with serious further (violent) offences whilst under probation supervision for the years 2006-07 and 2007-08. However, this does not include all types of violent offence. The following table contains data on the number of offenders, managed by Greater Manchester probation area, who were charged with certain violent offences, where there was a requirement initially to notify the National Offender Management Service, in line with the Serious Further Offence Probation Circulars 06/2006 and 41/2006.

Notifications of serious further offence (violent offence) charges received by National Offender Management Service for 2006-07 and 2007-08. Serious Further Offence breakdown of Greater Manchester cases notified to NOMS PPU between 1 April 2006 —31 March 2008

Serious violent offence description

Initial notifications received 2006-07

Initial notifications received 2007-08

Aggravated burglary (section 10 of the Theft Act 1968)

0

6

Aggravated theft

4

5

Arson (section 1 of the Criminal Damage Act 1971)

10

9

Attempt to commit murder or a conspiracy to commit murder

7

6

Burglary with intent to (a) inflict grievous bodily harm on a person or (b) do unlawful damage to a building or anything in it. (section 9 of the Theft Act 1968)

0

2

Causing death by dangerous driving (section 1 of the Road Traffic Act 1988)

4

2

False imprisonment

3

6

Kidnapping

6

6

Manslaughter

1

0

Murder

9

6

Other offences against the person

5

2

Other serious violent offence

6

5

Possession of firearm at time of committing or being arrested for offence specified in Schedule 1 to that Act (section 17(2) of the Firearms Act 1968)

0

1

Possession of firearm with intent to endanger life (section 16 of the Firearms Act 1968)

0

1

Robbery or assault with intent to rob (section 8 of the Theft Act 1968)

0

1

Serious firearms offences (SFO)

8

22

Wounding with intent to cause grievous bodily harm (section 18 of the Offences against the Person Act 1861)

40

57

Total

103

137

Security

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many breaches of security at his Department's Petty France office were recorded in the last 12 months. (279222)

The Ministry of Justice (MoJ) records as incidents any breach of security rules or events that have resulted in or had the potential to result in the loss, damage or harm to assets.

The total number of recorded security breaches/incidents occurring in 102 Petty France (MoJ HQ) for the last reporting year was 25.

Most of these were low-level departures from security procedures by staff and none were assessed to be significant, for example not displaying their passes adequately. They were identified via enforcement activity/inspections. Remedial action was taken in all cases to address areas of non-compliance and ensure no re-occurrence.

The MoJ is applying the Government's Security Policy Framework to control risks effectively, efficiently and reliably across its organisation. This includes a regime of education and awareness for staff/contractors, robust implementation of controls to manage risks to a reasonably practicable level and a physical security monitoring/inspection and auditing regime across its HQ estate.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many breaches of security at his Department were recorded in each of the last two years. (279223)

The Ministry of Justice records as incidents any breach of security rules or events that have resulted in or had the potential to result in the loss of, damage to or harm to assets. The total number of centrally recorded security breaches/incidents occurring within the Ministry of Justice for the 2008-09 and 2007-08 reporting year is broken down as follows:

2008-09

Information

394

IT

922

Buildings/physical

4,022

Personnel

2

Operational

4,745

Other

269

Total

10,354

2007-08

Information and IT

563

Buildings/physical

1,882

Personnel

0

Operational

8,435

Other

Total

10,880

Of the total, over 80 per cent. relate to incidents involving prisons and courts. This needs to be put into the context of the challenges faced with work in the high-risk prison environment. 2008-09 saw the lowest number of escapes from prisons to date; abscond performance is good and improving.

The Ministry of Justice is applying the Government’s Security Policy Framework to control risks across its organisation.

Although, there has been a 43 per cent. increase in reported information and IT security related breaches/incidents, much of this is the result of the implementation of a robust information assurance programme. This has included the need for all areas to robustly apply procedures for reporting security incidents, including the identification and investigation of the departure, however minor, from all security procedures. The result is an evidently improving information security management system. This has seen a 70 per cent. reduction in the number or significant information security incidents/breaches between the two reporting years.

The figures above detail a 47 per cent. increase in building/physical related breaches/incidents and 87 per cent. decrease in operational security breaches between the two years. 97 per cent. of these relate to either prison or court physical security operational breaches/incidents. The split is solely attributable to the change in the way HM Prison Service have assigned breaches/incidents to classifications between the two years.

Sentencing: Foreigners

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the answer of 13 July 2009, Official Report, column 86W, on sentencing: foreigners, (1) how many of the three prisoners discharged from a mandatory life sentence were (a) handed over to the custody of the UK Border Agency and (b) transferred to approved premises; (287735)

(2) what the nationality was of each of the three prisoners discharged from a mandatory life sentence.

Of the three prisoners discharged from a mandatory life sentence, one was an Irish national, one an Indian national and one a Pakistani national. None of the offenders was subject to deportation or, therefore, taken into UK Border Agency custody. One of the three was released into approved premises; the other two were released into alternative accommodation, which had been risk-assessed by the probation service.

All three were released subject to supervision on life licence by the probation service.

There are 101 approved premises in England and Wales. Approved premises are used primarily to supervise certain high risk of harm offenders on release from custody. They provide for the kind of effective and close supervision of certain offenders which would be much more difficult to achieve if those offenders were dispersed into less suitable accommodation elsewhere in the community.

Trespassing: Agricultural Land

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many prosecutions for trespass on agricultural land (a) resulted and (b) did not result in a conviction in the last three years. (286254)

Offences related to “trespass on agricultural land” are covered by sections 61, 63, 68, and 70 of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994.

The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts in England and Wales for these offences under the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 are shown in the table.

It should be noted that offences under the aforementioned statute and appropriate sections are not solely for “trespass on agricultural land”.

The found guilty column may exceed those proceeded against, as it may be the case that the proceedings in the magistrates court took place in the preceding year and they were found guilty at the Crown court in the following year, or the defendants were found guilty of a different offence to the original offence proceeded against.

These data are on the principal offence basis. The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offence for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences, the offence selected is the one for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

Court proceedings data for 2008 will be available in the autumn of 2009.

Number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts for offences under the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 Sections 61, 63, 68, and 70, in England and Wales, 2003 to 20071,2,3

Proceeded against

Found guilty

Statute

Offence description

2005

2006

2007

2005

2006

2007

Public Order Act 1986 Part II S.14B(3) as added by Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 S.70

Inciting another to take part in a prohibited trespassory assembly

1

1

0

0

0

1

Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 S.61

Failing to leave land when directed or to return as a trespasser within three months

1

3

2

0

2

2

Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 S.63

Failing to leave land when directed or returning within 7 days of the direction (raves)

0

1

13

0

1

9

Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 S.68

Disrupting or obstructing a lawful activity or seeking to intimidate

60

36

87

39

26

69

Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 S.63 (7A) and (7B) as added by Anti-Social Behaviour Act 2003 S.58

Committing an offence knowing that a direction under S.63(2) applies and making preparations for or attending a gathering (rave) within 24 hours starting when the direction was given

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

62

41

102

39

29

81

1 The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

2 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

3 The found guilty column may exceed those proceeded against, as it may be the case that the proceedings in the magistrates court took place in the preceding year and they were found guilty at the Crown court in the following year, or the defendants were found guilty for a different offence to the original offence proceeded against.

Source:

Evidence and Analysis Unit—Office for Criminal Justice Reform, Ministry of Justice

Visas: Fraud

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many convictions for offences of fraud in relation to visa applications there were in (a) England, (b) the East of England region, (c) Essex and (d) Castle Point in each of the last 10 years. (286368)

The number of defendants found guilty at all courts in relation to visa application frauds for offences under the Immigration Act 1971 in England and Wales, the Essex police force area and the East of England Government Office Region from 1998 to 2007 (latest available) is shown in the table.

The statistics given relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. For example, when a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences the principal offence is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

Information for Scotland and Northern Ireland are matters for the Scottish Executive and the Northern Ireland Office respectively.

Information held by the Ministry of Justice on the Court Proceedings Database is not available at constituency level.

Data for 2008 will be available in the autumn 2009.

