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Driving Offences: Convictions

Volume 505: debated on Wednesday 10 February 2010

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many hit and run traffic incidents led to an individual being convicted in (a) England and Wales and (b) each police force area in each year since 1998. (315061)

The number of hit and run incidents cannot be directly linked to prosecutions and convictions at court. Therefore, it is not possible to provide the information requested.

The information given in the following table shows the number of offenders convicted at all courts for the offence of “failing to stop after an accident” in England and Wales, by police force area, from 1998 to 2008 (latest available).

Number of persons convicted at all courts for the offence of failing to stop after an accident1, 2, 3, 4,in England and Wales and by police force area, from 1998 to 20085, 6

Police force area

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Avon and Somerset

146

151

124

117

39

50

53

78

74

86

45

Bedfordshire

47

56

56

51

50

49

39

36

51

59

30

Cambridgeshire

45

55

54

39

48

51

55

53

56

67

54

Cheshire

131

128

133

100

119

135

145

154

129

98

52

Cleveland

44

40

31

31

37

34

36

35

28

35

18

Cumbria

46

47

56

54

52

76

63

67

54

65

34

Derbyshire

72

81

81

89

77

82

90

75

80

108

59

Devon and Cornwall

83

85

73

95

103

109

197

176

115

78

44

Dorset

71

51

56

65

48

64

47

53

48

41

19

Durham

31

42

22

45

40

48

42

46

42

37

16

Essex

199

177

205

224

244

247

218

180

174

152

39

Gloucestershire

56

44

49

58

52

63

25

25

20

14

12

Greater Manchester

346

383

358

397

383

332

404

393

363

316

166

Hampshire

116

126

140

138

138

150

123

89

96

115

111

Hertfordshire

81

79

98

82

106

112

94

89

104

124

94

Humberside

73

80

79

103

83

110

74

75

57

41

31

Kent

68

49

68

72

87

68

105

83

80

105

84

Lancashire

115

97

92

102

'61

98

88

89

71

105

63

Leicestershire

69

78

77

85

60

91

80

65

97

116

86

Lincolnshire

36

45

35

55

45

60

58

39

28

39

24

London, City of

7

15

5

8

4

5

5

1

3

6

2

Merseyside

115

46

94

117

107

183

198

153

104

78

41

Metropolitan Police

514

478

403

375

397

349

287

314

368

385

203

Norfolk

121

103

76

76

90

75

103

91

100

71

55

Northamptonshire

64

56

44

21

8

45

65

74

56

76

30

Northumbria

78

71

106

99

106

103

115

120

132

145

115

North Yorkshire

67

60

61

75

74

66

72

76

57

52

33

Nottinghamshire

138

90

101

104

101

106

99

70

65

65

53

South Yorkshire

112

111

135

148

118

151

124

152

142

140

123

Staffordshire

64

26

25

19

35

48

58

33

26

33

21

Suffolk

50

42

27

47

32

53

61

51

46

57

24

Surrey

46

111

61

72

57

53

44

55

61

80

55

Sussex

109

127

92

80

70

89

73

54

73

77

70

Thames Valley

100

108

84

121

135

116

125

118

110

107

52

Warwickshire

44

49

48

46

37

43

46

36

38

19

18

West Mercia

112

112

101

126

152

158

168

147

191

186

166

West Midlands

344

344

314

284

297

273

275

271

269

245

173

West Yorkshire

191

190

186

209

224

189

236

253

233

253

212

Wiltshire

49

41

39

58

51

45

53

48

37

39

19

Dyfed Powys

33

27

37

39

'37

42

45

51

54

59

28

Gwent

60

39

49

38

35

38

35

40

45

39

14

North Wales

83

65

54

63

85

67

86

62

61

56

62

South Wales

133

118

123

105

124

118

140

137

136

129

79

England and Wales

4,509

4,323

4,152

4,332

4,248

4,444

4,549

4,307

4,174

4,198

2,729

1 Offence under the Road Traffic Act 1988 S.170(4),

2 Not all hit and run incidents are pursued through the courts—minor ones in particular may not involve police attendance and may not be reported to the police by the injured party.

3 “Hit and run” usually refers to a collision in which someone was injured or killed. The offence of failure to stop is also committed if there has only been damage but such incidents cannot be distinguished from those involving injury or death.

4 A person involved in a hit and run incident may be convicted of a more serious offence such as dangerous driving.

5 The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it Is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

6 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source:

Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice.