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Written Answers

Volume 503: debated on Wednesday 6 January 2010

Written Answers to Questions

Tuesday 5 January 2010

International Development

Departmental Air Travel

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what his Department’s policy is on the accumulation and use of air miles by his Department’s personnel flying at public expense. (308486)

Staff employed by the Department for International Development (DFID) are not permitted to use air miles for their personal benefit. Any breach of these rules may result in dismissal.

Air miles accumulated in the course of an employee’s business, may however be used to fund official travel.

Departmental Information and Communications Technology

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development on what pay band his Department’s Chief Information Officer (CIO) is employed; whether the CIO is employed on a fixed-term or permanent contract; and what the size is of the budget for which the CIO is responsible in the period 2009-10. (307562)

The role of the chief information officer (CIO) in the Department for International Development (DFID) is discharged by the director of business solutions division. The current post holder is employed on a permanent contract in the senior civil service pay band 2. The director of business solutions is responsible for an administration budget of £24.9 million in 2009-10.

Departmental Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many (a) year end and (b) in-year bonuses were paid to officials in his Department in each of the last three years; and how much was paid in such bonuses in each such year. (307107)

I refer the right hon. Gentleman to the answer of 16 December 2009, Official Report, column 1341W, on departmental pay.

Departmental Training

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many (a) away days and (b) conferences that took place outside his Department’s building attended by civil servants in his Department there have been since 2005; and what the cost was of each. (307515)

Departmental Written Questions

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many and what percentage of Parliamentary Questions tabled for written answer by his Department on a named day in session 2008-09 received a substantive answer on that day. (307532)

The number and percentage of named day parliamentary questions tabled for answer by the Department for International Development (DFID) which were answered on the day named are provided in the table.

Month

Number answered on named day

Percentage answered on named day

December 2008

4

100

January 2009

15

94

February 2009

16

100

March 2009

52

97

April 2009

14

94

May 2009

9

90

June 2009

16

95

July 2009

15

94

August 2009

0

n/a

September 2009

9

90

October 2009

19

80

November 2009

22

92

Central guidance on answering parliamentary questions is now available in the “Guide to Parliamentary Work”, at

http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/parliamentary-clerk-guide.aspx

In the response to the Procedure Committee Report on written parliamentary questions, the Government accepted the Committee’s recommendation that Departments be required to provide the Procedure Committee with sessional statistics in a standard format on the time taken to respond to written parliamentary questions, accompanied by an explanatory memorandum setting out any factors affecting their performance. This will be taken forward as soon as possible.

Eritrea: Overseas Aid

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 21 October 2009, Official Report, column 497, on Eritrea: overseas aid, what steps his Department is taking to increase the access of non-governmental organisations to assist in the development of Eritrea. (307912)

The Government of Eritrea do not consider non-government organisations to have a major role to play in either the development of the country or in addressing relief needs.

The UK Government will continue to press Government of Eritrea officials at every available opportunity to allow aid agencies to operate freely and without constraint for the good of the Eritrean people.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what his latest assessment is of the food security situation in Eritrea; what steps his Department is taking in this regard; and if he will make a statement. (307913)

The next three months will be critical for many areas across Eritrea. Poor rainfall, prolonged dry spells and high cereal prices have continued to impact on the food security of large numbers of people across the country. Early crop estimates indicate a decline in cereal production, compared to previously good harvests in 2007 and 2008. Acute malnutrition rates among children under-five continue to rise.

The Government of Eritrea has officially stated that there will be no hunger or food shortages in 2010. They have drawn up plans to meet any food shortfalls nationwide if cases arise.

The Department for International Development (DFID) will continue to monitor the situation closely alongside our relief partners in Eritrea.

Overseas Aid

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much of his Department's aid budget has been allocated to each recipient country in (a) 2007-08, (b) 2008-09 and (c) 2009-10; and if he will make a statement. (306824)

The Department for International Development’s (DFID’s) past and future spending allocations are laid out in our Annual Reports which are available at:

http://www.dfid.gov.uk/About-DFID/Finance-and-performance/Annual-report/

Palestinians: Overseas Aid

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 30 November 2009, Official Report, column 435W, on Gaza: reconstruction, what reasons the Government of Israel has given for preventing the entry into Gaza of building materials for reconstruction funded by his Department; and what his policy is on securing entry for such materials. (307176)

There are two main reasons given by the Government of Israel for preventing entry of reconstruction materials into Gaza.

Firstly, Israel has expressed concerns that materials such as steel pipes or cement could be misused or misappropriated by Hamas and other organisations in Gaza to build weapons or defensive structures. We recognise that Israel has legitimate security concerns and that there is a risk some items could have a dual use. However, we believe with robust monitoring it is possible to address these concerns. The United Nations and other agencies have had extensive discussions with the Government of Israel over practical safeguards against diversion or misuse. Moreover, many items required to repair damaged homes and other infrastructure are not dual-use—such as plastic piping and glass. We have not received specific explanations from Israel of why the import of such items has been blocked or delayed.

Secondly, Israeli Ministers have noted that the continuing detention of Gilad Shalit and Hamas’s refusal to renounce violence creates a wider political context for restrictions on movement of people and goods into and out of Gaza. The UK Government continue to call for the immediate, unconditional release of Gilad Shalit and for Hamas to renounce violence and recognise Israel’s right to exist in peace and security. We do not accept, however, that access for humanitarian aid and aid workers should be linked to such considerations, nor that the import of materials needed to rebuild houses, schools, medical facilities and other critical infrastructure should be contingent on Hamas’s actions.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 30 November 2009, Official Report, column 435W, on Gaza: reconstruction, whether his Department is considering alternative proposals to expedite the reconstruction of homes in Gaza; and if he will make a statement. (307177)

With the onset of winter, the reconstruction or repair to houses of an estimated 60,000 families in Gaza has been identified by the United Nations as a humanitarian priority. However, the continuing restrictions imposed by the Government of Israel on access for construction materials (including cement, steel reinforcement bars, and glass) have effectively put these reconstruction efforts on hold. The UK Government continue to lobby the Government of Israel for the unrestricted import of these, and other, materials.

At the same time, the Department for International Development (DFID) will consider favourably any alternative construction proposals which are practical, cost-effective, and meet the needs of the beneficiary population.

Palestinians: Utilities

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 30 November 2009, Official Report, column 436W, on Gaza: utilities, what remedial action his Department has taken to address the contamination of water supplies in Gaza; and what the Government’s policy is on the supply of clean water to Gaza. (307175)

The Department for International Development (DFID) is supporting a number of projects to increase the supply of clean water in Gaza. DFID is supporting the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) in coordinating the international response on water and sanitation. We are also providing funding to Oxfam and Action Against Hunger to supply drinking water to vulnerable communities and carry out emergency rehabilitation of water infrastructure. Projects funded by DFID have helped improve access to water for over 335,000 people.

Restrictions placed on materials entering Gaza have limited the capacity to treat contaminated water or run desalination plants. We continue to lobby the Israeli Government to allow into Gaza the essential materials required to repair Gaza’s water and sanitation infrastructure.

Security

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many UK private military and security companies have been awarded contracts by his Department to carry out work in (a) Afghanistan, (b) Iraq, (c) Sudan, (d) Israel, (e) Somalia, (f) Pakistan, (g) Colombia, (h) Ethiopia and (i) Eritrea in (i) 2005, (ii) 2006, (iii) 2007, (iv) 2008, (v) 2009 and (vi) future years; and what the monetary value is of each contract. (306912)

The Department for International Development (DFID) has not awarded any contracts to UK private military or security companies to carry out work in the listed countries during the periods stated.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many third sector agencies operating in (a) Afghanistan and (b) Iraq and receiving government funding are employing private military and security companies. (307009)

None of the NGOs receiving funding through the Department for International Development’s (DFID) bilateral programmes in Afghanistan and Iraq employ either private military or security companies.

Sri Lanka: Internally Displaced Persons

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what assessment has been made of the Sri Lankan government’s progress in resettling internally displaced persons in the north of the country; and if he will make a statement. (307997)

The United Nations reported that as of the 10 December 2009 approximately 160,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) have been released from the closed camps in Sri Lanka. Of this number, around 131,000 people have been returned to their districts of origin and 29,000 people are either living with host families or in institutions. This represents progress by the Government of Sri Lanka towards their own target of returning 80 per cent. of the IDP population from the camps to their areas of origin by the end of 2009.

However, we are concerned that the conditions for returning IDPs are often poor and humanitarian access for UN agencies and NGOs to assist this population remains restricted. The UK Government continue to press the Government of Sri Lanka for humanitarian access to all returning IDPs as a priority. I refer the hon. Gentleman to my written ministerial statement to the House on 24 November 2009, Official Report, columns 61-63WS.

Health

Ambulance Services: Standards

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what clinical evidence was used to establish the target emergency response time for (a) Category A patients at eight minutes and (b) Category B patients at 19 minutes; and what research his Department has (i) commissioned and (ii) evaluated on the effectiveness of those response times. (307428)

The eight minute response time standard for Category A (immediately life-threatening) calls is based on clinical evidence that shows that within the first 10 minutes of a sudden cardiac arrest, a patient's survival rate improves 10 per cent. for every minute that is saved by getting the defibrillator to the patient (Eisenberg, Horwood and Cummins 1990). Category B offers a fast response for those patients presenting conditions that are serious but not immediately life-threatening.

In 2006, The Department commissioned an evaluation on ambulance response time targets from the University of Sheffield titled ‘The costs and benefits of changing ambulance service response time performance standards’.

Basildon and Thurrock University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) when he was first informed of the high standardised mortality rates at Basildon and Thurrock NHS Foundation Trust; and if he will make a statement; (303856)

(2) how many reports he has received of high standardised mortality rates in the last 12 months; and to which hospitals such reports related.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health on what date his Department was first informed of the high standardised mortality rates at Basildon and Thurrock University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. (304701)

Hospital Standardised Mortality Rates have been published on the NHS Choices website since April 2009 and are normally updated monthly. However, it can take several months to verify and check the raw data before they can be used reliably and placed on the website.

In addition, the Care Quality Commission alerts individual national health statistics organisations to high specialty mortality ratios and they can then pursue any issue arising with the NHS organisation concerned until it is satisfactorily resolved. The Department does not routinely receive reports of high specialty mortality ratios on open cases at individual trusts.

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State made an oral statement about Basildon and Thurrock NHS Foundation Trust in the House on 30 November 2009, Official Report, column 855.

Breast Cancer

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many hospital admissions there were (a) in total and (b) in each (i) primary care trust area of responsibility and (ii) cancer network area of responsibility where a diagnosis of breast cancer was recorded in the Hospital Episodes Statistics Database in each of the last five years. (307667)

I refer the hon. Member to the written answer I gave him on 26 November 2009, Official Report, column 343W.

Burns: Merseyside

To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether he expects to receive any further recommendations or reports from the Northern Burn Care review relating to the provision of burn care services in Merseyside; and if he will make a statement. (308031)

On 11 November 2009 NHS North West published a statement concluding that there was no compelling evidence to demonstrate that the new supra regional service would improve upon existing outcomes for patients with the most severe burns. They did, however, agree to re-examine proposals if there was evidence to demonstrate that supra regional centres would provide significantly improved outcomes and sustainable services for the population of Northern England, North Wales and Isle of Man.

In the meantime, the Northern Burn Care Network continues to work with all specialist burn care services across Northern England, North Wales and Isle of Man to improve the quality of services across the whole patient pathway and to meet the National Burn Care Standards.

Cancer: Health Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much was spent per head on cancer treatment and services in (a) England, (b) the South West Strategic Health Authority and (c) each primary care trust within the South West Strategic Health Authority in each financial year from 1997-98 to 2008-09. (307368)

The information is not available in the format requested.

The following table shows an estimate of the gross expenditure on cancers and tumours per head of population for the last five available financial years for England. This information was first collected in 2003-04 and is not available for any previous years.

Estimated gross expenditure on cancer and tumours (all types) at England level from 2003-04 to 2007-08

Financial year

£ per head of population

2003-04

68.85

2004-05

76.73

2005-06

87.50

2006-07

86.23

2007-08

97.92

Source:

Department of Health Resource Accounts

The following table shows an estimate of the gross expenditure on cancers and tumours per head of population for the same period for South West Strategic Health Authority (SHA) and those primary care trusts (PCTs) serving the South West SHA area.