The number of defendants found guilty at all courts for selected offences under the Immigration Act 1971, by area, 1998 to 20071,2

Offence description

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

England and Wales

Person who is not a British citizen: obtaining or seeking to obtain leave to enter or remain in the UK by deception; obtaining or seeking to obtain the avoidance, postponement or revocation of enforcement action—sections 24A(1)(a), 24A(1)(b), 3

9

106

169

117

136

146

74

83

Entering the UK in breach of a deportation order—Section 24(1)(a)

4

5

2

1

7

7

7

6

7

6

Entering the UK without leave—section 24(1)(a)

7

15

14

24

36

39

24

33

63

26

Failing to observe condition of leave—section 24(1)(b)(ii)

5

5

2

8

1

2

1

1

1

Sub-total

16

25

27

139

213

165

168

186

145

115

Essex police force area

Person who is not a British citizen: obtaining or seeking to obtain leave to enter or remain in the UK by deception; obtaining or seeking to obtain the avoidance, postponement or revocation of enforcement action—sections 24A(1)(a), 24A(1)(b), 3

2

3

9

11

27

7

1

Entering the UK in breach of a deportation order – Section 24(1 )(a)

2

Entering the UK without leave—section 24(1)(a)

1

2

1

Sub-total

1

2

3

11

11

28

7

3

East of England Government Office Region

Person who is not a British citizen: obtaining or seeking to obtain leave to enter or remain in the UK by deception; obtaining or seeking to obtain the avoidance, postponement or revocation of enforcement action—sections 24A(1)(a), 24A(1)(b), 3

2

6

20

16

30

8

2

Entering the UK in breach of a deportation order—Section 24(1)(a)

2

1

2

Entering the UK without leave—section 24(1)(a)

1

3

11

2

3

Sub-total

2

1

2

10

31

16

32

11

4

1 These data are on the principal offence basis.

2 Figures given represent case that went through the courts on offences from all prosecuting departments including the police and Serious Organised Crime Agency.

Note:

Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source:

Office for Criminal Justice Reform—Evidence and Analysis Unit.

Young Offenders: Reoffenders

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what percentage of (a) 12, (b) 13, (c) 14, (d) 15, (e) 16, (f) 17, (g) 18 and (h) 19 year-olds who were released from each young offender institution in each of the last five years were reconvicted within a year of release; (282914)

(2) what percentage of (a) 12, (b) 13, (c) 14, (d) 15, (e) 16, (f) 17, (g) 18 and (h) 19 year-olds who were released from young offender institutions after serving a sentence for a non-violent offence were reconvicted within a year for a violent offence in each of the last five years.

Juvenile reoffending covers those aged 10 to 17. A release from custody could be from a Secure Training Centre, a Secure Children's Home or a Young Offender Institution. Data are not broken down by type of release establishment or by individual release establishment.

The following table shows the frequency of reoffences per 100 offenders and the actual rate of reoffending for each of the last five years for which data are available. Those aged 10 through to 15 have been banded due to the small number of offenders in each of the groups.

Juvenile actual and frequency rates per 100 offenders for custody

Age band

Number of offenders

Actual reoffending rate (%)

Frequency of reoffences (per 100 offenders)

2003

10-15

133

78.2

424.8

16

235

76.6

465.1

17

418

70.8

435.4

Total

786

73.8

442.5

2004

10-15

209

80.4

461.2

16

244

77.0

401.6

17

362

73.8

397.0

Total

815

76.4

414.8

2005

10-15

195

80.0

463.1

16

275

70.2

424.7

17

374

71.7

370.3

Total

844

73.1

409.5

2006

10-15

200

83.0

463.5

16

262

79.4

433.2

17

355

71.8

349.0

Total

817

77.0

404.0

2007

10-15

171

78.9

407.0

16

246

77.2

370.7

17

361

72.3

328.3

Total

778

75.3

359.0

The information on the re-offence of juveniles released from custody for non-violent offences is not available at this level of detail.

Reoffenders that are aged 18 and 19 are included in the adult dataset. We do not have the facility to determine those that were released from young offender institutions. Further information on adult re-offending is available at:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/docs/reoffending-adults-2007.pdf

For information on the latest juvenile re-offending statistics please consult:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/docs/reoffending-juveniles-2007.pdf

Youth Justice Board: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what methodology was used to calculate the budget of the Youth Justice Board for the provision of youth custody when the Board was formed in 1998. (287900)

The Youth Justice Board took responsibility for commissioning and purchasing places in the under 18 secure estate in 2000-01. The funding allocated to the Youth Justice Board by the Home Office was based on historical information on the cost of placing young people in custody and anticipated levels of need. YJB funding requirements are reviewed annually.

The following answers were received between Wednesday 22 July and Friday 28 August 2009

Cabinet Office

10 Downing Street: Repairs and Maintenance

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office pursuant to the answer of 5 May 2009, Official Report, column 78W, on 10 Downing Street: repairs and maintenance, how much was paid to Ecovert FM for the works carried out in August and September 2008. (287280)

Information on capital expenditure on improving Cabinet Office buildings, including the Downing Street estate for 2008-09 is included in the Resource Accounts published in the Cabinet Office Annual Report and Accounts 2008-09. Copies are available in the Library of the House.

Charities

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what guidance the Charity Commission has issued on whether registered charities may (a) register as third parties with the Electoral Commission and (b) engage in political campaigning during a regulated election period. (287264)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the Charity Commission. I have asked the Commission to reply.

Letter from Andrew Hind, dated July 2009:

As the Chief Executive of the Charity Commission, I have been asked to respond to your written Parliamentary Question on what guidance the Charity Commission has issued on whether registered charities may (a) register as third parties with the Electoral Commission, and (b) engage in political campaigning during an election period.

Charity law on campaigning and political activity is set out in our published guidance ‘Speaking Out—Guidance on Campaigning and Political Activity by Charities’ (CC9) and ‘Charities and Elections’ which are available on our website at www.charitycommission.gov.uk. This guidance makes clear that a charity can carry out campaigning and political activity as a means of furthering or supporting its charitable purpose, but that under charity law a charity must never carry out party political activity.

On part (a) of your question regarding the issue of a charity's registration as a third party with the Electoral Commission, our guidance signposts charities to the Electoral Commission and to the Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act 2000. We do not provide detailed guidance ourselves. Charities must not support or oppose any party political campaign, candidate or manifesto. Therefore we do not envisage circumstances where it would be necessary for a charity to register with the Electoral Commission as a third party. We would be concerned about any charity that was recognised in this way, and would certainly want to explore this further with them.

As to part (b), the Commission's guidance on political campaigning during an election period makes clear that the principles for a charity engaging in any campaigning or political activity continue to apply. The key principle of charity law in terms of elections is that charities must be, and be seen to be, independent from party politics. We therefore urge charities to think carefully about what activities they engage in during this period, and how they might be perceived.

We are currently in the process of arranging to meet with the Electoral Commission to discuss further the issue of third party registration. Please do not hesitate to get in touch if you have other questions. I hope this is helpful.

Civil Servants: Vacancies

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office pursuant to the answer of 20 May 2009, Official Report, column 1473W, on civil servants: vacancies (1) how many civil service jobs were advertised in the last 12 months (a) externally and (b) internally; (287283)

(2) what the job titles were of each of the vacancies in the last 12 months which were advertised on the internal gateway; and in which Department each of the vacancies was.

Further to the answer given on 17 March 2009, since civil service jobs online service went live on 25 February 2009, 4,587 vacancies in the civil service have been advertised externally on the website and 2,789 have been advertised to civil servants. Further information about these vacancies could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Cybercrime

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how much funding the Government plans to provide to protect UK IT networks from cyber attacks in 2009-10. (286994)

I have been asked to reply.

While there is no one budget for cyber security, and the Government do not provide details of the resources employed by the UK intelligence and security agencies, cyber security is a key priority and as such is appropriately resourced. A number of Government bodies contribute towards the protection of UK networks. For example: CPNI, Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure, provides advice on electronic or cyber protective security measures to the businesses and organisations that comprise the UK’s critical national infrastructure, including public utilities companies and banks CPNI also runs a CERT service which responds to reported attacks on private sector networks; and CESG, part of GCHQ, provides Government Departments with advice and guidance on how to protect against, detect and mitigate various types of cyber attack.

CESG also runs the computer emergency response team, GovCertUK, which provides warnings, alerts and assistance in resolving serious IT incidents for the public sector. In addition to this existing work, the June 2009 Cyber Security Strategy also announced the provision of additional programme funding for the development of innovative future technologies to protect UK networks; the details will be reported to Parliament in the autumn.

Departmental Billing

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what percentage of invoices to (a) the Cabinet Office and (b) the Office of the Leader of the House from suppliers her Department paid within 10 days of receipt in June 2009. (288936)

In June 2009 the Cabinet Office paid 97.4 per cent. of correctly rendered invoices within 10 days. This figure covers the whole of the Cabinet Office, including the Office of the Leader of the House of Commons.

Departmental Postal Services

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how much her Department spent on services from Royal Mail in each of the last five years. (288790)

Details of expenditure with the Royal Mail is shown in the following table:

£000

2004-05

378

2005-06

271

2006-07

168

2007-08

221

2008-09

203

Departmental Publications

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office if she will restore the Cabinet Office publication Public Bodies to its 1997 format. (250551)

The annual “Cabinet Office Public Bodies” publication provides headline information on the NDPB sector and on public appointments. Detailed information on individual NDPBs is provided by relevant sponsor departments. Following representations by my hon. Friend, links to this detailed information, together with the latest publication Public Bodies 2008, are now located on the Civil Service website at:

www.civilservice.gov.uk/about/work/codes/ndpbs.aspx

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what expenditure her Department incurred in the production of its document, Building Britain’s Future; and how many copies were printed. (286918)

1,000 copies of the main document were produced in print. In addition, 4,500 of the 15 page summary document were printed. 1,000 copies of the summary document are also being produced in Welsh. The total cost was £39,047.00 (excluding VAT).

Departmental Training

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office with reference to the answers of 3 November 2008, Official Report, column 22W, and 29 October 2008, Official Report, column 1020W, on departmental training, what personal training courses at public expense other Ministers in (a) her Department and (b) the Leader of the House’s Office have undertaken since 1 January 2008. (251320)

Training is provided to Ministers as necessary in order to carry out their duties effectively under the “Ministerial Code”.

Ministers: Gifts and Endowments

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what criteria are used to ascertain whether a Minister has received a gift or hospitality in a private capacity for the purposes of declarations under the Ministerial Code. (287250)

Guidance on the acceptance of gifts and hospitality is set out in paragraphs 7.20-7.24 of the “Ministerial Code”.

Public Appointments Unit

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office pursuant to the answer of 30 April 2009, Official Report, column 1464W, on public appointments, what financial saving was attributed to the closure of the Public Appointments Unit when it was counted as a Gershon efficiency saving; and what assessment has been made of the effect of the closure on the costs of other Government departments. (287282)

The Cabinet Office Public Appointments Unit was disbanded in July 2007 in response to recommendations arising from the 2006 Capability Review of the Cabinet Office, rather than as a result of the Gershon Review, and its responsibilities transferred elsewhere within the Department.

Costs would be available only at disproportionate cost.

Defence

Afghanistan: Peacekeeping Operations

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many rounds have been fired by British forces in each Brigade rotation in Afghanistan since Herrick 6, broken down by type of ammunition used. (232644)

Officials are collating and validating the data needed to answer this question and this is taking longer than anticipated. I will therefore write to the hon. Member when this work is complete and place a copy of my letter in the Library of the House.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the answer of 3 November 2008, Official Report, column 1518W, how many rounds of (a) 0.338 ammunition of all natures, (b) 12 bore shotgun ammunition, (c) 30 mm armoured fighting vehicle ammunition of all natures, (d) 30 mm attack helicopter ammunition of all natures and (e) 105 mm ammunition of all natures were used in Operation Herrick 7. (268012)

Officials are collating and validating the data needed and this is taking longer than anticipated. I will write to the hon. Member when this work is complete and place a copy of my letter in the Library of the House.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many rounds of (a) 51 mm and (b) 81 mm mortar ammunition of all natures were used in Operation (i) Herrick 4, (ii) Herrick 5, (iii) Herrick 6 and (iv) Herrick 7. (268210)

[holding answer 1 April 2009]: Officials are collating and validating the data needed and this is taking longer than anticipated. I will write to the hon. Member when this work is complete.

Substantive answer from Bob Ainsworth to Adam Holloway:

I am writing to provide you with the information promised in mine and my predecessor’s holding replies to your Parliamentary Questions regarding ammunition expenditure in Afghanistan on 20 April 2009 (Official Report, column 46W); 31 March 2009 (Official Report, column 1034W) and 26 November 2008 (Official Report, column 1518W).

The Ministry of Defence has recently completed a review of the data on ammunition usage required to answer this question, and has revised the manner in which we classify and present data to ensure consistency. The table below shows all ammunition expenditure for UK forces in Afghanistan from the beginning of retained records (August 2006) to the end of Operation HERRICK 9 (October 2008-April 2009), in April of this year.

You will note that, unfortunately, this review has resulted in corrections to the ammunition figures previously issued for the HERRICK 6 (April 2007-October 2007) and HERRICK 7 (October 2007-April 2008) roulements. These figures have been found to be incorrect due inconsistency of tour dates taken, inconsistency of inclusion of training rounds and a failure to include all variations of ammunition in all cases.

Ammunition type

Herrick 4 (13 August 2006-October 2006)1

Herrick 5 (October 2006-April 2007)

Herrick 6 (April 2007-October 2007)

Herrick 7 (October 2007-April 2008)

Herrick 8 (April 2008-October 2008)

Herrick 9 (October 2008-April 2009)

7.62 mm all variants

210,000

520,000

1,300,000

1,380,000

700,000

908,400

5.56 mm all variants

235,000

615,000

1,490,000

1,390,000

1,000,000

1,080,000

0.5 inch all variants

25,000

90,000

200,000

180,000

113,000

196,000

12.7 mm all variants

2,400

350

4,800

21,000

13,000

10,600

9 mm all variants

10,000

69,000

30,000

69,000

71,700

61,400

0.338 inch all variants

200

1,700

5,600

7,300

8,200

12,100

12 bore shotgun all variants

5

45

660

15,100

300

525

105 mm all variants

8,600

4,300

12,100

12,400

5,600

11,200

30 mm armd fighting veh rounds

1,200

5,000

3,600

2,800

745

4,500

30 mm Attack helicopter rounds

29,800

21,000

27,800

15,700

34,400

34,200

1 Accounting records exist only from 13 August 2006—mid Herrick 4.

Notes:

1. All tour dates are taken from the Transfer of Authority from one Brigade to the next.

2. All figures rounded to nearest 10,000, 1,000 or 100.

Ammunition expenditure is shown for the whole of Afghanistan, rather than just Helmand Province as the information is collated centrally for UK forces in Afghanistan. The data include all training rounds used and all variants of each ammunition type. They are collated by each HERRICK roulement, at the end of which the data are finalised for records.

All data shown above are data based on information derived from a number of sources and can only be an estimate, not least because of the difficulties in ensuring a consistent interpretation of the basis for collating statistics in a complex fast-moving multinational operational environment.

I hope that the above information addresses your concerns on this matter.

I will place a copy of this letter in the Library of the House.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many rounds of ammunition have been discharged by British forces in Afghanistan in each rotation since 2006. (251707)

Officials are collating and validating the data needed and this is taking longer than anticipated. I will write to the hon. Member when this work is complete and place a copy of my letter in the Library of the House.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many rounds of ammunition have been discharged in Helmand province by British forces in each roulement since June 2006, broken down by ammunition type. (257687)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 11 February 2009, Official Report, column 1993W.

Substantive answer from Bob Ainsworth to Liam Fox:

I am writing to provide you with the information promised in my predecessor's holding reply to your Parliamentary Questions regarding ammunition expenditure in Afghanistan on 11 February 2009, (Official Report, column 1992W), and 26 February 2009, (Official Report, column 1050W).

The Ministry of Defence has recently completed a review of the data on ammunition usage required to answer this question, and has revised the manner in which we classify and present data to ensure consistency. The table below shows all ammunition expenditure for UK forces in Afghanistan from the beginning of retained records (August 2006) to the end of Operation HERRICK 9 (October 2008- April 2009), in April of this year.

You will note that, unfortunately, this review has resulted in corrections to the ammunition figures previously issued for the HERRICK 6 (April 2007 - October 2007) and HERRICK 7 (October 2007 - April 2008) roulements. These figures have been found to be incorrect due inconsistency of tour dates taken, inconsistency of inclusion of training rounds and a failure to include all variations of ammunition in all cases.

Ammunition type

HERRICK 4 (13 August 2006 - October 2006)1

HERRICK 5 (October 2006 - April 2007)

HERRICK 6 (April 2007 -October 2007)

HERRICK 7 (October 2007 - April 2008)

HERRICK 8 (April 2008 - October 2008)

HERRICK 9 (October 2008 - April 2009)

7.62mm all variants

210,000

520,000

1,300,000

1,380,000

700,000

908,400

5.56mm all variants

235,000

615,000

1,490,000

1,390,000

1,000,000

1,080,000

0.5 inch all variants

25,000

90,000

200,000

180,000

113,000

196,000

12.7mm all variants

2,400

350

4,800

21,000

13,000

10,600

9mm all variants

10,000

69,000

30,000

69,000

71,700

61,400

0.338 inch all variants

200

1,700

5,600

7,300

8,200

12,100

12 bore shotgun all variants

5

45

660

15,100

300

525

105mm all variants

8,600

4,300

12,100

12,400

5,600

11,200

30mm armd fighting veh rounds

1,200

5,000

3,600

2,800

745

4,500

30mm Attack helicopter rounds

29,800

21,000

27,800

15,700

34,400

34,200

1 Accounting records exist only from 13 August 2006 - mid HERRICK 4

Notes:

All tour dates are taken from the Transfer of Authority from one Brigade to the next.

All figures rounded to nearest 10,000, 1000 or 100.

Ammunition expenditure is shown for the whole of Afghanistan, rather than just Helmand Province as the information is collated centrally for UK forces in Afghanistan. The data include all training rounds used and all variants of each ammunition type. They are collated by each HERRICK roulement, at the end of which the data are finalised for records.

All data shown above is data based on information derived from a number of sources and can only be an estimate, not least because of the difficulties in ensuring a consistent interpretation of the basis for collating statistics in a complex fast-moving multinational operational environment.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what estimate his Department has made of the number of shots fired by UK armed forces in Helmand province since 2006. (273309)

Officials are collating and validating the data needed and this is taking longer than anticipated. I will write to the right hon. Member when this work is complete and place a copy of my letter in the Library of the House.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what estimate he has made of the number of shots fired by the armed forces in Helmand province in (a) 2006 and (b) 2007; and how many shots were fired in the latest period for which figures are available. (249208)

Officials are collating and validating the data needed and this is taking longer than anticipated. I will write to the hon. Member when this work is complete and place a copy of my letter in the Library of the House.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many rounds of ammunition were fired by UK armed forces in Afghanistan in 2007-08. (235233)

Officials are collating and validating the data needed to answer this question and this is taking longer than anticipated. I will therefore write to the hon. Members when this work is complete and place a copy of my letter in the Library of the House.

Substantive answer from Bob Ainsworth to Michael Ancram:

I am writing to provide you with the information promised in mine and my predecessor's holding replies to your Parliamentary Questions regarding ammunition expenditure in Afghanistan on 11 February 2009 (Official Report, cols 1992-1993W), 11 May 2009 (Official Report, col 605W) and 26 November 2008 (Official Report, col 1518W).

The Ministry of Defence has recently completed a review of the data on ammunition usage required to answer this question, and has revised the manner in which we classify and present data to ensure consistency. The table below shows all ammunition expenditure for UK forces in Afghanistan from the beginning of retained records (August 2006) to the end of Operation HERRICK 9 (October 2008 - April 2009), in April of this year.

You will note that, unfortunately, this review has resulted in corrections to the ammunition figures previously issued for the HERRICK 6 (April 2007 – October 2007) and HERRICK 7 (October 2007 - April 2008) roulements. These figures have been found to be incorrect due inconsistency of tour dates taken, inconsistency of inclusion of training rounds and a failure to include all variations of ammunition in all cases.

Type

HERRICK 4 (13 August 2006 -October 2006)1

HERRICK 5

(October 2006 -April 2007)

HERRICK 6 (April 2007 -October 2007)

HERRICK 7 (October 2007 - April 2008)

HERRICK 8 (1 April 2008 -October 2008)

HERRICK 9 (October 2008 -April 2009)

7.62mm all variants

210,000

520,000

1,300,000

1,380,000

700,000

908,400

5.56mm all variants

235,000

615,000

1,490,000

1,390,000

1,000,000

1,080,000

0.5 inch all variants

25,000

90,000

200,000

180,000

113,000

196,000

12.7mm all variants

2,400

350

4,800

21,000

13,000

10,600

9mm all variants

10,000

69,000

30,000

69,000

71,700

61,400

0.338 inch all variants

200

1,700

5,600

7,300

8,200

12,100

12 bore shotgun all variants

5

45

660

15,100

300

525

105mm all variants

8,600

4,300

12,100

12,400

5,600

11,200

30mm armd fighting veh rounds

1,200

5,000

3,600

2,800

745

4,500

30mm Attack helicopter rounds

29,800

21,000

27,800

15,700

34,400

34,200

1 Accounting records exist only from 13 August 2006 - mid HERRICK 4

Notes:

All tour dates are taken from the Transfer of Authority from one Brigade to the next.

All figures rounded to nearest 10,000, 1000 or 100.

Ammunition expenditure is shown for the whole of Afghanistan, rather than just Helmand Province as the information is collated centrally for UK forces in Afghanistan. The data include all training rounds used and all variants of each ammunition type. They are collated by each HERRICK roulement, at the end of which the data are finalised for records.

All data shown above are data based on information derived from a number of sources and can only be an estimate, not least because of the difficulties in ensuring a consistent interpretation of the basis for collating statistics in a complex fast-moving multinational operational environment.

I hope that the above information addresses your concerns on this matter.

I will place a copy of this letter in the Library of the House.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether he has received reports of Taliban forces seeking to acquire ground-to-air missiles. (288197)

I am withholding this information as its disclosure would, or would be likely to prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of the armed forces.

We constantly monitor the threats faced by our personnel in Afghanistan and ensure that we take all possible steps to respond to these threats as they evolve.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether his Department has assessed the potential effectiveness of infrared surveillance capabilities used by the police for deployment for military purposes in Afghanistan. (288691)

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) undertakes a wide-ranging research programme supporting the needs of our troops on current and future operations. As part of continuing successful coalition operations, the MOD is currently discussing infrared surveillance with several parties including the Metropolitan Police Service.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 24 June 2009, Official Report, column 899W, on Afghanistan: peacekeeping operations, how many British troops were required to serve in the Regional Command South Headquarters between May 2007 and February 2008. (289094)

Air Force: Military Bases

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what research his Department has commissioned on the relative merits of RAF bases (a) in the UK (b) overseas in the last three years. (288607)

The number and operation of RAF bases both in the UK and overseas is constantly under review to ensure that the best use is made of the Defence estate for our armed forces. The outcome of this work is reflected in the Defence Estate Development Plan 2009, which can be found at the following link:

http://www.defence-estates.mod.uk/publications/dedp.php

Armed Forces: Housing

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many complaints Modern Housing Solutions received in each area in each month in 2008. (289138)

The requested information for 2008 is provided in the following table:

Month

Region

Number of complaints

January

East

39

London

120

North

37

South East

116

South West

105

West

33

Total for month

450

February

East

44

London

114

North

41

South East

101

South West

101

West

25

Total for month

426

March

East

37

London

98

North

30

South East

108

South West

91

West

18

Total for month

382

April

East

63

London

121

North

29

South East

102

South West

88

West

25

Total for month

428

May

East

49

London

113

North

29

South East

106

South West

85

West

15

Total for month

397

June

East

48

London

110

North

21

South East

84

South West

102

West

14

Total for month

379

July

East

38

London

152

North

24

South East

124

South West

88

West

32

Total for month

458

August

East

31

London

129

North

30

South East

104

South West

71

West

33

Total for month

398

September

East

53

London

150

North

27

South East

119

South West

96

West

34

Total for month

479

October

East

56

London

154

North

45

South East

135

South West

83

West

36

Total for month

509

November

East

53

London

112

North

22

South East

103

South West

92

West

25

Total for month

407

December

East

44

London

128

North

18

South East

90

South West

78

West

32

Total for month

390

British Forces Post Office: Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what recent consideration he has given to future staffing levels in the British Forces Post Office; and if he will make a statement. (288609)

The staffing levels of the British Forces Post Office are determined by the requirement to ensure that our personnel have access to appropriate postal facilities. Support to operations, exercises and to HM Ships can be provided only by British Forces Post Office staff. However, we have identified that savings may be realised if personnel based in countries with a well developed postal infrastructure utilise the indigenous postal service rather than relying on British Forces Post Office staff. To that end the Forces Post Offices servicing the UK elements of NATO HQs in SHAPE, Brussels, Brunssum, Stavanger, Karup, Rome, Milan, Lisbon, Valencia and Norfolk Virginia are due to close.

Defence: Procurement

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much was spent by each of the armed services on defence procurement in the latest year for which figures are available; and how much such expenditure was incurred by each service in (a) Wales, (b) Northern Ireland, (c) England and (d) overseas. (289137)

The defence budget is not allocated by service or by sub-UK level. Defence Procurement provides the UK armed forces with the equipment needed as efficiently as possible to deliver the best value for money for the armed forces. The Defence Budget is planned solely on this basis.

The latest estimates of direct MOD expenditure on equipment and non-equipment procurement are provided in the following table.

£ million at current prices (VAT exclusive)

2006-07

Wales

Northern Ireland

England

Overseas

Total

220

200

15,230

2,330

of which:

Equipment expenditure

120

60

9,620

2,170

Non equipment expenditure

100

140

5,610

160

Note:

Figures rounded to nearest £10 million

The data underlying the estimates of direct expenditure on procurement cannot be broken down by service. In addition, these figures do not take into account expenditure by main contractors to sub-contractors in these geographic areas, nor do they take account of monies paid for work done in that area if the company's billing address is elsewhere.

The MOD reports spend on procurement in the UK Defence Statistics can be found at the following link;

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/UKDS2008/ukds.html

This annual report presents the MOD procurement of goods and services in the UK broken out by industry sector and estimates of aggregate MOD equipment expenditure.

Defence: Research

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what cash allocations his Department has made for defence research for each of the next two years; and if he will make a statement. (288608)

The current planning assumption is that the science innovation and technology budget will have available approximately £439 million in 2010-11. This compares with £544 million in 2009-10 when calculated on the same basis. Departmental expenditure limits have not yet been set for the years beyond 2010-11.

Departmental Budgets

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what his Department's science innovation and technology budget is for 2010-11. [Official Report, 18 November 2009, Vol. 501, c. 1MC.] (284525)

The current planning assumption is that the SIT budget will have available approximately £439 million in 2010-11. This compares with £544 million in 2009-10 when calculated on the same basis. Departmental expenditure limits have not yet been set for the years beyond 2010-11.

Departmental Compensation

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much compensation his Department has paid to former and serving (a) members of the armed forces and (b) civil servants in cases of (i) sexual discrimination, (ii) bullying and (iii) other infringements of employment rights in the last 12 months. (288200)

Some £182,600 was paid out to Military personnel in the last 12 months to settle two sexual discrimination cases, comprising one payment each by the Army and RAF. An additional claim was settled in 2008-09 for £90,000 in respect of the previously operated MOD policy of debarring homosexuals from serving in the armed forces.

In respect of civilian staff in the last 12 months, some £43,500 was paid to settle sexual discrimination cases. This figure includes one payment in respect of an age discrimination case the cost of which cannot be separately identified. One case, where bullying was alleged, was settled with £3,250 of compensation. Some £233,920 was paid to settle cases where other infringements of employment rights occurred.

Departmental Internet

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 13 July 2009, Official Report, column 23W, on departmental internet, what the (a) names and (b) versions are of the web browsers used on the (i) desktop machines and (ii) laptop computers used by his Department's (A) Permanent Secretary, (B) chief information officer, (C) head of communications and (D) head of finance. (288992)

The name and version of the web browser used by the Ministry of Defence’s Permanent Secretary, chief information officer, head of communications and head of finance, on their officially designated desktop and laptop computers, is Internet Explorer Version 6.

Departmental Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what percentage of employees in his Department are (a) women and (b) men; and what the average hourly pay is of those (i) male and (ii) female employees. (288605)

The percentage breakdown of employees by gender in the Department, as of 1 June 2009, is as follows:

Men: 61.47 per cent

Women: 38.53 per cent

The average hourly pay rates between genders, as of 1 June 2009, is as follows:

Male: £12.139

Female: £10.368

Departmental Secondment

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many employees of his Department have been posted to work in offices of hon. Members of each political party in each of the last five years. (284974)

Civil servants are required to act in accordance with the requirements of the civil service code.

Civil servants may shadow MPs as part of a programme run by the Industry and Parliament Trust. Details of numbers of civil servants from the Ministry of Defence who have undertaken such an attachment are not held centrally.

Ex-servicemen: Sleeping Rough

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what progress his Department's Taskforce established to tackle rough sleeping among forces veterans has made; and what his most recent estimate is of the number of veterans sleeping rough at the latest date for which figures are available; and if he will make a statement. (288610)

Service men and women should be provided with the best possible support as they move back to civilian life, and this is recognised in the Service Personnel Command Paper, The Nation's Commitment: Cross-Government Support to our Armed Forces, their Families and Veterans, published in July 2008.

Measures proposed in the Command Paper to improve access of ex-Service personnel to housing include: a change in legislation to enable Service personnel to establish a local connection with the area in which they are serving; an investigation to see what steps are required to ensure that local authorities follow good practice in respect of ‘cessation to occupy' certificates when service-leavers are threatened with homelessness; the consideration of how ‘void' military accommodation can be used to temporarily accommodate injured ex-service personnel; and an extension to the Key Worker Living programme to ex-service personnel for up to 12 months after discharge.

The Department does not hold figures on the number of veterans sleeping rough. However, independent research carried out, specifically in London, last year by the University of York shows that the proportion of veterans among the homeless population has fallen dramatically over the last 10 years. Veterans are now some 6 per cent. of the homeless population in London.

The MOD works closely with the Department of Communities and Local Government (CLG) and the Devolved Administrations, veterans' organisations and other service providers to ensure a co-ordinated and structured approach to this problem as it affects a small minority of our ex-service personnel. We aim to prevent new service leavers becoming homeless and to provide an effective safety net for those veterans who are homeless.

Current measures, including new commitments in the July 2008 Service Personnel Command Paper, provide a comprehensive package of support. Mike Jackson House provides 25 units of secure short-term supported accommodation built in Aldershot for young single ex-service leavers identified at risk of homelessness. Mike Jackson House opened in March 2008 on land gifted by MOD.

There are service charities who are able to offer assistance with housing matters. The Soldiers, Sailors, Airman and Families Association (SSAFA Forces Help) for example offer assistance and advice relating to housing needs

Gurkhas

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many Gurkhas were stationed in the UK in each year from 1992 to 1997. (288395)

The number of Gurkhas stationed in the UK in each year from 1992 to 1997 is provided in the following table.

Date of strength as at 31 March each year

Officers

Soldiers

Total

1992

40

1,340

1,390

1993

40

1,380

1,420

1994

50

1,570

1,620

1995

60

1,730

1,780

1996

70

1,640

1,710

1997

70

1,930

2,000

Notes:

1. Figures have been rounded to 10; numbers ending in “5” have been rounded to the nearest multiple of 20 to prevent systematic bias.

