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Electricity Generation

Volume 497: debated on Tuesday 13 October 2009

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps his Department is taking to promote the uptake of smart grid technologies to generate electricity. (289366)

The Department of Energy and Climate Change is already working on key areas of smart networks to ensure it understand the benefits of smart grid technologies for meeting our goals and to encourage deployment in the coming years. Its programme currently consists of:

Smart meters:

A programme to roll out smart meters to every home by end 2020—an £8 billion private sector investment. This is one of the building blocks for creating a smart grid.

Deploying new technologies:

Encouraging Distribution Network Operators through regulatory incentives to trial new ‘smarter’ technologies on their networks. The Office of the Gas and Electricity Markets are proposing to significantly increase the amount of funding available for this.

Developing new technologies:

Providing direct funding for innovation through the Energy Technologies Institute which aims to invest up to £l billion over the next 10 years in low carbon energy technologies, including networks. The Government are engaging with the recently established Energy Technologies Institute networks panel that is scoping the objectives they set for a call for projects.

Funding research:

Providing direct funding, through the Research Councils, of over £30 million for collaborative research in networks involving academia and industry. Providing complementary funding of £6 million to supplement other funding for network innovation such as Ofgem’s Innovation Funding Incentive among other sources. Government funding for smart grids will be used to support early stage development of trials of key technologies consistent with a vision for a smart grid in the UK to be published later this year.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change pursuant to the answer of 30 March 2009, Official Report, columns 931-2W, on electricity generation, what the electricity supply capacity margin was in each year from 1990 to 2006. (289758)

The following table shows the UK electricity supply capacity margin, for financial years 1993-04 to 2006-07.

Total electricity declared net capacity (MW)

Simultaneous UK maximum electricity load met (MW)

Implied percentage margin

1993-94

66,901

54,848

22.0

1994-95

64,923

52,362

24.0

1995-96

66,100

55,611

18.9

1996-97

69,090

56,815

21.6

1997-98

68,288

56,965

19.9

1998-99

68,390

56,312

21.4

1999-2000

70,245

57,849

21.4

2000-01

72,193

58,452

23.5

2001-02

73,382

58,589

25.2

2002-03

70,369

61,717

14.0

2003-04

71,465

60,501

18.1

2004-05

73,287

61,013

20.1

2005-06

73,941

61,697

19.8

2006-07

72,996

59,071

23.6

Source:

Energy Sector Indicators, 2009, available at:

http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/statistics/publications/indicators/indicators.aspx

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what information his Department holds for benchmarking purposes on the percentage of electricity generated lost in (a) transmission and (b) distribution in other EU member states. (290261)

The Department does not hold such information. However, Eurostat does publish data on total network losses, transmission and distribution combined, for each member state.