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Written Answers

Volume 506: debated on Friday 5 March 2010

Written Answers to Questions

Friday 5 March 2010

Scotland

Departmental Ministerial Policy Advisers

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many full-time equivalent staff of each grade are employed by his Department to assist special advisers. (321142)

The Scotland Office does not maintain records of the administrative time provided to special advisers and therefore is unable to identify the full-time equivalent figure. However, no staff are solely dedicated to supporting special advisers.

International Development

Democratic Republic of Congo

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development whether an environmental impact assessment has been conducted for each (a) current and (b) proposed road building project funded by his Department in Democratic Republic of Congo; how much funding for each such project was allocated to reducing the effect on these projects; and what the percentage of the budget for the environment and local population was in (i) 2008, (ii) 2009 and (iii) 2010. (320086)

All road rehabilitation projects funded by the Department of International Development (DFID) in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) are subject to Environmental and Social Impact Assessments (ESIAs). The following amounts have been allocated to address environmental and social impacts of road rehabilitation projects currently funded by DFID:

£12 million, or 15 per cent., of a total contribution of £78 million from 2009 to 2013 for the ‘Pro Routes’ programme, in partnership with the World Bank.

£476,733, or 13 per cent., of a total contribution of £3.66 million from July 2009 to July 2011 for rehabilitation of roads in eastern DRC, in partnership with the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS).

£435,949, or 15 per cent., of a total budget of £2.79 million for the same period to rehabilitate a road from Kisangani to Ubundu in partnership with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much funding has been allocated to the Congo rainforest region as part of the £1.5 billion commitment to the fast start global financial package to help developing countries address climate change and its impacts agreed at Copenhagen; and if he will increase the fast-track funding contribution to $800 million per year. (320089)

The Prime Minister has committed up to £1.5 billion in Fast Start finance over the next three financial years from 2010-11 to 2012-13. 20 per cent. of this total will be allocated for forestry, including planned investment in the Congo Basin Forest Fund. We are currently developing plans for 2010-11 and will determine priorities for 2011-12 and 2012-13 as part of the next spending review.

Departmental Paper

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what (a) suppliers and (b) brands of (i) paper and (ii) paper products his Department uses; and what his Department's policy is on the procurement of those materials. (320038)

The Department for International Development (DFID) uses Office of Government Commerce (OGC) framework contracts for the purchase of all standard paper items such as A4 paper and envelopes in the UK. The majority of products are purchased from Banner Business Services, including general use paper from their Evolve range, which is made from 100 per cent. recycled content. More detailed information on paper products cannot be provided without incurring disproportionate costs.

Departmental Temporary Staff

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development from which companies his Department sourced temporary staff in each of the last three years; how many temporary staff his Department employed in each year; and what the monetary value of the contracts with each such company was in each such year. (320016)

The Department for International Development (DFID) has formal arrangements with Margaret Hodge, Josephine Sammons and Manpower to provide temporary staff at the administrative level. In addition, professional and specialist temporary staff can be appointed through specialist suppliers without the involvement of DFID's Human Resources Division. Subsequently, there is no central record of the total number of temporary staff employed or the associated costs for each of the last three years. This information cannot be provided without incurring disproportionate costs.

Food: Overseas Aid

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps his Department plans to take to implement its commitment to agricultural and food security research related to developing countries supported by the UK science base in co-operation with UK research councils. (319936)

The Department for International Development (DFID) is providing funds for agricultural research to the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). This enables us to harness the UK's world-class bioscience base to address the challenges of agricultural growth and food security in developing countries.

We fund two programmes jointly with BBSRC: a crop science programme, to which DFID contributes £5.34 million; and a livestock disease research programme, to which DFID contributes £9.7 million.

We are exploring a third collaboration with BBSRC into crop science which can help withstand the impact of climate change. DFID is also working with the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) and other public sector funders to improve coordination of agriculture and food security related research.

Haiti: Earthquakes

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what equipment was used by fire and rescue personnel deployed to Haiti; and if he will make a statement. (320284)

The following equipment was used by the UK fire and rescue personnel deployed to Haiti; technical search equipment including cameras, listening devices and dogs; light concrete breaking equipment; hand tools including percussion rescue tool (PRT); chainsaws; lighting and generators; and medical kit including splints, pain relief and stretchers.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much funding his Department has provided to each (a) multi-national organisation and (b) UK non-governmental organisation which it has funded as part of the Haiti relief operation; and if he will make a statement. (320285)

Details of funding provided by the Department for International Development (DFID) to non-governmental organisations and multilateral organisations to help the relief operation in Haiti are provided in the following table.

£

Non governmental organisation

Merlin

398,998

Agency for Technical Co-operation and Development (ACTED)

400,000

Action Against Hunger (ACF)

1,000,000

Handicap International

500,000

Oxfam

1,000,000

Multilateral organisation

Office for Co-ordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA)

1,000,000

World Food Programme (WFP)

2,000,000

Pan-American Health Organisation/World Health Organisation (PAHO/WHO)

300,000

International Organisation for Migration (IOM)

1,120,000

International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC)

1,000,000

International Assistance

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what recent steps he has taken to assess the effectiveness of his Department’s international aid. (320058)

The Department for International Development (DFID) prioritises steps to ensure that all our aid is effective, whether delivered by DFID or through multilateral organisations.

For example we have recently conducted Portfolio Reviews in the Education and Health sectors which have shown that DFID is delivering excellent value. DFID’s bilateral aid to the education sector, delivered through Government systems, funds an estimated 5 million children through primary school. This aid is funding more children in developing countries than the number attending primary schools in the UK at just 2 per cent. of the cost. Similar reviews on Governance and Civil Society are currently under way.

Millennium Development Goals

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what his most recent estimate is of the additional aid required from contributing states in order to meet the Millennium Development Goals. (319953)

At the G8 Summit in L'Aquila last year the UK successfully called for an international assessment of what is needed to achieve the MDGs. The needs assessment will take a broad based approach to what is needed to achieve the MDGs, retaining aid as a central component, while also taking account of other issues such as trade, aid effectiveness, climate change and international and domestic policy frameworks. The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is currently undertaking this assessment and is due to produce a report in May.

Rwanda: Politics and Government

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what recent progress has been made on issues covered by point B.10 of the renewed Memorandum of Understanding between the UK and the Government of Rwanda, with particular reference to the registration of opposition parties in advance of presidential elections in August 2010. (320173)

The UK Government are closely monitoring the progress made on the registration of political parties in Rwanda. Ten political parties are currently registered and a further two parties are attempting to register. The Department for International Development (DFID) is aware that some parties are reporting registration difficulties and we are pressing the Government of Rwanda to ensure that full political rights, within the framework of Rwandan law, are upheld.

Uganda: Armed Conflict

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what humanitarian assistance his Department has provided to those displaced and otherwise affected by the activities of the Lord's Resistance Army; and what steps his Department is taking to ensure the (a) delivery and (b) security of this assistance. (320343)

In 2009 the Department for International Development (DFID) provided over £100 million for humanitarian assistance to those affected by the activities of the Lords Resistance Army (LRA). Of this, around £70 million was provided through UN Humanitarian Pooled Funds, and the remainder through other UN agencies, NGOs and other partners.

Monitoring and security procedures are built into all DFID programmes as standard. This allows staff to assess the delivery and impact of UK aid, and closely monitor security risks. All UN pooled funds include mechanisms that enable all donors to monitor the delivery and security of assistance.

Work and Pensions

Children: Maintenance

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the total value of overpayments made by the Child Support Agency was in each of the last three years. (318741)

The Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission is responsible for the child maintenance system. I have asked the Child Maintenance Commissioner to write to the hon. Member with the information requested and I have seen the response.

Letter from Stephen Geraghty:

In reply to your recent Parliamentary Question about the Child Support Agency, the Secretary of State promised a substantive reply from the Child Maintenance Commissioner as the Child Support Agency is now the responsibility of the Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission.

You asked the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the total value of overpayments made by the Child Support Agency was in each of the last three years. (318741)

The total value of child maintenance payments overpaid to a parent with care is included in the table below. This includes figures over each of the last three financial years to January 2010.

£

April 2007 to March 2008

6,203,754.72

April 2008 to March 2009

6,510,103.73

April 2009 to January 2010

6,497,860.88

These figures are for overpayments made by non-resident parents as a result of retrospective changes of circumstances and a consequent downward valuation of maintenance assessments. These recalculations usually occur as an outcome of new information being provided to the agency.

Where an overpayment is made the money is refunded to the non-resident parent.

I hope you find this answer helpful.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the Child Support Agency's policy is on payment by credit card from individuals in arrears on their maintenance payments. (318742)

The Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission is responsible for the child maintenance system. I have asked the Child Maintenance Commissioner to write to the hon. Member with the information requested and I have seen the response.

Letter from Stephen Geraghty:

In reply to your recent Parliamentary Question about the Child Support Agency, the Secretary of State promised a substantive reply from the Child Maintenance Commissioner as the Child Support Agency is now the responsibility of the Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission.

You asked the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the Child Support Agency's policy is on payment by credit card from individuals in arrears. [318742]

The Child Support Agency has had the facility to accept credit and debit card payments since the introduction of Regulation 3 of the Child support (Miscellaneous Amendments) Regulations 2006. This was introduced to provide access to a convenient and widely used method of payment.

The policy is to ensure the best payment agreement is reached with the non-resident parent without jeopardising the flow of regular maintenance payments. It is for the non-resident parent to determine whether it is appropriate to use a credit card to make the payments required by such an agreement.

I hope you find this answer helpful.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what advice is given by the Child Support Agency to people liable for maintenance payments on the use of credit cards to clear their arrears. (318745)

The Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission is responsible for the child maintenance system. I have asked the Child Maintenance Commissioner to write to the hon. Member with the information requested and I have seen the response.

Letter from Stephen Geraghty:

In reply to your recent Parliamentary Question about the Child Support Agency, the Secretary of State promised a substantive reply from the Child Maintenance Commissioner as the Child Support Agency is now the responsibility of the Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission.

You asked the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what advice is given by the Child Support Agency to people liable for maintenance payments who are (a) in arrears, (b) late in making payments and (c) behind on their payment schedules on the use of credit cards to clear their arrears. [318745]

The Child Support Agency's Debt Steer states that the starting point when negotiating an arrears payment plan is to require full repayment immediately. Where this is not possible, the aim will be to reach an agreement that will achieve full recovery within, at most two years, with the discretion to accept an arrangement extending beyond this period where a client's circumstances warrant it.

In all cases involving arrears, caseworkers are instructed to discuss payment options that could be available to the client. Caseworkers do not provide financial advice, or recommend one payment option over another. Caseworkers can also signpost clients to other, independent organisations for financial help and advice where appropriate.

I hope you find this answer helpful.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many cases of absent parents in (a) Scotland and (b) Angus constituency the Child Support Agency is managing. (318801)

The Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission is responsible for the child maintenance system. I have asked the Child Maintenance Commissioner to write to the hon. Member with the information requested and I have seen the response.

Letter from Stephen Geraghty:

In reply to your recent Parliamentary Question about the Child Support Agency, the Secretary of State promised a substantive reply from the Child Maintenance Commissioner as the Child Support Agency is now the responsibility of the Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission.

You asked the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many cases of absent parents in (a) Scotland and (b) Angus constituency the Child Support Agency is managing. [318801]

In December 2009, there are 112,810 live and assessed cases in Scotland and 2,170 in the parliamentary constituency of Angus. These figures include old scheme cases with a full or interim maintenance assessment as well as current scheme cases with a full maintenance calculation or default maintenance decision. Figures are adjusted to reflect those cases administered clerically.

I hope you find this answer helpful.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many cases relating to absent parents resident in Milton Keynes the Child Support Agency is managing. (319003)

The Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission is responsible for the child maintenance system. I have asked the Child Maintenance Commissioner to write to the hon. Member with the information requested and I have seen the response.

Letter from Stephen Geraghty:

In reply to your recent Parliamentary Question about the Child Support Agency, the Secretary of State promised a substantive reply from the Child Maintenance Commissioner as the Child Support Agency is now the responsibility of the Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission.

You asked the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many cases relating to absent parents resident in Milton Keynes the Child Support Agency is managing. [319003]

Latest figures available show as at December 2009, the number of cases in Milton Keynes is 4,480. These figures include old scheme cases with a full maintenance assessment as well as current scheme cases with a full maintenance calculation or default maintenance decision. Figures are adjusted to reflect those cases administered clerically.

I hope you find this answer helpful.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many cases managed by the Child Support Agency relate to absent parents in (a) Scotland and (b) Moray constituency. (319674)

The Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission is responsible for the child maintenance system. I have asked the Child Maintenance Commissioner to write to the hon. Member with the information requested and I have seen the response.

Letter from Stephen Geraghty:

In reply to your recent Parliamentary Question about the Child Support Agency, the Secretary of State promised a substantive reply from the Child Maintenance Commissioner as the Child Support Agency is now the responsibility of the Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission.

You asked the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many cases managed by the Child Support Agency relate to absent parents in (a) Scotland and (b) Moray constituency. [319674]

Latest figures show as at December 2009, the number of cases in Scotland is 111,050; of these 1,760 are in the Parliamentary Constituency of Moray. These figures include old scheme cases with a full or interim maintenance assessment as well as current scheme cases with a full maintenance calculation or default maintenance decision. Figures are adjusted to reflect those cases administered clerically.

I hope you find this answer helpful.

Council Tax Benefits

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what measures introduced by her Department since May 2005 have made it easier for (a) pensioners and (b) low income earners to claim council tax benefit. (319609)

Council tax benefit provides financial assistance with payment of council tax bills to people on low income and plays an important role in helping to combat pensioner and child poverty. Modernising and simplifying the claims process is a key part of the Department's strategy to increase benefit take-up among both pensioners and people of working age. We are also introducing a range of measures to improve awareness among staff, customers and advisers of the help that council tax benefit can give to people both in and out of work.

The main focus of activity to help poorer pensioners has been the automation of the claims process. In December 2005 a shortened, three page claim form was introduced for housing benefit and council tax benefit replacing a claim form that ran to 28 pages. Completion of the form was undertaken on behalf of the customer by officials in the Pension, Disability and Carers Service at the same time as a claim to pension credit was made over the telephone. The form was then sent to the customer to check and sign and return to the local authority.

From November 2008, the need for the customer to complete and sign a claim form was removed and housing benefit and council tax benefit claims data have been sent direct to the local authority.

This automated claims process has been further enhanced and since January 2010, all local authorities are able to receive secure electronic transfer of data making the claiming process virtually automatic for all pensioner customers.

Jobcentre Plus has successfully rolled out a new process which makes claiming benefits, including council tax benefit, easier and faster for people moving into and out of employment. The in and out of work process involves Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs and local authorities, working with Jobcentre Plus to smooth the transition for customers moving in and out of work reducing the number of organisations the customer has to contact at the point they make a new claim or when they start work. Jobcentre Plus gathers all the information and evidence that is needed for housing benefit, council tax benefit and tax credits improving the speed and accuracy of information sharing so that the right benefit is paid more quickly.

The Department continues to explore ways to make the claiming process more automatic through wider use of data sharing and also by data matching to assist local authorities to identify customers with potential entitlement. It will continue to look for service improvements on offer to pensioners for example by partnership working with local authorities and other agencies and signposting to the most appropriate contact point too pursue a benefit claim.

Departmental Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many full-time equivalent staff there have been in her Department's (a) Fraud Investigation Service and (b) Organised Fraud Unit in each year since 2006. (316364)

The available information is in the table (data are not available prior to 2007):

Numbers of full-time equivalent staff in Fraud Investigation Service and Organised Fraud Unit since 2007

Date

Total number of Fraud Investigation staff (excluding Organised Fraud Unit staff)

Total number of Organised Fraud Unit staff

March 2007

2,785

233

March 2008

2,671

201

March 2009

2,564

214

September 2009

2,557

218

The decrease in the total number of Fraud Investigation Service staff needs to be seen against the pre-recession spending review efficiency challenge. There have been significant productivity gains and elimination of waste that have seen record numbers of benefit thieves caught and sanctioned. The numbers in the Organised Fraud Unit are a reflection of our commitment to tackle the serious and organised fraudsters who abuse the benefits system.

Departmental Written Questions

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many questions tabled for answer on a named day her Department received in each of the last 12 months; and to how many such questions her Department provided a substantive answer on the day named. (305384)

The information requested is in the following table:

Named day questions by month tabled

2009

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Number answered on or before the named day

20

21

19

9

6

29

34

17

17

14

18

Number answered after the named day

62

83

91

29

47

65

43

44

53

35

34

Total number

82

104

110

38

53

94

77

61

70

49

52

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many and what percentage of parliamentary questions tabled for written answer by her Department on a named day in session 2008-09 received a substantive answer on that day. (307546)

The Department answered 829 named day questions in session 2008-09, of which 252 (30.4 per cent.) received a substantive reply on the named day.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what average time her Department took to answer questions for (a) ordinary written answer and (b) written answer on a named day in the last 12 months. (313648)

In the 12 months to 31 January 2010 the average time taken by the Department to answer (a) ordinary written questions was 14.0 sitting days and (b) named day questions was 8.9 sitting days.

With effect from the current Session of Parliament, each Department will provide the Procedure Committee with sessional statistics on the time taken to answer written questions. This implements recommendation 24 of the 3rd report from the Procedure Committee, Session 2008-09

Housing Benefit

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what proportion of claimants of local housing allowance make an additional payment to cover the difference between benefit received and rent paid; and what estimate she has made of the average weekly payment made by such claimants in the latest period for which figures are available. (318637)

In August 2009, 48 per cent. of customers who received housing benefit under the local housing allowance arrangements had a shortfall of £23 per week on average. This relates to shortfalls caused by a customer's contractual rent being higher than the appropriate local housing allowance rate.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what percentage of those in receipt of housing benefit in the private rented sector, excluding those in receipt of local housing allowance, have their benefit paid to (a) their landlord and (b) themselves. (318813)

The information is not available in the format requested and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what percentage of those in receipt of local housing allowance have their benefit paid to (a) their landlord and (b) themselves. (318815)

The local housing allowance, rolled out from 7 April 2008, uses the appropriate local housing allowance rate, based on the area where the person lives and the size of their household, to determine the maximum amount to be included in the housing benefit calculation. Customers can choose to rent properties with rents below the local housing allowance rate and are able to keep the excess benefit up to a maximum of £15 per week. If the rent is higher than the local housing allowance rate they must make up the difference from other sources of income.

In August 2009, 25 per cent of customers who received housing benefit under the local housing allowance arrangements had their benefit paid to their landlord and 72 per cent had their benefit paid to themselves. For 3 per cent. of customers the payment destination information is not reliably reported.

Mortgages: Government Assistance

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how much was spent by her Department on the Support for Mortgage Interest Scheme in (a) each of the last three years and (b) 2009-10 to date. (316745)

Annual expenditure on the Support for Mortgage Interest scheme in the last three years was as follows:

£ million

2006-07

390

2007-08

430

2008-09

430

The latest available data are for the first quarter of 2009-10, for which the total expenditure on the Support for Mortgage Interest scheme was £120 million.

Source:

DWP Quarterly Statistical Enquiry

Pension Credit: Essex

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what estimate she has made of the number of pensioners resident in (a) Essex and (b) Southend eligible for but not claiming pension credit. (320642)

Estimates of eligibility are not available below the level of Great Britain.

The latest estimates of the take-up rates and the number of those entitled but not receiving pension credit are published in the report “Income Related Benefits estimates of Take-Up in 2007-08”, which is available in the House of Commons Library or on the DWP website at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/irb.asp

Social Security Benefits: Aberdeenshire

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many individuals are in receipt of (a) pension credit, (b) attendance allowance, (c) incapacity benefit and (d) jobseeker’s allowance in Banff and Buchan constituency; and what the average weekly level of each benefit received was in the latest period for which figures are available. (319346)

Attendance allowance provides an important non-contributory, non-income-related and tax free cash contribution towards the extra costs of severely disabled people. The Government are committed to providing real help to disabled people, particularly through the early stages of economic recovery. This is why the Chancellor announced in the December 2009 pre-Budget report that attendance allowance would be increased by 1.5 per cent.—bringing forward help when it is most needed. Without this commitment, the recent negative growth in the Retail Prices Index would have meant that this benefit would not have increased in 2010.

From 27 October 2008 we replaced incapacity benefits for new customers with the employment and support allowance and a revised medical assessment which focuses on what people can do, as well as what they cannot.

The principal function of pension credit is to tackle pensioner poverty by topping up the incomes of pensioners over 60 to the guaranteed minimum amount appropriate to their circumstances.

The information requested is in the table.

Number of cases in payment and average weekly payment of Pension Credit, Attendance Allowance, Incapacity Benefit/Severe Disablement Allowance and Jobseeker's Allowance in the Banff and Buchan constituency in August 2009

Benefit

Number of cases in payment

Average weekly amount paid (£)

Pension Credit (households)

4,570

48.81

Attendance Allowance

1,990

59.29

Incapacity Benefit/Severe Disablement Allowance

3,930

94.43

Jobseeker's Allowance

980

62.70

Notes:

1. Benefit recipients are rounded to the nearest 10.

2. Average weekly amounts rounded to the nearest penny.

3. Benefit recipients receiving more than one of these benefits will be counted under each benefit.

4. Attendance allowance totals exclude people with entitlement where the payment has been suspended, for example if they are in hospital.

5. These data do not include claimants of employment and support allowance introduced from October 2008.

6. All data refer to benefit recipients and will therefore exclude credits only and nil payment cases.

7. Household is defined here as the number of individuals or couples in receipt of pension credit and equates to a “benefit unit” which, since 2006, also include same-sex partners. Two individuals who are not partners but live in the same house are counted as separate households.

Source:

Department for Work and Pensions Information Directorate: Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study.

State Retirement Pensions

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) what mechanisms were in place to monitor the implementation of the financial corrections made by her Department in respect of voluntary pension payments made between 1996 and 2002; (316300)

(2) what financial corrections were made by the Government in respect of reminders for voluntary pensions contributions in each year between 1996 and 2002; and whether those corrections were made only in respect of individuals who had previously made voluntary pension contributions;

(3) how much has been paid in pension back payments to overseas residents who did not receive reminders about their voluntary pension contributions in each year between 1996 and 2002.

For the tax years 1996-07 to 2001-02 deficiency notices inviting customers with gaps in their national insurance records to pay voluntary contributions were temporarily suspended. Following the suspension my Department was responsible for contacting those people who reached state pension age between 6 April 1998 and 24 October 2004, and were due to receive a deficiency notice for one of more of the above tax years. An exercise started in September 2004 to contact such customers, where it would be beneficial for them to consider paying voluntary contributions.

Regulations allow for any customer who reached state pension age between 6 April 1998 and 24 October 2004 to pay voluntary contributions for the tax years 1996-07 to 2001-02. It is not possible to identify separately those who have made voluntary contributions after contact by my Department and those who have made them through their own inquiries. To date, following payment of voluntary contributions by individual customers, arrears of state pension amounting to £84.2 million have been paid to customers in Great Britain and £30 million to customers resident overseas. This is based on current information as customers still have until 5 April 2010 to decide whether to pay such voluntary contributions for these years. An annual breakdown of arrears attributable to voluntary contributions made in each of the tax years is not available.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what recent representations she has received on the uprating of the additional state pension; and if she will make a statement. (318621)

The Department has received a number of representations on the uprating of additional pension.

Increasing the basic state pension along with pension credit is the most effective way of getting help to over 11 million pensioners in Great Britain.

In the absence of RPI inflation there is no legal requirement to uprate additional pension. We have therefore decided to adopt a more equitable approach to helping pensioners by increasing the basic state pension which goes to virtually all pensioners in Great Britain and pension credit which goes to the poorest.

Work Capability Assessment

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what (a) medical training and (b) diagnostic experience her Department requires of Atos Medical Ltd. employees contracted to carry out work capability assessments. (318177)

Atos Healthcare doctors must be fully registered with the General Medical Council (GMC) without current or previous restrictions, conditions or warnings and hold a licence to practice from the date the GMC issues licences. In addition they must have at least three years post full registration (GMC or EEA—European Economic Area equivalent) experience. Alternatively for non EU graduates three years minimum post full registration experience in the doctors native country is required. In individual cases, solely at the discretion of the DWP chief medical adviser, the requirements that no conditions or warnings be attached to registration and that the doctor must have a minimum of three years post registration experience, may be waived.

Atos Healthcare nurses must be fully registered (level 1) Registered General Nurses without current or previous restrictions or cautions with the Nursing and Midwifery Council. In addition they must have at least three years post full registration experience. In individual cases, solely at the discretion of the DWP chief medical adviser, the requirements that no cautions be attached to registration and that the nurse must have a minimum of three years post registration experience, may be waived.

Atos Healthcare doctors and nurses are specifically trained to provide decision making authorities with independent, accurate and authoritative advice and reports on the effects of disability.

Initial Training: varies in detail according to which benefit is involved. However all such training follows a similar basic pattern, as follows:

Theoretical Training: Theoretical training commences with a trainer led theory based course usually delivered to a group of trainees in a classroom setting. Trainees who are new to the work of Atos Healthcare will receive instruction in such areas as disability analysis, customer's rights, equal opportunities and professional standards. Detailed technical information relevant to the benefit concerned is provided. All Atos Healthcare trainers have undergone specific training to prepare them for the role, including practical sessions to enhance their understanding of how adults learn.

Practical Training: Practical Training is the work undertaken by the new recruits that is produced in a controlled environment. For examination centre based assessments the trainee is supervised and appraised by an experienced medical adviser as they complete their introductory cases. In the domiciliary visit based benefits the initial cases are monitored immediately on return to allow feedback to be given without delay.

Demonstration of understanding assessed by multiple choice examination: for incapacity benefit, employment and support allowance and disability living allowance the trainee is required to attain a pass mark in a multiple choice questionnaire before they are allowed to proceed to the practical training. The questionnaire includes questions on the whole range of topics covered in the training course.

Demonstration of understanding by audit: In all benefits the initial cases produced by the trainee are target monitored by an experienced medical adviser and the training cannot be considered as complete until the HCP has demonstrated that their work is acceptable. Whenever any problems are identified appropriate feedback is provided. Further cases are monitored until the work is shown to be satisfactory. If the situation is not rectified the HCP may be required to repeat the entire training process. Continued lack of progress will result in the HCP being offered no further training and no further work.

Approval: All HCPs must be approved by the chief medical adviser to the DWP and separate approval is required for each benefit area in which the HCP is involved. Approval is dependent on successful completion of all stages of their training process and ongoing demonstration that the work being carried out meets a satisfactory standard.

Written Guidelines: As part of the trainees training and ongoing support, HCPs are issued with guidelines pertaining to the benefit involved. These guidance notes provide specific technical advice about the benefit concerned, outline best practise and contain general advice about disability analysis and service to the people with disabilities.

Transport

A19: North Tyneside

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport if he will take steps to ensure that the proposed improvements to the junction of the A1058 and A19 are concluded in a way that makes appropriate provision for further future improvement works on the A19 to be carried out, with particular reference to traffic flow arrangements during any period of construction. (320807)

The proposed improvements by the Highways Agency to the roundabout where the A1058 slip road and the A19 meet are an interim scheme designed to relieve congestion at the roundabout in the short term until a major improvement scheme can be delivered. In the Highways Agency's contract for these works, there will be a requirement to maintain two lanes in both directions for traffic on the A19 during peak periods.

By increasing the available road space at the junction, this scheme should make it easier to manage traffic flow during the construction of further future improvements, such as the major improvement scheme for the Interchange.

During the development of the interim scheme, discussions have been held with the designer of the major improvement scheme to ensure that there is a minimum of abortive work, and that the two schemes are compatible. The precise traffic management requirements for the major improvement scheme will not be decided until a contractor is appointed, but it is envisaged that the scheme can be constructed without major disruption, with two lanes maintained in both directions for traffic on the A19 and A1058 Coast Road during peak periods.

Bus Services: Concessions

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport if he will estimate the cost to the Exchequer of mutual recognition of concessionary bus travel passes between England and Wales. (320936)

It is difficult to predict the cost of mutual recognition of concessionary travel bus passes across the devolved Administrations because the precise pattern of passholder travel is not knowable in advance. However, the Department for Transport has commissioned some research and this suggested that mutual recognition, excluding Northern Ireland, could cost in the region of £11 million per annum. This does not take into account the potentially significant costs of harmonisation of the different concessionary travel schemes which apply in England, Wales and Scotland.

Parking Offences

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what powers the Secretary of State has to (a) suspend and (b) revoke the civil parking enforcement powers exercised by a local authority; and what criteria he uses to determine whether it is appropriate to exercise such powers. (320958)

The Secretary of State has the power to revoke a Statutory Instrument that designates the whole or part of a local authority's area as a civil enforcement area for parking contraventions on the application of that authority. Each application would be considered on its merits. There is no power to suspend such an instrument.

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what steps he takes to assess the performance of local authorities in respect of civil parking enforcement. (320959)

We have no plans to carry out such assessments. Councillors are accountable to the electorate, rather than to the Government, for the performance of their local authority. The Government's longer term vision for local government involves councils reporting less to central Government and more to their local communities.

Children, Schools and Families

Class Sizes

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the average staff to pupil ratio is in secondary schools in (a) St. Albans constituency and (b) England. (320889)

The following table provides the pupil:adult ratios for local authority maintained secondary schools in St. Albans constituency and England, January 2009.

Within school pupil:adult ratio (PAR)1 in local authority maintained secondary schools2 Year: January 2009, Coverage: St. Albans constituency and England

Secondary

England

10.7

St. Albans

11.5

1 The within school PAR is calculated by dividing the total full-time equivalent (FTE) number of pupils on roll in schools by the total FTE number of all teachers and support staff employed in schools, excluding administrative and clerical staff.

2 Excludes city technology colleges and academies.

Source:

School Census

Solicitor-General

Departmental Paper

To ask the Solicitor-General what (a) suppliers and (b) brands of (i) paper and (ii) paper products the Law Officers' Departments use; and what the Law Officers' Department's policies are on the procurement of those materials. (320021)

The information requested is as follows:

Attorney-General's Office (AGO)

Where possible, the AGO uses recycled paper products. Where it is not recycled, it is sourced from ‘well-managed forests’. The hand towels, which are currently ‘virgin pulp' are being switched to a 100 per cent. recycled product once current supplies are exhausted

Brand

Supplier

Paper type

Size

Weight

Recycled content

Evolve

Eximedia

Copier paper

A4

80g/m

100 per cent.

Steinbeis

Banner

Copier paper

A3

80g/m2

100 per cent.

Xerox Symphony

Banner

Copier paper—green

A4

80/gm

Virgin

Letterheaded paper

Eximedia

Ministerial paper

A4

100g/m

Virgin

Viking

Viking

White Card

A4

160g/m2

Virgin

Luxury whisper

Mayflower

Toilet tissue

100 per cent.

Tork premium

Mayflower

Hand towels

Virgin

Katrin classic

Mayflower

Kitchen roll

100 per cent.

National Fraud Authority (NFA)

The NFA is committed to using suppliers that are contracted via the Office of Government Commerce Buying Solutions Framework to ensure value for money; procuring paper products that are sustainably sourced where possible. In 2008-09 all paper products used by NFA were sourced from sustainable forests and are 100 0 per cent. recyclable. Current brands used are as follows:

Type

Supplier

Brand

Specification

Copier paper

Lyreco UK Ltd.

Navigator Universal

A4 and A3 80gsm White

Printing paper

Lyreco UK Ltd.

Navigator Universal

A4 and A3 80gsm White

Banner Business Supplies

Xerox

A4 Symphony Tint 80gsm Green

No orders were placed for paper packaging, craft materials or hygiene products

between August 2008 and March 2009.

Serious Fraud Office

SFO policy on the procurement of paper and paper products is (wherever possible) to meet the “Buy Sustainable—Quick Wins” best practice specifications issued by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA). Suppliers used are ‘Talk paper’ and ‘KH packaging’. The brands are as follows:

Paper brand

Evolve Office

Evolve Office 2 Hole

Drilled

Data Copy Colour

Data Colour

Data Colour Every day

Crown Prosecution Service

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) has a national framework contract with Office Depot for the supply of general stationery items and photocopying paper. CPS Sustainable Procurement Policy mandates that relevant products are purchased in accordance with the Office of Government Commerce's list of quick wins.

The CPS does not keep central records of the brands of paper products purchased and to obtain these details would involve manually checking paper records throughout the organisation and would incur disproportionate cost.

According to records supplied by Office Depot brands of paper purchased during 2008-09 include Niceday, Epson, Evolve, Hewlett Packard, Xerox, Datacopy, Steinbeis and Conqueror.

The CPS is a devolved organisation and it is possible that additional paper products outside of the Office Depot contract have been purchased. To obtain details of these including the brands of items would incur disproportionate cost.

Prior to the merger of the two departments in 2009-10 Revenue and Customs Prosecutions' Office (RCPO) obtained all its paper supplies, other than the fine quality bond paper, from Premier Beswick Paper mills, who are a recommended supplier from OGC. All the paper provided by Premier Beswick is 100 per cent. recycled.