2. Totals and sub-totals have been rounded separately and so may not appear to be the sum of their parts.

Over the same period the trained strength of the Brigade of Gurkhas reduced from around 7,180 to 3,760, as the Brigade progressively withdrew from Hong Kong to be based in the UK. This process was completed on 1 July 1997.

Merlin Helicopters

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many Merlin helicopters Agusta Westland has offered to supply to his Department; and (a) at what cost and (b) to what timetable Agusta Westland has offered to supply those helicopters. (288834)

During recent consideration of whether the acquisition of new medium helicopters could be advanced in lieu of the planned life-extension of Puma and Sea King Mk4 helicopters informal discussions were held with a number of aircraft manufacturers, including Agusta Westland. These discussions are commercial-in-confidence and so it would be inappropriate to disclose details as their disclosure would prejudice commercial interest.

Military Aircraft

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many aircraft of each type are in service with the Royal Air Force. (289133)

The number of aircraft in the Royal Air Force in-service fleet are provided in the following table. The figures show the service fleet position as of 30 June 2009.

In-service fleet

Aircraft type

Number

BAe 146

2

BAe 125

6

C-17

6

Dominie

9

Harrier

74

Hawk T1

129

Hawk T2

11

Hercules CI30K

14

Hercules CI30J

24

Nimrod MR2

11

Nimrod R1

3

Sea King (SARF)

25

Sentinel

5

Sentry

7

Tornado F3

62

Tornado GR4

138

Tristar

9

Tucano

93

Typhoon

56

VC10

16

Vigilant

64

Viking

82

Military Aircraft: Helicopters

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many helicopters there are in the British armed forces. (288239)

The MOD departmental fleet consists of 585 helicopters as at 30 June 2009.

This figure excludes helicopters that are leased by the MOD.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the maximum (a) loaded weight and (b) take-off weight for all variants of helicopters used by UK forces is when operating in ambient temperatures of 50 degrees celsius at a density altitude of 6,000 feet. (289129)

The operation of helicopters in hot conditions and at high altitudes, such as those experienced on current operations, is particularly demanding. Details of helicopter operating parameters, such as maximum loaded and take-off weights, is operationally sensitive information and cannot be released as it would or would be likely to prejudice the effectiveness and security of the armed forces.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many helicopters of each type are in service with each service. (289132)

“In service” has been taken to mean the effective fleet, which includes all aircraft barring those that are redundant, declared as surplus or awaiting disposal.

The number of effective aircraft within each helicopter type and service, as at 30 June 2009 is provided in the following tables.

Royal Navy

Number

Lynx MK3/8

61

Merlin Mk1

42

Sea King Mk4/6C

42

Sea King Mk5

15

Sea King Mk7

13

Army

Number

NSRW

4

Apache

67

Gazelle

39

Lynx Mk7/9

94

Royal Air Force

Number

Chinook Mk2/2a

40

Merlin Mk3/3a

28

Puma

34

Sea King Mk 3/3a

25

These figures do not include aircraft leased by the MOD.

Navy

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the cost of operating a (a) Type 22, (b) Type 23 and (c) Type 42 vessel was in the last year for which information is available; and what the estimated annual cost of operating a Type 45 vessel is. (287196)

Operating costs for Royal Navy vessels are not held centrally. Officials are, however, in the process of compiling this information and I will write to you once the work has been completed.

Nigeria: Military Aid

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether he has received any recent requests for military assistance from the Nigerian government. (289016)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 17 June 2009, Official Report, column 340W, to my right hon. Friend the Member for Oxford, East (Mr. Smith).

In addition we provide support to enhance the Nigerian peace-keeping capacity, advice on defence management, and professional officer education and training. We maintain a regular dialogue with Nigeria on defence and security matters.

Puma Helicopters

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) how long after contract signature he expects the first upgraded Puma helicopter to be (a) delivered and (b) available for operational deployment; (288837)

(2) whether he has plans to deploy the upgraded Puma helicopter to Afghanistan.

We expect to place the Puma Life Extension contract with Eurocopter later this year, though this remains subject to negotiations and final approvals. It would not be appropriate to make public any specific details of the proposed programme schedule while negotiations are ongoing.

It is for the chain of command to determine how many and which of their aircraft should be deployed and when.

Royal Hospital Haslar

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what recent consideration he has given to the future use of the Royal Hospital Haslar site; and if he will make a statement. (288769)

I refer the hon. Member to my written ministerial statement published on 20 July 2009, Official Report, column 95WS.

The MOD ran an Expressions of Interest campaign earlier this year and a number of bids were received by the closing date. I have announced today that Our Enterprise, a community interest company that brokers and delivers bespoke commercial partnerships between charities, social investors, commercial operators and the public sector to deliver large-scale integrated regeneration projects, has been chosen as our preferred bidder for the site. Our Enterprise has been chosen as our preferred bidder for the site in accordance with Government policy on the disposal of historic buildings. We expect to exchange contracts with the purchaser and complete the transfer by the autumn, if not earlier.

Our Enterprise has a vision of promoting the quality of life for both individuals residing on the site and for Gosport as a whole. I believe that the choice of preferred bidder for Haslar is good news for the local community, and will preserve the heritage and visual aspects of this important site.

Royal Military Academy: Foreigners

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many foreign nationals of each nationality passed out from the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst in (a) 2006, (b) 2007 and (c) 2008. (288414)

The information requested is provided in the following tables. In accordance with MOD release protocols that protect us from unintentionally revealing the identity of an individual, any number less than five is represented by a asterisk (*) and any number equal to zero is represented by an Em dash (—).

Commonwealth and dual nationality officer cadets who commissioned into the British Army in 2006, 2007 and 2008

Nationality/year

2006

2007

2008

Total

Australian

*

*

Canadian

*

*

*

Citizen Irish Rep

*

*

*

5

Fijian

*

*

German/British

*

*

Ghanaian

*

*

Indian

*

*

Japanese/British

*

*

Kenyan

*

*

*

Nepalese/British

*

*

New Zealander

*

*

South African

5

5

5

15

Trinidadian

*

*

Zimbabwean

*

*

*

5

Total

15

12

14

41

Grand total

41

Overseas officer cadets who commissioned into a Foreign Army in 2006, 2007 and 2008

Nationality/ year

2006

2007

2008

Total

Afghan

*

*

*

Algerian

*

*

*

Antiguan

*

*

Bahrain

*

*

*

10

Bangladeshi

*

*

*

Belizean

*

*

*

*

Botswana

*

*

*

*

Brunei

*

*

*

10

Chinese

*

*

Egyptian

*

*

Ethiopian

*

*

Fijian

*

*

Filipino

*

*

Gambian

*

*

*

Ghanian

*

*

Guatemalan

*

*

Guyanese

*

*

Iraqi

*

*

*

5

Jamaican

*

5

*

15

Jordanian

*

*

*

5

Kenyan

*

*

*

*

Kuwaiti

*

5

*

10

Lesothian

*

*

Malawian

*

*

*

*

Malaysian

*

*

*

Maltese

*

*

*

*

Maldivian

*

*

Namibian

*

*

Nepalese

*

*

*

5

Nigerian

*

*

*

*

Omani

5

*

5

15

Pakistani

*

*

*

*

Palestinian

*

*

Qatar

*

*

*

Rwandan

*

*

Saudi Arabian

*

*

*

5

Senegalese

*

*

*

Singaporean

*

*

*

*

South African

*

*

Sri Lankan

*

*

*

Sudanese

*

*

Tanzanian

*

*

*

Thai

*

*

*

U.A.E.

5

5

10

20

Ugandan

*

*

*

*

Yemeni

*

*

5

Total

67

54

64

185

Grand total

185

Scotland

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether his Department plans to make a submission to the Scottish Executive’s National Conversation consultation on Scotland’s constitutional future. (288950)

The Ministry of Defence has not submitted evidence to the Scottish Government’s National Conversation.

The Commission on Scottish Devolution was established by majority vote in the Scottish Parliament and with the full support of the UK Government. UK Departments submitted evidence to the Commission during its first phase of evidence gathering.

