Skip to main content

Low Carbon Buildings Programme

Volume 501: debated on Wednesday 2 December 2009

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how much has been allocated to the Low Carbon Buildings Programme in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14; and (i) what proportion of funding will be for England, (ii) what carbon dioxide emissions reduction is expected to be achieved, (iii) how many properties will be affected and (iv) how many jobs will be created in each of those years. (301088)

[holding reply 24 November 2009]: As at September 2009 the amount of funding allocated to the Low Carbon Buildings Programme in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12, (d) 2012-13 and (e) 2013-14 is as shown:

Note:

The LCBP programmes (phase-1 and phase-2) are due to close on 31 March 2011.

Allocation of funding

In Budget 2009, an additional £45 million was allocated to the LCBP programme which was allocated as follows:

£

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

Total

LCBP-1 (Householders)

1,000,000

5,000,000

0

6,000,000

LCBP-2 (Communities and other not-for-profit etc.)

29,000,000

10,000,000

0

39,000,000

Total

30,000,000

15,000,000

0

45,000,000

The geographical division of funding

There is no prescriptive allocation of funding within the programmes for regions or nations as the programmes allocates funding on a first-come-first-served basis. However, using historical information, we estimate that the approximate ‘split’ of where funding will be made is as follows:

2009-10 (£)

2010-11 (£)

Total (£)

Percentage

England

25,800,000

12,900,000

38,700,000

86

Northern Ireland

600,000

300,000

900,000

2

Scotland

1,500,000

750,000

2,250,000

5

Wales

2,100,000

1,050,000

3,150,000

7

Total

30,000,000

15,000,000

45,000,000

100

Number of installations

Based on an estimate of 60 per cent. in 2009-10 and 40 per cent. in 2010-11 to account for the introduction (and therefore closure of the programmes to electrical microgeneration on 31 March 2010) of green energy cash-backs (feed-in tariffs), our forecast for the number of installations is as follows:

Number

Installations

2009-10

2010-11

Total

Percentage

England

6,703

4,469

11,172

91

Northern Ireland

0

0

0

0

Scotland

139

92

231

2

Wales

553

369

922

7

Total

7395

4930

12,325

100

We are unable to make a forecast with regards to Northern Ireland as they are currently undergoing public consultation on their own legislation for a ‘FITs equivalent’. We will revise these figures when the outcome in published.

Carbon dioxide emission reduction

It is not possible to give accurate estimates of the anticipated carbon savings attributable to installations in 2009 through to 2011 as this is dependent on the size, efficiency and type of equipment to be specified in future applications, however, since inception of the programmes in early 2007, we estimate that the savings from installed equipment to date is as follows:

Estimated Carbon units (per annum)

Estimated Carbon units (lifetime)

Number of completed installations

LCBP-1 (Householders)

2,555

61,825

8,480

LCBP-2 (Communities, not-for profit etc.)

10,240

224,259

2,845

Total

12,795

286,084

11,325

With an estimate of 12,325 installations in financial year 2009-10 to FY 2010-11, we would anticipate approximately doubling the above savings.

Green jobs

The Department does not hold information on the number of people employed in the microgeneration industry.

The additional £45 million funding that was allocated to the Low Carbon Buildings Programme in the recent Budget will create jobs and move the microgeneration industry supply chain to a position where it can contribute to achieving the challenging 2020 renewable targets. Our Renewable Energy Strategy consultation estimated that renewable energy could generate 160,000 jobs by 2020, both in the UK and abroad. Since the consultation, research commissioned by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) suggests that the size of the renewable energy sector and of the broader low-carbon and environmental goods and services economy, has been substantially underestimated. Based on the research projections and Labour Force Survey data, we estimate that this strategy, combined with a growing market for renewable energy across Europe and globally, could increase UK employment in the renewable energy sector by up to 500,000 people by 2020. (These projections use a broad definition of the sector and are subject to considerable uncertainty).