Treasury Solicitor's Department

The Treasury Solicitor's Department (TSol) utilises (a) Banner Office Supplies and Exi Serve Ltd. and (b) paper products as follows:

Size

Stationery items—supplier and brand both Banner Office Supplies

A-Z index books

A4/A5

Memo pads

A4/A5

Shorthand notebooks

A5

Plain pads

A5/A6

Post-it notes

Small/medium/large

Blue inserts/spines/corners

Photocopying paper (part recycled fibres)

A4

Photocopying paper (part recycled fibres)

A3

Envelopes—supplier and brand both Banner Office Supplies

A5 White Window

229x162

A5 Plain

229x162

A4 Window

A4 Plain

Plain

254x178

Plain

381x254

Window

110x220

Plain

110x220

Plain

406x305

Transit envelopes

Medium/large

Stationery products—supplier Exi Serve Ltd; Brand Q-Connect

Business storage boxes/archive boxes

Counsel note books

The Treasury Solicitor's Departments policy is to procure, where possible, all items of paper products from Banner Office Supplies under a framework agreement negotiated by HM Revenue and Customs and to ensure that items are procured in the most cost-efficient and environmentally manner possible.

HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate

HMCPSI have adopted sustainable procurement and are working with TSol towards adopting their e-procurement policy and framework. Wherever possible, HMCPSI are committed to meet the “Buy Sustainable—Quick Wins” best practice specifications issued by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA).

The following table shows the (a) suppliers (b) brands of (i) paper and (ii) paper products bought during the financial year 2008-09.

(a) Supplier

(b) Brands

(i) Paper

(ii) Paper products

Lyreco UK Ltd.

Evolve which is 100 per cent. recycled content

Copier/office paper

Paperback Ltd.

Croxley Heritage which is 80 per cent. recycled content

Letterhead

Paperback Ltd.

Evercolour which is 100 per cent. recycled content

Coloured paper

Xerox (MOJ) supplier

Usually Xerox own brand paper. No definite figure for recycled content but meets government standard

Report Printing

Pioneer Quality Services and their sub-contractors

No information supplied by contractor

Toilet paper and hand towels

Lyreco UK Ltd.

Impega and Tyrek—company brands. They are endorsed by the Forest Stewardship Council and are sourced from sustainable forests and are 100 per cent. recyclable

Envelopes

Hotels

To ask the Solicitor-General pursuant to the answer to hon. Member for Ruislip Northwood of 9 February 2010, Official Report, column 861W, on hotels, at which hotels graded five star or above bookings were made; for what (a) dates and (b) purposes the bookings were made; and whether the bookings were made on behalf of (i) Ministers and (ii) civil servants. (320911)

The following five star hotels were booked for civil servants carrying out official duties. SFO policy is that hotel expenditure should meet the SFO hotel booking policy which compares favourably with wider Government service policies. Hotels with five star ratings have only been selected in exceptional circumstances where other lower ratings were not available or suitable. The geographical location of the hotels has not been specified because all the bookings related to investigations conducted by the Serious Fraud Office into possible criminal activity.

Hotel name

Arrival

Hilton

25 May 2009

Hilton

25 May 2009

Inter-Continental hotel

26 Aug 2009

Radisson

20 May 2009

Radisson

15 Sep 2009

Radisson

02 Mar 2009

Radisson

02 Mar 2009

Radisson

03 Aug 2009

Radisson

22 Apr 2009

Radisson

22 Apr 2009

Radisson

22 Apr 2009

Other unnamed hotel

05 Jul 2009

Royal Family

To ask the Solicitor-General which members of the Royal Family are entitled to the assistance of the Attorney-General in her capacity as legal adviser. (319371)

The only member of the Royal Family whom the Attorney-General, as Her Majesty's Attorney-General, is on occasion called upon to advise is the Queen.

Royal Family: Wills

To ask the Solicitor-General (1) who initiated the discussions between the Palace, Farrers, the Attorney-General's Secretariat, the Attorney-General, a Senior District Judge, and President of the Family Division on the practice of the sealing of royal wills, leading to the creation of a document considering the practices for the closure of royal wills which was created in discussions before and after the death of the late Her Royal Highness the Princess Margaret Countess of Snowdon, but prior to the issue of any proceedings; (319368)

(2) if she will publish the record of the discussions between the Palace, Farrers, the Attorney-General's Secretariat, the Attorney-General, a Senior District Judge, and President of the Family Division on the practice of sealing of royal wills before and after the death of the late Her Royal Highness the Princess Margaret Countess of Snowdon, but prior to the issue of any proceedings to the sealing of royal wills.

There have from time to time for many years been discussions between interested parties about the practice of the sealing of royal wills. It is not usual practice to comment on discussions undertaken in confidence with the Royal Household or their legal representatives.

To ask the Solicitor-General whether the Attorney-General attended a court hearing to determine whether the will of (a) Her Majesty the Queen Mother and (b) Her Royal Highness the Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon should be sealed. (319370)

The Attorney-General did attend court hearings to determine whether the wills of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother and Her Royal Highness the Princess Margaret should be sealed.

Health

Departmental Pay

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much was paid in reimbursable expenses to special advisers in his Department in each of the last five years. (320477)

The Department paid the following amounts, as reimbursable expenses, over the past five financial years:

£

2009-10 (to date)

476.69

2008-09

738.62

2007-08

1,156.28

2006-07

501.49

2005-06

1,081.34

Grimsby

To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will set out, with statistical information related as directly as possible to Great Grimsby constituency, the effects of his Department's policies on that constituency since 1997. (320181)

The Government have put in place a programme of national health service investment and reform since 1997 to improve service delivery in all parts of the United Kingdom. 93 per cent. of people nationally now rate the NHS as good or excellent. The NHS Constitution contains 25 rights and 14 pledges for patients and the public including new rights to be treated within 18 weeks, or be seen by a cancer specialist within two weeks and an NHS health check every five years for those aged 40 to 74 years.

There is significant evidence that these policies have yielded considerable benefits for the Great Grimsby constituency. For example:

Figures for December 2009 show that in the North East Lincolnshire Care Trust Plus:

99 per cent. of patients whose treatment involved admission to hospital started their treatment within 18 weeks.

99 per cent. of patients whose treatment did not involve admission to hospital started their treatment within 18 weeks.

In December 2009, at the Northern Lincolnshire and Goole Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, 98.5 per cent. of patients spent less than four hours in accident and emergency from arrival to admission, transfer or discharge.

Between September 2002 and September 2008, the number of consultants at the Northern Lincolnshire and Goole Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust has increased from 120 to 141. Between September 2002 and September 2008 the estimated number of nurses has increased from 1,646 to 1,826.

Between September 2001 and September 2008 the number of general practitioners (GPs) per 100,000 within the North East Lincolnshire Care Trust Plus has increased from 55.9 to 62.6.

96.3 per cent. of urgent GP referrals to the Northern Lincolnshire and Goole Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust with suspected cancer are seen by a specialist within two weeks of the referral (as at December 2009).

In July 2009, a new GP-led health centre opened in Grimsby town centre. The health centre is open from 8 am until 8 pm, seven days a week, 365 days a year, and offers bookable appointments and walk-in services for any member of the public.

There is one publicly funded scheme in the area that serves this constituency: a £12 million women and children's unit at the Diana Princess of Wales Hospital, which opened in February 2004.

Although statistical information is not available at a local level, Great Grimsby will have also benefitted from national policies in other areas. For example:

Since 1997, gross current expenditure on personal social services has increased by around 70 per cent. in real terms with around 105,000 households now receiving intensive home care and 3,076 new extra care housing units—exceeding the original target of 1,500 new extra care units.

Other strategies currently being implemented are:

Subject to parliamentary approval, the Personal Care at Home Bill will guarantee free personal care for 280,000 people with the highest needs and help around 130,000 people who need home care for the first time to regain their independence.

‘Shaping the Future of Care Together’ Green Paper, published in July 2009, sets out a vision of a National Care Service for all adults in England which is fair, simple and affordable. The Department has consulted widely on this reform and is currently analysing the responses, which will feed into a White Paper later this year.

The National Carer's Strategy (‘Carers at the heart of 21st century families and Communities’), launched in 2008.

The first National Dementia Strategy was published in February 2009.

‘Valuing People Now’, a three year strategy for people with learning disabilities published in January 2009.

‘New Horizons: A Shared Vision for Mental Health’, launched in December 2009, to maintain improvements in mental health services combined with a new cross-Government approach to promoting public mental health.

Since 1998, there are now 2.4 million fewer smokers in England as a result of the Government's comprehensive tobacco control strategy which has a measurable impact on reducing smoking prevalence.

Child obesity levels are reducing due to the efforts of families across England, supported by the Government's obesity strategy. In 2008, 13.9 per cent. of children (aged two to 10) in England were classified as obese, compared with 17.3 per cent. in 2005.

Overall, life expectancy at birth for men has increased from 74.5 years (1995-97 data) to 77.7 years (2006-08 data) while for women, life expectancy at birth has increased from 79.6 years (1995-97 data) to 81.9 years (2006-08 data).

Health Services: Isle of Man

To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether Flybe has been consulted on the implications for carriers of the discontinuance of the reciprocal health agreement between the UK and the Isle of Man; and if he will make a statement. (318456)

The Department took the decision to end the reciprocal healthcare agreement between the United Kingdom and the Isle of Man, as it no longer represents value for money to the UK taxpayer. Neither Flybe, nor other carriers, were consulted as part of that process. However, the Department will be targeting the tourist industry as part of a campaign to raise awareness that the agreement with the Isle of Man will be ending.

Illegal Immigrants

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many staff his Department and its agencies have appointed who were later discovered to be illegal immigrants since 2005. (320445)

No illegal immigrants have been found to be working within the Department or its agencies in the last five years.

Mobile Phones: Children

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps his Department has taken to increase awareness of its advice on the use of mobile telephones by children and young people under the age of 16; and if he will make a statement. (320171)

The Department's leaflet, “mobile phones and health”, including advice concerning children’s use of mobile phones, is available on the Department’s website at:

www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/DH_4123979

The Department keeps this leaflet under review to ensure the presentation is fresh and effective. A copy has already been placed in the Library.

Advice on using mobile phones is also available on the NHS Choices website at:

www.nhs.uk/conditions/mobile-phone-safety/pages/risks.aspx

The Health Protection Agency's Radiation Protection Division advises the Government on science matters concerning electromagnetic fields and has recently reviewed its website advice on mobile phones at:

www.hpa.org.uk/webw/HPAweb&HPAwebStandard/HPAweb_C/1195733769169

NHS: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what contacts the NHS has had with the National Bullying Helpline; and whether the NHS has made any payments to (a) the National Bullying Helpline and (b) HR and Diversity Management Limited since 2004. (320132)

This information is not held centrally. Any data on payments to the above bodies would be held at local trust level. One of the measurement criteria in the NHS staff survey is

“Percentage of staff experiencing bullying & harassment from staff (manager, team leader or other colleague) in the previous 12 months”.

The next staff survey results are due on 17 March 2010.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Flood Control

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many dams, reservoirs and lakes in England have a system of releasing water to provide storage for excess rain; and if he will make a statement. (320166)

The Environment Agency keeps a public register of the 2,102 (1,899 in England) large raised reservoirs which are capable of holding 25,000m3 or more of water above natural ground level. The Environment Agency is the enforcement authority for the Reservoirs Act 1975 in England and Wales.

The register does not contain details of the systems for releasing water from the reservoirs. However, most reservoirs do have such systems for operation and maintenance purposes.

The Environment Agency is the operator for 182 flood storage reservoirs in England. The purpose of these reservoirs is to provide storage for excess rain.

Horses: Anaemia

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many cases of equine infectious anaemia were reported in the UK in each of the last five years. (320968)

There have been two cases of equine infectious anaemia reported in the UK in the last five years. The first was in Northern Ireland in September 2006, the second was in England in January 2010.

Livestock: Exports

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many (a) unweaned calves, (b) cattle, (c) sheep and (d) other livestock species were exported for (i) further fattening and (ii) slaughter in 2009. (319974)

Statistics on numbers of animals consigned for export from Great Britain are not routinely collated (although numbers of export consignments are). Nor are statistics collated on whether consignments are for breeding, further fattening or slaughter, or numbers of weaned or unweaned calves.

Information for trade within the European Union is currently being sought through the European Commission. However, the system used to access this has been unavailable since 22 February although the Commission has been contacted and is expected to provide this information shortly. The information for non-EU trade can be gathered by scrutinising the export certificates for each of the 49 consignments in 2009, though this could not be achieved within the timescale required for this response but will be supplied subsequently.

Northern Ireland

Departmental Languages

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many (a) Ministers and (b) civil servants in his Department received coaching in a foreign language in the last 12 months; what expenditure his Department incurred in providing such coaching; and in what languages such coaching was provided. (320541)

The Northern Ireland Office (NIO) has not provided or funded, coaching in a foreign language to Ministers or civil servants in the last 12 months.

Departmental Paper

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what (a) suppliers and (b) brands of (i) paper and (ii) paper products his Department uses; and what his Department's policy is on the procurement of those materials. (320027)

The majority of divisions within the Northern Ireland Office (NIO) use a central contract to procure copying paper. Suppliers on this contract are Antalis; Banner; Office Depot and Supplies Team.

Brand details of copying paper procured through this contract are:

Everyday Business recycled paper A4 80 gsm white;

Evolve Business recycled paper A4 80 gsm white;

Xerox recycled paper A4 80 gsm (various colours);

Banner minute sheets A4 and A5 sizes 70 gsm;

Steinbeis recycled paper A4 80 gsm white.

Separate arrangements are in place for our London Office, who source copying paper via locally based suppliers. The local supplier used is Xerox. The brand of paper procured is Xerox Supreme recycled paper A4 80 gsm white.

All brands of copying paper procured by the Department are 100 per cent. recycled.

There are local arrangements in place in each NIO location with landlords providing paper based products such as kitchen and toilet rolls. There is no central list of the suppliers or brand names of these products.

Departmental policy is to procure recycled copying paper and paper products in line with the Quick Wins targets set by the Government.

Illegal Immigrants

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many staff his Department and its agencies have appointed who were later discovered to be illegal immigrants since 2005. (320448)

The Northern Ireland Office (NIO) has not appointed any staff since 2005 who were later discovered to be illegal immigrants.

Business, Innovation and Skills

UK Innovation Investment Fund

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills when he expects the first funding to be disbursed from the UK innovation investment fund. (320208)

The UK Innovation Investment Fund brings together public and private sector finance to back the best of British Innovation. The fund has appointed two managers, Hermes Private Equity and the European Investment Fund. There is a total pool of capital of £325 million. £200 million will be invested through the EIF's UK Future Technologies Fund in areas such as ICT, life sciences and advanced manufacturing. £125 million through the Hermes Environmental Innovation Fund will specialise in cleantech and low carbon. We expect these two funds to begin investing over the next few months.

Science and Knowledge Transfer

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment he has made of the effects on the economy of his Department's policies on science and knowledge transfer. (320211)

Independent studies have shown that excellent research improves the performance of existing business, creates new business, delivers highly skilled people to the labour market and attracts research and development investment from global business.

UKTI used the strength of the research base to attract 450 R and D investments to the UK between 2007-08 and 2008-09.

Business Funding

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills how many businesses have received funding directly from his Department since 2008. (320214)

During the economic downturn, the Government have supported thousands of businesses of all sizes by way of a number of programmes through a combination of grants, guarantees, investments and loans. Through the Enterprise Finance Guarantee, over 8,000 businesses have been offered loans totalling over £850 million. Through the Regional Transition Loan Fund, over £40 million of loans have been agreed. And 160,000 businesses have been able to spread £5 billion in business taxes through allowing businesses more time to pay their tax bill.

Statutory Redundancy Pay

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will take steps to equalise eligibility for statutory redundancy pay for those aged under 22 and 22 or older. (320215)

The Government believe that the age bands in the statutory redundancy scheme are objectively justified. The lower band is designed to encourage employers to recruit and retain younger workers.

Aerospace Industry: Skills

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills what recent assessment he has made of the skills requirement of the aerospace industry. (320216)

We are working closely with aerospace businesses to understand their requirements, and with organisations like the Sector Skills Council for Science Engineering and Manufacturing Technologies and the Aerospace Defence Security Industries trade association, who are helping businesses plan their individual skills needs through a Strategic Workforce Planning tool. Building on this, the Aerospace Defence Security Industries trade association is developing a Roadmap to provide a clearer signal of the sector’s skills needs.

Biotechnology and Biological Science Research Council

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills what projects will be funded as part of the Biotechnology and Biological Science Research Council initiatives on animal disease. (319841)

[holding answer 3 March 2010]: BBSRC has recently announced 16 projects that will be funded through the 'Combating infectious diseases of livestock for international development' initiative. BBSRC is also currently funding projects through other initiatives on endemic diseases, avian influenza, blue tongue virus and swine flu. Details are on the web at

http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/web/FILES/Publications/100215-cidlid-brochure.pdf

BBSRC is also involved in an initiative led by DEFRA on Emerging and major infectious diseases of livestock. The projects to be supported under this initiative have yet to be assessed.

In addition to these initiatives BBSRC has also supported research projects on animal disease through core funding to the Institute for Animal Health (IAH), which in 2008-09 totalled £9.5 million with a further £19.6 million of capital funding related to research on animal disease in 2008-09.

In 2008-09, BBSRC total spend on animal disease research was around £31 million.

Copyright

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps his Department is taking to protect copyright privileges. (320580)

[holding answer 4 March 2010]: Copyright is a private property right. In the vast majority of cases of copyright infringement, the law provides this is a civil wrong. As such it is not for Government to intervene in the enforcement of a private right. The Government are however aware of the need to ensure that the copyright framework is fit for purpose, such that copyright owners are able to take action to enforce their own rights if appropriate. Our proposals in the Digital Economy Bill will improve the options available to copyright owners in the case of online infringement of their rights. Our strategy published last October, ‘Copyright—the way ahead: A Strategy for Copyright in the Digital Age’, takes a broader view at changes that may be necessary to keep pace with developments. It can be found at:

http://www.ipo.gov.uk/c-strategy-digitalage.pdf

The Government also believe there must be an appropriate and proportionate legal framework in place to tackle criminal infringement of copyright. As part of this framework, the Digital Economy Bill will introduce increased financial penalties for online and physical copyright infringement.

Graduates: Government Assistance

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills how many people have attended each Make it Happen (a) day and (b) roadshow event. (319915)

The total number of people who attended a Flying Start - Make it Happen day between 27 October and 10 December is 1,066. Since January 2010 the Make it Happen day events have been combined with the self-employment and business start-up programmes, and between 19 January 2010 and 25 February 2010, 544 people have attended such combined events.

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills how many students from each higher education institution have registered with the Flying Start—Make it Happen campaign. (319916)

The Make it Happen programme is aimed primarily at unemployed graduates; however, students—especially final year students—are not discouraged from attending a Make it Happen event.

The following table shows the numbers of graduates and students to have registered with Make it Happen since its launch in September 2009, broken down by University, and whether a student or graduate, where this is known.

University

Number of graduates

Number of students

Aberystwyth, University of Wales

9

3

Anglia Ruskin University

5

1

Architectural Association School of Architecture

1

Aston University

34

10

Bangor, University of Wales

7

3

Bath Spa University

12

3

Bedfordshire (University of Luton), University of Bedfordshire

20

2

Bell College

1

Birkbeck, University of London

8

2

Birmingham City University

32

8

Bournemouth University

94

16

Brunei University

37

15

Buckinghamshire (Bucks) New University

11

2

Business Link

6

Business Support Organisation

1

1

Canterbury Christ Church University

7

39

Cardiff University

18

Central School of Speech and Drama, University of London

1

City University, London

18

13

College of St. Mark and St. John

1

1

Coventry University

32

37

Cranfield University

8

3

Dartington College of Arts

2

2

De Montfort University (Leicester)

22

1

Edge Hill University

7

1

Edinburgh College of Art

2

Falmouth, University College

12

12

Glasgow Caledonian University

2

Glasgow School of Art

1

Goldsmiths College, University of London

19

3

Grimsby Institute of Higher and Further Education

2

Harper Adams University College—Shropshire

2

1

Henley Management College

1

1

Heriot Watt University

4

Imperial College London

23

13

Keele University

5

Kent Institute of Art and Design

2

King's College, University of London

26

16

Kingston University

59

86

Lampeter, University of Wales

3

Lancaster University

26

9

Leeds Metropolitan University

66

37

Liverpool Hope University

13

22

Liverpool John Moores University

45

3

London Business School, University of London

3

1

London Metropolitan University

67

18

London School of Economics and Political Science

10

9

London South Bank University

27

8

Loughborough University

26

2

Manchester Metropolitan University

99

24

Middlesex University

37

12

Newman College of Higher Education

1

Napier University

1

Newcastle University

14

Newport, University of Wales

8

North East Wales Institute

2

Norwich School of Art and Design

1

Nottingham Trent University

23

4

Open University London

31

11

Other HE/FE Institution

49

15

Overseas University

20

Oxford Brookes University

36

90

Queen Margaret University College

1

1

Queen Mary, University of London

35

6

Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication

1

Robert Gordon University

7

1

Roehampton University

15

5

Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester

1

Royal College of Art

1

Royal Holloway, University of London

4

7

Royal Veterinary College, University of London

2

Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama

1

School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London

6

2

School of Pharmacy, University of London

1

Sheffield Hallam University

69

52

Southampton Solent University

15

5

St. George's, University of London

1

3

Staffordshire University

18

Surrey Institute of Art and Design, University College

7

1

Swansea Institute of Higher Education

3

Swansea University

6

Thames Valley University

28

5

The Arts Institute at Bournemouth

6

3

The Open University

4

4

Trinity and All Saints College (Leeds)

5

University College Birmingham

4

2

University College for the Creative Arts

27

6

University College London, University of London

43

15

University of Aberdeen

2

1

University of Bath

13

1

University of Birmingham

36

12

University of Bolton

64

22

University of Bradford

31

5

University of Brighton

34

42

University of Bristol

11

9

University of Buckingham

1

University of Central England

1

University of Cambridge

17

University of Central Lancashire

35

7

University of Chester

5

1

University of Chichester

5

University of Cumbria

9

University of Derby

19

28

University of Durham

16

University of East Anglia

4

University of East London

29

7

University of Edinburgh

4

University of Essex

12

2

University of Exeter

14

6

University of Exeter (Cornwall)

1

University of Glamorgan

10

2

University of Glasgow

7

University of Gloucestershire

6

7

University of Greenwich

62

17

University of Hertfordshire

40

52

University of Huddersfield

24

4

University of Hull

46

4

University of Kent

35

14

University of Leeds

60

38

University of Leicester

15

4

University of Lincoln

80

36

University of Liverpool

37

20

University of London

10

3

University of Manchester

69

58

University of Northampton

9

University of Northumbria at Newcastle

8

2

University of Nottingham

31

17

University of Oxford

21

3

University of Plymouth

36

18

University of Portsmouth

40

18

University of Reading

17

16

University of Salford

44

18

University of Sheffield

42

12

University of Southampton

12

4

University of St. Andrews

3

1

University of Stirling

1

University of Strathclyde

3

1

University of Sunderland

7

University of Surrey—Guildford

12

71

University of Sussex

13

8

University of Teesside

4

2

University of the Arts—Chelsea College of Arts and Design

1

University of the Arts—Camberwell College of the Arts

4

University of the Arts—Central St. Martins

10

University of the Arts—London College of Fashion

6

University of the Arts—London School of Communications

12

5

University of the Arts London

10

2

University of the Arts of London

1

1

University of the West of England

60

9

University of Ulster

1

University of Wales Institute, Cardiff

12

2

University of Warwick

22

8

University of Westminster

34

20

University of Wolverhampton

49

37

University of York

26

25

Worcester, University College

3

2

York St. John University

11

1

Registrations where home university and graduate or student status is unknown

2,539

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills how many unique visitors there were to the FlyingStart—Make it Happen website in each month since it was launched. (319917)

The total number of unique visitors to the Flying Start—Make it Happen website since it was launched on 24 September 2009 is 23,863. The figures by month are:

Number

2009

September

3,376

October

7,551

November

6,481

December

2,212

2010

January

2,912

February

1,330

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills how much has been spent on (a) roadshow Make it Happen events, (b) creating and maintaining the Make it Happen website and (c) other activities involved in the FlyingStart - Make it Happen campaign. (319918)

The total spend to date on the Flying Start—Make it Happen programme is £350,000. This is broken down as follows:

£68,000 for the Make it Happen days and programmes;

£69,000 for the creation and maintenance of the Make it Happen Website; and

£213,000 for other activities.

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills how many people have began a Make it Happen self-employment and business start-up programme. (319920)

1,570 people have begun a Flying Start—Make it Happen self-employment/business start-up programme.

Innovation: Finance

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills what programmes and initiatives received funding from the other innovation programmes budget referred to in Table 11 of his Department's Departmental Report for 2009; and how much such funding was allocated to each such programme and initiative in the latest year for which figures are available. (318920)

[holding answer 3 March 2010]: The following received funding in 2008/09 from the “other innovation programmes” budget, referred to in Table 11 of the 2009 Departmental Report:

£ million

Expenditure on National Measurement System Programmes

62

Depreciation and capital costs associated with the National Weights and Measurements laboratory site

12

Capital Expenditure on National Weights and Measurements laboratory site

12

British Standards Institute and UK Accreditation Service programmes

6

DIUS/Technology Strategy Board collaborative activities

3

Dividend received from Intellectual Property Office

-7

Intellectual Property Office cost of capital

3

Total

91

Music

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps his Department is taking to assist the music industry, with particular reference to intellectual property rights relating to that industry. (320604)

This Department conducted a review of copyright last year. The resulting strategy: ‘Copyright—the way ahead: A Strategy for Copyright in the Digital Age’ was published in October 2009. It can be found at:

http://www.ipo.gov.uk/c-strategy-digitalage.pdf

This covered copyright issues relating to a range of creative industries, including the music industry, and made a number of commitments which we are working to deliver. These include measures in the Digital Economy Bill to combat online infringement of copyright.

The music industry is of course an integral part of the creative economy, for which the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) has responsibility. DCMS works closely with the music industry on a wide range of issues and, among other things, is setting up a number of community music rehearsal spaces around England in order to encourage and develop grass-roots talent. ‘Creative Britain—New Talents for the New Economy’, published in February 2008, and ‘Digital Britain’, published in June 2009, set the strategic direction for the Government's work to support the creative and digital sectors respectively and a programme of work in these areas is ongoing.

Photographs: Copyright

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills what recent representations he has received on mandatory attribution of photographs to the photographer. (320581)

[holding answer 4 March 2010]: I have recently received a number of representations from photographers about Clause 42 of the Digital Economy Bill which covers the treatment of Orphan Works and Extended Licensing. Some of these have also referred to the question of attribution.

UK law provides certain “moral rights”, including that photographers and creators of other works may assert their right to be identified as the author when their work is used for certain purposes. There are, however, a number of exceptions including where a work is intended for use in a newspaper, magazine or similar periodical. I am aware that some photographers would like to see the law changed to require attribution in all cases.

As my Noble Friend the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Postal Affairs and Employment Relations explained in the debates on the Digital Economy Bill, the Government have noted the concerns of creators (including photographers) and will be keeping the issue under review. The Strategic Advisory Board for Intellectual Property is already looking at the broader issue of moral rights.

Royal Mail

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills what plans he has for the future of Royal Mail sorting centres. (320740)

I have asked Adam Crozier, chief executive of Royal Mail, to respond directly to the hon. Member as Royal Mail management has responsibility for the company's operations. A copy of his reply will be placed in the Libraries of the House.

Mail volumes continue to decline, by 8 per cent. in the first half of the financial year (April to Sept 2009), due to increased use of digital methods of communication. It is vitally important that Royal Mail can structure its operations as efficiently as possible so that it can compete in a competitive communications market while continuing to maintain the universal postal service at affordable prices. Royal Mail and the CWU are currently discussing a wide ranging agreement covering modernisation of the postal network.

Students: Loans

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills how many borrowers had a Student Loan Company debt cancelled or written off in each of the last five years; and in how many such cases action was taken because of (a) bankruptcy and (b) completion of an individual voluntary arrangement. (319902)

The available information is shown in the table. Figures reflect the year in which the processing of the write-off took place and not necessarily the year in which the circumstances surrounding the write-off occurred.

Student loan borrowers with accounts cancelled or written-off1 England

Financial year

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-094

Cancelled or written-off2

800

1,600

3,300

4,600

6,300

of which:

because of bankruptcy3

500

900

on completion of IVA3

100

100

— = nil or negligible

1 The table shows the financial year in which the cancellation or write-off action was processed. The total includes both Mortgage Style and Income Contingent Repayment (ICR) borrowers.

2 The functionality for processing cancellation of IC loans due to death and disability was put in place in 2008-09. Some write-offs due to death or disability were processed manually in earlier years, but a number of such write-offs dating back to previous years were processed in 2008-09 and are included in this figure.

3 The functionality for processing write-offs due to bankruptcy and on completion of an IVA was put in place in 2007-08. Some write-offs due to bankruptcy or IVAs were processed manually in earlier years, but a number of such write-offs dating back to previous financial years were processed in 2007-08 and 2008-09 and are included in figures for those years.

4 Provisional

Source:

Student Loans Company

The number of student loan borrowers has increased each year since loans were introduced in 1990, and it is therefore expected that the number of loans cancelled or written-off will increase annually.

Student loans have been exempt from bankruptcy arrangements since 2004, therefore the figures provided for write-offs due to bankruptcy in 2007-08 and 2008-09 all relate to bankruptcy in earlier years. The Apprenticeships, Skills, Children and Learning Act 2009 contains the provision to exclude student loans from Individual Voluntary Arrangements (IVAs).

Technology Strategy Board

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills what (a) projects and (b) companies have received funding from the Technology Strategy Board in each month since its creation; and how much funding was provided for each. (307911)

Since it was established in July 2007 the Technology Strategy Board has provided grant funding to companies and collaborative R and D projects, and to knowledge transfer partnership projects.

A copy of the tables will be placed in the Libraries of the House.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Afghanistan: Politics and Government

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what definition of corruption his Department uses in respect of Afghanistan; and what steps he is taking to ensure that officials of his Department based in that country are trained to recognise and report any such corruption. (319019)

I have been asked to reply.

Both the UK and Afghan Governments are party to the United Nations Convention Against Corruption (UNCAC) which defines corruption as;

(a) the promise, offering or giving to a public official, directly or indirectly, of an undue advantage, for the official himself or herself or another person or entity, in order that the official act or refrain from acting in the exercise of his or her official duties;

(b) the solicitation or acceptance by a public official, directly or indirectly, of an undue advantage, for the official himself or herself or another person or entity, in order that the official act or refrain from acting in the exercise of his or her official duties.

HMG officials based in Kabul and Lashkar Gah include Governance and Rule of Law advisers, who are able to identify and advise on how to tackle corruption. The UK government also provides annual guidance to all embassies and overseas offices on reporting suspected corruption.

Arms Control

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what progress has been made on negotiations on the content of the proposed UN Arms Trade Treaty; when he expects negotiations to be completed and a text to be laid before the House; what discussions his Department has had with Shorts Bombardier on the effects of such a treaty on (a) that company and (b) the defence industry; and what steps will be taken to consult representations of the defence industry if a draft Treaty is agreed by the UN. (320941)

We have made very good progress in securing overwhelming global support to start formal negotiations on an Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) in the UN in July this year. These negotiations will continue through 2011 and culminate in a UN Conference in 2012. We would hope to lay a text before the House following this.

We maintain a regular dialogue with a large number of states in support of the UN ATT process, and with a wide range of UK stakeholders. We have not had discussions with Shorts Bombardier, but we are pleased to be working closely with the UK defence industry trade associations to ensure there is no unintended impact on the legitimate trade in arms.

British Indian Ocean Territory: Environment Protection

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs pursuant to the answer of 22 February 2010, Official Report, column 211W, on the British Indian Ocean Territory: environment protection, what proposals were made by each of the bodies represented at the meeting on (a) 14 January and (b) 21 July 2009; what response the Government made to each of those proposals; and what his policy is on relations between the UK and Mauritius. (320128)

During the 14 January meeting the delegations discussed the latest legal and policy developments relating to the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT)/Chagos Archipelago. Both delegations set out their respective positions on sovereignty and the UK also set out how the UK needed to bear in mind its treaty obligations with the US and our ongoing need of the British Indian Ocean Territory for defence purposes. There was mutual discussion of fishing rights, environmental concerns, the continental shelf and future visits to the Territory by Chagossians.

