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Non-Domestic Rates

Volume 502: debated on Wednesday 16 December 2009

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government which local authorities have exercised their powers under section 49 of the Local Government Finance Act 1988 to reduce or remit the payment of business rates in cases of hardship in (a) 2008-09 and (b) 2009-10 on the latest date for which figures are available. (306894)

The following local authorities have reported to Communities and Local Government that they granted hardship relief in 2008-09, the latest date for which figures are available:

Aylesbury Vale, Barnsley, Basingstoke and Deane, Bedford, Berwick-upon-Tweed, Blyth Valley, Bradford, Brighton and Hove, Bristol, Broxbourne, Cannock Chase, Castle Morpeth, Charnwood, Crewe and Nantwich, Daventry, Derby, Derwentside, Easington, East Devon, East Hampshire, East Lindsey, East Riding of Yorkshire, East Staffordshire, Eastleigh, Exeter, Forest Heath, Forest of Dean, Greenwich, Hackney, Harrogate, High Peak, Horsham, Huntingdonshire, Ipswich, Kennet, Kensington and Chelsea, Kerrier, Kings Lynn and West Norfolk, Kirklees, Knowsley, Leeds, Leicester UA, Lewes, Luton UA, Macclesfield, Mansfield, Mendip, Mid Bedfordshire, Mid Sussex, Middlesbrough, Milton Keynes, North Cornwall, North East Derbyshire, North East Lincolnshire, North Tyneside, North Warwickshire, Norwich, Purbeck, Redcar and Cleveland, Richmondshire, Rother, Rotherham, Salisbury, Sandwell, Scarborough, Sedgemoor, Selby, Sevenoaks, Sheffield, Shepway, Slough, South Bedfordshire, South Derbyshire, South Gloucestershire, South Lakeland, South Northamptonshire, South Ribble, St. Albans, Stevenage, Stratford-on-Avon, Stroud, Sutton, Tendring, Tewkesbury, Thanet, Tower Hamlets, Tynedale, Vale Royal, Wandsworth, Warrington, Waveney, West Devon, West Dorset, West Wiltshire, Westminster, Weymouth and Portland, Wigan, Woking, Wolverhampton, Wychavon, Wycombe, Wyre Forest.

The information was reported on the annual national non-domestic rates (NNDR3) form completed by all billing authorities in England.

Data for 2009-10 will not be available until the autumn of 2010.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government which 50 individual hereditaments in Greater London have the greatest percentage increase in rateable values from the 2005 rating list to the draft 2010 rating list; what the rateable value was in each case (a) before and (b) after revaluation; and what the (i) address and (ii) local billing authority is in each case. (305815)

The table shows the billing authority and the rateable values on the 2005 Rating List and on the draft 2010 Rating List of the 50 individual hereditaments in Greater London which saw the biggest percentage increase in the period between the two lists, as at 29 May 2009. These data are consistent with the consultation document titled: “The Transitional Arrangements for the Non-Domestic Rating Revaluation 2010 in England”, published on 8 July 2009. A copy of this can be found at the following link:

http://www.communities.gov.uk/publications/localgovernment/nndrrevaluation2010

No address information other than postcode is held in the dataset used for the analysis. The address, 2005 list rateable value and 2010 draft list rateable value from the live database for each hereditament in the central and local rating lists are published on the Valuation Office Agency’s website and this information is updated weekly:

http://www.voa.gov.uk/

£

Rank

Billing authority

Rateable value on the 2005 ratings list

Rateable value on the draft 2010 ratings list

1

Hackney

1

11,000

2

Bromley

1,000

16,000

3

Islington

23,000

450,000

4

Hackney

13,000

225,000

5

Haringey

1,000

8,000

6

Greenwich

5,000

68,000

7

Bromley

1,000

8,000

8

Southwark

14,000

185,000

9

Harrow

1,000

10,000

10

Bromley

3,000

37,000

11

Tower Hamlets

10,000

108,000

12

Hackney

8,000

83,000

13

Hillingdon

14,000

141,000

14

Sutton

1,000

12,000

15

Tower Hamlets

21,000

206,000

16

Brent

1

3,000

17

Tower Hamlets

1

3,000

18

Hackney

6,000

55,000

19

Wandsworth

1,000

7,000

20

Camden

76,000

665,000

21

Richmond upon Thames

3,000

24,000

22

Tower Hamlets

1

3,000

23

City of Westminster

8,000

70,000

24

Ealing

10,000

84,000

25

Kensington and Chelsea

1,000

11,000

26

Greenwich

6,000

46,000

27

Hammersmith and Fulham

2,000

17,000

28

Greenwich

2,000

16,000

29

Greenwich

3,000

21,000

30

Southwark

6,000

43,000

31

Lambeth

13,000

96,000

32

Islington

3,000

20,000

Islington

5,000

35,000

34

Newham

1

3,000

35

Southwark

2,000

14,000

36

Enfield

1,000

3,000

37

Tower Hamlets

11,000

70,000

38

Lambeth

3,000

16,000

39

Islington

5,000

32,000

40

Barnet

9,000

59,000

41

Barnet

9,000

59,000

42

Barnet

7,000

46,000

43

Enfield

20,000

126,000

44

Tower Hamlets

55,000

350,000

45

Camden

23,000

146,000

46

City of Westminster

19,000

121,000

47

Barnet

2,000

13,000

48

Newham

4,000

26,000

49

City of Westminster

12,000

71,000

50

City of London

17,000

100,000

1 Less than £500.

Note:

The figures are rounded to the nearest thousand.

Rateable values are based on rental value at a set valuation date—1 April 2003 and 1 April 2008 for the 2005 and the new 2010 rating lists respectively. At each revaluation a completely fresh valuation of each property is made and it is to be expected that values will change at differential rates reflecting the change in demand for property over time.

The five-yearly business rates revaluations make sure each business pays its fair contribution and no more by ensuring the share of the national rates bill paid by any one business reflects changes over time in the value of their property relative to others. The 2010 revaluation will not raise a single extra penny for Government.

Over a million properties will see their business rate liabilities come down as a result of revaluation. The Government intend to put in place a £2 billion relief scheme to limit the impact on the minority with bill increases. That is on top of the wider support available to help ease business pressures including discounted rate bills for small businesses and deferring tax payments.