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Written Answers

Volume 504: debated on Monday 18 January 2010

Written Answers to Questions

Monday 18 January 2010

Northern Ireland

Departmental Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many (a) year end and (b) in-year bonuses were paid to officials in his Department in each of the last three years; and how much was paid in such bonuses in each such year. (307108)

Non-consolidated performance payments are made to staff in the senior civil service in line with Cabinet Office guidance and also to staff at grades D2 to A in line with HM Treasury guidance. These payments are made to reward performance throughout the previous reporting year.

Under a separate scheme, non-consolidated special performance payments are awarded to staff to reward particularly meritorious contributions throughout the year.

The total amount of non-consolidated performance payments made to Northern Ireland Office (NIO) staff since 2006 is shown in the following tables.

Number of non-consolidated year end performance payments

Number of payments

Total amount (£)

2006-07

324

557,000.00

2007-08

1409

609,875.00

2008-09

563

599,048.50

1 This figure does not include non-consolidated performance payments made by the Northern Ireland Prison Service to staff below senior civil service.

Number of in-year special performance payments

Number of payments

Total amount (£)

2006-07

891

174,882.00

2007-08

809

227,349.48

2008-09

996

260,865.00

Departmental Training

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many sessions of media training were organised for Ministers in his Department in each of the last three years. (310755)

The Northern Ireland Office (NIO) has not organised media training sessions for Ministers in the last three years.

Employment Tribunals Service

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many employment tribunals relating to his Department have been held in each of the last five years; and what the cost to his Department was of such tribunals in each such year. (309939)

Only one employment tribunal relating to the Northern Ireland Office core Department has been held in the last five years. The hearing took place in 2007 and found in favour of the Department. Legal costs of £1,762.50 have been paid to date.

Olympic Games: Canada

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many (a) Ministers and (b) officials from his Department are planning to attend the Winter Olympics in Vancouver in February 2010; and what estimate he has made of the cost of such attendance. (310852)

Since 1999, the Government have published on an annual basis a list of all overseas visits by Cabinet Ministers costing in excess of £500, as well as the total cost of all ministerial travel overseas. The list also provides information on the number of officials who accompany Ministers. Copies are available in the Libraries of the House. Information for 2009-10 will be published as soon as the information is available.

All travel by Ministers and civil servants is undertaken in accordance with the Ministerial Code and Civil Service Management Code respectively.

Church Commissioners

Church of England: Pay

To ask the hon. Member for Middlesbrough, representing the Church Commissioners how much the Church of England pension funds paid in bonuses to staff in each of the last three financial years. (310796)

Neither the Church of England Pensions Board (which is responsible for clergy pensions earned on service after I January 1998 as well as pension schemes for lay employees of Church organisations) nor the Church Commissioners (responsible for pre-1998 clergy pensions) have paid staff bonuses in the last three financial years.

House of Commons Commission

Manpower

To ask the hon. Member for North Devon, representing the House of Commons Commission how many people were employed by the House in (a) visitor services, (b) the Parliamentary Education Service, (c) catering and (d) security in each of the last 10 years; at what cost in each of those years, how many police worked on security for the House on the parliamentary estate in each of those years; and at what cost in each of those years. (310543)

The number of people directly employed on these services together with the related cost in the last three years has been:

2006-072007-082008-09

Number

Cost (£000)

Number

Cost (£000)

Number

Cost (£000)

Visitor Services

25.0

475

24.0

766

31.0

1,044

Parliament's Education Service

11.0

271

13.7

385

19.0

539

Catering

277.5

7,983

269.3

9,074

276.7

9,185

Security (Metropolitan Police Service)

470

20,720

520

19,985

520

20,601

The figures show the total number of staff at 1 April each year, excluding casual staff recruited to meet short-term work requirements (e.g. summer tour guides). With the exception of catering, these services are bicameral with the House of Lords being re-charged a proportion of the expenditure incurred. The costs shown represent the Commons share only of all salary-related expenditure. Comparable information before 2006-07 is not available. Security staff listed are not employed by Parliament but provided by the Metropolitan Police Service under the Special Service Agreement.

Scotland

Departmental Internet

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland which websites his Department's staff are blocked from accessing from departmental networked computers. (310246)

The Scotland Office shares an information technology system (SCOTS) with the Scottish Executive, which is responsible for the development, administration, maintenance, monitoring and security of the system, including the provision of hardware and software. An IT Code of Conduct is in place which provides advice and guidance to staff on safe usage of the system, along with software which blocks user access to websites in specified categories for reasons of appropriateness of content or to protect the integrity of the network. This conforms to the same standards as are set out in the HMG Security Policy Framework.

Olympic Games: Canada

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many (a) Ministers and (b) officials from his Department are planning to attend the Winter Olympics in Vancouver in February 2010; and what estimate he has made of the cost of such attendance. (310844)

Neither my right hon. Friend nor I have any plans to attend the winter Olympics in Vancouver. There are no plans for his officials to visit the winter Olympics either. Consequently, there will be no costs.

Olympics

Olympic Village

8. To ask the Minister for the Olympics when she next expects to meet representatives of relevant local authorities to discuss use of the Olympic Village after the London 2012 Olympics. (310886)

I hold regular meetings with the leaders and mayors of the five east London host boroughs, along with my ministerial colleagues at Communities and Local Government, on a range of issues relating to ensuring a sustainable legacy for east London from the games, including on housing provision on the park site.

After the games the Olympic village will become a significant asset to this part of east London, with over 2,800 homes providing a mixture of private and social housing, available for take-up by both local people and others.

London 2012: Legacy

To ask the Minister for the Olympics what assessment she has made of the legacy to Amber Valley and the east midlands of hosting the London 2012 Olympics. (310880)

Amber Valley, the east midlands and the whole of the UK will benefit from the sporting, economic and cultural opportunities created by the 2012 Games.

I am aware of two companies based in Amber Valley that have secured contracts to supply the London 2012 Aquatics Centre. 36 businesses registered in the east midlands have won work supplying the Olympic Delivery Authority.

Furthermore, 21 cultural projects in the east midlands have been awarded the Inspire Mark, which provides brand recognition to projects which have been inspired by the 2012 Games, and the Japanese National Olympic Committee have agreed to use Loughborough university and other selected facilities to prepare for the 2012 Games.

Departmental Billing

To ask the Minister for the Olympics what proportion of invoices from suppliers the Government Olympic Executive paid within 10 days of receipt in November and December 2009. (311202)

The proportion of invoices paid within 10 days of receipt by the Government Olympic Executive (GOE) was 98.46 per cent. in November 2009 and 94.55 per cent. in December 2009.

As GOE reports to me as Minister for the Olympics through the permanent secretary to the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS), information on invoices paid by GOE will be included within the overall DCMS figure which will be provided by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State at DCMS.

Government Olympic Executive: Pay

To ask the Minister for the Olympics how many (a) year-end and (b) in-year bonuses were paid to officials in the Government Olympic Executive in each of the last three years; and how much was paid in such bonuses in each such year. (307100)

The Government Olympic Executive (GOE), which reports to the Minister for the Cabinet Office, Olympics, London and Paymaster General through the Permanent Secretary to the Department of Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS), makes non-consolidated performance payments to its employees for two purposes: (a) in year non-consolidated performance payments to reward outstanding contributions in particularly demanding tasks or situations; and (b) year end non-consolidated performance payments to reward highly successful performance over a whole year. In both cases they help drive high performance.

Non-consolidated performance payments are an integral element of the reward package for staff, have to be re-earned each year and do not add to future pay bill costs (e.g. pensions).

Details of both in-year and year end non-consolidated performance payments for GOE are set out in the table.

These figures are exclusive of two key senior staff in GOE, who were appointed on fixed term contracts ending in 2012 and whose remuneration reflects extensive relevant experience and the unique challenge of delivering the Olympics to a fixed deadline. Details of their remuneration were published in the departmental Annual Reports and Accounts 2009.

Number of in-year non-consolidated performance payments

Number of year end non-consolidated performance payments

Total (£)

2008-09

25

26

76,793

2007-08

25

24

67,791

2006-07

9

9

21,341

As GOE is part of DCMS, GOE bonus payments were included in the overall DCMS figures given in the answer by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State at DCMS on 2 December 2009, Official Report, column 722W.

Olympic Games 2012

To ask the Minister for the Olympics what procedures are in place under which British citizens may apply to work on construction projects in connection with the London 2012 Olympics. (310928)

Through the ‘Jobs, Skills, Futures’ brokerage service the Olympic Delivery Authority works in partnership with contractors on the Olympic Park to identify job vacancies that can be made available to local people. Local people, those who give a permanent address in one of the five host boroughs, are given priority access to vacancies that arise on the park. Vacancies are initially offered exclusively and equally to each of the five host borough employment brokerage services and through local Jobcentre Plus offices for a period 48 hours. If no suitable candidates are put forward by the local employment brokerage services, vacancies are then made available throughout London for a further 24 hours though Relay London Jobs. If after this time vacancies are unfilled, they are then advertised nationally through the Jobcentre Plus network.

Olympic Games 2012: Bexley

To ask the Minister for the Olympics how many businesses in the London borough of Bexley are under contract in respect of the construction of venues for the London 2012 Olympic Games. (308848)

As of November 2009 the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) had directly awarded contracts to five suppliers registered in the London borough of Bexley. This does not include companies that have won contracts in the supply chains of the ODA’s tier one contractors. The ODA has recently published a map showing that many suppliers are winning work both directly with the ODA and within the supply chains of its contractors. Details of these are available in the business section of the London 2012 website

www.london2012.com/get-involved/business-network/oda-suppliers/index.php

http://www.london2012.com/get-involved/business-network/oda-suppliers/index.php

Olympic Games 2012: Manpower

To ask the Minister for the Olympics how many people of each sex in each age group have been working on the Olympic site in each month since construction began; and how many of these are apprentices. (310358)

The Olympic Delivery Authority publishes details of the Olympic Park workforce on a quarterly basis. The latest report, with data for September 2009, showed that there were 4,842 people working on the Park at that time, and of these, 94 per cent. were male and 6 per cent. were female.