During the 21 July meeting both delegations reiterated their respective positions on sovereignty and resettlement as expressed at the first round of talks held in London on 14 January. The delegations agreed on the desirability of a co-ordinated submission to the UN Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf for an extended continental shelf in the Chagos Archipelago/BIOT region. A joint technical team would be set up with officials from both sides to look into the possibilities of a co-ordinated response. The UK delegation proposed that consideration be given to the possible creation of a Marine Protected Area (MPA), which the Mauritians agreed in principle. The UK delegation agreed to examine the Mauritian proposal to set up a mechanism to look into the joint issuing of fishing licences for BIOT waters, and stated that such examination would also include consideration of the implications of the proposed MPA.

UK relations with Mauritius are broad and deep, with regular contacts at all levels. The UK is Mauritius’ largest trade partner and second largest tourism market. The UK and Mauritius have many shared international priorities and, subject to regional voting constraints, the UK and Mauritian Governments frequently take the same positions in international fora. Within regional blocs, such as the African Union (AU) and Southern African Development Community (SADC), Mauritius is often a voice supporting UK aims. The Government also supports, through the EU, structural adjustment of the Mauritian economy to cope with the loss of sugar preferences. The UK will continue to develop this relationship—later in the year, we will be marking the 200th Anniversary of UK involvement in Mauritius. More immediately, the Privy Council will hold their second sitting in Mauritius this April.

Members: Correspondence

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs when he plans to reply to the letter of 3 February 2010 from the hon. Member for Walsall North on a constituent. (320742)

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office transferred the hon. Member for Walsall North’s letter of 3 February to the Department for International Development (DfID) for reply. I understand that DfID replied on 3 March.

Middle East: Armed Conflict

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a specific assessment of the extent of damage caused by Israeli armed forces to projects in Gaza which have been (a) constructed and (b) financed with UK assistance since the Oslo Peace Accords. (320972)

The UK Government have no plans to make such an assessment. Given current circumstances in Gaza, it would not be possible to gather the necessary data.

Nuclear Weapons: Proliferation

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs pursuant to the answer of 23 February 2010, Official Report, column 419, on nuclear weapons, what resources have been spent on solutions to (a) technical, (b) political and (c) institutional challenges to prevent (i) vertical and (ii) horizontal proliferation in each year since 1997; and what resources have been committed since to promoting abroad (A) the expansion of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and (B) nuclear disarmament since July 2009. (320535)

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office has undertaken extensive activity across these eight areas in collaboration with its global network of posts and other Government Departments, principally the Ministry of Defence, the Department of Energy and Climate Change (previously the Department of Trade and Industry and the Department of Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform) and the Agencies. The information requested is not immediately available and compilation could be attempted only at disproportionate cost.

Rwanda: Politics and Government

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what reports he has received on (a) attacks on Rwandan presidential candidate Victoire Umuhoza, (b) progress made toward the registration of opposition parties and (c) the extent of political freedom in Rwanda in the run-up to the 2010 presidential election; and if he will make a statement. (319692)

[holding answer 1 March 2010]: Our high commission in Kigali is in regular contact with the full spectrum of political opinion in Rwanda, including Mme Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza. We are aware of reports stating that Mme Ingabire was involved in an altercation on 3 February when she attended a registration office in Kigali to obtain her identity card. The circumstances are disputed, but Mme Ingabire was not herself harmed, although her driver was attacked by unknown assailants.

We are aware of reports of opposition parties facing difficulties registering prior to the elections. In this context, we meet regularly with political parties, including Government and opposition parties. We continue to engage with the Government of Rwanda, both with Ministers and with the National Election Commission, on the issues of registration and functioning of political parties, as well as the wider matter of extending political space in Rwanda, particularly with regard to the elections in August this year.

We continue to support political and media freedom in Rwanda and we engage regularly, both bilaterally and with our EU partners, to ensure that the Rwandan Government respects these issues.

Justice

Departmental Paper

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what (a) suppliers and (b) brands of (i) paper and (ii) paper products his Department uses; and what his Department's policy is on the procurement of those materials. (320037)

The Ministry of Justice currently use Banner Business Supplies Limited for all office paper and paper products that fall under the office stationery category. During 2008/09 Banner was the sole provider for all the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) paper based products and Office Depot were the main provider for all Wider Ministry of Justice paper based products.

The wider Ministry of Justice did not collate this information centrally before 2009. However, a new procurement system has been established that will enable more data to be captured and maintained. Implementation is due to complete shortly with information being available in the second quarter of 2010.

The following table shows the brands, size, weight, recycled content and volume purchased for paper only and refer solely to NOMS. The Information requested for paper products are not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Brand of Paper

Product

Size

Weight

Recycled content (percentage)

Volume purchased (reams) 2008-09

Supplier Own Brand

Paper

A3

80gsm

1

10

Supplier Own Brand

Paper

A4

80gsm

1

9,190

EP4

Paper

A3

80gsm

80

7,400

EP4

Paper

A4

80gsm

80

551,045

Evolve

Paper

A4

80gsm

100

812

Evolve

Paper

A4

100gsm

100

Steinbeis

Paper

A4

80gsm

100

540

Conqueror

Paper

A4

100gsm

n/a

Duplicating

Coloured Paper

A4

80gsm

n/a

3,198

Index Card

Index Card

A4

150gsm

n/a

134

Proprietary

Coloured Card

A4

200mu

1

127

Xerox

Paper

A3

100gsm

1

Xerox

Paper

A3

160gsm

1

15

Xerox

Coloured Card

A4

120gsm

1

165

Xerox

Paper

A4

160gsm

1

2,205

Xerox

Coloured Card

A4

160gsm

1

1,620

Xerox

Paper

A4

80gsm

1

245

Xerox

Coloured Paper

A4

80gsm

1

11,303

Xerox

Paper

A5

80gsm

1

1,280

1 Farmed from sustainable sources.

Prison industries provide a printing solution for the MoJ which also provides constructive employment for inmates. The information requested for recycled content is not held centrally and could be provided only as disproportionate cost.

Brand of paper

Product

Item description

Size (A3/a4)

Recycled content (percentage)

Quantity

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A3 80 gsm Yellow (500 Sheets per Ream - 5 Reams per box)

A3

35

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper White SRA3 120 gsm Colotech+ Silk (250 Sheets per Pack - 6 Packs per box)

SRA3

128

Xerox

Paper

100g Colotech Mattor Silk SRA3 Paper 6 packs of 500 sheets = 3,000 sheets required

SRA3

6

Xerox

Paper

100gColotech Matt or Silk SRA3 Paper 2 packs of 500 sheets = 1,000 sheets required.

SRA3

2

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 80 gsm Dark Red (Box of 2500 Sheets)

A4

45

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 80 gsm Lilac (Box of 2,500 Sheets)

A4

7

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 80 gsm Pink (Box of 2,500 Sheets)

A4

18

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 80 gsm Yellow (Box of 2,500 Sheets)

A4

71

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 80 gsm Salmon (Box of 2,500 Sheets)

A4

5

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 80 gsm Orange (500 Sheets per Ream - 5 Reams per box)

A4

121

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 160 gsm Blue (Box of 1,250 Sheets)

A4

15

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 160 gsm Pink (Box of 1,250 Sheets)

A4

3

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper White A3 80 gsm Recycled+ (500 Sheets per Ream - 5 Reams per box)

A3

80

546

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper White A4 80 gsm Recycled+ (500 Sheets per Ream - 5 Reams per box)

A4

80

5,290

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper White A4 80 gsm Recycled+ (Box of 2,500 Sheets)

A4

80

1,053

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper White A4 80 gsm Recycled Supreme (500 Sheets per Ream - 5 Reams per box)

A4

80

525

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper White A3 80 gsm Recycled Supreme (500 Sheets per Ream - 5 Reams per box)

A3

80

255

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper White A3 80 gsm Recycled + (Box of 2,500 Sheets)

A3

80

109

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper White A4 80 gsm Recycled Supreme (Box of 2,500 Sheets)

A4

80

30

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 160 gsm Yellow (Box of 1,250 Sheets)

A4

14

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 80 gsm Blue (Box of 2,500 Sheets)

A4

16

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 160 gsm Ivory (250 Sheets per Ream - 5 Packs per box)

A4

35

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 80 gsm Dark Yellow (500 Sheets per Ream - 5 Reams per box)

A4

158

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A3 80 gsm Lilac (500 Sheets per Ream - 5 Reams per box)

A3

55

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 160 gsm Orange (Box of 1,250 Sheets)

A4

5

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 80 gsm Mid Blue (500 Sheets per Ream - 5 Reams per box)

A4

35

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 80 gsm Mid Grey (500

A4

5

Sheets per Ream - 5 Reams per box)

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 80 gsm Gold (500 Sheets per Ream - 5 Reams per box)

A4

21

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 160 gsm Green (Box of 1,250 Sheets)

A4

10

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 160 gsm Orange (250 Sheets per Ream - 5 Packs per box)

A4

5

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 160 gsm Gold (250 Sheets per Ream - 5 Packs per box)

A4

5

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 160 gsm Yellow (250 Sheets per Ream - 5 Packs per box)

A4

5

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 160 gsm Ivory (Box of 1,250 Sheets)

A4

5

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper White SRA3 220 gsm Colotech+ (Box of 750 Sheets)

SRA3

4

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 160 gsm Mid Grey (Box of 1,250 Sheets)

A4

1

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 160 gsm Dark Blue (Box of 1,250 Sheets)

A3

5

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A3 80 gsm Mid Grey (Box of 2,500 Sheets)

A3

2

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 160 gsm Dark Red (250 Sheets per Ream - 5 Packs per box)

A4

5

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A3 80 gsm Green (500 Sheets per Ream - 5 Reams per box)

A3

107

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper White SRA3 280 gsm Colotech+Silk (125 Sheets per Pack – 5 Packs per box)

SRA3

5

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 80 gsm Dark Green (Box of 2,500 Sheets)

A4

5

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 80 gsm Mid Grey (Box of 2,500 Sheets)

A4

6

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 80 gsm Mid Green (500 Sheets per Ream - 5 Reams per box)

A4

10

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A3 80 gsm Dark Yellow (500 Sheets per Ream - 5 Reams per box)

A3

8

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper White SRA3 220 gsm Colotech+ (250 Sheets per Pack - 3 Packs per box)

SRA3

7

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 160 gsm Dark Yellow (Box of 1,250 Sheets)

A4

7

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper Symphony Tint A4 80 gsm Mid Pink (Box of 2,500 Sheets)

A4

2

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper White SRA3 120 gsm Colotech+ Silk (Box of 1,500 Sheets)

SRA3

25

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper White SRA3 250 gsm Colotech+ Silk (Box of 625 Sheets)

SRA3

1

Xerox

Paper

100gColotechMatt 8 packs of 500 sheets = 4,000 sheets required.

SRA3

8

Xerox

Paper

100g ColotechSRA3 White Paper (500 sheets per ream ) 3 reams per box .

SRA3

8

Xerox

Paper

Xerox Printing Paper White SRA3 160 gsm Colotech+ (200 Sheets per Pack - 4 Packs per box)

SRA3

12

Xerox

Paper

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3

Driving Offences

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the average (a) fine and (b) custodial sentence was for convictions for motor offences which resulted in (i) injury and (ii) death in the last 10 years. (320162)

The available information is provided in the following table.

