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Written Answers

Volume 504: debated on Wednesday 27 January 2010

Written Answers to Questions

Wednesday 27 January 2010

House of Commons Commission

Bars

To ask the hon. Member for North Devon, representing the House of Commons Commission what the rules are governing (a) the use by and (b) the admission of guests of (i) hon. Members, (ii) hon. Members' staff and (iii) House of Commons staff in respect of each bar on the House of Commons part of the parliamentary estate. (312634)

Bars on the House of Commons part of the parliamentary estate currently available to staff of the House (all grades) and Members' staff are:

Bellamy's Bar (Mon-Thurs 12.00-23.00 or rise of House, whichever is the earlier, but not before 22.00) with up to two guests.

Moncrieff s CafeBar (Mon-Tue 09.00 (bar 12.00)-20.00; Weds-Thurs 09.00 (bar 12.00)-22.00 or rise of House, whichever is the later; Fri 09.00 (bar 12.00)-16.00) with up to three guests.

Additionally, senior staff of the House of Commons may use the following bar facilities:

Strangers' Bar (Mon-Weds 12.00-23.00 or rise of House, whichever is the later; Thursday 12.00-22.00; Fri 12.00-15.15 or rise of House, whichever is the later). Staff grade A2 and above may take in up to three guests; Staff Grade B may not take in guests.

June-July only: Terrace Pavilion Bar (open 13.00-23.00 Mon-Weds). Access as for Strangers' Bar.

Pugin Room (Bar service open Mon-Tue 11.00-15.00 and 17.30-midnight or 15 minutes after the rise of House, whichever is the earlier; Weds 11.00-15.00 and 17.30-23.00; Thurs 11.00-15.00 and 17.30-22.00; closed Fridays). Open to staff grade A2 and above with up to three guests.

Members and up to three guests have access to all the bar facilities listed above. Also, the Members' Smoking Room is provided for the exclusive use of Members of Parliament (Mon-Tue 14.00-17.00 and 18.00-midnight; Weds 14.00-17.00 and 18.00-23.00; Thurs 13.00-17.00 and 18.00-19.00; closed Fridays).

The following bars are provided elsewhere on the parliamentary estate for all parliamentary pass holders, including Members, their staff and all staff of the House of Commons:

Sports and Social Club bar 12.00-23.00 Monday to Friday (sitting weeks) and at reduced time, depending on the level of trade, during recess.

Lords Bar (Mon-Thurs 10.30-21.00; Fri 10.30-19.30) with up to two guests.

Department of Resources

To ask the hon. Member for North Devon, representing the House of Commons Commission how much was spent on running costs for the Department of Resources and its predecessors in each year from 2005-06 to 2008-09; what estimate has been made of such costs in 2009-10; and if he will make a statement. (312213)

The direct running costs of the Department of Resources and its predecessor the Department of Finance and Administration have been:

£000

Actual

Forecast

2005-06

7,596

2006-07

6,860

2007-08

7,939

2008-09

8,753

2009-10

8,753

9,922

These figures include staff and directly related accommodation costs, but not other expenditure managed on behalf of the House as a whole. They also exclude ICT infrastructure costs which are managed jointly by the parliamentary ICT for both Houses.

Fluctuations in expenditure represent organisational and other work changes that have arisen during the period. For example, the departmental ICT team was amalgamated into PICT on 1 January 2006, the Internal Audit team transferred to the Office of the Chief Executive on 1 January 2008, and there have been additional resources consumed recently because of FOI, the Legg Review and other Member-related work.

Members: Allowances

To ask the hon. Member for North Devon, representing the House of Commons Commission what remunerated positions Sir Thomas Legg declared prior to his appointment to review payments from the additional cost allowance; and whether Sir Thomas was required to declare the amount of remuneration he receives from such positions. (313437)

Sir Thomas Legg has declared the following positions: non-executive director of Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, consultant to Clifford Chance, and Commissioner of the Audit Commission. Sir Thomas was not required to inform the House Administration of the amount of remuneration from these positions.

Justice

Back Office: Central Government

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment he has made of the reasons for the cost of the finance function of his Department's core headquarters referred to in the publication Benchmarking the Back Office: Central Government; and if he will make a statement. (312681)

The cost of the finance function for the Ministry of Justice's headquarters is made up of:

the costs of finance teams that provide support to a number of the MOJ's Directorates, including the corporate centre which provides support and challenge to the entire Department;

the costs for transaction processing for the former Department for Constitutional Affairs parts of the Department (including HM Courts Service and the Tribunal Service) that are funded and managed through a central contract.

The cost differences reflected in the publication ‘Benchmarking the Back Office: Central Government’ may have a number of causes including, as the report notes: “different bodies in central Government have very different business models to deliver their different services”. I believe that, given the MOJ's business model, this level of headquarters expenditure is reasonable in supporting a wider business area and providing support and challenge to help the board and Ministers to achieve outcomes efficiently.

The MOJ supports the work on benchmarking, and is working with other Government Departments to help us to better understand the variations in costs these data illustrate and to drive further efficiencies across the MOJ through the shared services programme started in July 2009. The MOJ also has plans, annexed to ‘Putting the Frontline First’, to improve the efficiency of both its finance and human resources functions across its headquarters, agencies and non-departmental public bodies. These include moving all human resources and finance transaction processing into a single shared service.

Convictions: Knives

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people have been (a) charged and (b) convicted of an offence of carrying a knife in each of the last five years. (312767)

The number of persons proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts for offences relating to carrying a knife, England and Wales 2003 to 2007 (latest available) is shown in the following table.

The Ministry of Justice do not collect charging data; proceeded against information has been provided in lieu.

Court proceedings data for 2008 are planned for publication on 28 January 2010.

Number of persons proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts for offences relating to knife possession1, England and Wales 2003-072, 3

Proceeded against

Found guilty

2003

6,928

5,396

2004

7,352

5,890

2005

7,319

6,005

2006

7,699

6,369

2007

7,404

6,169

1 Includes the following offences and statutes:

Having an article with blade or point in public place. (Criminal Justice Act 1988 S.139 as amended by Offensive Weapons Act 1996 S.3).

Having an article with blade or point on school premises. (Criminal Justice Act 1988 S.139A (1)(5)(a) as added by Offensive Weapons Act 1996 S.4(1)).

2 The statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences the principal offence is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

3 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source:

Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice.

Driving Offences

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the average fine given to a person convicted of driving without insurance was in each justice administrative area in each year since 1997. (312817)

The number of average fines imposed at all courts in England and Wales for using a motor vehicle uninsured against third party risks, by police force area, from 1997 to 2007 (latest available) is given in the table.

Court proceedings data for 2008 are planned for publication on 28 January 2010.

Average fine imposed at all courts for offences of using a motor vehicle uninsured against third party risks, by police force area, England and Wales, 1997 to 20071

Average amount of fines (£)

Police force area

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Avon and Somerset

259

204

164

182

130

133

138

154

154

155

155

Bedfordshire

314

293

274

226

164

169

137

143

156

183

210

Cambridgeshire

220

209

215

182

119

118

131

152

171

182

186

Cheshire

274

248

237

211

149

153

167

179

190

195

224

City of London

332

314

346

374

369

368

334

230

198

214

245

Cleveland

162

167

170

179

167

173

171

189

202

210

216

Cumbria

150

171

220

265

151

151

159

169

171

186

193

Derbyshire

270

279

283

296

337

355

367

367

376

372

379

Devon and Cornwall

184

185

178

179

133

132

127

134

145

150

161

Dorset

295

302

301

261

121

114

125

158

171

176

186

Durham

181

177

194

159

118

122

121

116

123

132

138

Essex

174

149

140

123

101

104

112

164

182

202

217

Gloucestershire

154

201

247

240

91

86

133

148

143

140

156

Greater Manchester

245

226

236

232

152

151

157

167

176

181

186

Hampshire

132

135

138

136

119

122

124

131

138

141

150

Hertfordshire

193

164

173

205

155

166

181

198

208

216

216

Humberside

159

148

143

137

122

132

137

150

180

194

200

Kent

245

241

226

271

209

192

190

197

204

221

223

Lancashire

332

296

237

219

111

113

141

156

169

183

191

Leicestershire

318

318

276

254

134

135

138

150

145

152

163

Lincolnshire

159

197

209

188

133

134

148

179

185

196

202

Merseyside

199

203

200

206

163

167

148

137

141

147

156

Metropolitan Police

202

184

184

169

139

140

143

147

165

179

195

Norfolk

242

256

265

210

99

108

139

152

152

165

167

North Yorkshire

249

236

230

211

130

137

141

160

177

185

193

Northamptonshire

243

286

310

280

280

334

245

183

156

172

175

Northumbria

136

146

148

144

130

135

135

137

142

148

153

Nottinghamshire

164

165

153

150

152

156

152

188

138

147

159

South Yorkshire

194

206

191

169

128

137

146

126

147

143

157

Staffordshire

251

228

234

198

152

163

166

186

230

256

257

Suffolk

192

192

192

185

128

138

133

136

156

162

168

Surrey

243

242

215

218

201

215

221

198

195

217

236

Sussex

218

186

181

167

118

117

138

162

170

169

185

Thames Valley

292

256

268

250

134

135

158

198

206

217

226

Warwickshire

228

175

178

188

157

168

164

210

200

230

229

West Mercia

268

282

282

263

176

180

165

193

208

218

223

West Midlands

207

190

189

201

169

192

200

206

207

211

209

West Yorkshire

255

242

242

208

120

123

134

144

144

146

147

Wiltshire

152

183

186

204

283

286

280

200

208

228

217

Dyfed Powys

183

182

175

169

155

166

172

187

184

191

206

Gwent

253

225

225

208

148

154

170

157

171

172

174

North Wales

209

226

272

230

143

150

149

154

163

173

175

South Wales

190

179

182

188

159

173

158

154

149

158

167

England and Wales

224

214

212

203

150

155

160

169

177

185

194

1 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are use.

Source:

Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice

Family Courts: Mass Media

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice when an assessment will be made of the effectiveness of the changes introduced in April 2009 to arrangements for the media to attend family court hearings. (312933)

The Ministry of Justice published a study into the impact of the April 2009 rule changes on 21 January 2010. The study can be found on the Ministry of Justice website and copies have been laid in the House of Commons Library.