Estimated gross expenditure on cancer and tumours (all types) from 2003-04 to 2007-08 for the South West SHA and those PCTs within the South West SHA area

£ per head of unified weighted population

National health service organisation

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

South West SHA

77.47

84.52

96.38

83.21

103.42

Bath and North East Somerset PCT

92.11

99.42

97.25

87.08

132.35

Bournemouth and Poole Teaching PCT

89.87

79.23

88.01

116.72

113.67

Bristol Teaching PCT

82.54

83.46

87.32

86.87

97.47

Cornwall and Isles of Scilly PCT

75.47

88.40

99.04

68.39

94.73

Devon PCT

78.19

85.66

105.94

78.71

114.78

Dorset PCT

78.87

82.53

91.80

79.12

104.84

Gloucestershire PCT

85.10

97.76

109.79

78.55

106.15

North Somerset PCT

71.75

82.51

110.19

98.14

107.18

Plymouth Teaching PCT

69.40

75.24

87.25

78.65

78.70

Somerset PCT

71.47

85.99

89.95

82.62

102.33

South Gloucestershire PCT

72.39

58.80

98.33

75.15

95.43

Swindon PCT

55.97

67.60

74.83

83.86

86.98

Torbay Care Trust

91.28

110.18

105.62

104.01

112.63

Wiltshire PCT

66.92

76.47

91.20

79.86

98.75

Notes:

1. PCT-level Figures for 2003-04 are net expenditure per head of unified weighted population. PCT-level figures for 2004-05 onwards are net expenditure per head of unified weighted population, adjusted to add back expenditure from sources outside the national health service and to deduct expenditure on other PCT's populations incurred through lead commissioning arrangements.

2. SHA-level expenditure per head is calculated using the combined expenditure and population figures of each PCT within the SHA area.

Source:

Department of Health Resource Accounts

The figures in these tables include primary prescribing but exclude General Medical Services and Personal Medical Services expenditure and any prevention-related expenditure, such as screening.

Care Quality Commission: Expenditure

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department has spent on the Care Quality Commission since the Commission's formation. (307699)

The Care Quality Commission was formally established on 1 October 2008. The Commission published its report and accounts for the period 1 October 2008 to 30 March 2009 in July 2009.

The Commission commenced its regulatory responsibilities on 1 April 2009. The agreed revenue funding for the Commission from the Department in the 2009-10 financial year is £137.4 million, of which, £38.3 million is funding to support the transition from the previous regulators. The agreed capital funding for the Commission from the Department for 2009-10 is £17.4 million.

Carers

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent estimate has been made of the number of carers in England. (308148)

The main source of information that the Department uses for the number of carers is the 2001 Census.

Nomis, a web-based database, run by the University of Durham on behalf of the Office for National Statistics, shows that there were 4.85 million carers in England in 2001.

Dental Services: Learning Disability

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people with learning disabilities had all their teeth removed in 2009; and if he will make a statement. (306807)

Departmental Billing

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many and what proportion of invoices submitted to his Department have been paid within 10 days in each month since October 2008; and if he will make a statement. (307959)

The quantity and proportion of invoices paid within 10 days of receipt to commercial suppliers are shown in the following table.

Month

Quantity of invoices paid within 10 days to commercial suppliers

Proportion of invoices paid within 10 days to commercial suppliers

October 2008

15,403

98.11

November 2008

13,384

98.14

December 2008

14,202

95.69

January 2009

15,830

97.02

February 2009

12,777

78.19

March 2009

16,949

95.56

April 2009

16,250

96.44

May 2009

15,851

95.77

June 2009

18,692

96.39

July 2009

18,174

97.36

August 2009

15,902

97.14

September 2009

18,281

97.98

October 2009

17,142

96.66

November 2009

17,504

94.11

Note:

Payment performance was lower in February 2009 due to the short term impact on Welfare Foods and Healthy Start payments caused by the introduction of a new web based claims system. This system was introduced to bring significant benefits to some of the smaller suppliers who will receive their payments more promptly and more regularly. This new system also provides higher security and validation checks.

Departmental Conferences

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) away days and (b) conferences that took place outside his Department's building attended by civil servants in his Department there have been since 2005; and what the cost was of each. (307516)

The Department is strongly committed to developing its staff and equipping them with the skills, knowledge and expertise they need to carry out their work. Away days and conferences make a significant contribution to such development.

Away days and conferences are typically arranged and booked by individual teams in the Department. No central records of these events are kept and to collect this information would incur disproportionate costs.

Departmental Co-ordination

To ask the Secretary of State for Health on what occasions on (a) Monday 7 December and (b) Tuesday 8 December 2009 he had discussions with Ministers of the Department for Work and Pensions. (307696)

Departmental Information and Communications Technology

To ask the Secretary of State for Health on what pay band his Department's Chief Information Officer (CIO) is employed; whether the CIO is employed on a fixed-term or permanent contract; and what the size is of the budget for which the CIO is responsible in the period 2009-10. (307564)

Christine Connelly (Director General and Chief Information Officer), is in senior civil service payband 3, and was employed on a permanent civil service contract. The overall budget for which the Chief Information Officer is responsible is, in total, £1,485.321 million in 2009-10. This includes those costs of the National Programme for Information Technology (NPfTT) in the national health service which are expected to be incurred in the 2009-10 financial year.

Departmental Internet

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what websites that are within his Department’s responsibility. (308030)

It is unclear what meaning the hon. Member attaches to the word “responsibility” in this context.

The Department contributes directly or indirectly through funds to the following websites, although some are run by other organisations.

www.dh.gov.uk

www.nhs.uk

www.chre.org.uk

www.gscc.org.uk

www.hpa.org.uk

www.hfea.gov.uk

www.hta.gov.uk

www.mhra.gov.uk

www.monitor-nhsft.gov.uk

www.cqc.org.uk/

In addition, the Department is also responsible for reviewing, converging and closing the following sites, as part of its commitment to Cabinet Office under Transformational Government:

www.info.doh.gov.uk/doh/finman.nsf

www.immunisation.nhs.uk

www.performance.doh.gov.uk

www.nhs-procure21.gov.uk

www.18weeks.nhs.uk

www.clean-safe-care.nhs.uk

www.mosaic.nhs.uk

www.valuingpeople.gov.uk

www.info.doh.gov.uk/cmo/cmosur01.nsf/frmcmosurvey

www.hgc.gov.uk

www.irpanel.org.uk

www.condomessentialwear.co.uk

www.breastfeeding.nhs.uk

www.5aday.nhs.uk

www.immunisation.nhs.uk

www.healthystart.nhs.uk

www.nhsidentity.nhs.uk

www.photolibrary.nhs.uk

www.pasa.nhs.uk

www.talktofrank.com

www.info.doh.gov.uk/doh/iar.nsf?open

www.appointments.org.uk

www.info.doh.gov.uk/nhsfactsheets.nsf

www.asthmar-d.org.uk

www.mdx.ac.uk/www/drugsmisuse/

www.disco.port.ac.uk/ictriwww.rddirect.org.uk

www.info.doh.gov.uk/doh/rd2policy.nsf

www.ct-toolkit.ac.uk

www.east-of-england-rdsu.org.uk

www.healthtechnologyportal.org.uk

www.rdsu.org.uk

www.rdinfo.org.uk

www.rdlearning.org.uk

www.socialworkandcare.co.uk

www.nhsplus.nhs.uk

www.smokefreeengland.co.uk

www.healthystart.nhs.uk

www.hsru.co.uk

www.info.doh.gov.uk/sar/cmopatie.nsf

www.info.doh.gov.uk/nhs/cdoweb.nsf/Main?OpenFrameset

www.buginvestigators.co.uk

www.arsac.org.uk

www.comare.org.uk

www.multites.com/dhthesaurus

www.info.doh.gov.uk/Sect64/S64users.nsf

www.shape.dh.gov.uk

www.adb.dh.gov.uk

www.nibsc.ac.uk

www.expertpatients.nhs.uk

www.pharmacopoeia.org.uk

www.nhscommslink.nhs.uk

www.sexualhealthprofessional.org.uk

www.info.doh.gov.uk/cfs/cfsusers.nsf/

www.info.doh.gov.uk/Carers/Carersweb.Nsf/vwWebHome

www.info.doh.gov.uk/nhs/cdoweb.nsf/Main?OpenFrameset

www.endoflifecare.nhs.uk

www.connectingforhealth.nhs.uk

Departmental Public Expenditure

To ask the Secretary of State for Health with reference to paragraph 6.24, page 103 of the pre-Budget report, Cm 7747, what his Department's planned (a) total, (b) resource, (c) capital and (d) near-cash resource expenditure is in each year until 2012-13. (307754)

The Government have not done a spending review at this stage, and therefore, the specific numbers requested in the question are not available.

Dietary Supplements: Health Hazards

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what (a) impact assessment and (b) economic impact assessment has been conducted in respect of the proposed restriction of sale of food supplements above a certain potency; and if he will make a statement. (307122)

An initial impact assessment on the setting of minimum and maximum levels of vitamins and minerals in food supplements was developed by the Food Standards Agency (FSA) in early 2007 with advice from better regulation teams at the FSA and Cabinet Office in order to obtain the views of stakeholders at an early stage and to inform the UK's negotiating position. The agency continues to gather information for, and develop, the impact assessment in consultation with industry.

A European Commission-sponsored analysis of the economic, social and environmental impact of the policy options for the establishment of maximum levels for vitamins and minerals in food supplements was undertaken in 2008. The United Kingdom food supplements industry provided relevant data. The European Commission has indicated that this impact assessment will accompany its proposals on maximum levels when they are issued.

The FSA will make a detailed assessment of the likely impact of setting maximum levels when the levels are set out in formal proposals. The FSA will carry out a full public consultation on the Commission's proposals and its draft impact assessment at that time.

Disabled: Social Security Benefits

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many respondees to the Social Care Green Paper (a) supported and (b) opposed changes to attendance allowance and disability living allowance. (307690)

The public consultation on the Green Paper “Shaping the Future of Care Together”, received around 29,000 responses overall. Analysis of all the responses is currently under way, and it would be misleading to comment or provide data on the results until this is analysis is fully completed. The Government will be publishing an analysis of the consultation early this year.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the proportion of (a) attendance allowance and (b) disability living allowance which is typically spent on (i) activities of daily living and (ii) instrumental activities of daily living. (307692)

To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Work and Pensions on 8 December 2009, Official Report, column 206, what plans the Government has to disburse (a) attendance allowance and disability living allowance and (b) a cash equivalent through local authorities. (307695)

If disability benefits for older people are reformed as part of the National Care Service, those receiving the affected benefits at the time of reform would continue to receive the same level of cash support. We will give more details about the National Care Service offer in our White Paper later this year.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) pursuant to the contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Work and Pensions on 8 December 2009, Official Report, column 154, whether an equivalent level of support includes non-care services currently purchased by money made available through attendance allowance or disability living allowance; and whether an assessment for cash disbursement includes non-care services currently purchased by money made available through these allowances; (307715)

(2) whether he plans to limit the services on which people may spend their entitlement under the Government’s proposals for the care system.

We have not taken any decisions on whether some disability benefits for older people will be reformed in the new care and support system. If disability benefits for older people are reformed as part of the National Care Service, those receiving the affected benefits at the time of reform would continue to receive the same level of cash support. We also know that the flexibility of disability benefits is valued by those who receive them, and we want to ensure that those in receipt of affected benefits at the time of reform retain control over how they spend their cash support.

Under the new care and support system, once people are assessed they will get a personal budget rather than being told what services they should receive and will receive support in using this resource. Some people will choose to take their budget as cash, and pay for everything directly themselves. Others will prefer to let someone else manage the funding on their behalf—either someone from the local authority or a family member or friend. People will have the control to get the services they want.

We will give more details about the National Care Service offer in our White Paper later this year.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether people currently eligible for (a) attendance allowance and (b) disability living allowance would receive (i) an equivalent level of support, (ii) an equivalent cash payment and (iii) an equivalent cash payment in addition to any other funds received under the proposals in the Government’s Social Care Green Paper. (307717)

As we said in the Green Paper, if we were to draw some disability benefits for older people into the new National Care Service, we would create a new offer for individuals with care needs. This support would be delivered in line with the best principles of the current benefits system: a universal entitlement, with flexible methods of payment, and a focus on lower-level needs and prevention. It is our aim to deliver a better joined-up service, with people only needing one assessment of their needs to gain access to a whole range of care and support services. We will give more details about the National Care Service offer in our White Paper later this year.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what (a) assessment he has made of and (b) modelling his Department has undertaken on the relationship between the group that currently receives (i) attendance allowance and (ii) disability living allowance and groups that would receive support under the Government’s proposed reform for the social care system. (307718)

We have not taken any decisions on whether some benefits for older people will be reformed in the new care and support system. If we do decide to integrate some benefits for older people into the new care and support system, we will provide further details in our White Paper later this year.

However, we said in our Green Paper “Shaping the Future of Care and Support Together” that we think we should create a new and better care and support system, looking at how we can make the best use of public money to provide a joined-up, consistent and fair care and support system. This would enable the greatest public support to go to those who will benefit from it most, both people who have developed low levels of need and people with high levels of need, and would ensure a fair and consistent allocation of resources. We want to make sure that people with low to moderate needs continue to get the support they need to live independently, building on the role that disability benefits play and considering how this might be best achieved in a new care and support system.