The ODA does not publish information on the age of the workforce, but does monitor the age characteristics of the total Park workforce using voluntary information provided by workers when they begin employment on the site. In September 2009:

0.5 per cent. of the workforce were under the age of 18

44 per cent. of the workforce were aged between 18 and 35

35 per cent. of the workforce were between 36 and 50

17 per cent. of the workforce were aged over 51

The ODA does not have this information for the remaining 3.5 per cent. of the workforce

In November 2009, a total of 120 apprentices were working on the Park.

The next set of figures will be issued this month and will be available on the London 2012 website.

To ask the Minister for the Olympics how many people she expects to be employed on the Olympic site over the duration of the project; and how many of those are apprentices. (310359)

The Olympic Delivery Authority forecasts that 30,000 people will work on the Olympic Park and Village over the lifetime of the construction programme. The ODA is working closely with its contractors to create 2,250 trainees, apprenticeships and work placements across the park and village, 350 of these are to be apprenticeships.

Olympic Games 2012: Marketing

To ask the Minister for the Olympics how much has been spent on social media and networking accounts in respect of the London 2012 Olympic Games; and on what accounts those funds have been spent. (308474)

The Government are committed to involving, informing and engaging local people in all stages of planning for the Olympic and Paralympic Games which will transform East London. Recognising that the Games will have greatest impact on local communities, the official bid commitments for London 2012 included an extensive engagement programme. The Government Olympic Executive has used social media to support this engagement work and runs an online forum for residents of the five host boroughs in East London. This forum enables invited local people—representative of the wide range of communities in the five host boroughs—to give their views on the Olympics in a context which encouraged ongoing debate and discussion.

The forum has discussed a variety of topics and issues important to local residents. These include how local people can access jobs and training opportunities created by the Olympics; ensuring that all opportunities are inclusive and benefit everyone; planning of the Olympic site and surrounding areas; and how to promote disability issues using the Paralympics. The Government Olympics Executive responds to the information gathered accordingly.

The cost of managing this forum to date, including set up costs, site hosting and recruitment of members has been £128,523.08.

Olympic Games: Canada

To ask the Minister for the Olympics how many (a) Ministers and (b) officials from her Office are planning to attend the Winter Olympics in Vancouver in February 2010 in an official capacity; and at what cost. (310256)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 11 January 2010, Official Report, column 648W, to my hon. Friend the Member for Vauxhall (Kate Hoey).

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Domestic Waste: Elderly

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether guidance has been issued to waste collection authorities on the provision of wheeled refuse containers to households with (a) disabled and (b) frail or elderly residents. (311482)

While no specific guidance has been issued on this matter, it is normal practice for local authorities to take account of the needs of the frail or disabled when operating waste and recycling services. They do this by either offering a choice of containers or by providing assisted collections. The Disability Discrimination Act now requires local authorities to consider these issues, but the practice of assisted collections was well established before the legislation came into force.

Genetically Modified Organisms: Regulation

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent representations he has received on the (a) safety and (b) regulatory approval process of genetically modified crops and foods. (311435)

DEFRA has received various items of correspondence recently from members of the public and other stakeholders on the environmental safety and regulatory control of GM crops. The Food Standards Agency has lead responsibility for the safety and regulation of GM foods and animal feeds.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs which genetically-modified products are authorised for sale in the UK. (311441)

Decisions on the commercial release of genetically modified (GM) products are taken at European Union (EU) level. Currently there are 31 GM products that are authorised for food and animal feed uses in the EU. Full details are available on the European Commission website. Only one type of GM crop seed has EU approval for cultivation and is being sold in some EU member states, but it is not being marketed in the UK because it is unsuitable for our growing conditions. It is a type of insect-resistant maize known as MON 810.

Waste Management

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) when he expects to finalise the draft end-of-waste protocol; (311360)

(2) when he expects to respond to comments made under Article 8(2) of the Technical Standards Directive (98/34/EC) on the draft end-of-waste protocol.

On 23 and 26 November 2009 the European Commission and Austria respectively commented under Article 8(2) of the Technical Standards Directive on the draft end-of-waste protocol for fuel produced from waste lubricating oil that the UK notified under Article 8(1) of the Directive. The UK is required to take such comments into account as far as possible in the subsequent preparation of the protocol. Our aim is to conclude consideration of these comments within the three month period that would have applied in the event of the UK's receiving a detailed opinion under Article 9(2) of the Directive. The Environment Agency will make a statement about the finalisation of the protocol on conclusion of our consideration of the comments made under Article 8(2) of the Directive.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will place in the Library a copy of his Department's research report WR0105 on measuring waste prevention. (311484)

The report for project WR0105 (Project REDUCE Monitoring and Evaluation - Developing Tools to Measure Waste Prevention) is available from DEFRA's website by entering "WR0105" into the search tool at the following address:

http://randd.defra.gov.uk/Default.aspx?Location=None &Module= FilterSearchNewLook&Completed=0

Wales

Departmental Billings

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what proportion of invoices from suppliers his Department paid within 10 days of receipt in December 2009. (311200)

Departmental Buildings

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what the (a) area and (b) estimated value is of (i) vacant and (ii) occupied office space (A) owned and (B) rented by his Department. (310518)

The Wales Office has a main building in London and rents serviced office space in Cardiff. The Department has no vacant office space.

The London building has 9,655 square feet of office space and was last valued in 2008 at £1.4 million.

The Cardiff office has an area of approximately 6,000 square feet. As it is part of a larger, privately-owned building, it is not possible to give an estimation of its value.

Departmental Food

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what estimate he has made of the quantity of food waste generated by his Department in each year for which figures are available. (310815)

The Wales Office does not collect information on food waste generated. My Department does not have any catering facilities in house, and therefore does not routinely generate food waste.

Departmental Internet

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales which websites his Department’s staff are blocked from accessing on networked computers. (310765)

The Wales Office obtains its information technology services from the Ministry of Justice. Staff are expected to comply with rules regulating the use of departmental computers, including internet use.

The IT system uses specialist blocking software to prevent users gaining access to inappropriate websites, such as those containing offensive, racist or defamatory content; gambling or betting sites; those that may circumvent information security rules such as web-based e-mail; and sites that may affect the efficiency of the network.

Departmental Training

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how many sessions of media training were organised for Ministers in his Department in each of the last three years. (310756)

Human Trafficking

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales whether he has had recent discussions with the First Minister on the extent to which people are trafficked between Wales and England for purposes of sexual exploitation. (309358)

While I have not discussed this matter recently with the First Minister, the aim of both Governments is to ensure that we tackle the horrendous crime of human trafficking.

The Government’s comprehensive victim-focused strategy to combat all forms of trafficking throughout the UK is contained in the UK Action Plan on Trafficking first published in 2007 updated in October 2009. This is available at

http://www.crimereduction.homeoffice.gov.uk/human trafficking004.htm

We recognise the vulnerability of children to trafficking to and within the UK and that this can happen for the purpose of sexual exploitation. Following consultation guidance for practitioners on child trafficking has been published by both Governments. This is available at:

http://wales.gov.uk/topics/childrenyoungpeople/publications/trafficked/?lang=en

http://publications.dcsf.gov.uk/default.aspx?PageFunction= productdetails&PageMode=publications&ProductId=HMG-00994-2007&

Olympic Games: Canada

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how many (a) Ministers and (b) officials from his Department are planning to attend the Winter Olympics in Vancouver in February 2010; and what estimate he has made of the cost of such attendance. (310853)

Defence

Afghanistan: Peacekeeping Operations

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether there are plans to allocate part of Kandahar province to the UK's area of responsibility. (309613)

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the monetary value was of allowances paid to civilian staff based in Afghanistan in each of the last five years. (310651)

[holding answer 14 January 2010]: This information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many (a) UK armed forces personnel and (b) personnel of other coalition forces were deployed in the operation to deliver a turbine to Kajaki dam in September 2008; and what the duration was of that operation. (311002)

The operation took 17 days but the number of UK and other coalition forces deployed is difficult to collate because of the various different phases and the number of support tasks involved. This information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what (a) deaths and (b) injuries to personnel were sustained in the operation to deliver and install the turbine to Kajaki dam in September 2008. (311004)

No UK deaths were sustained in the operation to deliver and install the turbine at Kajaki dam in September 2008. Four UK personnel sustained injuries in the operation.

Armed Forces: British Overseas Territories

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence with reference to the answer of 14 October 2009, Official Report, columns 1362-3W, on armed forces: foreigners, how many of the 390 British Overseas Territories personnel serving in the armed forces (a) are trained helicopter pilots and (b) serve in the Royal Air Force. (309275)

Of the 390 British Overseas Territories personnel serving in the armed forces as at 1 September 2009, fewer than five are trained helicopter pilots. 10 are serving in the Royal Air Force, one of whom is a trained helicopter pilot. All figures are rounded to the nearest five.

Armed Forces: Deployment

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the (a) required and (b) actual strength is of deployable troops of each infantry battalion. (311107)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 5 November 2009, Official Report, column 1150W, to the hon. Member for Woodspring (Dr. Fox). In that table, the “Number Fit for Task” column represents the actual deployable strength of each infantry battalion.