Legal Advice and Assistance

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the answer of 7 January 2010, Official Report, column 546W, on legal advice and assistance, whether seasonal fluctuations in workload of new matter start allocations for providers of the Advice and Assistance Scheme (Legal Help) were taken into account when deciding upon the period 9 April to August 2009 to assess the annual run-rate. (312922)

Seasonal fluctuations were not taken into account when calculating the annual run-rate of firms, which predict the number of matter starts that might potentially be required by each provider to year end. However, any provider who had their allocation of matter starts reduced following the review can request a review by the Legal Services Commission and present evidence in support of a request to reinstate matter starts, including data regarding seasonal fluctuations. Seasonal fluctuations vary greatly from firm to firm and among categories of law and therefore it is not possible to apply a standard formula to take these into account.

National Offender Management Service

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment he has made of the merits of proposals to set up separate operational arms in the National Offender Management Service. (312662)

As part of the restructure of the Ministry of Justice in 2008, a single NOMS delivery organisation has been created to join together and streamline headquarters, and deliver prison and probation services more effectively. This delivery arm is an executive agency. The expectations on prisons and probation are unchanged: to protect the public and reduce reoffending.

National Offender Management Service: Probation

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will take steps to increase the number of staff at the National Offender Management Service HQ who have a background in probation. (312663)

The National Offender Management Service (NOMS) fully recognises the benefits of using the specialist skills of probation staff in appropriate posts. Where there is a business need for a particular post to be filled by someone with a probation service employment background, NOMS headquarters groups may second or advertise externally, in line with NOMS and civil service recruitment policy.

NOMS has recently obtained special permission from the Office of the Civil Service Commissioners for secondments from probation services to last for up to three years, rather than the two years normally allowed by the Commissioners’ Recruitment Principles. Certain senior posts in the regional teams within NOMS headquarters are now reserved for probation service personnel on secondment. In addition, NOMS is developing a facility for vacant posts, where appropriate, to be simultaneously advertised internally to Ministry of Justice employees, and as secondment opportunities to probation service employees.

National Offender Management Service: Recruitment

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether probation staff (a) are permitted to apply for and (b) may be appointed to vacancies in the National Offender Management Service. (313008)

Probation service employees may apply for posts in the National Offender Management Service Agency that are advertised externally. They may also apply for internally advertised posts on secondment. Where appropriate, posts may also be reserved solely for secondment of personnel from probation areas or trusts.

Prison Accommodation

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many hospital beds in each prison are being used to ease overcrowding elsewhere in the prison; (313202)

(2) how many prisons used hospital beds to ease overcrowding elsewhere in the prison in 2009.

Places in in-patient health care centres may be added to the certified normal accommodation and/or operational capacity of a prison when routinely used to accommodate patients but not simply to provide additional accommodation to manage population pressures.

Prisoner Escapes

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many escape list prisoners there are in each category of prison accommodation. (313201)

This information is not held centrally. To collate this information would involve contacting every closed establishment in order to identify how many prisoners are currently on each local escape list. This would incur a disproportionate cost.

All closed prisons are required to have in place a system to identify and manage prisoners who are placed on the escape list. A prisoner may be placed on the escape list if they pose a current and significant threat of escaping that cannot be addressed through normal security arrangements.

Prisoners Release

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many prisoners were released before their agreed release date in the latest year for which figures are available; (312847)

(2) how many offences were committed by people released from prison in error in the latest period for which figures are available;

(3) how many people released from prison in error were returned to prison in the latest period for which figures are available.

As at 21 January 2010, 54 prisoners were recorded as released in error when an authority to retain them in custody was in place. This figure covers the period between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2009.

Most prisoners released in error are returned quickly to custody. Of those released in error during 2009 seven remain unaccounted for.

Figures relating to offences committed by those at large following a release in error are not available centrally. Releases in error are reported to the police who are responsible for apprehending prisoners. Information on further offences committed could only be collated by contacting each prison and police force across England and Wales which would incur disproportionate cost.

The number of releases in error is small, accounting for less than 0.05 per cent. of discharges from prison. All incidents are subject to investigation. There is no indication from the available information of any significant level of offending by prisoners who should have been in custody at the time.

These figures have been drawn from live administrative data systems which may be amended at any time. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system.

The number of releases in error reported for 2009 may change, should further incidents be reported.

Prisoners Release: Reoffenders

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many offences were committed by prisoners released for Christmas 2009. (312903)

No offences were recorded against any offender released on temporary licence (ROTL) over the Christmas period. Every prisoner who submits a request for ROTL is seen by a board which consists of prison and probation staff. A stringent risk assessment is carried out before any decision is made to grant the application. Throughout the whole process public protection is paramount.

These figures have been drawn from live administrative data systems which may be amended at any time. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system.

These figures may change should any further offences relating to this period be identified and reported to National Offender Management Service.

Prisoners: Foreigners

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) male and (b) female foreign national prisoners there are, broken down by (i) offence category and (ii) length of sentence. (313199)

The most recent data available relate to June 2009. The following tables give the numbers of (a) male and (b) female foreign national prisoners (FNPs) showing both (i) offence category and (ii) length of sentence.

Offence category

Male

Female

Total

Violence against the person

1,588

53

1,640

Sexual offences

881

11

892

Robbery

605

6

611

Burglary

292

8

300

Theft and handling

265

56

322

Fraud and forgery

779

149

928

Drug offences

1,841

297

2,138

Motoring offences

131

0

131

Other offences

479

35

515

Offence not recorded

23

2

25

Total

6,884

618

7,502

Sentence length

Male

Female

Total

Less than or equal to six months

588

86

674

Greater than six and less than 12 months

280

36

316

12 months less to than four years

2,015

172

2,188

Four years to less than life

2,973

301

3,273

Indeterminate (including life)

1,028

24

1,052

Total

6,884

618

7,502

In addition to the 7,502 sentenced prisoners, a further 3,848 were either untried, convicted unsentenced, a fine defaulter or non-criminals, giving a total of 11,350.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Prisoners: Gender Identity Disorder

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the answer of 11 January 2010, Official Report, columns 789-90W, on gender identity disorder: prisoners, from whom the draft guidance on the treatment of prisoners with gender dysphoria is available for (a) prisons and (b) prisoners. (312923)

As was indicated in the previous answer given to the House on 11 January 2010, Official Report column 789-90W, the responsibility for the production of the draft guidance on the treatment, care and management of transsexual prisoners is split between officials in the Department of Health and Ministry of Justice but in the majority of instances where prison staff have requested advice these have been directed to the latter and more specifically officials in Safer Custody and Offender Policy Group in the National Offender Management Service. As the document is still in draft form it is not readily available for wider distribution beyond policy officials and prison staff but where necessary the advice and information contained within is made available to prisoner(s) who require it.

Prisons: Drugs

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what recent assessment his Department has made of the merits of (a) maintenance and (b) abstinence-based drug treatment programmes for prisoners. (312905)

Contracts are in place with two groups of researchers for evaluation of different aspects of the Integrated Drug Treatment System (IDTS). This will include the impact of methadone maintenance in particular. The contracts were let in 2008 and each group of researchers will submit a final report by April 2012.

All accredited drug treatment programmes available in prisons aim ultimately for abstinence and are based on good practice found in the community. Offenders in custody are subject to drug testing and usually receive a range of interventions and support aimed at reducing reoffending. It is practically difficult to pinpoint the precise effect of any one of these interventions on overall drug misuse or reoffending. Evaluations to date specifically of prison drug treatment programmes run in England and Wales are limited and have not always met the highest methodological standards. However, they suggest that accredited programmes can reduce reoffending (Ramsay, M. (ed) (2003), Prisoners' Drug Use and Treatment: Seven Research Studies. Home Office Research Study 267. London: Home Office). International evidence supports these findings.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many prisoners were participating in (a) maintenance and (b) abstinence-based drug treatment programmes on the latest date for which figures are available. (312906)

In 2008-09, 64,767 prisoners received a clinical drug intervention. Of these 45,135 received detoxification and 19,632 received a maintenance prescription for opioid dependency.

The table shows the number of commencements on accredited drug treatment programmes for the last period for which data are available. Data are not collected centrally on the number of individual prisoners enrolled on such programmes at any one time.

Although all accredited drug treatment programmes run in prisons aim ultimately for abstinence, the short duration programme (SDP) has been designed to be appropriate for prisoners undergoing clinical maintenance as well as those that remain abstinent.

Intervention type (2008-09)

Intervention starts (rounded to nearest 10)

12-Step Programme

850

Therapeutic Communities

260

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) programmes1

9,650

Of which:

Short Duration Programme

(5,550)

Total

10,760

1 Prisons have in place a range of CBT accredited drug programmes, including: PASRO (Prisoner Addressing Substance Related Offending), STOP (Substance Treatment and Offending Programme), FOCUS (high security prisons only) and the Short Duration Programme.

Prisons: Mother and Baby Units

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many women prisoners have given birth since April 2009; (313206)

(2) how many women became pregnant while serving a prison sentence in the last year for which data are available.

Information on the number of women who have given birth in prison or became pregnant while serving a prison sentence is not collected centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost, as in order to provide this information staff would need to look at each individual's record.

In addition, it would not be possible to guarantee the accuracy of the data about when women become pregnant as this would be reliant on information being provided by the prisoners themselves.

Probation

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps he plans to take to increase the level of contact time between probation staff and offenders. (312664)

The National Offender Management Service (NOMS) is taking a number of actions to increase the amount of contact time between probation staff and offenders. These include:

allocating resources to the assessment and management of offenders according to the level of risk;

as part of the Probation Trusts Programme all areas (including locally initiated mergers) have identified efficiencies through for example the reduction in management overheads, and development, of shared services, to the benefit of front line staffing levels;

a national programme of specifying probation work, and benchmarking performance, to support the effective deployment of front line staff;

identifying opportunities for reducing bureaucracy and other demands currently placed on front-line staff; and

expanding the use of video conferencing to reduce the time probation staff spend travelling to interview prisoners.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Agriculture: Subsidies

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what plans he has to respond to the Parliamentary Ombudsman's report entitled “Cold Comfort: the Administration of the 2005 Single Payment Scheme by the Rural Payments Agency”. (311216)

[holding answer 19 January 2010]: The Department's views were relayed to the Parliamentary Ombudsman at various stages during the course of her investigations and are referred to in the report itself. A formal response will be made to any subsequent report the Public Administration Select Committee decides to produce on the issue.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how cross-compliance regulations in respect of single payments and the Integrated Administration and Control System scheme apply to turbines and related infrastructure built on farmland; and if he will make a statement. (312565)

Any area of farm land occupied by a wind turbine, electricity pylon or other item of non-agricultural infrastructure would not form part of the agricultural area eligible to support claims under the single payment scheme. As such the standards of cross-compliance would not apply to these features.

Chemicals: Animal Experiments

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will bring forward proposals to require the chemical industry to minimise the number of animals used in testing covered by the provisions of the EU Regulation on the registration, evaluation and authorisation of chemicals. (312689)

The Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) Regulation contains strong provisions to minimise the amount of animal testing by EU-based companies when compiling their substance registration dossiers. These require that animal tests be the last resort, with the use of non-animal test methods instead wherever possible, and prohibit the repetition and duplication of animal tests. REACH also requires that when preparing registration dossiers, data derived from animal tests must be shared between all members of a Substance Information Exchange Forum (SIEF) in order to achieve this. Where further tests are necessary to complete registrations for substances on the market in quantities of 10 tonnes or more per year, then proposals must be submitted to the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) for approval before any such tests are undertaken, so pre-emptive testing would be illegal. Part of this approval process involves a 45-day public consultation on the test proposals, so that third parties have the opportunity to provide information on the substance that would render the proposed animal tests unnecessary.

In order to help companies address the issue of using animal tests when preparing registration dossiers, a short guidance note has been published on the DEFRA website:

www.defra.gov.uk/environment/quality/chemicals/reach/index.htm

which draws attention to these legal requirements, and suggests a number of possible non-animal alternative test methods including chemical grouping and read-across approaches, use of (Quantitative) Structural Activity Relationships (QSARs), and in vitro tests. Information can also be provided by way of a weight of evidence assessment, and certain tests specified in REACH may also be waived where it can be shown that exposure of humans or the environment to a substance is insignificant or absent.

It is important that companies remember that they should not be undertaking animal testing for REACH registration before their test proposals are approved by ECHA as being necessary. Companies should actively look for alternatives to animal testing wherever possible, and refer to the REACH Test Methods Regulation for what is available for use. Other internationally-valid non-animal test methods that do not appear in the Test Methods Regulation may also be used. However, where animal tests are the last resort, then companies should use the most refined method possible to reduce the numbers of animals involved.

ECHA has published detailed guidance on data-sharing and information requirements for the REACH registration process on its website, and the UK REACH Competent Authority (provided by the Health and Safety Executive) is also shortly to publish a guidance leaflet for industry on animal testing and use of alternatives on its website. This will explain the REACH testing obligations, help with identifying the most appropriate test method, with information on the various available non-animal test methods.

Departmental Assets

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what departmental assets are planned to be sold in (a) 2009-10 and (b) 2010-11; what the (i) description and (ii) book value is of each such asset; what the expected revenue is from each such sale; and by what date each asset is expected to have been sold. (310243)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Twickenham (Dr. Cable) on 11 January 2010, Official Report, column 676W.

The Government have stated their intention to realise £16 billion from asset and property sales over the period by 2013-14. On 7 December the Government published the “Operational Efficiency Programme: Asset Portfolio”, setting out the next steps for the delivery of the £16 billion by 2013-14.

DEFRA has approximately £6.9 million (book value £10.2 million) of surplus properties for disposal in 2009-10, arising from the sale of land, residential and office premises. Anticipated disposals from land and laboratory premises are expected to realise £9 million in 2010-11 (book value £8 million).

Not all future asset disposals have been finalised, and for reasons of commercial sensitivity it is not possible to identify publicly each asset to be disposed of, or to set out deadlines for sales as this can have a negative impact on values.

DEFRA’s latest published asset management strategy is available on its website at:

http://www.defra.gov.uk/corporate/about/how/busplan/spending-review/docs/asset-management-strategy.pdf

The strategy is currently being updated following the creation of the Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC) and the transfer of certain functions from DEFRA to DECC, and it is planned that the new version of the strategy will be published in the spring.

Departmental Carbon Emissions

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether (a) his Department and (b) its agencies plan to sign up to the 10:10 campaign to reduce carbon dioxide emissions in 2010. (313044)

DEFRA has a long-term commitment to reduce its carbon emissions. Performance in 2008-09 shows that DEFRA’s carbon emissions from offices has reduced by 18 per cent. on the 1999-2000 baseline, exceeding the 2010 Sustainable Operations on the Government Estate (SOGE) target by 6 per cent. Since 2006-07 the Department has delivered a reduction of 4 per cent. carbon emissions (year on year) from its estate through its Carbon Reduction Programme.

DEFRA’s achievements have been recognised through the award of the Carbon Trust Standard in May 2008, where the Department was one of the first 12 pathfinder organisations to receive the award. This built upon the earlier success of the Department achieving Energy Efficiency Accreditation Scheme (EEAS) status in July 2007. Both of these awards clearly demonstrate that DEFRA has an ongoing commitment to long-term, year on year carbon emissions reductions.

The Department is expecting to continue to deliver significant year on year savings, anticipated at as much as 6 per cent. year on year.

A strategic long-term investment plan allows the delivery of projects which provide long-term benefits through reducing energy demand and minimising the need to reinvest in the short to medium term. To disrupt these long-term plans in order to achieve 10:10 would impact negatively on DEFRA’s ability to achieve its long-term goals and would not deliver value for money. However, the combination of DEFRA’s long-term plans, a minimum 6 per cent. reduction in 2010 and a short- term call to action all constitute a credible contribution to tackling climate change.

In light of the above, achieving a 10 per cent. saving across the DEFRA Estate in a single year would require my Department to divert significant funds from its long-term delivery plan; therefore The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and its Executive Agencies have not signed up to the 10:10 campaign.

Departmental Information and Communications Technology

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on what pay band his Department’s Chief Information Officer (CIO) is employed; whether the CIO is employed on a fixed-term or permanent contract; and what the size is of the budget for which the CIO is responsible in the period 2009-10. (307566)

DEFRA’s chief information officer is employed as a senior civil servant (SCS-Contractor) on a fixed term contract basis. The size of the budget the CIO is responsible for is £76 million for 2009-10.

Departmental Internet

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs which websites his Department's staff are blocked from accessing on departmental networked computers. (310054)

The Department has blocked access to:

www.facebook.com

There are also a number of other websites that the Department blocks for reasons of IT security. The security policies informing these IT security decisions are in line with HMG Security Policy Framework (SPF)

http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/spf.aspx

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much has been spent on (a) strategy and planning, (b) design and build, (c) hosting and infrastructure, (d) content provision and (e) testing and evaluation for his Department’s websites in each of the last three years; and what budget has been allocated for each such activity in 2009-10. (310212)

DEFRA website costs are as follows:

£

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

Strategy and planning

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Design and build

0

0

59,447

56,979

Hosting and infrastructure

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Content provision

340,000

340,000

340,000

340,000

Testing and evaluation

0

0

50,780

14,170

The costs shown for “Content Provision” are essentially the staff cost for the central team with responsibility for updating and maintaining DEFRA’s websites. An element of their work is “Strategy and Planning”, but the costs of such work cannot be easily separated.

This central team is also responsible for the DEFRA intranet, and the staff costs for the external DEFRA website alone cannot be readily disaggregated.

The costs shown in 2008-09 and 2009-10 under “Design and Build” and “Testing and Evaluation” are the costs for the project to redevelop the DEFRA website. The website was relaunched in September 2009, the first major website redesign since DEFRA came into being in 2001. The total cost of this work, spread over two years, was £181,378.

“Hosting and Infrastructure” of the DEFRA website—as well as a range of IT applications—are provided as part of DEFRA’s overall IT service provision, and the costs of this aspect of website maintenance cannot be readily disaggregated.

Departmental Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many (a) year-end and (b) in-year bonuses were paid to officials in his Department in each of the last three years; and how much was paid in such bonuses in each such year. (307099)

An element of DEFRA’s overall pay award is allocated to non-consolidated variable pay related to performance. These payments are used to drive high performance and form part of the pay award for members of staff who demonstrate exceptional performance, for example by exceeding targets set or meeting challenging objectives.

Non-consolidated variable pay awards are funded from within existing pay bill controls, and have to be re-earned each year against pre-determined targets and, as such, do not add to future pay bill costs. The percentage of the pay bill set aside for performance-related awards for the SCS is based on recommendations from the independent Senior Salaries Review Body.

The following table details the number and the total amount of non-consolidated variable pay awards awarded under DEFRA’s standard pay and performance management process for the three most recent performance years for which the relevant payments have been published in the Department’s accounts.

For DEFRA, the data cover staff at grade 6 and below in core-DEFRA and those Executive agencies covered by the core-Department’s terms and conditions i.e. Animal Health, Veterinary Medicines Directorate and the Marine and Fisheries Agency. They also include senior civil servants in core-DEFRA and its Executive agencies (Animal Health, Veterinary Medicines Directorate, Marine and Fisheries Agency, Rural Payments Agency, Veterinary Laboratories Agency, Centre for the Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science and the Central Science Laboratory—which is now part of the Food and Environment Research Agency, which was created on 1 April 2009.

For those Executive agencies that operate delegated pay arrangements (Rural Payments Agency (RPA), Veterinary Laboratories Agency (VLA), Centre for the Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS) and the Central Science Laboratory (CSL), which is now part of the Food and Environment Research Agency, which was created on 1 April 2009, the data cover staff at grade 6 and below only.

Department

Number of staff who received a non-consolidated performance payment

Total amount of payments (£)

Wages and salaries for the year (£)

Non-consolidated performance payments as a percentage of wages and salaries

Performance year 2005-06

DEFRA

2,395

3,171,792

294,379,000

1.1

VLA

251

39,120

39,485,000

0.1

RPA

505

243,072

88,093,000

0.3

CEFAS

511

566,766

16,881,000

3.3

CSL

260

176,901

21,703,000

0.8

Performance year 2006-07

DEFRA

1,959

3,235,664

252,501,000

1.3

VLA

212

45,327

40,846,000

0.1

RPA

813

425,417

99,667,000

0.4

CEFAS

506

610,125

19,203,000

3.2

CSL

328

233,049

22,127,000

1.1

Performance year 2007-08

DEFRA

1,914

3,072,554

211,900,000

1.5

VLA

226

47,409

40,028,000

0.1

RPA

1,126

507,572

99,405,000

0.5

CEFAS

496

773,747

19,160,000

3.9

CSL

332

264,280

22,657,000

1.2

CEFAS has relatively higher non-consolidated pay when compared as a percentage against the DEFRA network, because they have specifically worked to structure a total rewards package with a greater non consolidated pay element, that is directly performance based and must be re-earned each year. This places a greater link between performance and reward and while their percentage of non consolidated pay is larger than others this is more than offset by their consolidated pay (i.e. salaries) which is low relative to the DEFRA network and Whitehall.

Departmental Training

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many sessions of media training were organised for Ministers in his Department in each of the last three years. (310754)

Training is provided to Ministers on a range of issues including handling the media, as part of their induction and continuing development in order to carry out their duties effectively under the ministerial code.

Fly Tipping: Kent

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate he has made of the number of incidents of fly-tipping in (a) Ashford constituency and (b) Kent in each of the last five years. (313512)

The number of incidents of fly-tipping recorded on the Flycapture database by (a) Ashford borough council and (b) all local authorities in Kent in each of the last five years is as follows:

Ashford borough council

Kent local authorities (including Ashford)

2004-05

950

31,298

2005-06

1,177

38,878

2006-07

1,450

38,333

2007-08

1,177

27,702

2008-09

1,123

21.038

The number of incidents of fly-tipping recorded as having been dealt with by local authorities on the Flycapture database is published annually on the DEFRA website:

www.defra.gov.uk/environment/quality/local/flytipping/flycapture-data.htm

Incidents of fly-tipping cleared from private land by the landowner are not recorded.

Garages and Petrol Stations: Contamination

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what duties there are on the owner of a rental petrol forecourt site to decontaminate the site once its use as a petrol station has ceased; and if he will make a statement. (312671)

There are various measures which create duties to address contamination, depending on the circumstances of the case. Contaminated land legislation (Part 2A of the Environmental Protection Act 1990) makes persons liable for the cost of remediating a site if they caused or knowingly permitted it to become contaminated land. This allows direct action to be taken by regulators, and it creates an incentive for operators to avoid causing contamination in the first place, and to clean it up voluntarily if it occurs. For contamination caused after 1 March 2009, the Environmental Damage (Prevention and Remediation) Regulations 2009 would also be applicable in similar circumstances and to achieve similar objectives to Part 2A of the 1990 Act.

Legislation also directly applies to prevent contamination during the operation of a petrol station. Under the Groundwater Regulations 2009 there is a code of practice to prevent hazardous substances from reaching groundwater from underground tanks, such as those at petrol stations. The Environment Agency can serve a notice on the operator if it is likely that the code of practice is not being complied with. The Agency also has powers under the Anti-pollution Works Notices Regulations 1999 to serve notices where there is a threat of pollution to controlled waters or to require clean up where pollution of controlled waters has occurred.

Where a petrol forecourt is operated under a rental agreement, there may be further duties on the operator to deal with contamination as an indirect result of legislation.

Rural Payments Agency: Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate he has made of the monetary value of bonuses awarded to officials of the Rural Payments Agency in each of the last five years. (310620)

The payments made for non-consolidated performance payments awarded to employees at the Rural Payments Agency (RPA) in the last five years is shown in the following table:

Actual payment totals (£)

Percentage of the RPA paybill

2004-05

281,000

0.40

2005-06

252,000

0.37

2006-07

302,000

0.43

2007-08

452,000

0.52

2008-09

559,000

0.48

RPA performance payments are paid to RPA staff working on all aspects of the agency's work which includes managing and making payments for some 60 schemes, making payments on a further 30 schemes delivered by others, carrying out inspections and operating the British Cattle Movement Service under two reward schemes:

(a) Staff who have achieved the required performance assessment following the end of year individual performance review. This arrangement is negotiated each year with the trade union side; and

(b) A special recognition scheme was introduced in 2007 and exists to recognise instances of people making additional or outstanding contributions to RPA's work, giving an employee up to £500 for an outstanding performance.

These figures include non-consolidated performance payments paid to senior civil servants (SCS). The percentage of the pay bill set aside for performance-related awards for the SCS is based on recommendations from the independent senior salaries review body.

Wind Power: Planning Permission

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether the Environment Agency receives payment from money submitted as payment with wind farm planning applications to cover the cost of its contribution to the planning process; and if he will make a statement. (312564)

The Environment Agency does not receive any payment from money submitted as payment for wind farm planning applications, or from any other planning applications. The Environment Agency is a statutory consultee in the planning process, and this activity is funded by its grant funding from central Government.

Transport

Aviation: Security

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what security checks will apply in respect of passengers who refuse to be scanned by an airport full body scanner. (313213)

The Government are not proposing to offer an alternative method of search for passengers refusing to use a body scanner.

Passengers who are selected for scanning, but decline to use the scanner, will not be permitted to fly.

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport whether full body scanners will be used to scan children at airports. (313214)

We are confident that the introduction of these scanners is a proportionate and necessary next step in enhancing security of passengers, and that their use is consistent with the Protection of Children Act 1978. We will therefore be expecting children to use the scanners.

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what assessment he has made of the implications for human rights of the use of full body scanners at airports; and if he will make a statement. (313215)

The Department for Transport is working with the industry and other Government Departments to produce a code of practice for the operation of body scanners. This will include an assessment of the legal, health and privacy issues surrounding their deployment.

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport for how long images obtained by airport full body scanners will be stored. (313216)

The equipment being deployed in airports does not have the capacity to save an image in any form. Images are viewed remotely from the machine, and are deleted immediately after analysis. Images cannot be recovered at a later date from the machines.

Car Sharing: Road Traffic

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what modelling the Government has done on (a) changes in car sharing rates and (b) the effect such changes have on road congestion; and if he will place in the Library a copy of the outcomes of such modelling. (313001)

The Department for Transport has not modelled changes in car sharing rates. However, research was published by DFT in 2005 “Smarter Choice—Changing the way we travel” (Cairns S, Stoman L, Newson C, Anable J, Kirkbride A and Goodwin P; 2004). This research analysed the potential impact of car sharing on commuting vehicle trips and vehicle mileage. The report is available at:

http://dft.gov.uk/pgr/sustainable/smarterchoices/ctwwt/

Employment Tribunals Service

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport how many industrial tribunals relating to his Department there have been in each of the last five years; and what the cost to his Department was of such tribunals in each year. (310750)

The total number of employment tribunal cases recorded in each of the last five years and the costs are broken down in the following table and also include figures to date for 2009-10:

Financial year

Number

Cost (£)

2009-10

21

86,917.61

2008-09

37

312,679.34

2007-08

29

156,513.65

2006-07

8

7,602.21

2005-06

6

20,196.71

2004-05

14

15,000.00

Total

115

598,909.52

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency is unable to provide the cost element to this question as the information is not held centrally and to obtain it will incur disproportionate costs. For the same reason the Vehicle and Operator Services Agency is unable to provide costs for 2004-05.

First Capital Connect: Industrial Disputes

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport on what date the Secretary of State was first notified of the recent industrial action by drivers on the First Capital Connect Thameslink route. (312504)

The Secretary of State was first notified of the recent concerted action by drivers on the First Capital Connect Thameslink route on 26 October 2009.

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport whether the recent industrial action by drivers on the First Capital Connect Thameslink route constitutes a force majeure event under the terms of the franchise agreement with First Capital Connect. (312505)

The Secretary of State was satisfied that in this instance the concerted action that was taken by the drivers on the First Capital Connect Thameslink route was industrial action for the purposes of schedule 10.4 of the franchise agreement, and therefore a force majeure event.

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what meetings Ministers in his Department have had with the management of First Capital Connect to discuss industrial action by drivers on the First Capital Connect Thameslink route in the last three months. (312506)

The Secretary of State met with the managing director of First Capital Connect on 12 November 2009 to discuss the industrial action. Officials in the Department for Transport have also met with First Capital Connect on numerous occasions, within this period.

The Secretary of State has also spoken with the chief executive of First Group about First Capital Connect's performance.

Heathrow Airport

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what modelling the Government has done on the economic and environmental effects of a third runway at Heathrow; and if he will place a copy in the Library of the outcomes of such modelling. (313003)

The Department for Transport published its latest assessment of the economic and environmental effects of a third runway at Heathrow in “Adding Capacity at Heathrow Airport—Impact Assessment” in January 2009. The publication coincided with the Secretary of State for Transport’s announcement of his policy decisions on the future development of Heathrow airport. Copies of the published documents, and earlier technical reports on the environmental modelling, have all been deposited in the Library.

Immobilisation of Vehicles

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport how many (a) cars, (b) vans, (c) lorries and (d) motorcycles of each make were (i) clamped and (ii) crushed in each of the last three years; in what circumstances and under what legislative authority such vehicles are (A) clamped and (B) crushed; and if he will make a statement. (313149)

We do not keep information on the number of vehicles clamped or crushed by vehicle type. However, the following table provides the total number of vehicles wheel clamped; disposed of by crushing or via auction and immobilised in each of the last three calendar years.

Unlicensed Vehicles (DVLA)Unroadworthy Vehicles (VOSA)

Clamped

Crushed or auctioned

Immobilised

2009

113,288

37,758

13,481

2008

124,428

38,531

n/a

2007

108,385

39,872

n/a

1 May to December.

The Department for Transport employs the use of wheel clamping and immobilisation of unlicensed and un-roadworthy vehicles. The legislative authority is set out in the Vehicle Excise Duty (Immobilisation, Removal and Disposal of Vehicles) Regulations 1997, as amended and the Road Safety (Immobilisation, Removal and Disposal) Regulations 2009.

Immobilisation of Vehicles: South East

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport how many cars have been impounded in (a) Southend West constituency, (b) Essex, (c) the Metropolitan Police area of London and (d) England and Wales in each year since 2005; and at what total cost in each case in each such year. (313277)

It is not possible to provide the number of cars impounded or information by geographical area. A contract is in place to provide a wheel-clamping service, which may lead to impounding, on vehicles in the United Kingdom. The contract is on a fixed price basis for the entire service. Neither costs of impounding individual vehicles, nor costs of the operation within geographical locations are available.

London and South Eastern Railway: Snow and Ice

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what discussions his Department has had with Southeastern Railway on recent disruptions to its service caused by snow and ice. (312667)

The Department for Transport communicated regularly with Southeastern and Network Rail during the recent service disruption caused by snow and ice. The Department was informed of the services that would be operating, taking into account the availability of infrastructure and trains, and challenged Southeastern to run as full a service as possible. The Department is now collecting information on the service that was offered to understand whether or not any improvements can be made to rail services during future adverse weather.

Motor Vehicles: Excise Duties

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what the estimated average cost is of processing a vehicle excise duty application (a) at a post office, (b) by post and (c) online. (313636)

The average cost for processing a vehicle excise duty application during 2009-10 is as follows:

(a) Post Office: £1.47

(b) Not available

(c) 95 pence.

Railways: Hunting

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what steps his Department has taken following the incident on 31 December 2009 in which six foxhounds belonging to the Duke of Beaufort's hunt were killed by a high-speed passenger train near Wootton Bassett; and if he will make a statement. (312748)

The day-to-day running of the railways, and their safety is a matter for rail operators and the Office of Rail Regulation as the independent rail safety regulator.

The incident was included in the daily performance log submitted to the Department by the train operator involved. Aside from this, the Department is not involved in operational incidents of this nature (animals on the line).

Railways: Kent

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what information his Department holds on the number of scheduled trains operated by each franchised train operating company serving Kent which (a) were cancelled and (b) arrived late in each of the last five years. (313428)

The information requested is held by Network Rail but is also given in the following table. The table gives the information for each of the last five complete financial years, in relation to Southeastern trains which operates franchised rail passenger services in Kent.

Southeastern

Trains cancelled

Trains late at destination

2004-05

7,825

85,078

2005-06

6,341

70,737

2006-07

5,227

60,576

2007-08

5,102

49,592

2008-09

7,326

51,800

Note:

Commuter trains are classified as ‘late’ if they arrive at destination five or more minutes later than their scheduled arrival time.

Railways: North West

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what recent discussions he has had on the establishment of a high speed rail link between the North West and London. (312425)

The Secretary of State has now received High Speed Two’s report which he is considering. Both the Secretary of State and his ministerial colleagues continue to meet regularly with key stakeholders to discuss a range of transport issues, including high speed rail.

Railways: Standards

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport how many and what percentage of scheduled trains operated by each franchised train operating company in England (a) were cancelled and (b) arrived late in each of the last five years. (313430)

The information requested is held by Network Rail but is also given in the following tables. The tables give the information for each of the last five complete financial years.

2004-05

Train operating company

Trains cancelled

Trains late at destination

Percentage cancelled

Percentage late

c2c

1,307

6,120

1.2

5.6

Chiltern Railways

825

6,430

0.9

6.6

Crosscountry

1,432

27,557

1.6

30.2

East Coast

559

13,119

1.4

32.4

East Midlands Trains

1,857

32,643

1.4

24.4

First Capital Connect

3,982

39,741

1.2

12.4

First Great Western

4,980

80,156

1.1

17.3

First TransPennine Express

1,462

21,002

1.7

23.7

London Midland

5,902

77,913

1.7

22.0

London Overground

2,921

17,353

2.2

13.3

Merseyrail

2,153

9,768

1.1

4.8

National Express East Anglia

5,658

58,764

1.0

10.6

Northern Rail

6,612

117,899

0.8

14.6

South West Trains

6,532

97,076

1.1

16.8

Southeastern

7,825

85,078

1.3

14.5

Southern

8,989

103,020

1.5

16.8

Virgin Trains

1,812

21,976

2.9

35.2

2005-06

Train operating company

Trains cancelled

Trains late at destination

Percentage cancelled

Percentage late

c2c

1,343

6,501

1.2

5.9

Chiltern Railways

1,366

6,906

1.4

6.9

Crosscountry

1,432

23,092

1.5

25.0

East Coast

546

9,265

1.3

22.9

East Midlands Trains

1,952

26,983

1.5

20.1

First Capital Connect

5,565

34,758

1.7

10.6

First Great Western

4,609

86,309

1.0

18.2

First TransPennine Express

856

15,926

1.1

19.6

London Midland

6,203

61,603

1.6

15.5

London Overground

2,753

10,322

2.1

7.9

Merseyrail

3,038

12,980

1.5

6.3

National Express East Anglia

7,261

70,575

1.3

12.6

Northern Rail

6,116

104,717

0.7

12.8

South West Trains

5,663

54,355

0.9

9.1

Southeastern

6,341

70,737

1.1

12.2

Southern

6,892

68,449

1.1

10.8

Virgin Trains

688

16,959

1.0

24.1

2006-07

Train operating company

Trains cancelled

Trains late at destination

Percentage cancelled

Percentage late

c2c

1,152

5,045

1.1

4.6

Chiltern Railways

938

5,440

0.9

5.3

Crosscountry

1,382

21,127

1.4

21.5

East Coast

805

9,728

1.9

23.5

East Midlands Trains

1,970

19,609

1.5

14.5

First Capital Connect

5,166

34,061

1.6

10.3

First Great Western

7,045

80,288

1.5

17.0

First TransPennine Express

981

14,823

1.0

15.9

London Midland

6,198

48,346

1.5

11.9

London Overground

2,301

9,381

1.7

7.1

Merseyrail

2,077

13,255

1.0

6.5

National Express East Anglia

9,207

68,694

1.6

11.8

Northern Rail

7,626

93,989

1.0

11.8

South West Trains

6,034

52,815

1.0

8.9

Southeastern

5,227

60,576

0.9

10.6

Southern

5,954

62,531

0.9

9.8

Virgin Trains

878

14,131

1.3

20.1

2007-08

Train operating company

Trains cancelled

Trains late at destination

Percentage cancelled

Percentage late

c2c

1,249

4,920

1.1

4.4

Chiltern Railways

715

4,448

0.7

4.3

Crosscountry

1,267

17,698

1.3

18.2

East Coast

997

9,976

2.3

23.1

East Midlands Trains

2,197

18,865

1.6

14.0

First Capital Connect

4,280

26,962

1.3

8.1

First Great Western

8,153

79,244

1.8

17.1

First TransPennine Express

897

12,456

0.9

12.9

London Midland

5,623

38,846

1.4

9.7

London Overground

2,376

9,336

1.8

6.9

Merseyrail

1,847

9,011

0.9

4.4

National Express East Anglia

7,307

52,113

1.2

8.8

Northern Rail

8,670

83,594

1.1

10.4

South West Trains

3,890

41,668

0.7

7.1

Southeastern

5,102

49,592

0.9

8.5

Southern

5,627

60,619

0.9

9.3

Virgin Trains

678

15,248

0.9

20.4

2008-09

Train operating company

Trains cancelled

Trains late

Percentage cancelled

Percentage late

c2c

946

4,388

0.8

3.9

Chiltern Railways

738

4,360

0.7

4.1

Crosscountry

1,157

13,969

1.2

14.3

East Coast

625

8,351

1.4

18.8

East Midlands Trains

1,351

17,817

1.0

12.7

First Capital Connect

5,533

24,477

1.7

7.3

First Great Western

4,509

48,580

0.9

9.9

First TransPennine Express

1,001

14,916

1.0

15.0

London Midland

7,558

45,464

1.9

11.6

London Overground

1,339

9,734

0.9

6.8

Merseyrail

1,613

8,452

0.8'

4.2

National Express East Anglia

6,493

53,422

1.1

9.0

Northern Rail

6,920

77,156

0.8

9.4

South West Trains

6,327

34,348

1.1

5.8

Southeastern

7,326

51,800

1.2

8.8

Southern

9,629

66,578

1.3

9.1

Virgin Trains

2,205

23,779

2.5

26.6

Note:

Commuter trains are classified as ‘late’ if they arrive at destination five or more minutes later than their scheduled arrival time. Intercity trains are classified as late if they arrive 10 or more minutes later than the scheduled arrival time.

Roads: Royal Mail

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport how many requests the Highways Agency has received from Royal Mail to clear the roads in (a) Ashford and (b) Kent in the last two years. (313511)

The Highways Agency is responsible for the Strategic Road Network. It has not received any requests from Royal Mail to clear local authority or strategic roads either in Ashford or Kent in the last two years.

Rolling Stock: Construction

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport when he expects to announce the location of the facility to assemble the super express Agility train; what locations are under consideration; and how many such trains he expects to comprise the super express fleet. (313255)

The location of the manufacturing facility is a matter for Hitachi. The company has a number of locations under consideration, and I understand that it will make an announcement shortly. The super express fleet will comprise up to 1,400 rail vehicles.

Southend Airport

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport (1) what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the expansion of Southend airport on the local community in respect of (a) road traffic and (b) noise in the last three years; and if he will make a statement; (313145)

(2) which (a) individuals and (b) organisations he consulted regarding the expansion of Southend airport; if he will place in the Library copies of the representations he has received to date on this matter; and if he will make a statement;

(3) what discussions (a) he, (b) Ministers in his Department and (c) departmental officials have had with representatives of BAA plc on proposals for the expansion of Southend airport in each of the last three years; and if he will make a statement.

The Department for Transport has not consulted on the proposals to expand Southend airport, nor has it made any assessment of the effect of the proposed expansion on the local community in respect of road traffic or noise.

There have been no discussions between the Department for Transport and BAA on proposals for the expansion of Southend airport. Southend airport was purchased in December 2008 by Stobart Group Ltd. from Regional Airports Ltd.

“The Future of Air Transport” White Paper identified Southend airport as having a valuable role in meeting local demand and the potential to contribute to regional economic development. The White Paper supported further development in principle, subject to relevant environmental considerations. On 20 January Southend council made a decision to support the planning application for expansion proposals at Southend airport. The council’s recommendation has now been submitted to the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government for him to consider whether to call in the application for his own determination.

Scotland

Departmental Official Engagements

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland at what speaking events (a) he and (b) his Under-Secretary of State has been represented by (i) a special adviser and (ii) another elected official from the Scotland Office since October 2007; for what reasons John McTernan withdrew from the Reform Scotland debate scheduled for 4 February 2010; on what date his Department informed Reform Scotland that he was unavailable to attend that debate; by what form of communication his Department informed Reform Scotland that John McTernan would take part in that debate; on what date this communication was sent; and on what date his Department informed Reform Scotland that the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State would attend the event. (313580)

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (PuSofS) and I have never been represented by a special adviser at a speaking event and the Scotland Office does not have elected officials.

The Scotland Office confirmed with Reform Scotland on 18 January 2010 that PuSofS would attend this debate if timing of parliamentary business allowed for this.

Departmental Publications

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what the (a) total, (b) production and (c) staff cost was of the preparation and publication of his Department’s White Paper on Scotland’s future in the United Kingdom; how many copies were printed; and to whom they were distributed. (313053)

The production cost of “Scotland’s Future in the United Kingdom”, including typesetting, printing, binding, mailing and TSO fees was £5,968.39. The preparation of the White Paper was the work of civil servants employed in the Scotland Office as part of their normal duties and therefore incurred no additional cost. A total of 1,055 copies were printed; these were divided between the Scotland Office, Parliament and TSO. Of these 750 were used by the Scotland Office for laying in Parliament, distribution to stakeholders and internal departmental use.