The Personal Social Services Research Unit, which is part of the London School of Economics, has been commissioned by the Department to conduct detailed financial modelling of the new care and support system. Their methodology and interim report was published in July on their website at: www.pssru.ac.uk/pdf/dp2644.pdf, and in the impact assessment published alongside the Green Paper. This work is ongoing.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the number of people who are eligible for (a) attendance allowance and (b) disability living allowance who would cease to receive support under each proposal set out in the Green Paper on Social Care. (307719)

We have not taken any decisions on whether some benefits for older people will be reformed in the new care and support system. If disability benefits for older people are reformed as part of the National Care Service, those receiving the affected benefits at the time of reform would continue to receive the same level of cash support. We will give more details about the National Care Service offer in our White Paper later this year.

Health Professions: Complaints

To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether his Department holds information on complaints made to the General Medical Council against medical practitioners. (307347)

The Department does not hold information on complaints made to the General Medical Council (which is an independent regulatory body) against medical practitioners. Information relating to the GMC’s fitness to practice function is available from the GMC, a summary of which is published in their annual report, which is available on their website at:

http://www.gmc-uk.org/search.asp?client=gmc_frontend&site =gmc_collection&output=xml_no_dtd&proxystylesheet=gmc_ frontend&ie=UTF-8&q=annual%2Breport%2B2008& partialfields=&btnG=Google+Search&num=10&getfields= description&start=0&-as_sitesearch=http://www.gmc-uk.org/concerns&filter=0&txtKeywords=annual%Breport%2B2008&cbo Section=&cboUserType=

or by writing to them at GMC, Regent’s Place, 350 Euston Road, London NW1 3JN.

Health: Learning Disability

To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 26 November 2009, Official Report, column 354W, on health: learning disabilities, when he plans to publish the independent survey of activity on the directed enhanced service of health checks for those with learning disabilities. (307701)

Hospital Beds

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many bed days at Ashford and St Peters NHS Trust were taken by patients who had already been cleared for discharge in each of the last three years. (304742)

The Care Quality Commission (CQC), formerly the Healthcare Commission, reports in detail on delayed transfers of care at national health service trusts each year, with the exception of 2007-08, when this was not used as a indicator. CQC information about delayed transfers of care for Ashford and St. Peter’s NHS Trust for 2006-07 and 2008-09 can be found at:

2006-07

http://2007ratings.healthcarecommission.org.uk/healthcareproviders/searchforhealthcareproviders.cfm/widCalll/customWidgets.content_view_l/cit_id/11101/element/ET_AS_T004

2008-09

http://2009ratings.cqc.org.uk/findcareservices/informationabouthealthcareservices/overallperformance/searchfororganisation.cfm?widCalll=customWidgets.content_view_ l&cit_id=RTK&element=1114&parentelement=ET

Hospitals: Complaints

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many complaints the Care Quality Commission has received regarding the cleanliness and hygiene of acute hospitals since its inception. (307698)

The Care Quality Commission does not have a role in following up individual complaints. The Commission has advised us that when it does receive such complaints, it passes them on to the relevant body but it does not record the number of such complaints received.

Kidneys: Injuries

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he plans to take in response to each of the eight principal recommendations made in the recently published National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death report on acute kidney injury. (307637)

Dr. Donal O'Donoghue, National Clinical Director for Kidney Care, has written to the chief executive of the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death further to the report on acute kidney injury. The letter outlines a series of actions that the Department, working with a range of national health service, professional, and patients' organisations will oversee at the national level to improve the prevention, detection and management of acute kidney injury (acute renal failure).

A copy of the letter will be placed in the Library.

Muscular Dystrophy: Greater London

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what steps he is taking to ensure that patients with muscular dystrophy in London have access to NHS-funded muscular dystrophy care advisers; and if he will make a statement; (307434)

(2) what discussions he has had with the London Specialised Commissioning Group on a review of neuromuscular services in London; and if he will make a statement.

No discussions have been held with the London Specialised Commissioning Group on a review of neuromuscular services in that region.

It is the responsibility of primary care trusts to ensure the provision of services for neuromuscular dystrophy patients in that region, including access to national health service funded muscular dystrophy care advisers.

NHS: Buildings

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the risk-adjusted backlog maintenance cost for the NHS in (a) England and (b) each strategic health authority has been in each year since 1997; and what the maintenance backlog to reach estate code condition B was in (i) England and (ii) each strategic health authority in each such year. (308093)

The information held by the Department is shown in the following tables.

National health service organisations are responsible for the provision and maintenance of facilities to support the delivery of high quality clinical services. Therefore, the NHS will locally prioritise investment to reduce backlog maintenance based on risk assessment, reconfiguration planning and available resources. The majority of backlog maintenance relates to low priority work, which trusts will undertake through maintenance programmes. Where higher risks are present, work will be undertaken as a priority. While levels of backlog maintenance vary across the NHS, it is estimated that around 75 per cent. of the total costs to eradicate backlog maintenance are concentrated in 20 per cent. of organisations.

The Department collects data on backlog maintenance and risk adjusted backlog maintenance annually from NHS trusts through its Estates Returns Information Collection (ERIC). The data provided are not amended centrally and the responsibility for its accuracy lies with the contributing NHS organisations.

The collection of data on risk-adjusted backlog maintenance was first introduced in 2004-05 and therefore information prior to that reporting year is not available centrally. The 28 strategic health authorities were created in 2002-03 and re-organised in 2006-07 into 10.

Risk-adjusted backlog maintenance cost for the NHS in England

National total

Risk adjusted backlog maintenance (£ million)

2004-05

1,342

2005-06

1,744

2006-07

1,542

2007-08

1,854

2008-09

1,783

Risk-adjusted backlog maintenance cost for the NHS at each strategic health authority

£ million

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

East Midlands

92

118

65

154

130

East of England

115

116

107

152

128

London

346

535

451

489

424

North East

60

73

58

69

59

North West

86

108

111

96

120

South Central

80

115

103

136

118

South East Coast

121

139

140

159

137

South West

88

116

76

129

141

West Midlands

253

296

265

259

251

Yorkshire and the Humber

101

128

164

211

275

National total

1,342

1,744

1,542

1,854

1,783

Total backlog maintenance cost for the NHS in England

National total

Total backlog maintenance (£ million)

1997-98

2,836

1998-99

3,027

1999-2000

3,108

2000-01

3,242

2001-02

3,378

2002-03

3,518

2003-04

3,198

2004-05

3,142

2005-06

3,684

2006-07

3,740

2007-08

4,044

2008-09

4,085

(ii) Total maintenance backlog cost for the NHS at each strategic health authority

£ million

Total backlog maintenance by the 28 strategic health authorities

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

Avon, Gloucestershire and Wiltshire

177

91

128

130

Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire

94

82

136

138

Birmingham and the Black Country

244

262

286

360

Cheshire and Merseyside

153

75

53

69

County Durham and Tees Valley

62

29

57

63

Cumbria and Lancashire

97

64

58

58

Dorset and Somerset

47

10

18

15

Essex

82

76

93

77

Greater Manchester

205

172

117

122

Hampshire and Isle of Wight

89

80

102

131

Kent and Medway

106

114

109

151

Leicestershire, Northamptonshire and Rutland

109

118

100

95

Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire

99

87

63

78

North and East Yorkshire and Northern Lincolnshire

72

79

85

93

North Central London

172

189

135

241

North East London

147

174

168

121

North West London

221

344

266

456

Northumberland, Tyne and Wear

81

70

76

74

Shropshire and Staffordshire

98

100

94

90

South East London

164

145

119

154

South West London

161

154

176

204

South West Peninsula

41

18

31

70

South Yorkshire

69

46

49

67

Surrey and Sussex

108

85

75

94

Thames Valley

151

106

124

149

Trent

148

151

146

106

West Midlands South SHA

94

90

84

92

West Yorkshire

224

188

193

185

National total

3,518

3,198

3,142

3,684

£ million

Total backlog maintenance by the 10 strategic health authorities

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

East Midlands

297

285

279

East of England

290

363

371

London

1,110

1,106

1,088

North East

132

148

145

North West

309

309

322

South Central

276

307

273

South East Coast

249

306

297

South West

173

249

296

West Midlands

519

553

525

Yorkshire and the Humber

383

418

489

National total

3,740

4,044

4,085

NHS: Cost Effectiveness

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what key efficiency gains are under consideration in the national health service in order to provide resources for front-line services. (308050)

The national health service locally and regionally is best placed to identify savings based on their circumstances and priorities. However, NHS staff have told us that they need support to make these changes. Drawing on the available evidence and on the ideas and experience of front-line staff, we will back major programmes of work to support commissioners and providers. These programmes will be locally led, but will have national support, and will ensure that innovation is spread rapidly.

As part of these programmes, we are exploring a number of areas under the HM Treasury-led Public Value Programme, including:

commissioning;

tariff;

estates;

long term conditions; and

community services.

We are also working actively with our arms length bodies, NHS organisations and others including HM Treasury and the Shareholder Executive to implement the recommendations of the Operational Efficiency Programme. Rather than initiating new projects, in many areas this builds upon significant progress made by the Department and the NHS in recent years. For example, the establishment of NHS Shared Business Services, which is now delivering shared back office services for over 100 NHS organisations.

NHS: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Health with reference to paragraph 6.24, page 103 of the pre-Budget report, Cm 7747, what his Department's plans are for NHS (a) total, (b) resource, (c) capital and (d) near-cash resource expenditure in each year until 2012-13. (307752)

As set out in paragraph 6.23, page 103 of the pre-Budget report, the Government have not done a spending review at this stage, and therefore, the specific numbers requested in the question are not available.

NHS: Information and Communications Technology

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) whether he plans to renegotiate the National programme for IT contracts for the delivery of the Care Records Service with (a) BT for its delivery of the Spine, (b) CSC for its delivery of iSOFT's Lorenzo and (c) BT for its delivery of Cerner Millennium; (307705)

(2) what components of the National programme for IT will have their budgets ring-fenced from the proposed efficiency saving outlined in the pre-Budget report, Cm 7747.

Decisions on where efficiency savings will be found remain to be taken. They will depend partly on the outcome of discussions with suppliers about the potential for reductions to the scope of the systems, and any contractual consequences. We will also look carefully at the savings that can be made from the costs of managing delivery of the programme.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health by what date BT is expected to complete the implementation of Cerner Millennium in each of the 12 trusts in its Southern Local Service Provider structure; and how much BT will be paid on completion of this work. (307707)

BT took over responsibility for the Cerner Millennium system at eight sites in the southern programme for information technology (IT) area, which were previously covered by a contract with Fujitsu Services Ltd, in July 2009. BT has been contracted to upgrade six of the trusts to an enhanced version of Cerner Millennium. BT first needs to transfer these systems from Fujitsu's data centre to its own, and is on schedule to complete this work before the end of March 2010. Timing of completion of the upgrades will depend on the outcome of ongoing discussion between the national health service locally and the company. Discussions are continuing with BT with regard to implementing Cerner Millennium at some further sites in the southern programme for IT area.

The increase in the total lifetime value of the BT local service provider contract consequent on transfer to the company of elements of work in the southern programme area previously covered under contract with Fujitsu, assuming all the requirements are successfully delivered, is £546 million.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) pursuant to the pre-Budget report, Cm 7747, what discussions his Department has had with (a) HM Treasury and (b) suppliers to the National Programme for IT on changes to the National Programme for IT budgets; and on what dates such meetings took place; (307704)

(2) what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the National Programme for IT and the front line of the NHS.

Since its inception, the Department has consulted and communicated with its national health service stakeholders, including clinicians, senior NHS managers and information management and technology staff, and the medical professional representative and health regulatory bodies, on a frequent and regular basis about all aspects of the NHS information technology programme. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State has also often discussed issues relating to the programme in his regular meetings with the Chancellor.

As part of the current Government-wide drive to find efficiency savings and better value for money on major projects, officials are holding ongoing discussions with the Treasury, and with suppliers, about how these might be generated in relation to the national programme.

NHS: Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many full-time equivalent (a) managers and (b) senior managers were in post in each NHS trust in each of the last five years. (308029)

A table giving the number of managers and senior managers in post in each, trust in each of the last five years has been placed in the Library.

North East: Neuromuscular Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) whether he has had discussions with the North East Specialised Commissioning Group on a review of neuromuscular services in that region; (307507)

(2) if he will take steps to ensure that vulnerable patients with muscular dystrophy in the North East have access to NHS-funded muscular dystrophy care advisers.

No discussions have been held with the North East Specialised Commissioning Group (NESCG) on a review of neuromuscular services in that region.

It is the responsibility of the NESCG to ensure the provision of services for neuromuscular dystrophy patients in that region, including access to national health service funded muscular dystrophy care advisers.

Obesity: Surgery

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many non-UK citizens received gastric band surgery in hospitals and clinics in England and Wales in 2008. (306110)

The information is not available in the form requested. The NHS Information Centre does not collect information relating to activities in Wales, nor is information recorded on patients who are non-UK citizens. However, information is collected on a patients’ place of residence.

Data for 2008-09 show that there were four finished consultant episodes for non-UK resident patients who received gastric band surgery in hospitals and clinics in England.

Note:

The NHS Information Centre do not collect data relating to Wales. Data is provided relating to activities in English NHS hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector.

Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES)

Record details on residence (i.e. where the patient is living) rather than citizenship. Non-UK residence does not imply non-UK citizenship, for example, a UK citizen might be resident in France.

Finished Consultant Episode (FCE)

A FCE is defined as a continuous period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. FCEs are counted against the year in which they end. The figures do not represent the number of different patients, as a person may have more than one episode of care within the same stay in hospital or in different stays in the same year.

Number of episodes with a (named) main or secondary procedure

The figure represents the number of episodes where the procedure (or intervention) was recorded in any of the 24 operative procedure fields in a HES record. A record is only included once in each count, even if the procedure is recorded in more than one operative procedure field of the record. More procedures are carried out than episodes with a main or secondary procedure. For example, patients undergoing a ‘cataract operation’ would tend to have at least two procedures—removal of the faulty lens and the fitting of a new one—counted in a single episode.

OPCS 4.4 codes

The OPCS 4.4 codes used for gastric band surgery are:

G30.3—Partitioning of stomach using band (Insertion of a gastric band)

G38.7—Removal of gastric band (Removal of a gastric band)

The code G30.8 (Other specified plastic operations on stomach—Adjustment of gastric band) has not been included owing to the fact that though the code may include the adjustment of a gastric band, it is not limited to that procedure.

Data quality

HES are compiled from data sent by over 300 NHS trusts and primary care trusts (PCTs) in England. Data is also received from a number of independent sector organisations for activity commissioned by the English NHS. The NHS Information Centre for health and social care liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data via HES processes. While this brings about improvement over time, some shortcomings remain.

Source:

Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), The NHS Information Centre for health and social care

Out of Area Treatment: Wales

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients from Wales received treatment at Hereford Hospitals NHS Trust in each of the last five years; what the cost of such treatment was in each year; and if he will make a statement. (307284)

Information on the number of patients from Wales who received treatment at Hereford Hospitals NHS Trust in each of the last five years is not held centrally.

Treatment is measured as a count of finished consultant episodes (FCEs)1. The number of FCEs at the trust where the strategic health authority (SHA) of residence was Wales2 in each of the last five years is shown in the following table.

1 Finished consultant episodes (FCE). A FCE is a continuous period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. FCEs are counted against the year in which they end. Figures do not represent the number of different patients, as a person may have more than one episode of care within the same stay in hospital or in different stays in the same year.

2 SHA/primary care trust (PCT) of residence. The SHA or PCT containing the patient's normal home address. This does not necessarily reflect where the patient was treated as they may have travelled to another SHA/PCT for treatment.

Source:

Hospital Episode Statistics, The NHS Information Centre for health and social care

Number of FCEs where the SHA of residence was Wales

2008-09

5,058

2007-08

4,483

2006-07

4,484

2005-06

4,550

2004-05

456

Information on the cost of treatment of patients from Wales at Hereford Hospitals NHS Trust is not held centrally.

Smoking

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what percentage of people (a) under the age of 18 years old, (b) between 18 and 24 years old and (c) over the age of 24 years smoked in England in each year since 2000. (308085)

The information is not available in the requested format.

The percentage of children aged 11 to 15 who are regular smokers (smoke at least one cigarette a week) and occasional smokers (smoke less than one cigarette a week) is available in Table 2.1 of the publication ‘Smoking, drinking and drug use among young people in England, 2008’. Data are available from 2000 to 2008. This publication has already been placed in the Library and is available on the following link:

www.ic.nhs.uk/pubs/sdd08fullreport

The percentage of adults aged 16 and over in England, who are current smokers is presented in Table 2.1 of ‘Statistics on Smoking, England 2009’. Data are available for each year between 2000 and 2007 for the following age breakdowns: aged 16-19, 20-24, 25-34, 35-49, 50-59 and 60 and above. This publication has already been placed in the Library and is available at the following link:

www.ic.nhs.uk/pubs/smoking09

Data for adults and children are not directly comparable as definitions for smoking are different in adults and children and the data were collected in different surveys.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what impact assessments were undertaken of the effects on licensed premises of the ban on smoking in public places were carried out (a) before and (b) since the implementation of the ban. (308681)

The Regulatory Impact Assessment for the smokefree element of the Health Act 2006 is published, a copy has already been placed in the Library, and is available on the Department’s website at:

www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Legislation/Regulatoryimpactassessment/DH_4138930

We have given a commitment to review the impact of the smokefree law three years after its implementation on 1 July 2007. The review will take place in the latter part of 2010. In preparation for the review, the Department has commissioned a number of research reports. Once these reports have been completed and peer reviewed they will be published and will be given full consideration as part of the review.

Social Enterprise Investment Fund

To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 8 December 2009, Official Report, column 288W, on the Social Enterprise Investment Fund, on what date each organisation in receipt of a grant from the Social Enterprise Investment Fund in 2009-10 (a) applied for and (b) received its grant. (307684)

The following table shows the organisations that have received money from the Social Enterprise Investment Fund in 2009-10.

Organisation

Application date

Disbursement date

Grant or loan

Deep Green Care Community

1 February 2009

24 September 2009

Grant

Eagle Recruitment Centre

1 June 2009

1 October 2009

Grant

Paul Lambden (East Lanes PCT)

21 June 2009

6 October 2009

Grant

Destiny Support

31 July 2008

29 July 2009

Grant

MiLife UK CIC

1 August 2009

15 October 2009

Loan

DeCoda

1 April 2009

29 September 2009

Loan

Caleb CIC

4 August 2009

2 November 2009

Loan

To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 8 December 2009, Official Report, column 288W, on the Social Enterprise Investment Fund, how much the Social Enterprise Investment Fund has spent on business support services since July 2008; and how many organisations have made use of the business support services provided by the Fund in (a) 2008-09 and (b) 2009-10. (307685)

In 2008-09, the fund manager did not offer business support services. In 2009-10, business support services were offered and 31 organisations have made use of the services to date, and received £64,686 in total.

Social Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether the provision of free personal care at home falls under the (a) partnership, (b) insurance or (c) comprehensive model of the Social Care Green Paper. (307674)

It is very important not to conflate the funding for a national care service with the funding for the Government's Personal Care at Home Bill. The Bill is about putting more money into the system as soon as possible to help people with the highest needs live independently at home. The Green Paper is about building a sustainable system for the future. We have been consulting widely on how to best do that.

All the proposals outlined in the Bill are funded through efficiencies and reprioritisations in the Department of Health and in Local Government. The Bill will protect those who currently receive personal care services for free from changes in the future. It will also help around 130,000 people who need home care for the first time to regain their independence. This intensive help, or “re-ablement”, will help people to regain their independence and prevent ill health. This means people will maintain their dignity and rebuild their confidence so that they can live at home for longer. As well as providing a free personal care service to thousands of people, the Bill will also benefit their families.

There are still huge challenges in the care and support system and the Green Paper sought people's views on how we resolve those challenges and create a sustainable system for the long term. But we cannot stand still in meeting the challenge of rising costs now. The Bill will help support those who are currently most in need of personal care in their own homes.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether an assessment for a package of care as proposed in the Social Care Green Paper includes assessing the extra costs of being disabled in the same terms at the White Paper in which that allowance was proposed. (307691)

The Green Paper “Shaping the Future of Care Together” proposed a new nationally consistent care assessment process. We will give more details about the National Care Service offer in our White Paper later this year, and this will include information on the care assessment process.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 9 December 2009, Official Report, column 498W, on social services, from which of his Department's budgets he plans to fund the transition costs. (307726)

A one-off transition cost of £335 million is set out in the impact assessment for the first half-year of the policy, from October 2010. Of this, £210 million will come from the Department and £125 million from local government efficiency savings.

For details of the budgets which will be re-prioritised to meet these first half-year costs, I refer the hon. Member to the reply I gave to the hon. Member for Boston and Skegness (Mark Simmonds) on 8 December 2009, Official Report, column 296W.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health with reference to paragraph 6.46, pages 109-10 of the pre-Budget report, Cm 7747, how the anticipated savings correlate with the estimate in the impact assessment for his Department's Personal Care at Home Bill that more people will be brought into the state-funded home care system. (307757)

The pre-Budget report announced that councils will make £250 million efficiency savings by 2012-13 from reducing the significant variations in the proportion of funding that councils spend on residential care provision through supporting more people to live for longer in their own homes.

These efficiency savings will be used to help meet the ever growing pressure on budgets from demographic changes and to support more people to live in their homes through the offer of free personal care for those with the greatest need. These savings may be used alongside the funding made available by the Department to deliver the proposals of the Personal Care at Home Bill.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what assessment his Department has made of the ability of local authorities to deliver free personal care to people with (a) disabilities and (b) the highest need; (308024)

(2) what assessment his Department has made of the (a) capacity and (b) capability of local authorities to provide free personal care to all people who need it; and if he will make a statement.

It is the responsibility for each local authority (LA), at a local level, to determine and manage the extent to which they have the ability, capability and capacity to deliver the policy to meet their population needs. The consultation document, “Personal Care at Home-a consultation on proposals for regulation and guidance”, recognises this and, at section 2.4, sets out specific areas for LAs to consider and potential ways in which the Department can support LAs.

The consultation document has already been placed in the Library and on the Department's website at:

www.dh.gov.uk/en/Consultations/Liveconsultations/DH_109139

Social Services: Disabled

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate his Department has made of the annual cost of providing free personal care for people with disabilities; and if he will make a statement. (308022)

I refer the hon. Member to the reply I gave to the hon. Member for Eddisbury (Mr. O'Brien) on 9 December 2009, Official Report, column 497W.

Children, Schools and Families

Autism: Mental Health Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) what steps his Department has taken to ensure that children with an autistic spectrum disorder have appropriate support from Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services; (307299)

(2) whether any Tier 4 child and adolescent mental health services cater exclusively for children with an autistic spectrum disorder;

(3) what autistic-specific training is required of staff working in child and adolescent mental health services Tiers 2 to 4;

(4) whether the proxy indicator used in public service agreement 12 on the development and delivery of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services for children and young people with learning disabilities is intended to cover children with autistic spectrum disorders who do not have a learning disability.

I have been asked to reply.

The Government have taken steps to ensure that Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) are improved for all children and adolescents, including those with an autistic spectrum disorder. The independent CAMHS Review, commissioned by Ministers, reported in November 2008. The Review made 20 recommendations aimed at improving children's and young people's mental health and psychological wellbeing. The Government is shortly to publish a Full Government Response to the Review, aimed at providers and commissioners of services, which describes how professionals can work effectively together so that everyone in the wider children's workforce knows exactly where to turn when a child has emotional wellbeing or mental health needs.

The National Institute for Clinical Excellence is currently developing a clinical guideline on the recognition, referral and diagnosis of Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD).

The children's service mapping exercise in England in 2007-08 found that the number of children and young people supported with ASD had increased from 7,719 in 2006 (7 per cent. of caseload) to 10,231 in 2007 (9 per cent.). 685 CAMHS teams supported ASD children and young people and their families. Of these 108 CAMHS teams reported providing targeted work for children and young people with ASD. Additionally, of the 349 community paediatric services, 193 (55 per cent.) ran ASD clinics.

There are Tier 4 services which cater specifically for children with ASD. Examples include the Hawksmere Children's Unit (Autism Therapy and Education Centre) in Hertfordshire, which is specifically for boys from the age of 13-18 with ASD, and Cygnet Springside, based in the north west and south west of England.

The training of staff is for determination at a local level. Staff dealing with patients with ASD would be expected to be trained to deal with such patients.

Within PSA12 (to improve the health and wellbeing of children and young people) the Government are committed to improving the mental and emotional health and wellbeing of children and young people. Four proxy measures are being used to monitor progress: the development and delivery of CAMHS for children and young people with learning disabilities; appropriate accommodation and support for 16/17 year olds; availability of 24-hour cover to meet urgent mental health needs; and joint commissioning of early intervention support. Services for children and young people with ASD are included in three of these proxies and those who additionally have a learning disability are included in the learning disability proxy.

Building Schools for the Future Programme

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families which local authorities have received no funding under the Building Schools for the Future programme; and if he will make a statement. (303726)

75 local authorities have received no funding under the Building Schools for the Future (BSF) programme. 20 of these have already entered the BSF programme but will not have received any funding by the end of the 2009-10 financial year. These authorities are set out in the following list.

Local authority

Bedford

Brent

Camden

Croydon

Darlington

Hammersmith and Fulham

Havering

Hillingdon

Hounslow

Kingston

Norfolk

Plymouth

Sefton

Staffordshire

Stockton on Tees

Suffolk

Wakefield

Walsall

Warrington

Worcestershire

The remaining 55 local authorities are listed as follows. Those marked with an asterisk have received funding under the BSF One School pathfinder programme.