Just under 89 per cent. of current infantry strength is deployable. This includes those who have some limitations placed on the roles they can perform on operations. The vast majority of the remainder are contributing to military capability in a variety of supporting roles in home locations.

Armed Forces: Health Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what the average cost per service personnel patient was for (a) below knee and (b) above knee prosthesis follow-up in the (i) Defence Medical Services and (ii) NHS in the latest period for which information is available; (309990)

(2) how often (a) above knee and (b) below knee amputees were routinely followed up in the (i) Defence Medical Services and (ii) NHS in the latest period for which information is available.

Information on the cost per service personnel patient to the DMS for prosthesis follow-up is not held centrally, and could be provided only at disproportionate cost. However, in general, the long term cost of maintaining an above-knee amputee are considerably more that a below-knee amputee because of the expensive artificial knee components.

As regards frequency of follow-up for DMS patients, on average the numbers of follow-up appointments for above-knee and below-knee amputee patients are equal. The average patient will require diminishing prosthetics input up until year three when only regular servicing is required. Outlined as follows is the average number of follow-up appointments:

Average number of follow-up appointments

Year one

17

Year two

12

Year three and beyond

3 per year

NHS information on the cost per patient, whether a veteran or not, for prosthesis follow-up is not held centrally.

NHS assessments for prosthetics are undertaken at any one of 35 prosthetic centres within England with decisions on follow-up and aftercare being included within the assessment. This decision is agreed with an individual to ensure their circumstances and requirements are taken into consideration.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what rules are in place in respect of routine visits by a regimental associations to soldiers in the military ward of Selly Oak hospital. (310794)

Visits by members of regimental associations would usually be treated as “pastoral” rather than “official” visits. Pastoral visits are always welcome, but are subject to the wishes of the patient and to local hospital visiting rules and hours.

Further, visits by family and close friends take precedence, and consequently there may not always be the capacity to allow visits by regimental associations. For that reason, associations are strongly advised to check first with the Headquarters Joint Medical Command Visits Coordinator in order to avoid conflict with higher priority visitors before travel.

Armed Forces: Hearing Impaired People

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many servicemen have suffered hearing loss in the course of their duties in each year since 1999. (304010)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 13 January 2010, Official Report, column 993W, to the hon. Member for Colchester (Bob Russell).

Armed Forces: Uniforms

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what recent progress has been made on the army uniform contract; and if he will make a statement. (311005)

Invitations to tender for the cut and sew contract (for army uniforms) were sent on 11 January 2010 to the six companies/consortia that passed pre-qualification. Responses are due by 17 March 2010 and the contract is scheduled to be awarded by summer 2010.

Armoured Fighting Vehicles

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the (a) requirement, (b) actual number available and (c) percentage shortfall is of each type of armoured vehicle used for pre-deployment training in the latest period for which figures are available. (309235)

I am withholding the information requested to avoid deductions being made about current and future operational capability. Its disclosure would, or would be likely to prejudice the capability effectiveness or security of the armed forces. However, I can confirm that the number of vehicles available for pre-deployment training continues to improve as procurement programmes deliver against requirements. For example the number of Ridgback vehicles in the training pool increased by 87 per cent. between July and January.

Atomic Veterans Claimant Group

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence on what dates in 2008, 2009 and 2010 his Department's lawyers met legal representatives of the Atomic Veterans Claimant Group. (311462)

The Department's lawyers met legal representatives of the Atomic Veterans Claimant Group on 6 July, 27 July, 15 September, 30 September and 1 October 2009.

Civil Servants: Pensions

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the cash equivalent transfer value is of the Principal Civil Service Pension Scheme pension of each of the 10 highest paid members of staff in his Department and its agencies. (311008)

The total cash equivalent transfer value for the Principal Civil Service Pension Scheme pensions (PCSPS) of the 10 highest paid members in the Ministry of Defence (MOD) totals some £4.672 million as at 15 January 2010. Some of these individuals will be named in the Remuneration Reports that form part of the MOD’s Resource Accounts in which the cash equivalent transfer values of their PCSPS pensions are reported annually. The Remuneration Reports are in the public domain. These figures relate solely to civilian staff and do not include members of the armed forces.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the cost of the enhanced early retirement scheme for civil servants in his Department and its agencies has been in each year since 1997. (311009)

This information is not centrally available and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Departmental Billing

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what proportion of invoices from suppliers his Department paid within 10 days of receipt in December 2009. (311266)

In December 2009, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) paid 98.7 per cent. of invoices within 10 days.

This figure relates to invoices processed by the MOD Financial Management Shared Service Centre and the four MOD trading funds:

Defence Science and Technology Laboratory

Meteorological Office

Defence Support Group

UK Hydrographic Office.

Departmental Carbon Emissions

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether (a) his Department and (b) each of its agencies plans to sign up to the 10:10 campaign to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 10 per cent. in 2010. (311464)

The MOD is committed to reducing its carbon dioxide emissions, and has already met the Government target to reduce emissions from its estate by 12.5 per cent. by 2010-11 relative to the 1999-2000 baseline. There is a programme of work to further reduce our emissions across the entire Defence Estate.

Noting the work already under way in MOD the Secretary of State wrote to staff in October 2009 encouraging them to join 10:10.

Departmental Food

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what estimate he has made of the quantity of food waste generated by his Department in each year for which figures are available. (310816)

The Ministry of Defence does not hold data on the amount of food waste generated. It is included as part of the overall figure for departmental waste arisings.

Departmental Internet

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence which websites his Department's staff are blocked from accessing from departmental networked computers. (310055)

The vast majority of MOD's networked computers with Internet connection access the World Wide Web via the Department's Enterprise Gateway Service (EGS). The EGS uses commercial web categorisation software, which places the huge number of websites on the Internet (believed to exceed 100 million) into about 100 categories. MOD then determines which categories can be accessed, and which ones are blocked.

Categories are blocked because they fall into one of the following types:

They contravene the MOD Acceptable Use Policy;

They pose a risk to the technical security of the network, or to broader information security;

They result in excessive consumption of bandwidth or other technical resource, or of staff time.

Also, to safeguard security of MOD networks, MOD does not permit access to sites using mobile code (e.g. Java, Active X).

The attached document, Information Management Protocol 049, is published by the Chief Information Officer on the Defence Intranet, and this explains further detail. A copy of the MOD Acceptable Use Policy (JSP 740) is also attached.

Departmental Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 14 December 2009, Official Report, column 831W, on departmental pay, on what basis £1,860 was paid to two individuals; and to which executive agency or non-departmental public body they were engaged. (310148)

One payment was made by the Met Office for performance against pre-agreed targets, and one payment was made by the Defence Storage and Distribution Agency for exceptional effort.

Departmental Public Expenditure

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 10 December 2009, Official Report, columns 521-2W, on armed forces: costs, what information his Department holds centrally on the amount it has charged (a) other Government departments, (b) private sector companies and (c) foreign governments in employment costs for (i) members of his Department's civilian staff and (ii) military personnel. (310009)

We hold no central information on the amount charged for personnel services. Such information is not accounted for discretely and does not need to be reported centrally.

Future Large Aircraft

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the estimated total cost is of the Airbus A400M project. (308622)

The value of the fixed price acquisition contract for A400M, let on behalf of participating nations, is €20 billion.

The current forecast cost of A400M for the UK, including initial training and support, is £3,285 million, as published in the Major Projects Report 2009.

Haslar Hospital

Israel: Armed Forces

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what aspects of military co-operation were to have been discussed with the group of military officers from Israel whose proposed visit to the UK was recently cancelled. (311031)

The Israeli delegation planned to attend a joint Israeli-Kings College academic workshop. This was not at the invitation of MOD and, therefore, no official discussions of UK-Israel defence co-operation were planned.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) on how many occasions Israel Defence Forces personnel have been invited to the UK for discussions with (a) Ministers or officials of his Department and (b) members of the armed forces since 2005; and what topics were discussed; (311032)

(2) what areas of expertise of the Israel Defence Forces that have been shared with (a) his Department and (b) members of the armed forces.

This information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost. Israel is an important strategic partner of the UK and, as part of that relationship, the MOD has an ongoing and wide ranging dialogue with the Israeli Defence Force and Israeli Ministry of Defence. This engagement is in line with HMG's policy of supporting the Middle East Peace Process by having a balanced relationship with the Israelis and the Palestinians. Recent areas of discussion have included regional defence issues, the Middle East Peace Process, and the UK's role in training Palestinian Authority security forces. However, detailed information is withheld as its disclosure would, or would be likely to, prejudice relations between the United Kingdom and Israel.

NATO Cyber-security Centre of Excellence: Overseas Aid

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what (a) financial and (b) other assistance the UK is providing to the NATO Cyber-security Centre of Excellence in Estonia. (311352)

The United Kingdom is fully supportive of this Estonian-hosted Cyber Defence initiative and their endeavours in this important area.

We have not made a direct financial contribution to the costs of the Co-operative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence. Both the current head of the MOD Defence Security and Assurance Service and his predecessor, as well as other senior officers and Government officials, have visited the Centre of Excellence, participated in its conferences and in specific mutually beneficial work-streams.

Radioactive Materials: Imports

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence from which countries uranium used in (a) British nuclear warheads and (b) nuclear submarine propulsion fuel has been obtained since 1980; and what information has been provided to the International Atomic Energy Agency on such imports. (310089)

In March 2006 the Ministry of Defence (MOD) produced a report entitled “Historical Accounting for UK Defence Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU)”. The report was announced on 22 March 2006, Official Report, column 24WS. The report, covering the period from the start of the UK’s nuclear programme through to 31 March 2002, confirms that the UK obtained HEU for its military programme from two sources—The Gas Diffusion Plant at BNFL Capenhurst, and through exchanges with the US Department of Energy under the 1958 Mutual Defence Agreement. This does not contravene our obligations under the non-proliferation treaty. There has been no subsequent change to this position, nor is there any requirement to inform the International Atomic Energy Agency of any such acquisitions as MOD HEU is held outside international safeguards for defence purposes but is subject to a strict materials accountancy regime.