Fuel: Taxation

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what (a) written correspondence, (b) electronic correspondence, (c) meetings and (d) other communications he had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on (i) the Scottish economy and (ii) road fuel duty taxation between August 2008 and March 2009. (310784)

My right hon. Friend is in regular contact with a range of Cabinet Ministers on issues affecting Scotland, and has been since his appointment in October 2008.

Solicitor-General

Arrest Warrants

To ask the Solicitor-General if she will lift the European Arrest Warrant which has led to the detention of Wansanatha Bulugah Aitya in Frankfurt. (312772)

The European Arrest Warrant was executed on 27 December 2009 and the extradition process is under way in Germany.

A decision in an individual case not to pursue an extradition request would in any event be made by the relevant prosecuting agency, not by me or any other Minister.

Royal Family: Wills

To ask the Solicitor-General in which official capacity the then Attorney-General acted in discussions with (a) Buckingham Palace, (b) the then Senior President of the Family Division and (c) Farrers in respect of the creation of a practice for the sealing of royal wills. (312448)

In discussing the practice for the sealing of royal wills, the Attorney-General acts in his capacity as Attorney-General, acting in the public interest.

Olympics

Departmental Sick Leave

To ask the Minister for the Olympics how many working days were lost due to (a) illness and (b) stress of employees within her Office in each of the last three years. (309918)

My office is staffed by employees of the Cabinet Office. departmental reports are published quarterly giving details of sickness absences, and these are available at:

http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/reports/absence.aspx

Copies are also available in the Libraries of the House.

Information for absences from my office can be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Olympic Games 2012: Contracts

To ask the Minister for the Olympics how many businesses based in (a) England, (b) Scotland, (c) Wales, (d) Northern Ireland and (e) locations outside the UK have (i) registered with the London 2012 Business Network and (ii) secured Olympic contracts at each location. (312401)

I have been asked to reply.

The answer to the question is as follows:

The London 2012 Business Network hosts CompeteFor. CompeteFor is the chosen website of London 2012 for the publication of Games-related contract opportunities. Numbers of companies registered on CompeteFor and contracts awarded to CompeteFor suppliers are as follows;

Region

Registrations

Contracts awarded to CompeteFor suppliers

East of England

11,336

54

East Midlands

5,265

14

London

29,106

236

North East

2,089

12

North West

5,575

34

South East

17,596

104

South West

5,829

24

West Midlands

7,565

194

Yorkshire

4,922

20

Northern Ireland

1,109

1

Scotland

2,806

7

Wales

2,200

2

Non-UK

4,376

3

Total

100,556

707

It is important to note that these are the number of awarded contracts that have been recorded on the site by buyers and there will be other contracts that have been awarded, but not yet recorded. In total 4,700 contracts have been placed on CompeteFor.

To ask the Minister for the Olympics what the cost has been of maintaining the London 2012 Business Network in each year since its establishment. (312402)

I have been asked to reply.

The answer is as follows:

(a) CompeteFor cost £3.633 million to develop, which included concept development, specification, implementation and testing, and establishing the support structure.

(b) Running costs are as follows:

£

Year 1 (December 2007 to March 2008)

220,000

Year 2 (April 2008 to March 2009)

1.241 million

Year 3 (April 2009 to March 2010)—projected at

1.241 million

Olympic Games 2012: Illegal Immigrants

To ask the Minister for the Olympics (1) how many arrests have been made of illegal immigrants working on the Olympic site since construction began; (305745)

(2) what checks the Government makes to ensure that employees working on the Olympic site are entitled to work in the UK;

(3) whether any companies working on the Olympic site have been fined for the employment of illegal immigrants since construction began.

I have been asked to reply.

Between 1 April 2009 and 10 December 2009, 49 people have been arrested attempting to gain employment, or working specifically at the Olympic park and athletes’ village sites, 40 of these were never actually employed at the sites.

Prior to April 2009, no data exclusively for arrests on the Olympic park site are available. Arrest figures collected between April 2008 and March 2009 are for projects in Stratford and the surrounding area, and include the Olympic park and Olympic village. Only an aggregate figure is available for this period and a total of 138 foreign nationals seeking to gain employment or working at these locations (including the Stratford City Westfield development) were arrested on suspicion of working in the UK without permission or presenting false documentation during this time.

These figures do not constitute part of National Statistics as they are based on internal management information. The information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols and should be treated as provisional and subject to change.

The responsibility for ensuring employees have the right to work in the UK rests with the employer. Since April 2008, UKBA staff have been working with the Olympic Delivery Authority and contractors to support the site security process of checking that people employed on the Olympic park and athletes village hold genuine identity documents and are legally entitled to work in the UK.

Three employers have been issued with Notices of Potential Liability for employing illegal workers and failing to carry out the appropriate checks to confirm that their employees are entitled to work in the UK. Two have been fined, one was found not to be liable.

Culture, Media and Sport

Departmental Mobile Phones

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many (a) mobile telephones and (b) BlackBerrys were provided to (i) Ministers and (ii) special advisers in his Department since March 2009; and at what cost to the public purse. (313171)

The information is as follows:

My Department has:

(a) Mobile phones—three for our Ministers only.

(b) BlackBerry devices.

(i) Three for the Ministers

(ii) Two for special advisers

The total cost is £2361.02

Departmental Written Questions

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what average time his Department took to answer questions for (a) ordinary written answer and (b) written answer on a named day in the last 12 months. (313663)

Information on the average time taken to answer parliamentary questions is not readily available in the format requested and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Radio: Scotland

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what assessment has been made of the effects on rural communities in Scotland of ending FM/AM broadcasting in 2015. (312696)

Theatre: Young People

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many tickets have been taken up under the A Night Less Ordinary scheme. (313639)

Between February 2009 and November 2009, 121,742 tickets were taken up by young people under the ‘A Night Less Ordinary’ scheme.

Results from 1 December 2009 to 28 February 2010 will be made available in April.

Defence

Armed Forces: Housing

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many and what percentage of overseas (a) single living accommodation and (b) service family accommodation units are in each grade in each country. (312657)

Single living accommodation (SLA) is graded by its scale (this consists of a number of factors including size and amount of storage) as well as physical condition. The best available data indicate that as at October 2009, the following number and percentage of overseas SLA bed-spaces were at the each grade:

Grade 1Grade 2Grade 3Grade 4

Country

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

Germany

2,146

16

1,137

8

3,553

26

6,773

50

Cyprus

60

3

247

14

1,460

83

Gibraltar

249

81

60

19

South Atlantic Islands

2

2,374

100

Rest of world

70

8

13

1

60

7

736

84

UK (as at December 2008)1

34,933

25

19,498

14

22,101

16

60,745

45

1 The UK SLA figures, included for comparison purposes, are for the number of bed-spaces at each ‘condition grade’ rather than ‘Grade for Charge’.

Service family accommodation (SFA) is assessed for standard for condition (SfC), a measure of the physical condition of a property. The best available data indicate that as at October 2009, the following number and percentage of overseas SFA properties were at each SfC:

S1fCS2fCS3fCS4fC

Country

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

Germany

3,766

33

2,948

26

3,590

31

1,146

10

Cyprus

224

10

410

19

50

2

1,503

69

Gibraltar

163

37

24

5

70

16

184

42

South Atlantic Islands

15

16

22

23

49

50

11

11

Rest of world

222

19

526

46

393

34

4

1

UK (as at December 2009)

12,718

38

19,689

59

1,034

3

204

Less than 1

Departmental Drinking Water

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much his Department has spent on bottled drinking water in each of the last five years; and if he will make a statement. (313185)

I refer the hon. Member to the reply given by my noble Friend, the Minister for International Defence and Security, Baroness Taylor of Bolton, to the noble Lady, Baroness Warsi of Dewsbury, in another place on 19 May 2009, Official Report, House of Lords, column WA294.

NATO

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what representations he has made to the right hon. Member for Ashfield on NATO’s (a) nuclear policy and (b) New Strategic Concept Group; and if he will make a statement. (313551)

My right hon. Friend the Member for Ashfield (Mr. Hoon) has been appointed to the Group of Experts advising on NATO’s new Strategic Concept by Secretary-General, Anders Fogh Rasmussen, in an independent capacity. Mr. Hoon is able to draw on support from the Ministry of Defence and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on the full range of issues associated with this work.

Trident Submarines

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what his most recent assessment is of the likely effects on life extension of Vanguard-class submarines, should continuous at-sea deterrence cease. (313549)

The Government remain committed to the policy of Continuous At-Sea Deterrence, as set out in the 2006 White Paper “The Future of the United Kingdom’s Nuclear Deterrent” (Cm 6994). The 2006 White Paper indicated that it might be possible to extend the life of the current submarines by five years and these studies are ongoing, based on the operating posture of Continuous At-Sea Deterrence.

Warships: Portsmouth

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether his review of the use of naval bases will include issues other than the relocation of Type 23 Frigates to Portsmouth; when the outcomes of the review will be published; and if he will make a statement. (312853)

As my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Defence announced on 6 May 2009, Official Report, column 16WS, as part of work to consider the optimal base-porting arrangements for the less complex variants of the Future Surface Combatant (FSC), the Department would examine whether there is any case to change the base-porting of the Type 23 frigates. Under the Maritime Change Programme, key stakeholders, including representatives from Portsmouth and Plymouth city councils as well as naval base staff, are supporting Warwick university in developing a shared socio-economic model, which will help to greater understand the implications of any potential future change to warship base-porting arrangements at Portsmouth and Devonport.

The contiguous impact of three principal scenarios is to be initially investigated: the move of Trafalgar Class submarines from HM Naval Base Devonport to HM Naval Base Clyde; the decommissioning of Type 22 Frigates and any potential change to the current Type 23 base-porting arrangements. We aim to have this model ready in spring 2010 to help inform debate and decision making. The impact of any proposed base-porting changes across the Defence Lines of Development, including accommodation, support, personnel and infrastructure, will be also assessed during the decision making process.

Currently, no date has been agreed by when an announcement on any potential Type 23 base-porting arrangements will be made. As part of any future announcement, we will be able to confirm that there will be no base porting changes for around five years as we are committed to providing sufficient notice for Royal Navy personnel and their families and the wider community to plan for the future.