Local authority

Bath and North East Somerset*

Bexley

Bracknell Forest*

Brighton and Hove

Bromley

Buckinghamshire*

Bury

Calderdale

Cheshire East

Cheshire West and Chester

City of London

Cornwall*

Cumbria

Dorset*

Dudley

East Riding of Yorkshire

East Sussex*

Gloucestershire*

Harrow*

Herefordshire*

Isle of Wight

Isles of Scilly

Lincolnshire

Medway

Merton

Central Bedfordshire

Milton Keynes

North Somerset*

North Yorkshire*

Northamptonshire

Northumberland

Oxfordshire

Reading

Redbridge*

Richmond upon Thames*

Rutland*

Shropshire*

Slough

South Gloucestershire*

Southend-on-Sea*

Stockport

Surrey

Sutton*

Swindon

Thurrock

Torbay*

Trafford

Warwickshire

West Berkshire*

West Sussex*

Wiltshire

Windsor and Maidenhead*

Wirral*

Wokingham*

York*

The DCSF remains committed to the aim of BSF to provide 21st-century teaching and learning facilities for all secondary pupils and staff in England. The following link includes information on the indicative reprioritisation of BSF based on the revised expressions of interest provided in November 2008 by all authorities with projects in waves 7 to 15 of BSF.

http://www.teachernet.gov.uk/management/resourcesfinanceandbuilding/bsf/rnp/

On current timescales it is expected that all local authorities will have completed, or be in the final stages of their BSF projects by 2020.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what measures are in place to ensure that schools being constructed under his Department's Building Schools for the Future programme have high-calibre facilities for education in science, engineering and technology. (309300)

The aim of Building Schools for the Future (BSF), the largest capital investment programme for 50 years, is to provide world-class teaching and learning environments across the whole curriculum, including science, engineering and technology. We have a number of measures in place to support this, including:

PfS standard contract documents

The ‘Facilities and Services Output Specification (Design Brief)’ includes design standards and references for all curriculum subjects. For more information on BSF standard documents, see:

www.partnershipsforschools.org.uk/library/library.jsp

Design guidance: Building Bulletin 80

‘Science Accommodation for Secondary Schools’ and Building Bulletin 81: ‘Design and Technology Accommodation for Secondary Schools’ provide detailed design guidance on space standards, services, furniture and equipment. For more information on the Department's design guidance see:

www.teachernet.gov.uk/schoolbuildings/

Exemplar designs

Project Faraday has developed exemplar designs for school laboratories to meet the needs of 21st century practical science teaching. These exemplar projects, many of which are already built, will inform and inspire all those involved in BSF. For more information on Project Faraday see:

www.teachernet.gov.uk/schoolbuildings/

Children: Day Care

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many childcare settings based at college and universities have closed in each quarter of each of the last five years. (305334)

These are matters for Ofsted. The Chief Inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 10 December 2009:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, for reply.

I am able to provide you with the number of childcare providers based at colleges and universities which have closed in each quarter, since quarter four of 2008. Prior to this, we did not record whether childcare settings were on college or university sites.

Quarter

Period

Number of childcare providers closed

Q4 2008

1 October 2008 to 31 December 2008

0

Q1 2009

1 January 2009 to 31 March 2009

0

Q2 2009

1 April 2009 to 30 June 2009

2

Q3 2009

1 July 2009 to 30 September 2009

3

All data have been retrieved from Ofsted’s database as of 4 December 2009.

A copy of this reply has been sent to Rt Hon Dawn Primarolo MP, Minister of State for Children, Young People and Families, and will be placed in the library of both houses.

Children: Protection

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families who was responsible for drawing up guidance notes for the barring decision making process published in February 2009 by the Board of the Independent Safeguarding Authority; which external bodies were consulted in the preparation of the guidance; how many civil servants from which Departments were involved; what legal advice was sought concerning the guidance; and from whom. (307245)

[holding answer 14 December 2009]: I have been asked to reply.

The Board of the Independent Safeguarding Authority was responsible for the drawing up of the guidance notes for the barring decision making process with input from advisors and support from ISA staff. The Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA) engaged in discussions with over sixty stakeholders and held meetings in October 2008 and January 2009. Stakeholders included the Department for Health, Department for Children Schools and Families, General Social Care Council, General Medical Council, General Teaching Council and the Royal College of Nursing. Civil servants were not involved in the development of the Process or the Guidance as barring decisions are a matter for the ISA. They were included in the consultation process. The Process and Guidance was developed with the close involvement of the Board's legal adviser who is provided by the Treasury Solicitor.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many people have contacted Ofsted's safeguarding children whistleblower hotline in each month since its inception. (307577)

This is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 16 December 2009:

Your recent parliamentary questions have been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for response.

Since 1 April 2009, Ofsted has received 1,292 calls to its whistleblower hotline. Most of these calls were not actually “whistleblowing”, defined as the disclosure of employer malpractice by an employee. Of the 1,292 calls, 26 calls qualified as whistleblowing disclosures under Ofsted's whistleblower procedures. The other calls were either general queries or were complaints about providers, which were not whistleblowing as such, for example a parent making a complaint about a childcare provider.

In addition to calls on the hotline, Ofsted has received 15 whistleblowing disclosures by email and 24 disclosures by letter.

The table at the end of this letter gives a break down of the number of calls by month since the hotline's inception.

A copy of this reply has been sent to Vernon Coaker MP, Minister of State for Schools and Learners, and will be placed in the library of both Houses.

Total number of calls received by Ofsted's whistleblower hotline

Month

Number of calls

April

151

May

126

Jun

148

July

159

August

61

September

172

October

232

November

243

Total

1,292

Class Sizes: Preston

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the average class size in schools in Preston was in (a) 1997 and (b) 2009. (308668)

The average class size of maintained primary schools in Preston was 28.4 in 1997 and 25.3 in 2009; the figures for state funded secondary schools were 21.7 and 20.2 respectively.

Classroom Assistants: South East

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many full-time equivalent teaching assistants there were in (a) maintained nurseries, (b) primary schools, (c) secondary schools, (d) special schools and (e) pupil referral units in each education authority in the South East in each of the last five years. (305611)

The following tables provide the full-time equivalent number of teaching assistants employed in local authority maintained schools in each local authority in the South East Government office region, in each January from 2005 to 2009 broken down by phase of education.

Full-time equivalent number of teaching assistants in service in local authority maintained schools1 by phase of education, South East Government office region, January 2005 to 2009

Nursery

Primary

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

South East

240

260

250

310

320

13,820

13,190

14,280

15,650

16,130

Bracknell Forest

150

120

150

140

180

Windsor and Maidenhead

20

20

20

20

20

140

160

190

210

210

West Berkshire

10

10

10

10

10

300

250

210

240

390

Reading

30

20

30

30

30

190

120

150

260

330

Slough

40

40

40

50

50

340

330

340

420

480

Wokingham

10

10

10

10

10

240

240

250

280

310

Buckinghamshire

10

10

10

10

10

530

650

660

740

680

Milton Keynes

10

10

10

300

360

400

530

610

East Sussex

830

690

750

860

840

Brighton and Hove

10

10

10

240

260

290

460

480

Hampshire

20

30

40

50

50

2,170

2,030

2,140

2,240

2,340

Portsmouth

10

10

430

400

400

460

460

Southampton

10

10

10

10

440

420

450

430

360

Isle of Wight

170

150

200

240

190

Kent

10

3,090

2,810

3,190

3,160

3,120

Medway

630

570

620

560

530

Oxfordshire

30

30

30

30

40

920

820

870

1,140

1,320

Surrey

30

30

20

50

50

1,790

1,740

1,860

1,880

1,830

West Sussex

30

30

20

30

30

930

1,080

1,150

1,400

1,460

Secondary1Special

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

South East

5,140

5,560

5,760

6,000

6,290

2,960

3,100

3,360

3,380

3,660

Bracknell Forest

40

50

30

50

60

10

50

50

60

60

Windsor and Maidenhead

120

120

100

130

130

30

30

40

30

40

West Berkshire

150

140

150

190

190

70

80

90

100

110

Reading

60

50

50

60

50

30

40

40

70

80

Slough

70

80

90

100

90

60

60

70

90

110

Wokingham

100

100

100

120

130

30

30

40

60

70

Buckinghamshire

210

250

280

320

340

200

170

210

250

260

Milton Keynes

160

180

220

250

260

50

110

130

150

160

East Sussex

360

440

420

430

430

180

190

210

240

230

Brighton and Hove

110

110

130

160

180

100

130

110

110

120

Hampshire

640

700

710

700

760

420

420

510

440

520

Portsmouth

140

150

150

170

150

240

80

130

150

130

Southampton

130

150

160

130

120

70

70

60

60

20

Isle of Wight

210

210

210

250

230

60

60

80

80

80

Kent

1,100

1,100

1,210

1,130

1,240

630

710

700

630

760

Medway

220

250

230

250

260

90

110

110

120

120

Oxfordshire

520

590

590

590

570

190

170

240

180

180

Surrey

450

510

520

550

640

320

430

410

330

320

West Sussex

350

390

410

430

450

170

150

140

230

300

Pupil referral unitTotal all schools1

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

South East

230

250

280

370

400

22,400

22,360

23,930

25,710

26,790

Bracknell Forest

10

10

10

210

220

240

250

300

Windsor and Maidenhead

10

10

300

330

350

390

410

West Berkshire

10

10

10

10

10

530

490

470

550

710

Reading

10

10

10

20

20

320

250

280

440

510

Slough

10

20

10

10

20

530

530

550

680

750

Wokingham

380

380

410

480

520

Buckinghamshire

10

10

10

20

10

950

1,100

1,180

1,320

1,300

Milton Keynes

10

20

20

20

10

530

680

770

960

1,050

East Sussex

10

10

10

1,380

1,330

1,380

1,530

1,510

Brighton and Hove

460

510

540

740

780

Hampshire

30

30

40

40

60

3,280

3,210

3,430

3,470

3,740

Portsmouth

20

20

20

830

660

710

780

750

Southampton

10

20

10

20

20

660

660

680

660

520

Isle of Wight

10

10

10

10

20

450

430

500

580

510

Kent

30

40

40

100

100

4,860

4,660

5,140

5,020

5,220

Medway

20

10

30

20

20

960

930

990

950

920

Oxfordshire

10

10

20

20

30

1,670

1,630

1,750

1,960

2,140

Surrey

30

30

20

30

30

2,610

2,720

2,840

2,830

2,870

West Sussex

10

10

10

30

30

1,480

1,660

1,730

2,110

2,270

1 Excludes academies and city technology colleges.

Note:

Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.

Source:

Annual Survey of Teachers in Service and Teacher Vacancies, 618g

Common Assessment Framework

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) which children's services authorities have not yet been inspected under the Common Assessment Framework; (304658)

(2) which children's services authorities will be inspected under the Common Assessment Framework in the next six months.

These are matters for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 9 December 2009:

Your recent parliamentary questions have been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for response.

The Common Assessment Framework is a standardised approach, used at local level, to conducting individual assessments of children's additional needs and deciding how these should be met. The new system for assessing local authority children's services is the Comprehensive Area Assessment (CAA), which came into place from 1 April 2009.1 have assumed your questions relate to the latter.

Under the arrangements for CAA, all local authority children's services have been assessed by Ofsted and received an annual rating for 2009. The ratings, based on a four-point scale, have been published in a letter for each of the 152 local authorities, which is available to view on the Ofsted website. This annual rating of children's services will also form part of the joint inspectorate CAA area and organisational assessments for each of the 152 local authorities, which have now been published on the 'oneplace' website.

Ofsted also introduced unannounced visits to front-line social care services for children and young people from 1 June 2009. As of 7 December 2009, 29 reports have been published and the list can be found in full in Table A at the end of this letter. By the end of June 2010 all local authority children's services will have been subject to such an inspection.

In addition, a three-year programme of full inspections of local authority services for safeguarding and looked after children began in June 2009. As of 7 December 2009, nine local authorities have been inspected. The local authorities are listed in Table B at the end of this letter and the reports have been published on the Ofsted website. Local authorities are given no more than two weeks' notice of an inspection and it would therefore be inappropriate to list the authorities due for inspection in the next six months.

A copy of this reply has been sent to Rt Hon Dawn Primarolo MP, Minister of State for Children, Young People and Families, and will be placed in the library of both Houses.

The 29 local authorities already inspected under the unannounced visits to front-line social care services for children and young people since June 2009.

Bradford

Bristol

Camden

Derbyshire

Essex

Hammersmith and Fulham

Hampshire

Hertfordshire

Kirklees

Knowsley

Lambeth

Lancashire

Leicester City

Lincolnshire

Northamptonshire

Nottinghamshire

Peterborough

Plymouth

Reading

Rotherham

Salford

Sefton

Sheffield

Slough

Surrey

Thurrock

Trafford

West Sussex

Wokingham

The nine local authorities already inspected as part of the three-year programme of full inspections of local authority services for safeguarding and looked after children since June 2009.

Blackpool

Cambridgeshire

Cornwall

Devon

Hillingdon

Hounslow

N. Yorkshire

Staffordshire

Warrington

Co-operative Schools

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families if he will list for each local authority those Co-operative Schools registered with his Department; and if he will indicate what steps his Department has taken to encourage local authorities to expand this number. (307657)

[holding answer 16 December 2009]: Schools are required to notify the Department’s School Organisation Unit if they have changed their status and/or acquired a Trust, but the Department plays no role in decisions on individual cases. According to our records the following schools in the listed local authorities have become co-operative Trust schools.

Local authority

School

Central Bedfordshire

Samuel Whitbread Community College

Derwent Lower School

Etonbury Middle School

Gothic Mede Lower School

Hitchmead Special School

Langford Lower School

Robert Bloomfield Middle School

Thurrock

St. Clere’s School

Suffolk

Orwell High School

Deben High School

Southampton

Upper Shirley High School

Plymouth

Lipson Community College

Dorset

Wey Valley School, The

Wyvern Special School

Telford and Wrekin

The Sutherland School

Kingston Upon Hull

Andrew Marvell Business and Enterprise College

Doncaster

Campsmount Technology College

Bradford

Nab Wood School

Stockport

Reddish Vale Technology College

Wirral

Bebington High Sports College

Blackburn with Darwen

Blakewater College

Bolton

Lever Park School

Cheshire East

Alsager School

Alsager Highfields Primary School

Excalibur Primary School

Pikemere Primary School

Oldham

Hathershaw College of Technology and Sport, The

Broadfield Primary School

It is for the Governing Body of a school—not the local authority—to determine whether or not to acquire a Trust, and to decide which partners it wishes to work with.

However, to access the support funding and advice and guidance on the technical processes around acquiring a trust, schools can submit an Expression of Interest to the Trust Schools Programme.

The Co-operative is also sponsoring academies in Manchester and Stoke-on-Trent that are due to open in September 2010.

Education: Assessments

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many 16 year olds completed a BTEC First Diploma in each subject in each of the last five years. (303303)

The following table shows the number of 16-year-olds in England who completed a BTEC First Diploma in each subject in each of the last five years for which information is available.

BTEC First Diploma awards achieved by those with an academic age of 16 in England, 2003/04 to 2007/08

Year in which qualification was achieved

Qualification Title: EDEXCEL Level 2 BTEC First Diploma

2003/04

2004/05

2005/06

2006/07

2007/08

For ICT Practitioners

0

0

0

2,847

3,456

For IT Practitioners (General)

598

1,169

1,465

7

0

For IT Practitioners (ICT Systems Support)

107

207

332

0

0

For IT Practitioners (Software Development)

188

224

297

*

0

In Agriculture

75

72

102

98

103

In Animal Care

795

906

951

1,079

1,176

In Applied Science

87

208

346

658

782

In Art and Design

0

521

1,743

2,906

3,274

In Business

307

949

1,992

3,515

4,790

In Caring

561

1,018

385

*

0

In Children's Care, Learning and Development

0

0

0

803

991

In Construction

50

130

338

523

532

In Countryside and Environment

79

92

152

148

162

In Design

587

790

561

3

0

In Early Years

439

628

936

7

0

In Electronics

130

156

240

0

0

In Engineering

0

0

0

1,020

1,205

In Fish Husbandry

27

47

42

42

50

In Floristry

6

8

14

18

23

In Front Line Services

0

0

0

0

0

In Health and Social Care

0

0

1,524

3,296

4,058

In Horse Care

245

284

258

279

289

In Horticulture

138

108

156

172

182

In Hospitality

0

16

88

143

169

In Land-based Technology

0

0

0

33

34

In Logistics

0

0

4

0

20

In Manufacturing Engineering

479

556

690

7

11

In Media

232

868

1,182

1,501

1,718

In Music

0

0

0

822

1,001

In Operations and Maintenance Engineering

71

89

113

0

*

In Performing Arts

1,644

2,048

2,425

1,735

1,737

In Public Services

1,674

2,176

2,563

2,892

3,310

In Retail

*

27

111

139

241

In Sport

1,489

2,248

2,827

4,147

4,246

In Sport and Exercise Sciences

630

604

601

7

10

In Travel and Tourism

231

933

1,361

1,595

1,981

In Vehicle Service and Technology

216

196

205

245

290

Total

11,086

17,278

24,004

30,689

35,843

Note:

Figures few than three and more than zero have been suppressed and replaced by *.

Source:

National Information System for Vocational Qualifications.

GCSE: Nottingham

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what percentage of pupils in Nottingham North constituency obtained five A* to C grades at GCSE including English and mathematics in (a) 1997 and (b) 2009. (308989)

The information requested is given for 1996/97 and 2007/08. Data for 2008/09 will not be available until after the publication of the Achievement and Attainment Tables in mid January 2010.

Pupils at the end of key stage 4 in maintained schools in Nottingham North constituency achieving five or more GCSEs or equivalent1 at grades A*-C including English and Maths GCSEs, 1996/97 and 2007/082

Number of pupils achieving five or more GCSEs at grades A*-C including English and Maths GCSEs

Percentage of pupils achieving five or more GCSEs at grades A*-C including English and Maths GCSEs

1996/97

164

12.8

2007/08

353

28.2

1 Figures for 1997/98 include GNVQ equivalences. Figures for 2007/08 include other equivalences approved for use pre-16.

2 Figures for 1997/98 are based on pupils aged 15 years old at the start of the academic year. Figures for 2007/08 onwards are based on pupils at the end of key stage 4.

Source:

National Pupil Database and Achievement and Attainment Tables (final data)

GCSE: Preston

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many pupils in Preston schools gained five A* to C GCSEs or equivalent in (a) 1997 and (b) 2009. (308665)

The information requested is given in the following table for 1996/97 and 2007/08. Data for 2008/09 will not be available until after the publication of the Achievement and Attainment Tables in mid January 2010.

Pupils at the end of key stage 4 in maintained schools in Preston constituency achieving five or more GCSEs or equivalent1 at grades A*-C, 1996/97 and 2007/082

Number of pupils achieving five or more GCSEs at grades A*-C

Percentage of pupils achieving five or more GCSEs at grades A*-C

1996/97

306

32.7

2007/08

404

55.5

1 Figures for 1997/98 include GNVQ equivalences. Figures for 2007/08 include other equivalences approved for use pre-16.

2 Figures for 1997/98 are based on pupils aged 15-years-old at the start of the academic year. Figures for 2007/08 onwards are based on pupils at the end of key stage 4.

Source:

National Pupil Database and Achievement and Attainment Tables (final data)

Hotels

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills has spent on hotel accommodation for its officials in each of the last five years. (306040)

This is a matter for Ofsted. HM chief inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 10 December 2009:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, for a response.

Figures for 2006/07 and 2007/08 are not available from the current financial system and would need to be retrieved from archived data. Retrieval of this data would only be possible at disproportionate costs.

Ofsted expenditure on hotel accommodation for its officials in the last three years was:

£

2007/08

2,197,963.73

2008/09

2,373,804.91

2009/10

1,456,399.53

The 2009/10 figure is for the first eight months of the current financial year.

A copy of this reply has been sent to Vernon Coaker MP, Minister of State for Schools and Learners and will be placed in the library of both Houses.

National Academy of Parenting Practitioners: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much funding his Department has allocated to the National Academy of Parenting Practitioners in each financial year since 2006-07. (305272)

The Department has paid £8.76 million to the academy in 2007-08 when it was established, £8.24 million in 2008-09 and up to £10million has been allocated in 2009-10 of which £4.29 million has been paid to date.

National Curriculum Tests: Preston

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many 14 year olds in Preston schools reached level 5 or above in key stage 3 results in (a) 1997 and (b) 2009. (308666)

The information requested is given in the following table for 1997 and 2008. Key stage 3 tests were discontinued after 2008.

Pupils at the end of key stage 3 in maintained schools in Preston constituency achieving level 5 or above, 1997 and 20081

English

Maths

Science

Number of pupils achieving level 5 or above

Percentage of pupils achieving level 5 or above

Number of pupils achieving level 5 or above

Percentage of pupils achieving level 5 or above

Number of pupils achieving level 5 or above

Percentage of pupils achieving level 5 or above

1997

489

50

488

49

476

48

20081

456

65

473

68

454

65

1 Figures for 2008 are based on updated data. 1997 figures are final.

Source:

National Pupil Database and Achievement and Attainment Tables

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many 11 year olds in Preston schools reached level 4 or above in key stage 2 results in (a) 1997 and (b) 2009. (308667)

The information requested is provided in the following table.

Pupils at the end of key stage 2 in maintained schools in Preston constituency achieving level 4 or above in key stage 2 tests, 1997 and 20091

Pupils achieving level 4 or above

English

Maths

Science

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

1997

666

53

664

52

744

59

20091

781

74

768

73

869

83

1 Figures for 2009 are based on revised data. 1997 figures are final.

Source:

National Pupil Database and Achievement and Attainment Tables.

Ofsted

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families whether any of Ofsted's three regional contractors themselves have contracts for the supply of goods and services to any of the organisations they are contracted to inspect. (305810)

This is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to my hon. Friend and a copy of her reply has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 16 December 2009:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for a response.

Ofsted recognises that in contracting for inspection services there is a possibility of conflicts of interest and to mitigate this risk we have developed a protocol, which is supported by registers of interest, submitted by each of our Inspection Services Providers (ISPs). The protocol can be found on Ofsted's website.

If an ISP has a conflict of interest with an organisation it is contracted to inspect, responsibility for that inspection will be transferred to a different ISP. In the event that all three ISPs are deemed to have a conflict of interest, the inspection or regulatory activity will be carried out exclusively by HMI.

A copy of this reply has been sent to Vernon Coaker MP, Minister of State for Schools and Learners, and will be placed in the library of both Houses.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) what assessment he has made of the experience of each of Ofsted’s three regional contractors in respect of each of the services and organisations for which they are contracted to inspect; for how long each has been contracted in each case; and what assessment he has made of their performance; (305993)

(2) with which organisations Ofsted has contracts for the delivery of its services in its (a) North, (b) Midlands and (c) Southern regions;

(3) for the inspection of which services and organisations Ofsted is responsible.

These are matters for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to my hon. Friend and copies of her replies have been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 11 December 2009:

Your recent parliamentary questions have been passed to me, as Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, for a response.

Contracts to Ofsted’s three regional Inspection Service Providers were awarded in March 2009, following evaluation of competitive bids.

The evaluation criteria took into account the potential contractor’s:

capacity to be a credible partner

ability to deliver requirements

methods to deliver high quality, user-focused inspections

approach to risk management

approach to business improvement

acceptance of baseline documentation

These criteria accounted for 60% of the overall evaluation score, and price/financial terms accounted for 40%. During the prequalification stage of the competitive tender, references about each of the bidders were sought to inform the evaluations and these references were refreshed as part of the evidence for the consideration of the final tenders.

Under the criterion Delivering Requirements, potential contractors were invited to show how, when recruiting and training inspectors and staff, they would deal with the skills and experiences needed for different remits and how they would ensure that the practitioners meet requirements in all remits.

On the basis of the evaluation Ofsted was content to award contracts as specified to CfBT Education Trust to cover the contract area for the North, Serco Education to cover the contract area for the Midlands and Tribal Group to cover the contract area for the South. These contracts are in place for the period from the start of the 2009/10 academic year up to the end of the academic year 2014/15.

Each contract is evaluated regularly to ensure that key performance indicators are being met. These evaluations are formally reviewed by senior managers in Ofsted and shared with the Inspection Service Provider.

A copy of this reply has been sent to Vernon Coaker MP, Minister of State for Schools and Learners and will be placed in the library of both Houses.

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 10 December 2009:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, for response.

The Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills (Ofsted) was established in the Education and Inspections Act 2006 and since 1 April 2007, has had responsibility for the inspection of the following services and organisations:

education in all maintained schools in England and schools run by Service Children’s Education abroad

education in approximately half of independent schools and boarding in all schools which provide it

Early Years and childcare provision

Children’s homes, secure children’s homes and secure training centres - welfare, and also education where this is also provided

residential family centres

adoption and fostering, including local authority and voluntary adoption agencies, independent fostering agencies, local authorities' private fostering arrangements

learning and training in the post-16 sector including colleges, work-based learning, adult and community learning, and nextstep

contracted employment provision for the Department of Work and Pensions

initial teacher education and further education teacher training

education and training in prisons and other secure establishments

the Children and Family Court Advisory Support Service (CAFCASS)

services for child protection, safeguarding and looked after children in local authorities.

Ofsted also:

has responsibility for regulation and registration of childcare and children's social care

assesses the overall performance of children's services in local authorities

evaluates serious case reviews

monitors independent schools inspectorates.

A copy of this reply has been sent to Vernon Coaker MP, Minister of State for Schools and Learners, and placed in the library of both Houses.

Pre-School Education: Nottingham

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many children aged (a) three and (b) four years in Nottingham North constituency are in free nursery places. (308293)

The available figures are in the table.

Part-time equivalent number of free early education places1,2,3 filled by three and four-year olds. Parliamentary constituency: Nottingham North. Position in January

Number of three-year-olds

Number of four-year-olds

2009

1,300

1,300

1 A place is equal to 12.5 hours (five sessions) and can be filled by more than one child.

2 Figures are rounded to the nearest 100.

3 Age of all children taken at 31 December 2008.

Source:

Early Years Census and School Census

The Department publishes information on the part-time equivalent number of free early education places filled by three and four-year-olds in maintained, private, voluntary and independent providers. This is derived by counting children taking up 12 and a half hours per week as one place, 10 hours per week as 0.8 places, seven and a half hours per week as 0.6 places, five hours per week as 0.4 places and two and a half hours per week as 0.2 places.

Pupil Referral Units

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families which Pupil Referral Units he has visited since his appointment; and on what date each such visit took place. (305351)

[holding answer 8 December 2009]: The Secretary of State visited Knowsley Skills Academy on 16 September 2009. Knowsley Skills Academy is one of 12 alternative provision pilots, part of the action we are taking forward to implement the White Paper on alternative provision, “Back on Track” published in May 2008.

Pupils: Assessment

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what qualifications are equivalent to one or more GCSE passes; and if he will make a statement. (305997)

[holding answer 5 January 2010]: All level 2 qualifications approved under section 96 of the Learning and Skills Act 2000 contribute towards the reported performance of pupils at key stage 4 in obtaining GCSEs and equivalent qualifications.

An exhaustive list of equivalent qualifications and the size of their contributions to the five A*-C grade GCSE or equivalent threshold can be found at QCDA’s National Database of Accredited Qualifications website at:

http://www.accreditedqualifications.org.uk

in the “performance measures” section under the entry for each qualification.

Pupils: Per Capita Costs

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much funding was provided per pupil in the maintained sector for (a) primary schools and (b) secondary schools in (i) England, (ii) the South West Region and (iii) each local authority within the South West Region in each year from 1997 to 2009. (307365)

Per pupil revenue funding figures for primary school pupils (ages three to 10) for England, the South West Region, and each local authority in the South West of England between 1997-98 and 2005-06 are shown in table 1. These figures are in real terms and are based on financial years.

Table 1

Real terms revenue funding per pupil(£)—SSA/EFS plus grants

1997-98

1998-99

1999-2000

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

England

2,680

2,790

2,980

3,230

3,430

3,520

3,740

3,860

4,100

South West

2,570

2,670

2,840

3,070

3,220

3,290

3,470

3,560

3,790

Bath and North East Somerset

2,400

2,540

2,710

2,940

3,090

3,140

3,330

3,420

3,660

Bournemouth

2,730

2,740

2,890

3,140

3,230

3,270

3,410

3,490

3,700

Bristol, City of

2,580

2,690

2,880

3,130

3,330

3,490

3,690

3,850

4,130

Cornwall

2,490

2,720

2,900

3,140

3,330

3,400

3,580

3,670

3,890

Devon

2,670

2,750

2,870

3,100

3,250

3,310

3,530

3,610

3,820

Dorset

2,610

2,650

2,810

3,030

3,180

3,230

3,370

3,480

3,670

Gloucestershire

2,520

2,630

2,820

3,050

3,210

3,270

3,430

3,500

3,730

North Somerset

2,460

2,600

2,790

3,010

3,140

3,190

3,400

3,490

3,740

Plymouth

2,700

2,780

2,920

3,140

3,270

3,360

3,490

3,580

3,810

Poole

2,620

2,620

2,750

2,950

3,100

3,140

3,260

3,290

3,550

Somerset

2,530

2,640

2,830

3,070

3,230

3,290

3,470

3,570

3,770

South Gloucestershire

2,380

2,520

2,710

2,900

3,040

3,090

3,270

3,360

3,600

Swindon

2,650

2,660

2,780

3,000

3,160

3,200

3,460

3,540

3,800

Torbay

2,720

2,750

2,880

3,120

3,260

3,280

3,450

3,540

3,760

Wiltshire

2,570

2,660

2,830

3,050

3,200

3,260

3,520

3,600

3,820

Notes:

1. Price Base: Real terms at 2008-09 prices, based on GDP deflators as at 9 December 2009.

2. Figures reflect relevant sub-blocks of Standard Spending Assessment/Education Formula Spending (EFS) settlements and exclude the pensions transfer to EFS.

3. Total funding also includes all revenue grants in DFES Departmental Expenditure Limits relevant to pupils aged three to 10 and exclude Education Maintenance Allowances (EMAs) and grants not allocated at LEA level. For those authorities in receipt of advance of grant under the transitional support arrangements for 2004-05, advance grant funding is included in the year of payment (2004-05). There will be a consequential reduction in DFES grant for these LEAs in future years (either 2006-07 and 2007-08 or 2006-07 to 2008-09, depending on the terms on which the advance was given to the LEA).

4. The pupil numbers used to convert £ million figures to £ per pupil are those underlying the SSA/EFS settlement calculations plus PLASC three-year-old maintained pupils and estimated three to four-year-olds funded through state support in maintained and other educational institutions where these are not included in the SSA pupil numbers.

5. Rounding: Figures are rounded to the nearest £10.

6. Status: Some of the grant allocations have not been finalised. If these do change, the effect on the funding figures is expected to be minimal.

7. 1997-98 figures for authorities subject to local government reorganisation in that year have been estimated, pro-rata to their post LGR figures.

Per pupil revenue funding figures for secondary school pupils (ages 11-15) for England, the South West Region, and each local authority in the South West of England between 1997-98 and 2005-06 are shown in table 2. These figures are in real terms and are based on financial years.

Table 2

Real terms revenue funding per pupil (£)—SSA/ EFS plus grants

1997-98

1998-99

1999-2000

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

England

3,660

3,760

3,900

4,230

4,460

4,560

4,640

4,840

5,040

South West

3,450

3,550

3,670

3,950

4,120

4,210

4,280

4,470

4,660

Bath and North East Somerset

3,250

3,350

3,530

3,790

3,920

3,980

4,120

4,300

4,490

Bournemouth

3,490

3,580

3,680

3,970

4,150

4,230

4,240

4,410

4,610

Bristol, City of

3,660

3,760

3,880

4,300

4,550

4,620

4,880

5,170

5,510

Cornwall

3,560

3,660

3,780

4,050

4,230

4,330

4,280

4,470

4,670

Devon

3,520

3,620

3,730

3,980

4,130

4,210

4,220

4,400

4,600

Dorset

3,370

3,460

3,590

3,870

4,050

4,130

4,150

4,360

4,520

Gloucestershire

3,390

3,480

3,630

3,920

4,070

4,150

4,220

4,380

4,570

North Somerset

3,350

3,480

3,630

3,900

4,040

4,130

4,250

4,440

4,670

Plymouth

3,490

3,590

3,720

4,020

4,180

4,290

4,350

4,560

4,770

Poole

3,320

3,410

3,510

3,740

3,940

4,040

4,160

4,380

4,490

Somerset

3,450

3,540

3,670

3,950

4,120

4,220

4,310

4,520

4,660

South Gloucestershire

3,290

3,380

3,510

3,740

3,880

3,960

4,130

4,340

4,530

Swindon

3,410

3,500

3,620

3,880

4,020

4,130

4,300

4,480

4,720

Torbay

3,540

3,610

3,730

4,020

4,180

4,290

4,340

4,500

4,700

Wiltshire

3,420

3,510

3,650

3,920

4,080

4,150

4,230

4,390

4,580

Notes:

1. Price Base: Real terms at 2008-09 prices, based on GDP deflators as at 9 December 2009.

2. Figures reflect relevant sub-blocks of Standard Spending Assessment/Education Formula Spending (EFS) settlements and exclude the pensions transfer to EFS.

3. Total funding also includes all revenue grants in DFES Departmental Expenditure Limits relevant to pupils aged 11-15 and exclude Education Maintenance Allowances (EMAs) and grants not allocated at LEA level. For those authorities in receipt of advance of grant under the transitional support arrangements for 2004-05, advance grant funding is included in the year of payment (2004-05). There will be a consequential reduction in DFES grant for these LEAs in future years (either 2006-07 and 2007-08 or 2006-07 to 2008-09, depending on the terms on which the advance was given to the LEA).

4. The pupil numbers used to convert £ million figures to £ per pupil are those underlying the SSA/EFS settlement calculations plus PLASC three-year-old maintained pupils and estimated three to four-year-olds funded through state support in maintained and other educational institutions where these are not included in the SSA pupil numbers.

5. Rounding: Figures are rounded to the nearest £10.

6. Status: Some of the grant allocations have not been finalised. If these do change, the effect on the funding figures is expected to be minimal.

7. 1997-98 figures for authorities subject to local government reorganisation in that year have been estimated, pro-rata to their post LGR figures.

The revenue per pupil figures shown in table 3 as follows are taken from the Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG). They are not comparable with those for the years 1997-98 to 2005-06 (in tables 1 and 2 above) because the introduction of the DSG in 2006-07 fundamentally changed how local authorities are funded.

The 1997-98 to 2005-06 figures are based on Education Formula Spending (EFS) which formed the education part of the Local Government Finance Settlement, plus various grants. This was an assessment of what local authorities needed to fund education rather than what they spent. The DSG is based largely on an authority's previous spending. In addition, the DSG has a different coverage to EFS. EFS comprised a schools block and an LEA block (to cover LEA central functions) whereas DSG only covers the school block. LEA block items are still funded through DCLG’s Local Government Finance Settlement but education items cannot be separately identified. Consequently, there is a break in the Department’s time series as the two sets of data are not comparable.

To provide a comparison for 2008-09 DSG, the Department have isolated the schools block equivalent funding in 2005-06 (the baseline); as described above this does not represent the totality of ‘education’ funding in that year.

Per pupil revenue funding figures for pupils (ages three to 15) for England, the South West Region, and each local authority in the South West of England between 2005-06 and 2008-09 are shown in table 3. As the DSG is a mechanism for distributing funding, a split between primary and secondary schools is not available. These figures are in real terms and are based on financial years.

Table 3

Real terms revenue funding per pupil (£)—DSG plus grants

2005-06 (baseline)

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

England

4,340

4,470

4,640

4,690

South West

4,040

4,170

4,310

4,480

Bath and North East Somerset

4,120

4,240

4,370

4,430

Bournemouth

4,040

4,150

4,290

4,300

Bristol, City of

4,710

4,890

5,040

5,050

Cornwall

3,970

4,120

4,270

4,340

Devon

3,940

4,070

4,220

4,280

Dorset

4,070

4,160

4,300

4,350

Gloucestershire

3,980

4,110

4,260

4,370

North Somerset

4,030

4,120

4,250

4,310

Plymouth

4,200

4,340

4,500

4,540

Poole

3,990

4,090

4,230

4,250

Somerset

3,990

4,080

4,230

4,350

South Gloucestershire

3,880

3,970

4,110

4,150

Swindon

3,970

4,110

4,250

4,310

Torbay

4,170

4,280

4,440

4,460

Wiltshire

3,910

4,060

4,200

4,250

Notes:

1. This covers funding through the Dedicated Schools Grant, School Standards Grant, School Standards Grant (Personalisation) and Standards Fund as well as funding from the Learning and Skills Council; it excludes grants which are not allocated at LA level.

2. Price Base: Real terms at 2008-09 prices, based on GDP deflators as at 9 December 2009.

3. These figures are for all funded pupils aged three to 15.

4. Figures have been rounded to the nearest £10.

5. Some of the grant allocations have not been finalised. If these do change, the effect on the funding figures is expected to be minimal.

Schools

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many (a) primary and (b) secondary schools were closed in each local authority area in 2008-09. (305226)

This requested information to answer (a) primary and (b) secondary schools has been placed in the House Libraries.

Please note that there were no middle deemed primary school closures in 2009. Also there are 15 schools which are proposed to close on 31 December 2009 which have not been included in the Library figures but are shown in the following table for reference.

The schools which were included in preparing this answer were community, foundation, voluntary aided and voluntary controlled schools. This response does not include any special schools as they do not have a phase of education.

Phase of education

Local authority name

Primary

Secondary

Total

Barking and Dagenham

1

1

Birmingham

1

1

Harrow

1

1

Hounslow

4

4

Kent

2

2

Knowsley

2

2

Lancashire

1

1

Northamptonshire

1

1

Somerset

2

2

Grand total

10

5

15

Source:

EduBase 2

Schools: Gloucestershire

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the schools capital project budget is for Gloucestershire in 2009-10. (308139)

The schools' capital budget for Gloucester for 2009-10 is set by the local authority in accordance with asset management plans prepared locally. The budget is determined by allocations from the Department and any resources available locally, which can include brought forward reserves.

Allocations made by the Department to Gloucestershire in the financial year 2009-10 are set out in the following table, including funds advanced from 2010-11 to 2009-10. The local authority has considerable flexibility in deciding how these are used.

Description

£ million

14-19 Diplomas Pathfinder projects

1.3

Basic Need—for school expansion

9.2

Devolved Formula Funding—prioritised at school level

17.2

Expansion of popular schools

0.9

ICT Harnessing Technology

2.7

Voluntary Aided Schools

3.7

Modernisation

6.4

Primary Schools

5.0

14-19 Diplomas, SEN and Disabilities

4.0

Small programmes

2.4

Total

52.8

Schools: Inspections

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many schools have been placed in an Ofsted category under the new inspection framework; (306283)

(2) how many schools have received a limiting judgement arising from safeguarding issues under the new Ofsted inspection framework.