RAF Fairfield

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what steps his Department is taking to establish the exact boundaries of the site of RAF Fairfield. (310795)

This Department has reviewed the boundaries of RAF Fairford so that accurate maps can be produced. These maps will be used for making new Ministry of Defence byelaws under the Military Lands Act 1892 and for revising the property title in the Land Registry. The work is ongoing.

A number of issues which emerged during the review process will be taken up with the appropriate authorities including the highways Agency and neighbouring property owners.

Women and Equality

Equality and Human Rights Commission

To ask the Minister for Women and Equality how many staff of the Equality and Human Rights Commission from each ethnic group (a) lodged grievances, (b) started employment tribunal proceedings, (c) were subject to disciplinary action and (d) were subject to capability procedures between 1 October 2007 and 31 March 2009. (310481)

The Equality and Human Rights Commission has provided the information in the following table:

Ethnic origin

Number of people who submitted grievance

Number of people who submitted ET1

Number of people in a disciplinary procedure

Number of people subject to formal capability procedures

White

16

6

3

Asian

2

Chinese

2

Mixed

5

Black

3

2

Other

Not stated

4

5

1

Total

32

13

4

0

To ask the Minister for Women and Equality for what reasons staff of the Equality and Human Rights Commission of each ethnic group left the employment of the Commission between 1 October 2007 and 31 March 2009. (310482)

The Equality and Human Rights Commission has provided the following table showing reasons for staff exit by ethnic group.

Ethnic origin group

Death

Dismissal

Other reasons

Redundancy

Resignation

Retirement

Grand total

Asian

3

3

Black

1

2

3

White

7

1

24

2

34

Chinese

0

Mixed

2

2

Other

0

Not stated

1

1

12

14

Total

1

1

8

1

43

2

56

Equality and Human Rights Commission: Manpower

To ask the Minister for Women and Equality how many staff from each ethnic group were employed by the Equality and Human Rights Commission between October 2007 and March 2009. (310515)

The Equality and Human Rights Commission has provided the following information.

Ethnic origin group

Total

Asian

11

Black

9

Chinese

1

White

99

Mixed

3

Other

2

Not stated

26

Total

151

To ask the Minister for Women and Equality how many people from each ethnic group (a) applied for and (b) secured (i) permanent employment, (ii) temporary employment, (iii) promotion and (iv) staff training at the Equality and Human Rights Commission between 1 October 2007 and 31 March 2009. (310516)

The Equality and Human Rights Commission has provided the following data:

(a)(i) Applied for permanent recruitment 1 July 20081 to 31 March 2009

Ethnicity

Total

Asian

224

Black

198

Chinese

27

White

1,510

Mixed

93

Not stated

60

Total

2,112

1 Detailed records for recruitment monitoring for the Commission are available from 1 July 2008.

(a)(ii) Applied for temporary1 recruitment 1 July 20082 to 31 March 2009

Ethnicity

Total

Asian

47

Black

23

White

414

Mixed

20

Not disclosed

9

Total

528

1 Temporary employees include those on fixed term contract and exclude agency and consultancy workers.

2 Detailed records for recruitment monitoring for the Commission are available from 1 July 2008.

(b)(i) Secured permanent employment between October 2007 and March 2009

Ethnicity

Total

Asian

11

Black

9

Chinese

1

White

99

Mixed

3

Other

2

Not stated

26

Total

151

(b)(ii) Secured temporary1 employment between October 2007 and March 2009

Ethnicity

Total

Asian

2

Black

0

Chinese

0

White

4

Mixed

0

Other

0

Not stated

0

Total

6

1 Temporary employees include those on fixed term contract and exclude agency and consultancy workers.

Applied for, and secured, staff training between October 2007 and March 20091: 1 January 2008 to 31 March 20092

Ethnicity

Total employees

Number received training

Asian

31

30

Black

37

32

Chinese

4

5

White

305

250

Mixed

11

12

Other

4

4

Not stated

16

10

Total

408

343

1 No formal training took place between 1 October 2007 and January 2008, when our mandatory training programme commenced.

2 This includes both permanent and temporary staff.

There were five unsuccessful applications for funding for training. Following is a breakdown of the ethnic origin of the applicants.

Ethnicity

Total

White

5

Justice

Courts: Interpreters

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice with reference to the answer of 12 November 2009, Official Report, column 842W, on interpreters: finance, for what reasons he has not yet written to the hon. Member for West Chelmsford with the information he undertook to provide by Christmas 2009. (310642)

I apologise for the delay. However, during the collation of the information requested, we identified that inconsistent answers had been given by my hon. Friend the Minister of State for Justice (Maria Eagle) to the hon. Member for Wycombe (Mr. Goodman) on 9 May 2008, Official Report, columns 1270- 71W and the hon. Member for Romsey (Sandra Gidley) on 2 June 2008, Official Report, columns 640-41W and by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Justice and Lord Chancellor (Mr. Straw) to the hon. and learned Member for Beaconsfield (Mr. Grieve) on 16 March 2009, Official Report, columns 955-56W and the hon. Member for Ashford (Damian Green) on 20 April 2009, Official Report, column 337W, on the subject of interpreters expenditure. This necessitated an investigation which has now concluded. The information requested is provided in the following table and covers all the information the Ministry of Justice holds on interpreters expenditure. I will also write to the hon. Members who received incomplete information with a full response as soon as possible.

Expenditure on interpreters in England and Wales by the Department and its agencies

The expenditure for financial years 2007-08 and 2008-09

To nearest £000

2008-09

2007-08

Ministry of Justice HQ

26

19

HM Courts Service (HMCS)

638

704

HMCS Crown Courts paid from Central Fund Budget

4,503

4,034

Tribunals Service

5,283

6,126

Office of the Public Guardian

40

40

National Offenders Management Service1

966

868

Total

11,456

11,791

1 This figure includes translation costs as well as interpretation costs. The amounts are not separately recorded and can only be disaggregated at disproportionate costs.

The information in the table excludes the following expenditure:

It is not possible to separately identify expenditure on interpreters by magistrates courts from other magistrates costs financed from the Central Fund Budget without incurring the disproportionate cost of examining every transaction, the supporting records for which are held locally. Sample exercises have been undertaken in the past to estimate the proportion of magistrates expenditure that relates to interpreters but they have yielded inconsistent results.

The NOMS figure excludes expenditure by the National Probation Service which is held locally by 42 probation boards and trusts who use separate and different accounting systems. Information could only be determined at disproportionate cost through examination of local records.

Expenditure on interpreters in Essex by the Department and its agencies

Expenditure by Her Majesty's Courts Service for interpreters in Crown courts in the Essex region in 2008-09 was £101,941. The comparable figure for 2007-08 cannot be separately identified from the Central Fund payment records which did not include regional identifiers. Information for other parts of the Department is not recorded on a regional basis and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Suspects, charged individuals and victims

Her Majesty's Courts Service meets interpreters' costs for victims, which are provided above. The police meet interpreters' costs for suspects and charged individuals. Police costs are funded by the Home Office.

Departmental Buildings

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much his Department spent on works and refurbishment to offices allocated to Ministers in his Department’s buildings in the last 12 months. (305695)

There was no refurbishment, improvement or emergency repair works undertaken to Ministers’ offices in the Ministry of Justice within the timeframe of the question.

There has been some normal maintenance work to heating, cooling and lighting systems in Ministers’ offices. The costs for these visits are part of an overall building maintenance agreement and, while it is not possible to separate them out with accuracy, these costs are estimated to be less than £2,000.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the (a) area and (b) estimated value is of (i) vacant and (ii) occupied office space (A) owned and (B) rented by his Department. (310524)

The departmental estate of the Ministry of Justice currently has:

(a) Office space of 68,240 square metres (net internal area), all of which is rented and none of which is vacant.

(b) Annual rental cost of £25,588,986.

The Department also occupies 641square metres in Gwydyr House, Whitehall, London. This site is owned by the Crown Estate and the Department does not pay rent for this office accommodation.

The Ministry of Justice's Estates Transformation Programme is currently working to reduce the number of MOJ buildings in central London.

EC Immigration

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment he has made of the implications for the Government's policy of the European Commission draft regulation on jurisdiction applicable law, recognition and enforcement of decisions and authentic instruments of succession and the creation of a European certificate of succession; and if he will make a statement. (307382)

I refer the hon. Member to the written statement made by my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Justice and Lord Chancellor (Mr. Straw) on 16 December 2009, Official Report, columns 140-41WS.

Freedom of Information: Academies

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice when he expects to designate academy schools as public authorities under the Freedom of Information Act 2000. (311244)

Section 5(3) of the Freedom of Information Act requires the Secretary of State to consult with persons to whom a section 5 order may relate. The consultation with Academy Trusts concluded on 1 December 2009 and the responses received are being considered. Subject to the outcome of this consideration, the Government intend to bring forward a section 5 order in this session of Parliament.

Iraq Committee of Inquiry

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many (a) documents and (b) other items of information held in electronic format at each level of security classification the Iraq Inquiry has requested from his Department; and if he will make a statement; (310187)

(2) whether any (a) documents and (b) other items of information held in electronic format sought from his Department by the Iraq Inquiry have not been disclosed owing to Government's obligations to foreign governments or international bodies; and if he will make a statement;

(3) how many and what proportion of the (a) documents and (b) other items of information held in electronic format at each level of security classification requested by the Iraq Inquiry have been provided to it by his Department; and if he will make a statement.