Warships: Shipbuilding

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the (a) Astute and (b) Military Afloat Reach and Sustainability programmes; and if he will make a statement. (313110)

[holding answer 25 January 2010]: The Major Projects Report 2009 reported delays to the Astute Class Programme which will lead to cost growth and reduction in planned submarine availability. Of the seven planned Astute Class submarines the first four boats have been ordered. Boat 1 (Astute) is currently undergoing an extensive programme of Sea Trials while Boats 2 to 4 (Ambush, Artful and Audacious) are in various stages of construction. Orders for long lead items for Boat 5 and the reactor core for Boat 6 have also been placed.

Following the delays, work to re-baseline the Astute Programme is ongoing and the final impact on both the overall programme and individual boat build profile can only be confirmed once detailed joint planning and cost analysis work has been completed and MOD investment and HM Treasury re-approval has been obtained.

A competition for the Tanker element of the MARS Programme was originally started in late 2007. The competition was cancelled in March 2009 and subsequent work to review the procurement strategy concluded that a more open approach, considering a range of possible solutions, is more likely to secure best value for money. A new international competition for the Tanker element of MARS is therefore under way and Pre-Qualification Questionnaires from a number of companies/consortia are currently being evaluated. This work is nearing completion and, once internal MOD approval to proceed to the next stage of the competition has been granted, invitations to submit outline proposals will be issued. This is expected to be during spring 2010. On current plans the contract is due to be awarded in 2012.

The later classes of MARS ships, Fleet Solid Support and Amphibious Combat Support, remain uncommitted at this stage.

Leader of the House

Departmental Internet

To ask the Leader of the House what the cost was of maintaining her Office’s website for the 2008-09 financial year; and what the forecast cost is of maintaining websites within her responsibility in the 2009-10 financial year. (313039)

I refer the hon. Member to the reply given to the hon. Member for Welwyn Hatfield (Grant Shapps) on 25 January 2010, Official Report, column 534W.

International Development

Algeria: Overseas Aid

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much aid his Department allocated to Algeria in (a) 2005, (b) 2006, (c) 2007, (d) 2008 and (e) 2009. (312912)

The Department for International Development (DFID) does not have a bilateral programme in Algeria and has not allocated any aid to the country between 2005 and 2009.

Details of DFID’s aid expenditure in developing countries are published annually in “Statistics on International Development”, which is available in the House Library or online at:

www.dfid.gov.uk

Departmental Disclosure of Information

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development which non-departmental public bodies for which his Department is responsible sell information on a commercial basis to (a) companies or individuals in the private sector and (b) other organisations. (313228)

The Department for International Development (DFID) is responsible for one non-departmental public body, the Commonwealth Scholarship Commission (CSC). The CSC does not sell any information on a commercial basis to companies, individuals or other organisations.

Departmental Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many layers of management reporting from the most senior to the most junior there are in his Department; how many officials are employed in each such layer; and how much was spent on salaries and associated employment costs of staff at each such layer in the latest year for which information is available. (312832)

The Department for International Development (DFID) has a senior civil service (SCS) structure consisting of four separate management grades. Below the SCS there are a further eight grades. The following table shows the total number of staff at each grade and their associated employment costs for the 2008-09 financial year.

DFID grade

Traditional civil service grade

Number of staff1

Employment cost2 (£000)

SCS

Permanent Secretary

Permanent Secretary

1

3n/a

Director General

Director General

4

3n/a

Director

Director

15

1,955

Deputy Director

Deputy Director

79

8,543

Below the SCS

A1

G6

280

19,771

A2

G7

472

25,054

A2(L)

G7 (Lower)

133

5,853

B1(D)

HEO(D)—Fast Stream

51

1,773

B1

HEO

268

10,009

B2

EO

226

6,268

C14

AO

161

3,554

C24

AA

25

509

1 Staff numbers are on a headcount basis and include all DFID home civil service staff.

2 Employment cost consists of base salaries, overtime, performance related pay and includes the employer’s share of NI and pension contributions.

3 Cost withheld on confidentiality grounds as numbers in the grade are fewer than five.

4 Staff in these grades do not have line management responsibilities.

Developing Countries: Educational Visits

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much funding for school children to visit developing countries his Department allocated to pupils who attended National Challenge schools in (a) 2008-09 and (b) 2009-10; and if he will make a statement. (312735)

The following table shows how much funding for school children to visit developing countries the Department for International Development (DFID) provided to National Challenge schools in 2008-09 and 2009-10.

DFID funding for children to visit developing countries who attend National Challenge schools (approximate figures)

£

2008-09

5,370

2009-10

3,900

In 2009-10, fewer National Challenge schools applied for Global Curriculum Project grants compared to 2008-9. There were no unsuccessful applications from National Challenge schools in either 2008-09 or 2009-10.

This funding was provided through the Global School Partnerships programme implemented by the British Council.

Haiti: Overseas Aid

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what aid the Government have provided to Haiti in each year since 1997; for what purposes; and with which non-governmental organisations his Department has worked in Haiti over this period. (312692)

The Department for International Development’s (DFID’s) aid expenditure is published annually in “Statistics on International Development”, which is available in the House Library and at:

www.dfid.gov.uk

The relevant figures for Haiti are reproduced in the following table.

£

UK Financial year

Total UK bilateral aid

Total UK imputed multilateral aid

1997-98

124,788

2,201,626

1998-99

59,225

2,015,828

1999-2000

16,209

7,837,425

2000-01

60,562

681,563

2001-02

130,395

3,787,737

2002-03

125,165

29,929,110

2003-04

129,747

5,065,698

2004-05

2,027,103

7,139,048

2005-06

1,282,616

19,790,351

2006-07

446,153

7,859,963

2007-08

0

14,377,519

2008-09

823,599

1

2009-10

2735,000

1

1 Not yet available.

2 These figures are provisional and only include spend up to 12 January 2010.

In addition to these annual figures the UK has pledged £20 million in emergency assistance since the earthquake of 12 January 2010.

The majority of the UK's support to Haiti has been through multilateral channels, such as the United Nations (UN) agencies, the European Commission (EC) and World Bank. DFID does not have a regular bilateral programme for medium and long term development in Haiti. However bilateral aid has been provided for humanitarian purposes and debt relief.

Since 1997 DFID has supported work in Haiti by the following non-governmental organisations: Fonkoze, Oxfam, Handicap International, Action against Hunger, ActionAid, Catholic Aid for Overseas Development (CAFOD), CARE International, Christian Aid, Ethical Training Initiative, HelpAge International, International HIV/AIDS Alliance, Panos, Progressio and Transparency International.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much emergency aid has been provided to Haiti by the EU since the recent earthquake; and what discussions he has had at EU level on provision of aid. (312693)

On 18 January I attended a meeting of EU Ministers responsible for development and humanitarian aid in Brussels to discuss the support that the EU would provide to Haiti in the short, medium and long term. At the meeting, the European Commission pledged €30 million for emergency assistance, along with €100 million for early rehabilitation. It was also indicated that some €200 million more will be available for longer term reconstruction. These contributions are in addition to the €92 million pledged by individual EU countries at the same meeting.

Since the earthquake struck on 12 January, the Secretary of State for International Development has been in regular contact with the European Union High Representative Cathy Ashton, together with other European Ministers.

Morocco: Overseas Aid

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much aid his Department allocated to Morocco in (a) 2005, (b) 2006, (c) 2007, (d) 2008 and (e) 2009. (312913)

The Department for International Development (DFID) does not have a bilateral programme in Morocco. In 2005-06 DFID spent £1 million on humanitarian assistance. No other bilateral aid has been allocated to Morocco between 2005 and 2009.

Details of DFID’s aid expenditure in developing countries are published in Statistics on International Development, which is available in the Library or online at:

www.dfid.gov.uk

Overseas Aid

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what recent representations he has received on the policy of results-based aid; and if he will make a statement. (312918)

I refer the hon. Member to the oral answer provided on 20 January 2010, Official Report, column 287-8, on results-based aid.

Sudan: Elections

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what funding his Department has made available to the government of (a) Sudan and (b) Southern Sudan to assist preparations for the forthcoming (i) elections and (ii) referendum. (312616)

The Department for International Development (DFID) does not provide any funds directly to the Government of Sudan or the Government of Southern Sudan.

However, we have supported preparations for the election since 2007 through alternative means. DFID has spent £2.95 million providing training to the media and domestic observation groups as well as technical assistance on civic education and conflict management. We have also contributed £1.5 million to the Elections Basket Fund, managed by UN Development programme (UNDP). This fund provides support to all aspects of the electoral process, and continues the focus on civic and voter education and conflict prevention. On 6 January 2010, the UK announced a further £8.05 million contribution to the Elections Basket Fund, bringing our total contribution to support elections in Sudan to £12.5 million.

The UK is looking into kind of what assistance we can provide to support the referendum due to take place in 2010. We continue to discuss the nature and co-ordination of this support with the parties in Sudan and all our international partners.

West Africa: Overseas Aid

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development if he will increase aid to Morocco, Tunisia and Libya to help these states tackle illegal immigration from Western Africa to Europe. (312849)

The Department for International Development (DFID) aims to provide 90 per cent. of funding to low income countries. Given the middle income status of the majority of North African countries they are not the focus for our bilateral aid programmes.

The UK works closely with EU member states and third country partners to tackle illegal immigration into the EU. Illegal immigration is an important issue for the UK and the EU and we continue to work with third country partners on a range of operational activities and agreements, both bilaterally and with our EU partners.

This work takes various forms such as the Assisted Voluntary Return scheme in Libya implemented by the International Organisation for Migration.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Caribbean: EU External Trade

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent progress has been made on individual Caribbean countries signing Economic Partnership Agreements with the EU; and what recent representations he has received on the fairness of such agreements. (309435)

The Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) between the CARIFORUM States and the European Community (EC) and its member states was signed by 13 CARIFORUM states on 15 October 2008: Antigua and Barbuda, The Commonwealth of the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, The Commonwealth of Dominica, The Dominican Republic, Grenada, Jamaica, Saint Christopher and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, The Republic of Suriname, and the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. The Republic of Guyana signed on 20 October 2008 and most recently The Republic of Haiti signed on 11 December 2009. With the signature of Haiti, all 15 Caribbean states who chose to negotiate the EPA with the EC have now signed. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office has not received any recent representations on the fairness of this agreement.

Departmental Carbon Emissions

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether (a) his Department and (b) each of its agencies have plans to sign up to the 10:10 campaign to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 10 per cent. in 2010. (311432)

Yes, on 8 February 2010, my right hon. Friend the Foreign Secretary plans to sign up the UK operations of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) and our Trading Fund, FCO Services, to the 10:10 campaign and will urge our network of overseas posts to follow suit.