The Commission recently published its final report, which can be found at:

http://www.commissiononscottishdevolution.org.uk/uploads/2009-06-12-csd-final-report-2009fbookmarked.pdf

A Steering Group has been established under the Chairmanship of the Secretary of State for Scotland to help the UK Government and the Scottish Parliament plan how to take forward the Chairman’s recommendations and deliver stronger devolution within a stronger United Kingdom.

Trident

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the cost of conventional forces protecting Trident was in 2008-09. (288764)

We do not routinely calculate the operating cost of specific committed or contingent force elements in support of the deterrent, and such estimates are necessarily illustrative. The answer that my right hon. Friend the Member for Kilmarnock and Loudoun (Des Browne), as Defence Secretary, gave to the hon. Member on 8 March 2007, Official Report, column 2131W, estimated the annual operating costs of committed conventional force elements to be around £25-30 million. We have not prepared a more recent estimate as to do so would incur disproportionate costs.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much has been spent on Trident II; and what his Department's estimate is of how much it would cost to order (a) three and (b) four boats to replace Trident I. (287200)

The current Trident II D5 missile is expected to remain in service until 2042. No expenditure has been incurred on a successor to the Trident II D5 missile.

As set out in the 2006 White Paper, we estimate that the procurement costs of the replacement for the current Vanguard class submarines will be between £11-14 billion at 2006-07 prices. The total spent on the replacement submarine and associated propulsion system since the beginning of April 2007 to the end of June 2009 is some £250 million.

Work is ongoing to assess whether continuous at sea deterrence could be achieved with a three boat fleet, and at what cost.

Unmanned Air Vehicles

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what studies his Department has undertaken into the skill levels and qualifications required to fly unmanned aerial vehicles. (288198)

The UK's armed forces currently operate a range of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The Medium Altitude Long Endurance Reaper System is flown by fully qualified pilots following their completion of conversion training. Smaller systems, such as Hermes 450 and Desert Hawk, do not require the full range of pilot skills and can therefore be operated by non-pilots who have received specialist UAV training only.

Several UK studies have been undertaken into current and future requirements for skill levels and qualifications for UAV operators as our capabilities in this area have developed. These include studies to define the skills and competences required to underpin operator selection and training and to derive formal standards for training programmes. This work is ongoing.

USA: Arms Trade

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what recent progress has been made on the Defence Technology Transfer Treaty between the US and UK; and if he will make a statement. (288606)

Her Majesty's Government continue to discuss the Defence Trade Cooperation Treaty with the US Government at all levels. The Treaty still awaits ratification by the US Senate. The UK has worked hard to ensure that members of the Senate are aware of the importance the UK places on the Treaty and the benefits for both nations in operational and industrial terms. MOD and FCO officials in the British embassy in Washington regularly discuss Treaty implementation with their US colleagues in preparation for ratification.

White Phosphorus

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 26 June 2009, Official Report, column 1160W, what information his Department holds on munitions containing white phosphorus manufactured in the UK. (288805)

[holding answer 21 July 2009]: The 120 mm white phosphorous shell is the only white phosphorous munition in the UK armed forces inventory manufactured in the UK. The inventory also includes the 60 mm and 81 mm white phosphorous mortar bombs, which are manufactured outside the UK.

The Department holds a range of information on the 120 mm white phosphorous shell, as it does on all its munitions. This includes, but is not limited to, information on contracts, Through Life Management, safety, legality/International Humanitarian Law, composition, performance, storage, handling, transportation, training, in-service surveillance, stockpile, and usage.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Departmental Contracts

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many contracts let by his Department were awarded to businesses with fewer than 50 employees in each of the last five years; and what the monetary value of such contracts was in each such year. (287800)

The Department does not request or hold any central or local information on the number of staff in each of its suppliers. The number of staff in a supplier may vary over a period. The information could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Departmental Internet

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs pursuant to the answer of 15 July 2009, Official Report, column 386W, on departmental internet, what the (a) names and (b) versions are of the web browsers used on the (i) desktop machines and (ii) laptop computers used by his Department’s (A) Permanent Secretary, (B) chief information officer, (C) head of communications and (D) head of finance. (288994)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given on 15 July 2009, Official Report, column 386W.

All DEFRA staff, including the permanent secretary, chief information officer, head of communications and head of finance, are provided with Internet Explorer 7 on their desktop computers or laptops via our internal office system.

Scotland

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether his Department plans to make a submission to the Scottish Executive’s National Conversation consultation on Scotland’s constitutional future. (288958)

DEFRA has not submitted evidence to the Scottish Government’s National Conversation.

The Commission on Scottish Devolution was established by majority vote in the Scottish Parliament and with the full support of the UK Government. UK Departments submitted evidence to the Commission during its first phase of evidence gathering.

The Commission recently published its Final Report, which can be found on the Commission on Scottish Devolution website.

A steering group has been established under the chairmanship of the Secretary of State for Scotland to help the UK Government and the Scottish Parliament plan how to take forward the Calman recommendations and deliver stronger devolution within the United Kingdom.

Water Charges

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many people have accessed social tariff schemes in each water company area in each of the last five years. (288505)

The number of customers accepted on to the vulnerable groups scheme by water companies in each of the last five years is set out in the following table.

This will not strictly equal the number of customers currently on the tariff, owing to applications expiring during the year, bereavements, changes of occupancy and applications still being processed at year end.

Ofwat only routinely collects these data for the compulsory vulnerable groups tariff (WaterSure), and not for any other social tariffs which individual companies may offer.

Total number of successful applications for vulnerable groups tariff

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

Anglian and Hartlepool

682

719

904

3,385

3,068

Dwr Cymru

319

426

580

899

1,070

United Utilities

1,114

1,447

1,565

2,286

2,551

Northumbrian and Essex and Suffolk

483

672

898

1,077

1,403

Severn Trent

916

1,223

1,508

2,385

3,399

South West

1,645

2,962

3,857

5,837

6,782

Southern

258

324

280

197

641

Thames

1,323

1,780

2,053

2,333

2,747

Wessex

481

622

751

837

972

Yorkshire and York

1,059

1,308

1,663

2,090

2,702

Bournemouth and West Hampshire

118

96

222

274

381

Bristol

211

391

478

511

620

Cambridge

81

97

108

128

163

Dee Valley

10

16

36

73

83

Folkestone

33

42

106

176

270

Portsmouth

24

30

30

43

73

South East Water (including mid-Kent)1

229

217

143

249

156

South East Water (excluding mid-Kent)

91

114

102

97

Mid-Kent

138

103

41

152

South Staffs

39

139

198

259

364

Sutton and East Surrey

38

64

91

110

113

Tendring Hundred

313

328

425

468

533

Three Valleys

251

284

316

504

788

Industry total

9,627

13,187

16,212

24,121

28,879

1 In 2007, South East Water absorbed mid-Kent water. The figures shown above for the new South East Water (including mid-Kent) until 2007-08 are a sum of the figures reported by the former separate companies. The split between the former companies is shown in italics for information. These figures do not contribute to the industry totals.

Health

Brain Cancer

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what the five-year survival rate for cases of brain cancer in each strategic health authority area was in each of the last six years; (288890)

(2) what the five-year survival rate for cases of brain cancer in each primary care trust within the ceremonial county of Hampshire was in each of the last six years.

I have been asked to reply.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated July 2009:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Questions asking (1) what the five-year survival rate for cases of brain cancer in each strategic health authority area was in each of the last six years [288890] and (2) what the five-year survival rate for cases of brain cancer in each primary care trust within the ceremonial county of Hampshire was in each of the last six years [288891].

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) does not produce five-year survival rates for brain cancer for (1) strategic health authorities or (2) primary care organisations.

The latest available survival figures for brain cancer for England, among adult patients diagnosed during 2001-2006 and followed up to the end of 2007, are published on the National Statistics website at:

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/StatBase/Product.asp?vlnk=14007&Pos=1&ColRank=1&Rank=192

Cardiovascular System: Children

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the incidence of cardiovascular failure in children was in the latest period for which figures are available. (288384)

The numbers of finished consultant episodes in English national health service hospitals or in independent hospitals but commissioned by the NHS in England where the primary diagnosis was cardiovascular failure for children for 2007-08, the last year for which figures were available were as in the following table.