My right hon. Friend the Minister of State for the Cabinet Office (Angela E. Smith) has answered on behalf of all Departments. Her answer was published on 14 December 2009, Official Report, columns 840-41W.

Legal Aid

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much of the legal aid budget has been spent on very high cost cases in the last five years. (309629)

The Legal Services Commission manages individual case contracts on all very high cost criminal cases for trials lasting 41 days or over. The costs are agreed between the service providers and the LSC at each stage. The LSC also manages civil cases where the costs are likely to exceed £25,000 under individual case contracts. Expenditure on criminal and civil very high cost cases is shown in the following tables.

Crime very high cost cases

Expenditure (£ million)

Percentage of total criminal defence service expenditure

Percentage of total Crown court and higher courts expenditure

2004-05

96.0

8.0

14.0

2005-06

103.2

8.6

14.8

2006-07

104.6

8.9

16.1

2007-08

124.6

10.8

17.9

2008-09

112.1

9.5

16.5

Civil very high cost cases

Expenditure (£ million)

Percentage of total community legal service expenditure

2004-05

51

6.0

2005-06

57

6.8

2006-07

69

8.5

2007-08

65

7.7

2008-09

75

8.4

Legal Systems: Islam

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will estimate the number of marriages and divorces registered by sharia courts in England and Wales in each year since 1997. (311454)

Sharia councils do not describe themselves as 'courts' as they do not have powers to enforce their decisions. Sharia councils are not part of the court system in England and Wales, and are not unified under one system. Marriages conducted under sharia law are not legally recognised in England and Wales unless they also comply with the provisions of the Marriage Act 1949. The English and Welsh courts do not legally recognise divorces granted by any faith groups. The Government do not maintain statistics on either marriages or divorces conducted by sharia councils.

Prison Sentences

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many indeterminate sentences for public protection were given tariffs of 23 months or less in (a) 2005, (b) 2006, (c) 2007 and (d) 2008. (310660)

The number of offenders sentenced to an indeterminate sentence of imprisonment for public protection (IPP) with a tariff of 23 months or less sentenced in each of the years requested is shown in the following table:

IPPs sentenced with a tariff of 23 months or less

Number

2005

196

2006

529

2007

547

2008

365

These figures exclude those sentenced to an indeterminate sentence for public protection who subsequently had their sentence quashed.

By virtue of provisions in the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008, which took effect from 14 July 2008, an IPP may not be passed where the minimum tariff is less than two years, except where offenders have committed extremely serious crimes in the past.

The figures in the table above are taken from the Public Protection Unit Database in the National Offender Management Service, and, as with any large scale recording system, it is subject to possible errors arising from either data entry or processing.

Prison Sentences: Mentally Disturbed Offenders

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many offenders imprisoned with an indeterminate sentence for public protection have been held in secure hospitals since 2005; and if he will make a statement. (310956)

Prisoners may be detained in hospital under powers of the Mental Health Act 1983, either if directed to hospital by the court on sentencing or if directed by the Secretary of State during their sentence. They may also be remitted to prison during sentence.

Information is not available in the form requested. To answer how many offenders sentenced to an IPP who have been detained in a secure hospital at some time since 2005 would require manual checking of a large number of case files, which could be undertaken only at disproportionate cost.

On 14 January 2010, Ministry of Justice records showed 115 prisoners in hospital under powers of the 1983 Act, who were also serving indeterminate sentences of imprisonment for public protection (IPP).

Prisons: Drugs

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what (a) internal and (b) external audits of mandatory drug testing in prisons have been undertaken. (308738)

The most recent thematic internal audit of mandatory drug testing (MDT) was undertaken in 2009. Mandatory drug testing will be included in the NOMS audit programme which means that the extent to which each prison is complying with MDT policy will be assessed and reported once every three years.

Independent research on the effectiveness of mandatory drug testing was published by the Office for National Statistics in 2005 at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs05/rdso1r0305.pdf

The performance of the MDT analytical laboratory is the subject to regular independent audit.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what recent assessment his Department has made of the level of accuracy of mandatory drug testing statistics. (308758)

A comprehensive assessment of the accuracy of mandatory drug testing (MDT) was undertaken by the Office for National Statistics published in 2005 at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs05/rdso1r0305.pdf

It concluded that the mandatory drug testing programme provides a reliable and statistically valid way of measuring patterns and trends of drug misuse in prisons. Random MDT continues to be the best overall measure of drug misuse in prisons.

In addition, MDT processes are assured by a rolling programme of internal audits and an independent quality assurance provider. The last audit concluded that comprehensive guidance was available to prisons and, by extension, did not require updating. Further, urine samples were taken correctly and chain of custody was generally well documented.

The audit also identified areas of concern, which NOMS is now working with prisons to address:

at a third of establishments sampled, there were long periods each month where no random testing was undertaken;

at one establishment the disciplinary award given for test refusals was more lenient than that for positive results; and

establishments were not sending details of refusals to the laboratory. Central records on refusals therefore did not match those held locally.

MDT roles were not always properly recorded in staff performance and development records.

Where urine samples were left with the prison gate prior to collection, a number of establishments did not require gate staff to complete a form to acknowledge receipt of samples.

Victim Support Schemes: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much funding his Department and its predecessors have allocated to Victim Support in each year since 1997. (310957)

The following table details the amount of Government funding allocated to Victim Support since 1997.

Total Government funding to Victim Support

£ million

1996-97

11.68

1997-98

12.68

1998-99

12.68

1999-2000

17.5

2000-01

18.6

2001-02

25.1

2002-03

29.3

2003-04

30

2004-05

30

2005-06

30

2006-07

30

2007-08

35.8

2008-09

37

Voluntary Work: Offenders

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people have been (a) convicted and (b) prosecuted for offences committed while working as a volunteer with vulnerable adults. (311109)

Statistical data held by the Ministry of Justice on the Court Proceedings Database record the number of defendants proceeded against, found guilty and sentenced for criminal offences in England and Wales.

Other than where specified in a statute these data do not include information on the circumstances of an offence and it is therefore not possible to identify whether an offence was committed by a volunteer while working with vulnerable adults.

The Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA) has been created to help prevent unsuitable people from working with children and vulnerable adults. Increased safeguards introduced under the Vetting and Barring Scheme from 12 October 2009 make it a criminal offence for individuals barred by the ISA to work or apply to work with children or vulnerable adults in a wide range of posts.

Court proceedings data for 2009 are expected to be published in the autumn of 2010.

Youth Custody

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many hours on average a young offender spent in (a) general education, (b) literacy work, (c) numeracy work, (d) training, (e) physical education and (f) recreation/association in each (i) secure children's home, (ii) secure training centre and (iii) young offender institution in the latest period for which figures are available. (308780)

I have been asked to reply.

Figures collected by the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) and the Youth Justice Board (YJB) for September 2008 to August 2009 indicate that in Young People in Prison Service YOIs received an average of 27.5 hours per person per week of education, training and personal development. From October 2009 NOMS have implemented new data collection systems which, along with data returns from the LSC will allow greater accuracy and detail in reporting on education, training and constructive activities in the future.

The YJB report that in private YOIs, young people received an average of 33.9 hours of education, training and personal development activity per week during August 2008 to September 2009.

Data from the YJB indicate that between September 2008 and August 2009, 91.3 per cent. of young people in SCHs received a minimum of 30 hours of provision and in STCs this was 99 per cent. of young people.

These figures encompass a range of education and constructive activities and information is not collected broken down by specific type of activity.

Home Department

Borders: Personal Records

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what impact assessment has been made of the cost of the e-Borders programme to the aviation industry. (310312)

The potential financial costs to the aviation industry of implementing the data collection requirements of the e-Borders programme were analysed as part of a regulatory impact assessment published in January 2008. The link to the RIA can be found on:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/documents/eBorders-RIA-2008-01-10.html

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the (a) original and (b) current estimated cost is of establishment of the e-Borders programme. (310321)

The original planned expenditure for e-Borders from award of the contract to Trusted Borders in November 2007 through to November 2017 was £1.2 billion.

The current forecast of expenditure for this period, including contingency, is £1.2 billion.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the Oral Statement of 5 January 2010, Official Report, columns 28-32, on aviation and border security, what proportion of the e-Borders programme is complete. (310337)

We estimate that e-Borders is currently tracking 45 to 50 per cent. of all passenger movements into and out of the UK, which equates to approximately 100 million passengers annually. This figure is pending formal verification by statisticians.

e-Borders aims to track 95 per cent. of all passenger and crew movements by December 2010. This will represent all major commercial traffic. The remaining 5 per cent. represents private aviation and the small craft category. e-Borders expect that there will be 100 per cent. coverage by March 2014.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the oral statement of 5 January 2010, Official Report, columns 28-32, on aviation and border security, whether his consideration of additional targeted passenger profiling includes non-behavioural profiling. (310338)

I have been asked to reply.

We are examining carefully whether targeted passenger profiling might help to enhance airport security. We will be considering all the issues involved, mindful of civil liberties concerns, aware that identity-based profiling has its limitations, but conscious of our overriding obligations to protect people’s life and liberty.

Departmental Advertising

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate he has made of his Department's expenditure on (a) television, (b) radio, (c) print and (d) online advertising in (i) 2009-10 and (ii) 2010-11. (309931)

The forecast for Home Office media spend for 2009-10 is as follows:

£

TV airtime

4,457,477

Radio airtime

1,121,206

Print (Newspapers and Magazines)

1,294,174

Online

1,705,195

The activity that has been scheduled may still be subject to alteration and the total for each media may change. Activity that has not yet been planned and booked is not included as specific media spend will not yet be known.

The figures quoted are for net media costs and do not include production costs or fees.

The projected Home Office media spend on television, radio, print and online advertising for 2010-11 cannot be forecast as budgets have yet to be allocated.

Departmental Buildings

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many residential properties his Department owns; and how many (a) are occupied and (b) have been empty for more than six months. (304000)

The Department owns one residential property which has been empty for more than six months. Agents have been appointed to dispose of it.

Departmental Data Protection

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many members of staff of his Department and its agencies have been disciplined for inappropriate use of information obtained from (a) a police database, (b) an immigration database and (c) an identity card or passport database in each of the last 10 years. (310128)

The available information is set out in the following tables.

Home Office headquarters staff that have been disciplined for inappropriate use of information obtained from a police, immigration database and identity card or passport database1

Disciplined

Dismissed

Total

2005

0

0

0

2006

0

0

0

2007

0

0

0

2008

0

0

0

2009

0

0

0

1 No central records exist prior to January 2005.

National Policing Improvement Agency (NPIA) staff that have been disciplined for inappropriate use of information obtained from police databases1

Disciplined

Dismissed

Total

2007

0

0

0

2008

0

0

0

2009

0

0

0

1 The NPIA has had responsibility for national police databases since 1 April 2007. No information is available prior to 2007.

UK Border Agency (UKBA) staff that have been disciplined for inappropriate use of information obtained from an immigration database and/or an identity card or passport database1

Disciplined

Dismissed

Total

2005

3

0

3

2006

0

0

0

2007

3

0

3

2008

2

1

3

2009

2

0

2

Total

10

1

11

1 UKBA have no information available prior to 2005.

Identity and Passport Service (IPS) staff that have been disciplined for inappropriate use of information obtained from identity card or passport database

Disciplined

Dismissed

Total

1999 to 2004

0

0

0

2005-06

1

1

2

2006-07

0

0

0

2007-08

1

1

2

2008-09

0

0

0

Total

2

2

4

Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) staff that have been disciplined for inappropriate use of information obtained from police databases

Disciplined

Dismissed

Total

1999 to 2009

0

0

0

Departmental Official Cars

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the cost of provision of Government cars to special advisers in his Department was in the last 12 months. (301387)

No special advisers are provided with an allocated Government car and driver. As with all civil servants, special advisers may use an official car or taxi in properly defined circumstances. Details of such use is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Departmental Public Expenditure

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much his Department has spent on (a) consultants, (b) advertising, (c) publishing, (d) public relations, (e) professional training and (f) other activities in respect of each campaign (i) operated by his Department and (ii) commissioned from other organisations in (A) 2005-06, (B) 2006-07, (C) 2007-08 and (D) 2008-09; and which organisation operated each campaign not operated by his Department. (308818)

The following table summarises the spend of the Home Office on advertising and public relations broken down by individual campaign area for the years 2005-06, 2006-07, 2007-08 and 2008-09.

£

Campaign

Advertising

PR

2005-06

Acquisitive Crime Reduction

4,123,311

Alcohol Misuse Enforcement Campaign

92,204

Anti-Social Behaviour

396,475

363,040

Child Protection on the Internet

862,229

Clean Up Campaign

39,819

Crime Stoppers

82,182

Domestic Violence

534,587

Drugs (including FRANK campaign)

1,524,701

474,386

Park Mark Car Parks—car crime

94,260

Police Specials Recruitment

1,389,166

Police recruitment High Potential Development Scheme

41,400

Community Support Officers Recruitment

2,380

Rape

66,153

Year of the volunteer

74,027

Criminal Justice System

265,780

Tackling violent crime

156,620

Total

9,205,087

1,377,633

2006-07

Acquisitive Crime Reduction

3,266,192

Alcohol Binge drinking

1,975,005

Alcohol Misuse Enforcement Campaign

231,713

Child Protection on the Internet

46,824

Domestic Violence

800,384

Drugs (including FRANK campaign)

3,467,021

374,666

Immigration

790,860

Knife Amnesty

137,083

PCSO Recruitment

1,748,743

Rape

280,022

Single Non-Emergency Number

780,325

Stop and Search

134,501

Community Sentences

193,181

Police Recruitment High Potential Development Scheme

28,716

Police Community Support Officer Recruitment

113,511

Respect

61,568

Single Non-Emergency Number

29,186

Criminal Justice

174,473

Total

13,658,673

975,301

2007-08

Alcohol Harm Reduction

2,900,411

Community Safety

866,889

Drugs (including FRANK campaign)

898,509

290,584

Immigration

1,973,558

Kerb Crawling

218,025

Mobile Phone Blocking

190,162

Total

7,047,554

290,584

2008-09

Acquisitive Crime Reduction—Burglary

918,170

Alcohol Harm Reduction

2,790,203

Justice Seen Justice Done

2,246,390

Drugs (including FRANK campaign)

717,397

427,815

Human Trafficking

8,928

Immigration—Points Based System

2,453,007

Child Sex Offender Review / Violence against Women

55,860

Knife crime

917,764

Knife crime stakeholder PR

358,119

UKBA toolkit

118,443

R1CU—Research Information Communications Unit

5,000

Total

10,051,859

965,237

Notes: 1. There were no costs incurred on consultants for any of the campaigns set out above. 2. There is no central record of Home Office spend on publishing activities. To collate this information would incur disproportionate costs. 3. There were no costs on Professional Training associated with the campaign set out in the table above. 4. There were no costs on “other activities”; the costs given cover the total costs of each campaign. The figures for advertising refer to the cost of media for TV, print, radio, cinema and posters net of VAT for public facing advertising campaigns. They do not include classified recruitment advertising or digital advertising. 5. The Alcohol Harm Reduction and Drugs campaigns are both cross-government campaigns. The figures that have been provided are those billed to the Home Office.

Departmental Sick Leave

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many working days were lost due to (a) illness and (b) stress of employees in his Department in each of the last three years. (309916)

Sick absence within the Home Office is reported using Cabinet Office standards and definitions, which were introduced with effect from 1 April 2007. Sick absence is defined as the absence of a civil servant due to their illness or injury. No distinction is made on recording systems between “illnesses” and “injuries”; the information provided therefore covers both illnesses and injuries. The data provided for 2006-07 include the Prison Service which was part of the Home Office before machinery of government changes in May 2007.

(a) Total working days lost due to illness/injury of paid civil servants:

Total working days lost

Number

2006-07

803,653.00

2007-08

264,501.10

2008-09

228,520.63

(b) Absence due to stress is reported within the category “Mental Disorders”, in line with Cabinet Office guidance to report absences using the World Health Organisation (WHO) International Classification of Diseases (ICD) version 10. Unfortunately, it is not possible to provide consistent information below this group as it covers anxiety, depression, and stress, as well as other more severe mental health conditions.

Total working days lost of paid civil servants due to mental disorders

Number

2006-07

171,637.39

2007-08

65,410.80

2008-09

24,947.41

Detention Centres: Children

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what his assessment is of progress made in improving provision for families with children at immigration removal centres; and how much has been spent on making such improvements in the last 12 months. (310109)

[holding answer 12 January 2010]: We take the welfare of children in our care very seriously and are proud of the investment made to improve services at Yarl’s Wood over the last couple of years, the main centre for holding families with children. These include:

A dedicated Ofsted inspected school delivering 30 hours per week of tuition by qualified teachers for children aged five-16 years.

A crèche staffed seven days a week from nine-five by appropriately qualified child care professionals for children under school age.

Professional supervision and support for teaching staff, in the form of oversight from the head teacher of another establishment.

Establishment of a softer and more child-focused reception area and further provision of age-appropriate activities such as a bouncy castle, and a library of games and toys for use in the children’s rooms.

Relocation of the youth club to a larger room with access to grassed outside play area.

The introduction of a fortnightly children’s forum and development of dedicated children’s complaints forms.

The provision of a midwife, healthcare visitor, paediatric nurse and child counselling services.

The improvements we have made have been considered and acknowledged by the likes of the Children’s Commissioner for England, the Independent Monitoring Board and HM Chief Inspector of Prisons.

At the same time, we have recently conducted an internal review of the services provided at other centres where children may be detained. This highlighted a number of areas where improvements need to be made at Tinsley House. A programme of improvement has commenced, and while this is being undertaken, we have taken the decision to reduce the maximum period of stay for families with children from 72 hours to 24 hours.

Services provided for children are funded within the operating contracts for centres, the value of which is commercially confidential. It is therefore not possible to provide a figure on how much has been spent on improvements in the last 12 months.

Entry Clearances

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many time-limited visas of each type have been issued in each year since 1997; (307632)

(2) how many time-limited visas of each type have been issued in each year since 1997.

[holding answer 10 December 2009]: The following table shows the number of time limited visas issued to applicants from 2004. Data prior to 2004 are not considered accurate and reliable; therefore they have not been included in the table.

Endorsement category

Issued

2004

EEA family permits

23,877

Family visit

248,154

Other non-settlement

95,541

Other visitor

1,140,775

Student

201,793

Transit

62,076

Work permit

98,320

Working holiday maker

70,304

Total

1,940,840

2005

EEA family permits

23,858

Family visit

331,100

Other non-settlement

109,656

Other visitor

1,112,301

Student

210,399

Transit

54,905

Work permit

113,052

Working holiday maker

58,433

Total

2,013,704

2006

EEA family permits

25,217

Family visit

376,377

Other non-settlement

115,103

Other visitor

1,202,704

Student

238,880

Transit

53,977

Work permit

123,807

Working holiday maker

46,138

Total

2,182,203

2007

EEA family permits

22,743

Family visit

354,351

Other non-settlement

120,112

Other visitor

1,101,832

PBS tier 1

Student

242,885

Transit

40,327

Work permit

96,750

Working holiday maker

39,392

Total

2,018,392

2008

EEA family permits

18,083

Family visit

313,426

Other non-settlement

112,089

Other visitor

1,073,547

PBS tier 1

12,052

PBS tier 2

90

PBS tier 5

382

Student

233,020

Transit

32,599

Work permit

78,973

Working holiday maker

34,467

Total

1,908,728

Note:

Information above is provisional and subject to change.

