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GCSE/Further Education

Volume 497: debated on Monday 12 October 2009

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) what percentage of children living in a two-parent household gained 5 GCSEs at grade A* to C in each year since 1997; and if he will make a statement; (290044)

(2) what percentage of children living in a single-parent household with their (a) mother and (b) father gained 5 GCSEs at grade A* to C in each year since 1997; and if he will make a statement;

(3) what percentage of children living in a two-parent household went on to study (a) for A-levels and (b) for a university course in each year since 1997; and if he will make a statement;

(4) what percentage of children living in a single-parent household with their (a) mother and (b) father went on to study (i) for A-levels and (ii) for a university course in each year since 1997; and if he will make a statement.

The Department does not hold administrative data on the attainment and progression in learning of young people by household characteristics for each year since 1997, but it does hold survey-based estimates of GCSE results and progression to A-level for the years 1999, 2001, 2003 and 2006, and for progression to Higher Education in the years 2001, 2003 and 2005.

Table 1 is derived from the Youth Cohort Study (data from 1999 to 2006) and the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England (2006 only). It shows the proportion of young people in England from two-parent, lone father, and lone mother households who achieved 5 GCSEs at A*-C in the years 1999, 2001, 2003 and 2006.

Table 1

Percentage gaining 5 GCSEs (inc equivalents) at A*—C by Year 11 in given year

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

Two parents

52

56

57

64

Father only

40

32

34

42

Mother only

40

39

41

47

Notes:

1. Data relate to England and Wales, however, 2006 relates to England only.

2. Cases which are missing, not applicable, refused, not stated, or not known are excluded.

Source:

YCS Cohorts 10, 11, 12, 13; LSYPE Wave 4.

Tables 2a and 2b overleaf are derived from the Youth Cohort Study and the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England. They show:

(a) The proportion of young people from two-parent lone-father and lone-mother families who went of to study A-levels (AS or A2) at the age (academic) of 16.

(b) The proportion of young people from two-parent, lone-father and lone-mother families who began a full-time Higher Education course at the age (academic) of 18.

Table 2a

Percentage studying for A-levels(AS or A2) at academic age 16

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

Two parents

44

48

51

53

Father only

32

24

30

34

Mother only

33

33

35

40

Notes:

1. Data relate to England and Wales, however data for 2006 relates to England only.

2. Cases which are missing, not applicable, refused, not stated, or not known are excluded.

Source:

YCS Cohorts 10, 11, 12, 13; LSYPE Wave 4

Table 2b

Percentage studying full-time HE at academic age 18

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Two parents

27

30

33

Father only

19

15

20

Mother only

20

18

23

Notes:

1. Data relate to England and Wales

2. Cases which are missing, not applicable, refused, not stated, or not known are excluded.

Source:

YCS Cohorts 10, 11, 12