These are matters for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to my hon. Friend and a copy of her reply has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 10 December 2009:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for response.

The new maintained schools inspection framework was introduced in September 2009. In accordance with our pre-announced publications, information about all inspections taking place during the autumn term 2009/10 will be published on the third Wednesday in March 2010. Given the code of practice for official statistics, I will not, therefore, be able to provide you with a response to this question until that time.

A copy of this reply has been sent to Vernon Coaker MP, Minister of State for Schools and Learners, and placed in the library of both Houses.

Schools: Northampton

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much was spent on school improvements in Northampton (a) between 1979 and 1997 and (b) between 1997 and 2009. (308707)

The Department has maintained central records of school capital allocations to local authorities from the financial year 1996-97. In the financial year 1996-97, Northamptonshire was allocated £7.5 million. In the 13 year period 1997-98 to 2009-10, the local authority has been allocated £612 million.

Expenditure on school improvements at local authority level may be slightly different, due to (a) other resources available locally and (b) timing differences resulting from procurement.

Schools: Standards

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) which schools inspected in 2009 to date have had their procedures for safeguarding rated as inadequate; and if he will make a statement; (303727)

(2) which schools have been graded as inadequate by Ofsted in relation to the quality of safeguarding since September 2009; and if he will make a statement.

These are matters for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to the hon. Member and copies of her replies have been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 3 December 2009:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for response. The latest period for which published figures are available is the academic year 2008/09. This answer, therefore, takes into account all inspections carried out between 1 January 2009 and 31 August 2009. Information about inspections taking place during the autumn term 2009/10 will be published in March 2010.

Between 1 January 2009 and 31 August 2009, 31 schools did not meet the safeguarding standard set out in the school inspection framework.

From September 2005 to September 2009, the school inspection framework included the judgement 'Do procedures for safeguarding learners meet current government requirements?' and used a Yes or No grading. Table A provides a list of the 25 maintained schools inspected between 1 January and 31 August 2009 where their latest Ofsted inspection resulted in a judgement that the safeguarding procedures did not meet the current government requirements.

In September 2009, a new school inspection framework was introduced. The new framework includes a judgement about the effectiveness of safeguarding procedures on the four point scale: outstanding, good, satisfactory and inadequate. Ofsted carried out pilot inspections against this new framework during the academic year 2008/09. Table B provides a list of those maintained schools inspected under the new framework between 1 January and 31 August 2009 where their latest Ofsted inspection resulted in a judgement of inadequate for the effectiveness of safeguarding procedures.

A copy of this reply has been sent to Vernon Coaker MP, Minister of State for Schools and Learners, and placed in the library of both Houses.

Table A: Maintained schools not reaching the required standard for “Do procedures for safeguarding learners meet current Government requirements?” between 1 January and 31 August 2009

URN

Phase of education

School name

Local authority

101861

Nursery

South Acton Children’s Centre

Ealing

116255

Primary

Hatch Warren Junior School

Hampshire

100148

Primary

Brooklands Primary School

Greenwich

102841

Primary

Wanstead Church School

Redbridge

103069

Primary

Oakhill Primary School

Waltham Forest

103071

Primary

The Beaumont School

Waltham Forest

103400

Primary

St. Clement's Church of England Primary School

Birmingham

104338

Primary

Priory Green Primary School

Wolverhampton

114469

Primary

Stafford Junior School

East Sussex

117917

Primary

Epworth Primary School

North Lincolnshire

118593

Primary

Rosherville Church of England (Voluntary Controlled) Primary School

Kent

120612

Primary

The Spalding Parish Church of England Day School

Lincolnshire

122304

Primary

St. Andrew's Roman Catholic Voluntary Aided First School

Northumberland

122683

Primary

Tollerton Primary School

Nottinghamshire

125023

Primary

Banstead Community Junior School

Surrey

126434

Primary

Bemerton St. John Church of England Aided Primary School

Wiltshire

131955

Primary

Hertsmere Jewish Primary School

Hertfordshire

134666

Primary

Chase View Community Primary School

Staffordshire

100196

Secondary

St. Thomas More Roman Catholic Comprehensive School

Greenwich

101558

Secondary

Copland—A Specialist Science Community College

Brent

Table A: Maintained schools not reaching the required standard for ‘Do procedures for safeguarding learners meet current Government requirements?’ between 1 January and 31 August 2009

URN

Phase of education

School name

Local authority

114599

Secondary

Portslade Community College

Brighton and Hove

122854

Secondary

Chilwell School

Nottinghamshire

123939

Special

The Priory School

Somerset

133588

Pupil Referral Unit

Fenland Junction PRU

Cambridgeshire

135533

Pupil Referral Unit

Short Course Centre

Leicester

Table B: Maintained schools judged inadequate for ‘The effectiveness of safeguarding procedures’ between 1 January and 31 August 2009

URN

Phase of education

School name

Local authority

111394

Primary

Farnworth Church of England Controlled Primary School

Halton

113139

Primary

Southmead School

Devon

122569

Primary

Eastwood Junior School

Nottinghamshire

101559

Secondary

Kingsbury High School

Brent

121212

Secondary

Marshland High School

Norfolk

103025

Special

Sherwood Park School

Sutton

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 3 December 2009:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for response.

In accordance with our pre-announced publications, information about all inspections taking place during the autumn term 2009/10 will be published on the third Wednesday in March 2010. Given the code of practice for official statistics, I will not, therefore, be able to provide you with a response to this question until that time.

A copy of this reply has been sent to Vernon Coaker MP, Minister of State for Schools and Learners, and placed in the library of both Houses.

Schools: Yorkshire and the Humber

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many schools in (a) Leeds West constituency and (b) West Yorkshire are below the National Challenge benchmark following the 2009 GCSE results. (306620)

Individual school results for the 2008/09 academic year are not available until the publication of the Achievement and Attainment Tables in January 2010.

Sure Start Programme

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families when he expects his Department to meet its target of 3,500 Sure Start children's centres. (305363)

We are on track to achieve our target of 3,500 children's centres by March 2010 for children under five and their families. Local authorities are responsible for rolling out children's centre programmes in their areas.

Teachers: Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many (a) physics, (b) chemistry, (c) mathematics, (d) English, (e) biology and (f) history teachers who entered the profession in a state school in 2005 were still teaching in state schools in the last year for which figures are available. (307328)

The data are not available in the format requested.

Full and part-time1 teachers in local authority maintained sector service2 who qualified in 2004, entered service in 2005 and were still in service in 2008, by subject of initial teacher training qualification, Coverage: England

Subject

Remained in service 20083 (percentage)

Physics

76

Chemistry

74

Mathematics

77

English

80

Biology

76

History

81

1 Teachers in part-time service are under-recorded on the DTR by between 10 and 20 per cent. and therefore these figures may be slightly underestimated.

2 The local authority maintained sector includes teachers in maintained nursery, primary, secondary, special schools and pupil referral units and excludes CTCs and academies.

3 Figures are provisional estimates and are subject to change.

Note:

Those in service in 2007-08 will not all have been in continuous service between 2005 and 2008; some may have left and returned during the period.

Source:

Database of Teacher Records (DTR) and General Teaching Council for England.

Teachers: Qualifications

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many (a) primary and (b) secondary school teachers have (i) applied for and (ii) obtained the National Professional Qualification for Headship in each of the last 10 years. (306470)

The National College for Leadership of Schools and Children’s Services, who have run the National Professional Qualification for Headship since 2001, provided the following data:

Primary (including nursery)SecondaryOther (inc. special, LA, independent, overseas)Grand total

APPS

GRADS

APPS

GRADS

APPS

GRADS

APPS

GRADS

2001

n/k

201

n/k

163

n/k

23

n/k

387

2002

2,426

1,726

1,549

920

201

141

4,176

2,787

2003

3,082

1,943

1,899

1,209

210

127

5,191

3,279

2004

3,121

2,294

2,031

1,368

164

177

5,316

3,839

2005

2,682

2,450

2,022

1,582

551

205

5,255

4,237

2006

2,487

2,492

1,702

1,662

473

255

4,662

4,409

2007

2,836

2,574

1,847

1,841

309

308

4,992

4,723

2008

1,178

2,356

337

1,428

300

223

1,815

4,007

2009

534

455

134

160

225

88

893

703

Total

18,346

16,491

11,521

10,333

2,433

1,547

32,300

28,371

Notes:

1. Data are unavailable for the period 1997-2000.

2. 2001 application figures not recorded.

3. 2009 figures only cover partial recruitment for this year as this is not yet completed.

4. NPQH takes 12 months to complete, so those starting in 2008 graduate in 2009

Young Offenders

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many reparation orders relating to those aged (a) 10 or 11, (b) 12 to 14 and (c) 15 to 17 years old have been (i) given and (ii) breached in each year since 1997. (302442)

The information is as follows:

(i) The following tables show the number of reparation orders that have been given to young people by courts.

The presented data are broken down by financial years and by the following age groups: (a) 10 and 11, (b) 12 to 14 and (c) 15 to 17-years-old.

(ii) The Youth Justice Board does not hold the data on number of breaches in relation to reparation orders.

Complete data prior to financial year 2000/01 is not held by the YJB. Reparation orders were only introduced in pilot areas from 1998 and nationally from 2000.

Reparation Orders

10-11

12-14

5-17

Total

2000-01

169

1,954

4,166

6,289

2001-02

230

2,875

5,524

8,629

2002-03

60

1,075

3,083

4,218

2003-04

39

938

2,791

3,768

2004-05

43

1,038

2,554

3,635

2005-06

36

1,201

2,802

4,039

2006-07

36

1,234

3,360

4,630

2007-08

42

1,275

3,691

5,008

Total

655

11,590

27,971

40,216

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing and may be subject to change over time.

Energy and Climate Change

Biofuels

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change for what reasons he decided that grandfathering rights on the basis of those applied to offshore wind projects should not apply to regular biomass projects. (305181)

‘Government Response to the Statutory Consultation on the Renewables Obligation Order 2009’, published in December 2008, we set out our decision not to grandfather existing biomass and waste plants following evidence from the biomass industry:

“that grandfathering existing stations at 1 ROC/MWh while banding up new stations would be detrimental to a competitive market for the fuel stock ... [as] existing plants could not have reasonably anticipated the introduction of banding, and made any contingency for this. We ... therefore decided to allow existing plants to be banded up and receive the same level of support as new plants. ... As the principle of banding has now been established we believe that there is less reason to treat biomass stations as a special case.”

However, we are currently carrying out work with the Renewables Advisory Board, the Renewable Energy Association and biomass stakeholders to assess whether moves in biomass fuel prices might warrant such action at the next banding review starting October 2010.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps his Department is taking to monitor the level of use of each source of biomass fuel. (307626)

The Government publish statistics on the annual use of biomass fuel in the Digest of UK Energy Statistics. Chapter 7 provides a breakdown by source. Further information relating to fuel use by power plants registered for the renewables obligation is kept by Ofgem on their searchable Renewable and CHP Register at:

https://www.renewablesandchp.ofgem.gov.uk/Public/ReportManager.aspx?ReportVisibility=1&ReportCategory=0

In addition, the UK renewables obligation (RO) scheme introduced, on 1 April 2009, a reporting requirement to monitor the sustainability of biomass, including information such as country of origin of the fuel.

Buildings: Carbon Emissions

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what the level of carbon emissions was from (a) housing and (b) other buildings in respect of (i) heating and cooling, (ii) hot water, (iii) lighting , (iv) appliances and (v) other sources in the latest year for which figures are available. (301943)

For the UK household sector, total end-use emissions of carbon were just over 146.5 million tonnes of CO2 (MtCO2) in 2006, for which a breakdown of emissions per service is shown in Fig.1. Overall household sector carbon emissions in 2007 were just over 140.5 MtCO2,but the breakdown by service is not yet available for that year.

Fig.1: Household carbon emissions by service in 2006

Service

MtCO2

Space heating

66.7

Water heating

31.9

Cooking

5.1

Lights appliances and cooling1

41.8

1 Of which lights contributed 8.4 MtCO2; appliances 33.4 MtCO2; and cooling 0.1 MtCO2 (indicative estimates).

For non-domestic buildings, the most recent estimates available are for 2008. Fig.2 shows the breakdown of emissions per service. These figures, totalling 88.9 MtCO2, include all energy use in public and commercial buildings and energy use for space heating and lighting in industrial buildings.

Fig.2: Non-domestic carbon emissions by service in 2008

Service

MtCO2

Space heating and cooling

42.7

Hot water

4.7

Lighting

22.7

Appliances

11.5

Other

7.3

Carbon Emissions: Developing Countries

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change with reference to his Department's press release of 26 June 2009, Make or break time for our climate, what research was used in the development of the policy to establish a $100 billion fund to assist developing countries reduce their carbon dioxide emissions by 2020. (307601)