Entry Clearances: Overseas Students

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he plans to issue his response to the recent consultation on proposed changes to Tier 4 student visa arrangements. (310366)

[holding answer 12 January 2010]: The outcome of the review of tier 4 announced by the Prime Minister on 12 November will be announced shortly.

Foreign Workers: Immigration Controls

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will require the Migration Advisory Committee in formulating its advice on the level of immigrant labour needed to complete the (a) London Olympics and (b) Crossrail construction work to obtain information on whether jobs on these projects are first advertised through Jobcentre Plus. (310657)

[holding answer 14 January 2010]: The Government have no plans at present to ask the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) for specific advice relating to the London Olympics or Crossrail.

It is possible that the MAC may review jobs relating to these projects independently as part of their regular work on the Shortage Occupation List.

Unless a job is on the Shortage Occupation List, it must be advertised through Jobcentre Plus before it can be offered to a migrant worker under tier 2.

Illegal Immigrants

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people were (a) prosecuted and (b) found guilty of employing illegal immigrants in each month of (i) 2007, (ii) 2008 and (iii) 2009. (306001)

[holding answer 10 December 2009]: The “prosecution” of an individual employer for an offence relating to employing illegal migrant workers formerly occurred through the courts under section 8 of the Asylum and Immigration Act 1996. The prosecution offences in 1996 were replaced by the introduction of civil penalties for employers in the Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Act 2006 in February 2008. An individual employer who has received a civil penalty for offences related to illegal working under the 2006 Act does not undergo prosecution through the courts.

Between 29 February 2008 and 30 November 2009 a total of 3,376 Notices of Liability for a Civil Penalty were issued to employers of illegal migrant workers. These data are derived from local management information and are therefore provisional and liable to change.

An employer may still be prosecuted under section 21 of the Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Act 2006 where it can be established that the employer “knowingly” employed an illegal migrant worker after 29 February 2008.

Data on the number of defendants proceeded against and found guilty in 2007 and 2008 of offences relating to employing a person subject to immigration control are published by the Home Office in table 3.4 of the Control of Immigration.

Statistics United Kingdom 2008, which is available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office Research, Development and Statistics Directorate website at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/immigration-asylum-stats.html

Data for 2008 remain provisional and subject to change. Data for 2009 will be published in summer 2010.

The following tables from the Ministry of Justice provide a monthly breakdown of the overall figures set out in the above publication.

20072, 3, 420081, 2, 3, 4

Proceeded against in magistrates court

Found guilty in all courts

Proceeded against in magistrates courts

Found guilty in all courts

January

0

0

5

3

February

4

4

12

6

March

4

4

4

2

April

3

1

5

7

May

2

1

2

1

June

1

1

5

3

July

4

3

4

2

August

1

0

6

7

September

7

5

7

0

October

3

2

8

4

November

3

2

7

5

December

7

2

2

0

Total

39

25

67

40

1 Provisional.

2 Includes offences of employing a person aged 16 and above and employing a person knowingly that they are an adult subject to immigration control.

3 These are data on the principal immigration offence basis.

4 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitation are taken into account when those data are used.

Immigrants: Detainees

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many and what proportion of people in each age group held in immigration detention centres have been (a) released and (b) deported in each year since 1997. (308447)

Tables A and B show the number of persons recorded as leaving detention in the United Kingdom solely under Immigration Act powers, by age and reason for leaving detention for the year 2005 and the period January to September 2006. These figures are not available prior to or after this period.

However, in August 2009 the Control of Immigration Quarterly Statistical publication was expanded to include management information on the total number of persons leaving detention and the number of children leaving detention. The information is now available for Quarter 1, Quarter 2 and Quarter 3 of 2009. Table C shows these figures, they will continue to be published quarterly in the future; however data for earlier years will remain unavailable.

Table D shows persons removed from the United Kingdom on leaving detention held solely under Immigration Act powers, by age for 2005, January to September 2006, 2007, 2008 and January to September 2009. Data for earlier years are unavailable.

Published statistics on immigration and asylum are available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office Research, Development and Statistics Directorate website at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/immigration-asylum-stats.html

Table A: Persons recorded as leaving detention in the United Kingdom solely under Immigration Act powers, 2005, by age1 and reason for leaving detention2,3 (excluding Oakington and Harwich4)

Number of individuals

Children

Total persons5

of whom:

Adults1 18 yrs+

Under 5 yrs

5-11 yrs

12-16 yrs

17 yrs

Total children

Reason for leaving detention

No.

%

No.

%

No.

%

No.

%

No.

%

No.

%

No.

%

Removed from the UK

20,420

70

19,185

70

555

70

355

61

265

67

55

67

1,230

66

Granted leave to enter/remain6

130

0

130

0

0

0

0

0

0

Granted temporary admission/release7

7,290

25

6,715

25

225

28

210

36

120

30

25

31

575

31

Bailed8

1,370

5

1,320

5

20

2

20

3

10

3

*

1

50

3

Other

5

0

5

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total persons leaving detention

29,210

27,350

795

585

395

85

1,860

Table B: Persons recorded as leaving detention in the United Kingdom solely under Immigration Act powers, January to September 2006, by age1 and reason for leaving detention2,3 (excluding Oakington and Harwich4)

Number of individuals

Children

Total persons5

of whom:

Adults1 18 yrs+

Under 5 yrs

5-11 yrs

12-16 yrs

17 yrs

Total children

Reason for leaving detention

No.

%

No.

%

No.

%

No.

%

No.

%

No.

%

No.

%

Removed from the UK

14,360

68

13,625

69

315

60

250

59

135

59

35

67

735

60

Granted leave to enter/remain6

110

1

110

1

*

0

0

0

0

*

0

Granted temporary admission/release7

5,470

26

5,000

25

205

39

160

38

85

38

15

31

470

38

Bailed8

1,105

5

1,080

5

10

2

10

3

5

3

*

2

25

2

Other

*

0

*

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total persons leaving detention

21,045

19,810

530

425

230

50

1,235

1 Recorded age at the end of their period of detention. Figures for children will overstate if any applicants aged 18 or over claim to be younger.

2 Numbers rounded to the nearest five (— = 0, * = 1 or 2) and may not sum to the totals shown because of independent rounding. Percentages rounded to the nearest per cent. and may therefore not sum to 100. Figures exclude persons recorded as leaving detention from police cells and Prison Service establishments, those recorded as detained under both criminal and immigration powers at time of removal/release and their children.

3 Some detainees may be recorded more than once if, for example, the person has been detained on more than one separate occasion in the time period shown.

4 Oakington Reception Centre and Harwich were not controlled by the same part of UKBA as the removal/detention centres in the UKBA estate before 2007. Oakington and Harwich data on the database were incomplete so they were excluded prior to 2007.

5 Figures include dependants and those detained in family groups.

6 Short or long term stay in the UK has been granted.

7 Decision on case has not been made.

8 Detainee has applied for, and been granted, bail at a bail hearing.

Table C: Persons leaving detention in the United Kingdom held solely under Immigration Act powers, January to September 20091,2,3,4

Number of individuals

Period

Total persons4, of whom:

Children5

Quarter 16

6,765

250

Quarter 2

6,910

225

Quarter 3

6,975

305

1 These figures are based on management information and are not subject to the detailed checks that apply for National Statistics. They are provisional and may be subject to change. Excludes persons detained in Harwich short term holding facility, police cells and Prison Service establishments.

2 Figures rounded to the nearest five.

3 Some detainees may be recorded more than once if, for example, if the person has left detention then been detained again and left once more in the time period shown.

4 Figures include dependants and those detained in family groups.

5 Recorded age at the end of their period of detention. Figures for children will overstate if any applicants aged 18 or over claim to be younger.

6 Figures include those leaving detention between 28 and 31 December 2008.

Table D: Persons removed from the United Kingdom on leaving detention1 held solely under Immigration Act powers, by age2,3,4,5, for 2005, January to September 2006, 2007, 2008 and January to September 2009

Number of individuals

Children

Period

Total persons, of whom:

Adults2 18 yrs+

Under 5 yrs

5-11 yrs

12-16 yrs

17 yrs

Total children

20056

20,420

19,185

555

355

265

55

1,230

2006 Jan to Sep6

14,360

13,625

315

250

135

35

735

20077

16,120

15,490

300

195

110

25

630

20088

16,310

15,695

280

195

125

15

615

2009 Q18

4,035

3,925

55

40

10

5

110

2009 Q28

3,815

3,720

55

30

15

100

2009 Q38

4,085

3,930

65

55

25

5

150

1 Some detainees may be recorded more than once if, for example, the person has been detained on more than one separate occasion in the time period shown, such as a person who has left detention for the purpose of a removal, but who has subsequently been re-detained.

2 Recorded age at the end of their period of detention. Figures for children will overstate if any applicants aged 18 or over claim to be younger.

3 Figures rounded to the nearest five (— = 0, * = 1 or 2) and may not sum to the totals shown because of independent rounding. Figures exclude persons recorded as leaving detention from police cells and Prison Service establishments, those recorded as detained under both criminal and immigration powers at time of removal and their dependants.