Departmental Disclosure of Information

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether (a) agencies and (b) non-departmental public bodies for which his Department is responsible sell information on a commercial basis to (i) companies or individuals in the private sector and (ii) other organisations. (313225)

Government Departments and agencies and non-departmental public bodies that have Crown status make most of their information available for free re-use under the Public Sector Information Click-Use Licence. Government trading funds, such as Foreign and Commonwealth Office Services, for which I have ministerial responsibility, are able under their trading fund status to charge for the services they provide in order to cover their costs. This covers information and its supply provided to other public bodies, commercial organisations and individuals. In common with other Government policy initiatives, some Foreign and Commonwealth Office information is published and sold as priced publications.

Departmental Mobile Phones

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many (a) mobile telephones and (b) BlackBerrys were provided to (i) Ministers and (ii) special advisers in his Department in 2009; and at what cost to the public purse. (313174)

At the start of 2009 a total of nine BlackBerries and one car phone were in operation. Ministers had a total of six BlackBerries and one car phone assigned between them. Special advisers were allocated a total of three BlackBerries

After the reshuffle in June the total was reduced to four BlackBerries, one mobile phone and one car phone. Ministers had two BlackBerries, one mobile phone and one car phone in use between them. Special advisers were allocated a total of two BlackBerries.

Our billing cycle runs quarterly from 1 December to 30 November. Provision and usage of mobile phones for Ministers and special advisors over the 12-month period 1 December 2008 to 30 November 2009 has cost £7,263.56. This is broken down as follows:

Provision and usage of mobile phones for Ministers: £6,246.53

Provision and usage of mobile phones for special advisers: £1,017.03.

December 2009 expenditure will appear on our February statement.

Diplomatic Service

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs with reference to the evidence of the Permanent Under-Secretary to the Foreign Affairs Select Committee on 9 December 2009, HC 145-i, question 10, at which overseas posts local staff have (a) lost overtime payments, (b) been asked to take involuntary unpaid leave and (c) been asked to work four-day weeks. (311592)

Decisions about overtime, unpaid leave and working patterns for locally engaged staff are devolved to delegated budget holders and individual posts. Comprehensive information on these decisions are not held centrally and can be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Members: Correspondence

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs when he plans to reply to the letter of 9 December 2009 from the right hon. Member for Manchester, Gorton with regard to Mr. S Choudhry. (313438)

Snow and Ice

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what estimate he has made of the costs to his Department arising from the severe weather conditions in the period 4 January to 18 January 2010; and if he will make a statement. (313588)

Western Sahara

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what remedy exists under international law to remove settlements in the occupied Western Sahara which are deemed to be illegal. (312362)

The Government see the status of the disputed territory of Western Sahara as undetermined and continue to believe that progress towards a negotiated solution to the dispute, providing for the self-determination of the people of Western Sahara, is best achieved under the auspices of the UN. Therefore, any issues relating to residence and property rights will need to be considered in this context.

Western Sahara: Human Rights

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent assessment he has made of the human rights situation in Western Sahara; and what steps he is taking to assist in improvements to the human rights situation in that territory. (312312)

Officials from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in London and our embassy in Rabat visited Layounne in December 2009 to assess the situation. A similar visit was also carried out in March 2009 to the refugee camps in Tindouf (Algeria) by an official from our embassy in Algiers. We will continue our programme of visits and our embassy in Rabat is developing links with Moroccan and Sahrawi non-governmental organisations who work on the dispute.

The Government believe that greater openness and transparency on human rights by all the parties to the dispute would create a significantly better environment for political dialogue through the auspices of the UN. We support the call by the UN Secretary-General, in his latest report, for the parties to remain engaged in a continuous and constructive dialogue with the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights and to make progress on the human dimension of the conflict.

Home Department

Antisocial Behaviour

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department with reference to the answer of 27 October 2009, Official Report, column 284W, on antisocial behaviour, what the names are of the expert practitioners on the action squad. (303784)

The antisocial behaviour squad is a group of established practitioners working with our ASB local delivery managers to ensure that antisocial behaviour is effectively tackled. It is made up of 66 skilled practitioners, drawn from a broad range of expertise and specialisms including the police, councils and housing organisations, with national coverage which can be called upon at short notice to help local areas deliver the package of measures I announced on 13 October 2009.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department with reference to the answer of 27 October 2009, Official Report, column 283W, on antisocial behaviour orders, how many antisocial behaviour orders were breached following the imposition of a parenting order in the latest period for which figures are available. (303785)

Data collected centrally by my Department on breaches of antisocial behaviour orders (ASBOs) cover the period to the end of 2007 (latest currently available). ASBO breach data compiled by my Department do not include details of whether defendants proven in court to have breached their ASBO were subject to either an individual support order or a parenting order. This information could only be ascertained by examination of individual court files, which could be achieved only at disproportionate cost.

Borders: Personal Records

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether an automated authority to carry capability will be specified in his Department's contract with Trusted Borders for services relating to the e-borders programme. (312900)

The automated authority to carry capability did not form part of the core services in the e-Borders contract signed on 14 November 2007. However, it was included as an agreed option within the contract, as a potential future service.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent progress has been made on the implementation of the e-Borders programme; whether the programme met its project milestones in the latest period for which figures are available; and if he will make a statement. (312901)

The project milestone for processing 100 million annualised passenger movements per year has been met by the e-Borders Programme.

The programme has not yet achieved the milestone for processing 60 per cent. of all passenger journeys into and out of the UK.

Currently, e-Borders is checking between 45 and 50 per cent.1 of all passenger movements.

1 This figure is subject to verification by statisticians.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent assessment he has made of the level of compliance by airlines with the data requirements of the e-Borders programme; and when he expects all airlines to implement that programme. (312902)

Currently 111 carriers are providing data to the e-Borders system, covering approximately 2,454 routes.

It is expected that all commercial airlines will be compliant by the end of December 2010, in line with the Prime Minister's statement of 20 January.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when his Department expects to meet its target of capturing 100 million passenger movements through passenger name record checks; and how many such movements have been captured to date. (312907)

We have met our target to capture the travel document information (TDI) for 100 million passenger movements.

To date, through the e-Borders system and its pilot project Semaphore, TDI data have been processed on over 147 million passengers travelling to and from the UK, at an annualised rate of over 100 million passenger movements per year.

e-Borders expects to capture 100 million passenger name record (PNR) movements into and out of the UK by 2013.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent progress has been made on the inclusion of the category of other passenger information in the e-Borders programme. (312909)

Other passenger information (OPI) is known within the aviation industry as passenger name record (PNR).

OPI collection will be rolled out on a phased approach, with particular focus on higher risk routes first. The e-Borders/Semaphore system is already collecting OPI data on a voluntary basis and includes 121 carriers on 76 routes.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent estimate he has made of the cost of implementing the authority to carry element of the e-Borders programme. (312910)

Following a limited trial last year and the Prime Minister's recent statement on security and border protection, we are examining the options for preventing people travelling to the United Kingdom. No recent estimate has been made of the cost of implementing an authority to carry scheme through the e-Borders Programme.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he has plans to increase the number of security checks on (a) outbound and (b) transit passenger movements carried out by the UK Border Agency. (312925)

UK Border Agency officers carry out a range of intelligence-led checks on outbound and transit passengers. More than 50 per cent. of the data analysed by our e-Borders system relate to people who are leaving British ports. This will increase as e-Borders continues to roll out.

Following the Prime Minister's recent statement on security and border protection, we are examining the options for strengthening our checks further.

British Nationality

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what regulations govern the re-admission to the UK of a UK national who has taken US citizenship but whose citizenship has been revoked upon deportation from the United States. (312726)

[holding answer 25 January 2010]: All passengers, including deportees, who claim to be British nationals, must be able to demonstrate this on arrival in the UK. This is normally achieved by presentation of a valid travel document, confirming their nationality and identity. The requirement is irrespective of any other nationality currently or previously held by the passenger.

British nationals are not subject to immigration control; however, all arriving passengers are checked against the Watchlist. In certain circumstances, their arrival in the UK may be referred to other law enforcement agencies, for further action.

Community Safety Accreditation Schemes

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people in each area have been approved by the Community Safety Accreditation Scheme since it was introduced. (302192)

Community Safety Accreditation Schemes allow Chief Officers to designate limited powers to employees of organisations which contribute towards community safety and tackling antisocial behaviour (ASB) such as park wardens, train operators and private security guards. These powers enhance the contribution of people in roles that are already concerned with keeping communities safe; and mean that there are more people on the streets with powers to tackle and not tolerate ASB.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested centrally. In order to provide an answer, all police forces that have operated a scheme would have to be asked to provide figures and this could be done only at disproportionate cost. The Home Office does conduct an annual audit of persons accredited by each police force. This is a snapshot of accredited persons at one time and does not represent all people accredited over time. Figures for accredited persons in the Vehicle and Operator Services Agency are collected separately as theirs is a specialist role with a single power granted to stop vehicles for testing. The last published figures, for 2008, are set out in the following table. The 2009 CSAS audit was published on the Home Office website on 15 December 2009 and can be accessed at:

http://police.homeoffice.gov.uk/community-policing/citizen-focused-policing/community-safety-accredit-scheme/index29f9.html?version=9

spring 2008

Force area

Accredited persons (non-VOSA)

VOSA accredited persons

Avon and Somerset

11

6

Bedfordshire

0

8

British Transport Police

129

0

Cambridgeshire

0

2

Cheshire

17

24

City of London

0

0

Cleveland

82

0

Cumbria

0

4

Derbyshire

0

6

Devon and Cornwall

5

0

Dorset

0

0

Durham

65

6

Dyfed and Powys

0

0

Essex

291

10

Gloucestershire

0

5

Greater Manchester

0

5

Gwent

75

5

Hampshire

111

6

Hertfordshire

117

7

Humberside

0

0

Kent

138

14

Lancashire

51

8

Leicestershire

8

7

Lincolnshire

0

3

Merseyside

0

6

Metropolitan Police

0

0

Norfolk

0

8

Northamptonshire

57

7

North Wales

0

8

North Yorkshire

0

0

Northumbria

0

3

Nottinghamshire

120

5

South Wales

0

4

South Yorkshire

7

8

Staffordshire

0

11

Suffolk

0

4

Surrey

40

3

Sussex

12

13

Thames Valley

0

24

Warwickshire

28

0

West Mercia

32

17

West Midlands

10

0

West Yorkshire

0

8

Wiltshire

0

0

Counter-terrorism