Age groupNumber of episodesUnder 1624416 to 1825Notes:Finished Consultant Episode (FCE)1. A finished consultant episode (FCE) is defined as a continuous period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. FCEs are counted against the year in which they end. The figures do not represent the number of different patients, as a person may have more than one episode of care within the same stay in hospital or in different stays in the same year.Primary diagnosis2. The primary diagnosis is the first of up to 20 (14 from 2002-03 to 2006-07 and seven prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in the FCE Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data set and provides the main reason why the patient was admitted to hospital.3. The ICD-10 codes used to identify Cardiovascular failure are as follows:I50.0 Congestive heart failureI50.1 Left ventricular failureI50.9 Heart failure, unspecifiedI11.0 Hypertensive heart disease with (congestive) heart failureI11.0 Hypertensive heart and renal disease with (congestive) heart failureI11.0 Hypertensive heart and renal disease with both (congestive) heart failure and renal failureP29.0 Neonatal cardiac failure Data quality4. HES are compiled from data sent by more than 300 NHS trusts and primary care trusts in England. Data are also received from a number of independent sector organisations for activity commissioned by the English NHS. The NHS Information Centre for health and social care liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data via HES processes. While this brings about improvement over time, some shortcomings remain.Ungrossed data5. Figures have not been adjusted for shortfalls in the data, i.e. the data are ungrossed.Source:Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), The NHS Information Centre for health and social care

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of mechanisms for identifying cardiovascular risk in children. (288385)

We have made no recent assessment of mechanisms for identifying cardiac risk in children but we believe that lack of exercise and poor diet are major factors. We are attempting to address these through the Change 4 Life programme, launched in January of 2009.

Committee on Carcinogenicity of Chemicals in Food Consumer Products and the Environment

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much the Committee on Carcinogenicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products and the Environment spent on external consultancy services in each of the last five years. (289055)

The Committee on Carcinogenicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products and Environment has not employed external consultant services in the last five years.

Departmental Billing

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what percentage of invoices from suppliers his Department paid within 10 days of receipt in June 2009. (288930)

The formal data collection to measure performance against the Prime Minister’s target of paying commercial suppliers within 10 days of receipt of a valid invoice is being coordinated across Government by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS). Data provided to BIS shows that in June 2009 96.39 per cent. of payments made by the Department of Health were made within 10 working days of receipt of the invoice.

Departmental Electronic Equipment

To ask the Secretary of State for Health with reference to the answer of 26 November 2008, Official Report, column 2060W, on departmental electronic equipment, how much (a) his Department and (b) its agencies have spent on (i) flat screen televisions, (ii) DVD players and (iii) stereo equipment since November 2008. (289165)

Comprehensive information on spend for flat screen televisions, DVD players and stereo equipment, since November 2008, is not held centrally and to collect it would incur disproportionate cost.

All expenditure has to be incurred in accordance with the principles of Managing Public Money and the Treasury handbook on Regularity and Propriety.

Departmental Internet

To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 9 July 2009, Official Report, column 972W, on departmental internet, what the (a) names and (b) versions are of the web browsers used on the (i) desktop machines and (ii) laptop computers used by his Department's (A) Permanent Secretary, (B) chief information officer, (C) head of communications and (D) head of finance. (289001)

The Department currently uses Internet Explorer Version 6 on the desktop and laptop computers it uses. This includes those used by the Permanent Secretary, the Chief Information Officer, the Head of Communications and the Head of Finance.

The exception to this is the use of Mozilla Firefox Version 3.0.1.1 on a small number of desktop machines used by:

the web publishing team, for compatibility with a web publishing system; and

the information technology development team, for the purposes of testing our systems.

Departmental Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what percentage of employees in his Department are (a) women and (b) men; and what the average hourly pay of (i) male and (ii) female employees is. (288305)

The percentage of employees in the Department who are women is 56 per cent. and the percentage who are men is 44 per cent.

The average hourly rates of pay for men and women are presented in the following table.

Hourly pay (£)

Type of average

Men

Women

Percentage difference

Median

20.10

16.17

19.6

Mean

22.06

19.03

13.7

Although median and mean hourly pay (excluding overtime as do the figures above) provide useful comparisons of men’s and women’s earnings, they do not reveal differences in rates of pay for comparable jobs. This is because such broad measures do not allow for the different employment characteristics of men and women, such as the proportion in different occupations and their length of time in jobs.

NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the cost of the office premises for the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement was in each of the last five years. (288686)

This is set out in the following table.

£

Premises

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

Coventry House at University of Warwick

325,690

414,922

434,441

397,615

414,922

Victoria House, London

110,117

163,371

147,355

207,581

233,098

Manchester, Gateway House

30,636

32,632

40,015

34,638

30,944

Birmingham, Birmingham Hospital

37,452

38,864

37,835

37,426

37,558

Total

503,895

649,789

659,646

677,260

716,522

Out of Area Treatment

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients in each primary care trust (PCT) area received referrals to consultant specialists based in a different PCT area in each of the last five years. (287875)

The available data on number of patients in each primary care trust (PCT) area that received referrals to consultant specialists based in a different PCT area in each of the last five years are shown in the document, referrals to consultant specialists based in a different primary care trust area, provided by the NHS Information Centre, which has been placed in the Library.

Out of Area Treatment: South West

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients from Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Primary Care Trust area did not keep an appointment following a referral to an out of county consultant specialist in each of the last five years. (287853)

The information requested is not held centrally. However, the number of out-patient appointments from Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Primary Care Trust where a patient did not attend or cancelled an appointment following a referral to an in county or out of county consultant specialist in each of the last five years has been placed in the Library.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients from Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Primary Care Trust area have been referred to out of county consultant specialists in each of the last five years. (287874)

The information requested is not held centrally. However, the number of out-patient appointments for patients resident in Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Primary Care Trust area who received referrals to out of county consultant specialists in each of the last five years has been placed in the Library.

Parkinson's Disease: Consultants

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the number of professionals in the NHS available to deliver high quality care to patients with Parkinson's Disease. (288272)

Professionals working in this area of patient care are not identified separately in the National Health Service Workforce Census.

Scotland

To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether his Department plans to make a submission to the Scottish Executive's National Conversation consultation on Scotland's constitutional future. (288946)

The Department has not submitted evidence to the Scottish Government’s National Conversation.

The Commission on Scottish Devolution was established by majority vote in the Scottish Parliament and with the full support of the United Kingdom Government. UK Departments submitted evidence to the Commission during its first phase of evidence gathering.

The Commission recently published its final report, which can be found here:

www.commissiononscottishdevolution.org.uk/uploads/20090612csdfinalreport2009fbookmarked.pdf

A steering group has been established under the chairmanship of the Secretary of State for Scotland to help the UK Government and the Scottish Parliament plan how to take forward the Calman recommendations and deliver stronger devolution within a stronger UK.

Prime Minister

Civil Service: Bullying

To ask the Prime Minister what Civil Service procedures govern the handling of complaints of bullying of civil servants by Ministers. (287291)

I have been asked to reply.

Complaints made by civil servants of bullying are dealt in accordance with the Civil Service Management Code which can be accessed online at:

http://www.civilservice.gov.uk/about/work/codes/csmc/index.aspx

Transport

Departmental Electronic Equipment

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport with reference to the answer of 26 November 2008, Official Report, column 1566W, on departmental electronic equipment, how much (a) his Department and (b) its agencies have spent on (i) flat screen televisions, (ii) DVD players and (iii) stereo equipment since November 2008. (289167)

The information is as follows:

£

(i) Flat screen televisions

(ii) DVD players

(iii) Stereo equipment

(a) Department

2,556

0

0

(b) Agencies

13,346

55

0

This excludes spend at the Maritime and Coastguard Agency and the Vehicle and Operator Services Agency as the requested information is not recorded and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Departmental Postal Services

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport how much his Department spent on Royal Mail services in each of the last two years. (288743)