4 Not necessarily removed in the same year as leaving detention.

5 Figures include dependants and those detained in family groups.

6 Oakington Reception Centre and Harwich were not controlled by the same part of UKBA as the removal/detention centres in the UKBA estate before 2007. Oakington and Harwich data on the database were incomplete so they were excluded prior to 2007.

7 Figures exclude persons recorded as leaving detention from Harwich short term holding facility.

8 Provisional figures.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people in each age group have been held in immigration removal centres on more than one occasion in each year since 1997; and on how many occasions such people were held in a removal centre. (308777)

Information on persons held on more than one occasion in each year and on how many occasions is not held centrally and would be available only through the detailed examination of individual case files at disproportionate cost.

However, in August 2009 the Control of Immigration Quarterly Statistical publication was expanded to include management information on persons entering detention, total number of persons leaving detention and the number of families with children held in detention. This information is available by age (to separately identify children), and will be published quarterly in the future; however data for earlier years will remain unavailable.

Information on the number of adults and children under the age of 18 entering detention solely under Immigration Act powers in Q1-Q3 2009 by age and country of nationality is available in:

Q1 and Q2 2009

Table 8a and 8b of the Control of Immigration Quarterly Statistical Summary United Kingdom publication:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs09/immiq209.pdf

Tables G and H of the supplementary tables:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs09/immiq209supp.xls

Q3 2009

Table 9 of the Control of Immigration Quarterly Statistical Summary United Kingdom publication:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs09/immiq309.pdf

Table H of the supplementary tables:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs09/immiq309supp.xls

Published statistics on immigration and asylum are available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office Research, Development and Statistics Directorate website at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/immigration-asylum-stats.html

Immigration: Chelmsford

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what his most recent estimate is of the number of people in West Chelmsford constituency who are awaiting a decision on an application for leave to remain in the UK; and what estimate he has made of the number of people in West Chelmsford constituency who made an application for leave to remain in the UK in the last 12 months. (310737)

The information is not recorded centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Passports

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many contracts relating to biometric passports his Department plans to let; when he expects each such contract to be put out to tender; and what the estimated monetary value is of each such contract. (310384)

[holding answer 12 January 2010]: The Home Department has no current plans to let any further contracts in relation to the design and/or production of biometric passports. Several support arrangements that will facilitate the delivery of biometric passport books are either under consideration or in the early stages of the tender process.

Procurement activity in the form of a request for expressions of interest for the provision of front office services has recently begun. It is not possible to provide details of the potential value of this arrangement at this time as this may prejudice the Department’s commercial position during the tendering process.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what his most recent estimate is of the cost of including fingerprint data in passports in each year from 2010-11 to 2018-19. (310386)

[holding answer 12 January 2010]: It is intended that passports incorporating fingerprints will be introduced from 2012 onwards and applicants for such passports will be enrolled on the National Identity Register. From that point, common business processes and technology infrastructure will be used to register applicants on the National Identity Register and issue them with an identity card and/or a passport.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much the Identity and Passport Service has spent in each month since October 2006; how many passports were issued in each such month; and how much revenue accrued in fees for such passports in each such month. (310387)

[holding answer 12 January 2010]: The following table outlines passport revenue, total expenditure for the Agency and volumes of passports issued for Identity and Passport Service from October 2006 to September 2009:

Passport revenue (£)

Expenditure (£)

Passports issued (Number)

October 2006 to March 2007

162,620,052

159,661,963

2,547,467

April 2007 to March 2008

375,681,000

430,098,000

5,900,000

April 2008 to March 2009

366,289,000

468,492,000

5,225,115

April 2009 to September 2009

198,889,236

241,108,460

2,960,654

Expenditure for the Agency includes that incurred for Passport, Home Office funded and GRO activities, a breakdown for which can be obtained in the segmental reporting note of the Annual Report and Accounts for respective years.

Passports: Biometrics

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment has been made of whether biometric information in the UK passport complies with (a) International Civil Aviation Organisation standards, (b) American visa waiver standards and (c) Schengen standards. (310656)

[holding answer 14 January 2010]: The UK passport contains a facial biometric, which complies with International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) standards for the inclusion of globally interoperable biometrics in travel documents. The UK passport also meets the requirements for the US Visa Waiver programme. As the UK is not a member of Schengen, the UK passport is not required to meet Schengen standards for passports. However the inclusion of a facial biometric in the UK passport is consistent with the EU Passport Regulation (EC 2252/2004) by which Schengen states are bound. The UK plans to implement fingerprint biometrics in passports from 2012.

Police: Essex

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the cost was of Essex Police Authority in each of the last two years. (305836)

Essex police authority has maximum flexibility to make the best possible use of their resources. According to the published statements of account of Essex police authority, the corporate and democratic core line lists the costs in the last two years as:

£ million

2007-08

1.562

2008-09

1.766

Police: Nottingham

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police officers were based in Nottingham North constituency in (a) 1997 and (b) the last year for which information is available. (309301)

Police personnel statistics are not collected by parliamentary constituency. Nottingham, North constituency is in the ‘City of Nottingham’ basic command unit (BCU) (area C). Data for police officers by BCU for Nottinghamshire were first available as at 31 March 2003.

There were 821 police officers in ‘City of Nottingham’ BCU as at 31 March 2003 and 783 police officers as at 31 March 2009.

Police: Preston

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the percentage change in the number of full-time police officers in Preston has been since 1997. (310996)

Police personnel statistics are collected at police force level on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis. A breakdown below police force level to the level of basic command unit level (BCU) has been collected only since 2002-03. Preston falls within the BCU of Lancashire Central, where there were 13 less FTE officers in 2009 than in 2003, a fall of 3.4 per cent. Overall figures for Lancashire constabulary show an increase of 406 FTE officers or 12.5 per cent. since 1997.

Figures are as at 31 March in each given year. Figures at BCU level include officers on career break or maternity/paternity leave. Figures for Lancashire constabulary exclude these in order to provide a like-for-like comparison with 1997. Further breakdown is available in the annual “Police Service Strength” publication available on the Home Office website and the Library of the House.

Thames Valley Police: Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police officers Thames Valley Police have employed in each year since 2005. (311250)

The available data can be seen in the following table.

These and other related data are published annually as part of the annual Police Service Strength Home Office Statistical Bulletin. The latest bulletin can be found at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/policeorg1.html

and bulletins for this and previous years are deposited in the Library of the House.

Police officer strength (FTE)1, 2 for Thames Valley as at 31 March 2005 to 31 March 2009

Number

2005

4,189

2006

4,288

2007

4,260

2008

4,186

2009

4,317

1 This table contains full-time equivalent figures that have been rounded to the nearest whole number. 2 Figures include officers on career break or maternity/paternity leave.

Vetting

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what guidance his Department provides to employers in receipt of information from enhanced Criminal Record Bureau checks on assessment of the nature of the data provided. (311137)

There are a number of published guidelines issued to organisations undertaking Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) checks, all of which are available on the CRB website at:

www.crb.homeoffice.gov.uk

The CRB regularly provide advice and guidance to registered organisations relating to best practice through its customer newsletter and the website.

The CRB advises organisations that certificates should be kept securely, in lockable, non-portable, storage containers with access strictly controlled and limited to those who are entitled to see it as part of their duties.

It is a requirement of the CRB's code of practice that all registered organisations must treat applicants who have a criminal record fairly and do not discriminate because of a conviction or other information revealed. Organisations are also advised not to make their recruitment decision solely on the contents of a certificate.

The CRB obliges registered organisations to have a written policy on the recruitment of ex-offenders' a copy of which can be given to applicants at the outset of the recruitment process.

Visas: Tourism

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent research his Department has evaluated on the economic effects of the cost of tourist visas on the tourist industry. (310296)

In July 2008 research was carried out to see if a direct link between application fees for short term visit visas and demand could be identified. This was jointly funded by the UK Border Agency, DCMS and Tourism Alliance. Research concluded that in general there is no link between application fees for short term visit visas and demand.

The UK Border Agency also ran two piloted schemes to see if a lower visit visa fee would stimulate demand. From March to September 2007 the pilot was for travellers from China applying to enter the UK on the Approved Destination Status (ADS) scheme. From December 2008 to April 2009 the pilot was carried out in India for visitors on an organised tour with a Trusted Partner (TP) travel agent. The pilot schemes demonstrated that visa cost is not the single most important driver to encouraging applications.

Cabinet Office

Central Office of Information

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what the (a) name, (b) cost and (c) sponsoring Department was of each advertising campaign supported by the Central Office of Information during 2008-09. (309843)

I have asked the chief executive of the Central Office of Information to reply to the hon. Member.

Letter from Mark Lund, dated 7 January 2010:

Re: COI Advertising Spend 2008/9

As Chief Executive of the Central Office of Information (COI), I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question on COI advertising spend in 2008/9 (309843).

The information requested is given in the table which will be placed in the Libraries of the House.

It should however be noted that this reflects only the expenditure that has passed through COI and not necessarily the total cost for the campaign.

Civil Servants: Travel

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office if she will publish the travel guidelines issued to (a) permanent secretaries, (b) senior civil servants and (c) other civil servants. (311060)

The Cabinet Office does not issue service-wide travel guidelines.

The Civil Service Management Code provides a central framework that Departments must adhere to when setting up their policies. However, as this is a delegated area, Departments are responsible for issuing and operating their own guidelines in relation to travel.

The Civil Service Management Code is available in its entirety, with chapter 8, section 8.2 setting out the central framework in relation to travel, at:

www.civilservice.gov.uk/about/resources/csmc/index.aspx

Deaths: Alcoholic Drinks and Drugs

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many deaths where (a) alcohol and (b) the misuse of drugs was the primary cause there were in (i) England and Wales and (ii) Hemel Hempstead constituency in the last five years. (311028)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Pennick, dated January 2010:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent question aski