Skip to main content

Police Cautions

Volume 502: debated on Tuesday 8 December 2009

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many people received (a) four, (b) five, (c) six, (d) seven, (e) eight, (f) nine and (g) 10 or more police cautions in each year since 1997; (302438)

(2) how many people received (a) four, (b) five, (c) six, (d) seven, (e) eight, (f) nine and (g) 10 or more police cautions in the period between 1997 and 2009.

have been asked to reply.

The figures requested are in the following tables. Data prior to 2000 has not been included.

Numbers of offenders receiving different numbers of cautions1 in each year: England and Wales

Number of offenders receiving:

1 caution

2 cautions

3 cautions

4 cautions

5 cautions

6 cautions

7 cautions

8 cautions

9 cautions

10 or more cautions

2000

210,490

21,842

3,934

1,243

529

288

148

90

45

137

2001

210,012

21,140

3,891

1,148

511

220

143

86

51

135

2002

213,191

20,733

3,444

1,042

401

215

105

48

31

115

2003

226,407

21,904

3,610

1,042

412

175

99

77

52

106

2004

230,100

24,251

4,141

1,201

474

221

124

83

47

155

2005

265,660

29,335

5,149

1,414

566

269

136

81

53

182

2006

301,443

35,369

6,252

1,747

697

354

164

122

72

266

2007

312,192

38,280

6,824

1,807

654

350

190

122

67

263

2008

285,687

34,785

5,714

1,603

581

272

171

88

60

238

1 Figures include reprimands and final warnings

Number of offenders receiving different numbers of cautions1 from 2000-08

Number of offences resulting in a caution

Number of offenders

1

1,639,891

2

397,458

3

104,915

4

31,078

5

10,884

6

4,286

7

2,014

8

1,101

9

638

10 or more

1,873

1 Figures include reprimands and final warnings

These figures have been drawn from the police's administrative IT system, the police national computer, which, as with any large scale recording system, is subject to possible errors with data entry and processing. The figures are provisional and subject to change as more information is recorded by the police.

Guidance to the police and Crown Prosecution Service is clear that if an offender has previously received a simple caution, then a further caution should not normally be considered unless there has been a sufficient lapse of time to suggest that a previous caution had a deterrent effect (two years or more), or if the current offence is trivial or unrelated to any previous offences. Repeat offenders should not receive cautions and ought to be prosecuted at court.

In response to concerns, Ministers announced a review of the use of out-of-court disposals on 9 November. The terms of reference for this review will be announced shortly.