Average fine and average sentence length for motor offences which resulted in death, 1998 to 2008

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

404

Causing death by dangerous driving1

Total fined

9

6

4

4

6

1

3

1

2

3

3

Average fine (£)

620.0

1958.3

425.0

562.5

750.0

1200.0

3833.3

300.0

625.0

1250.0

1133.3

Total given immediate custody4

169

136

166

193

199

217

221

238

210

214

206

ACSL

38.0

34.3

37.1

39.0

39.2

43.0

44.4

44.8

43.7

44.1

48.8

Total sentenced

203

173

193

226

228

233

241

254

223

233

221

406

Causing death by careless driving when under the influence of drink or drugs

Total fined

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

2

0

1

0

Average fine (£)

200.0

500.0

1000.0

1500.0

Total given immediate custody

58

45

49

48

61

58

59

62

64

65

45

ACSL

37.1

41.7

38.3

43.4

40.9

44.0

43.4

42.4

40.8

39.2

46.6

Total sentenced

63

46

53

51

66

60

62

66

65

67

46

408

Causing death by careless or inconsiderate driving5

Total fined

4

Average fine (£)

875.0

Total given immediate custody

0

ACSL

0

Total sentenced

4

409

Causing death by drivingunlicensed, disqualified or uninsured drivers6

Total fined

0

Average fine (£)

0

Total given immediate custody

0

ACSL

0

Total sentenced

0

804

Causing bodily harm by furious driving2

Total fined

3

0

2

0

1

2

0

1

0

0

0

Average fine (£)

650.0

400.0

250.0

375.0

250.0

Total given immediate custody

1

6

5

4

8

5

7

2

4

0

4

ACSL

6.0

7.5

11.6

11.5

8.7

14.4

11.5

11.0

9.5

11.2

Total sentenced

9

11

12

7

13

11

13

8

7

5

11

3701

Aggravated taking where, owing to the driving of the vehicle, an accident occurs causing the death of any person3

Total fined

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Average fine (£)

250.0

Total given immediate custody

12

3

8

8

8

11

8

8

6

8

4

ACSL

36.6

34.9

36.5

39.0

38.3

42.0

42.7

43.5

42.1

42.1

47.5

Total sentenced

19

7

11

11

11

14

11

23

11

18

4

1 Road Traffic Act 1988.

2 Offences against the Person Act 1861.

3 Theft Act 1968 as added by Aggravated Vehicle-Taking Act 1992.

4 Excludes life and indeterminate sentences.

5 408 Causing death by careless or inconsiderate driving, (Road Traffic Act 1988 s.2B was added by the Road Safety Act 2006) commenced in August 2008.

6 409 Causing death by driving: unlicensed, disqualified or uninsured drivers, (Road Traffic Act 1988 S.3ZB was added by the Road Safety Act 2006) commenced in August 2008.

Note:

1. These figures have been drawn from administrative data systems. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system.

2. These data have been taken from the Ministry of Justice Court Proceedings database. These data are presented on the principal offence basis. Where an offender has been sentenced for more than one offence the principal offence is the one for which the heaviest sentence was imposed. Where the same sentence has been imposed for two or more offences the principal offence is the one for which the statutory maximum is most severe.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many people have been convicted of dangerous driving in each of the smallest geographical areas for which figures are available in each of the last 10 years; and what proportion of those convicted were repeat offenders in each year; (320164)

(2) how many people in each age group have been convicted of causing death or bodily harm through driving in each of the smallest geographical areas for which figures are available in each of the last 10 years; and what proportion of those convicted were repeat offenders.

The number of persons found guilty at all courts in England and Wales of dangerous driving, by police force area, from 1999 to 2008 (latest available) is shown in table 1. These figures have been drawn from the Court Proceedings Database.

The proportion of convictions for dangerous driving where the offender had a previous conviction for dangerous driving, as recorded on the Police National Computer, by police force area, from 2000 to 2008 is given in table 2.

The figures in this table are provisional and subject to change as more information is recorded by the police. PNC data have been used for this table rather than the court proceedings data that forms the source of the published conviction statistics, as the PNC provides information on the criminal history of offenders. Figures prior to 2000 are not available.

The number of persons on the Court Proceedings Database found guilty at all courts in England and Wales of causing death or bodily harm through driving, by age group and police force area (which is the smallest geographic area for which statistics are available), from 1999 to 2008 can be found in tables 3A and 3B.

Figures taken from the Police National Computer show that between 2000 and 2008 three offenders were convicted for an offence of causing death or bodily harm through driving having been convicted previously for a similar offence.

Court proceedings data for 2009 are planned to be published in the autumn 2010.

Table 1: The number of persons found guilty at all courts in England and Wales for dangerous driving1, by police force area, from 1999 to 20082,3,4

Police force area

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

20083

Avon and Somerset

115

117

110

142

164

169

153

114

116

93

Bedfordshire

27

28

36

38

54

36

43

44

40

55

Cambridgeshire

77

61

67

74

95

78

72

77

52

50

Cheshire

80

83

79

77

97

104

70

84

72

59

City of London

3

4

8

9

6

8

7

4

2

1

Cleveland

66

57

72

82

79

101

72

66

63

56

Cumbria

52

54

48

62

79

72

63

59

88

63

Derbyshire

86

88

95

107

105

108

58

60

65

54

Devon and Cornwall

75

63

78

78

85

75

67

52

57

54

Dorset

15

24

36

37

52

50

44

23

34

23

Durham

49

49

62

66

85

89

55

61

44

35

Essex

94

74

69

95

99

104

89

76

91

63

Gloucestershire

48

54

49

45

52

52

56

34

29

34

Greater Manchester

330

368

315

390

433

427

328

292

281

225

Hampshire

134

158

158

158

144

130

113

95

104

108

Hertfordshire

36

47

37

53

71

69

73

76

56

40

Humberside

67

79

82

75

103

91

79

94

79

80

Kent

66

62

66

93

116

94

93

91

76

76

Lancashire

129

138

120

156

147

132

117

135

126

87

Leicestershire

75

97

121

114

126

118

87

61

53

60

Lincolnshire

45

39

41

45

49

44

33

36

33

32

Merseyside

112

99

126

122

169

243

233

152

189

128

Metropolitan police

317

359

390

446

562

570

515

475

442

396

Norfolk

47

31

32

59

67

60

56

59

72

36

North Yorkshire

64

61

60

77

65

70

63

73

66

63

Northamptonshire

64

56

27

32

36

77

46

50

43

52

Northumbria

227

185

196

193

187

191

170

171

157

123

Nottinghamshire

101

118

125

148

218

167

128

103

93

95

South Yorkshire

121

165

116

143

194

149

126

121

115

114

Staffordshire

61

49

66

81

75

65

70

107

62

85

Suffolk

54

43

50

60

50

51

42

36

67

54

Surrey

23

29

25

42

50

33

26

23

35

25

Sussex

71

56

82

75

65

64

83

66

61

54

Thames Valley

81

98

105

150

129

115

129

125

147

121

Warwickshire

36

28

29

35

40

33

63

63

51

43

West Mercia

111

72

78

106

108

102

117

104

89

92

West Midlands

231

289

349

451

448

488

397

413

320

272

West Yorkshire

205

186

162

247

278

279

249

178

216

183

Wiltshire

38

48

40

49

53

43

45

34

31

23

Dyfed-Powys

62

53

37

59

52

58

39

46

42

35

Gwent

86

95

64

86

95

79

84

68

60

44

North Wales

57

54

63

52

71

85

74

63

63

55

South Wales

170

172

203

206

198

187

168

150

136

93

Total England and Wales

4,008

4,090

4,174

4,915

5,451

5,360

4,695

4,314

4,118

3,534

1 Includes offences of aiding, abetting, causing or permitting reckless driving under the Road Traffic Act 1988 s.2 as amended by the Road Traffic Act 1991 s.2. 2 The figures given relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. 3 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. 4 Excludes convictions for Cardiff magistrates court for April, July and August 2008. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services in the Ministry of Justice.

Table 2: Proportion of convictions for dangerous driving where the offender had a previous conviction for dangerous driving,as recorded on the Police National Computer1

Percentage

Police force

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Avon and Somerset

21

19

22

27

22

18

19

15

18

Bedfordshire

*

*

*

14

*

*

14

*

19

Cambridgeshire

10

11

14

12

13

14

7

*

*

Cheshire

5

7

8

11

10

16

9

10

6

City of London

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Cleveland

12

15

12

14

18

19

19

13

16

Cumbria

9

*

12

13

19

15

10

11

12

Derbyshire

11

9

13

11

13

11

13

16

13

Devon and Cornwall

16

6

17

11

15

4

11

14

14

Dorset

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Durham

*

*

21

16

18

16

12

*

*

Dyfed-Powys

*

*

12

*

5

*

*

*

*

Essex

15

6

4

8

8

10

6

7

18

Gloucestershire

12

*

*

27

19

*

*

*

*

Greater Manchester

11

14

19

18

14

22

18

15

14

Gwent

18

20

20

17

17

25

16

10

12

Hampshire

10

8

16

11

12

11

11

6

7

Hertfordshire

*

*

11

15

9

3

11

12

*

Humberside

9

17

13

14

13

15

26

9

25

Kent

19

8

9

9

10

11

9

13

12

Lancashire

11

10

10

14

12

9

12

11

11

Leicestershire

18

13

13

15

16

13

22

19

14

Lincolnshire

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Merseyside

16

11

17

14

13

16

17

11

9

Metropolitan police

9

11

10

8

11

9

10

12

11

Norfolk

*

*

10

13

14

*

11

8

*

North Wales

9

10

11

11

14

9

9

13

11

North Yorkshire

2

9

11

15

12

8

14

11

10

Northamptonshire

10

*

13

14

14

*

*

10

*

Northumbria

16

23

19

24

18

18

15

19

13

Nottinghamshire

11

17

15

19

18

19

11

26

11

South Wales

20

24

23

22

22

22

27

24

21

South Yorkshire

8

11

14

15

13

9

19

19

15

Staffordshire

9

13

6

13

18

4

12

10

11

Suffolk

*

*

10

14

*

*

*

0

9

Surrey

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Sussex

*

13

6

13

17

9

7

14

10

Thames Valley

6

5

18

11

14

8

14

10

10

Warwickshire

*

*

*

*

*

9

10

9

*

West Mercia

8

7

7

8

10

9

5

8

6

West Midlands

13

8

11

13

11

13

19

17

18

West Yorkshire

11

15

12

16

12

17

15

15

18

Wiltshire

*

*

12

*

*

*

*

*

*

Total

12

13

14

14

14

14

14

13

13

* Indicates that the total number of convictions recorded on the PNC was less than 50. For small numbers this could give misleading percentage changes. 1 As with any large scale recording system, the data are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services Ministry of Justice.

Table 3A: The number of persons aged under 21 found guilty at all courts in England and Wales for causing death or bodily harm through driving1, by police force area, from 1999 to 20082,3,4

Police force area

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

20083

Avon and Somerset

2

1

2

2

1

1

1

2

1

1

Bedfordshire

2

1

1

1

1

2

1

Cambridgeshire

1

3

1

1

2

1

Cheshire

1

2

1

1

3

5

3

Cleveland

2

1

3

2

2

Cumbria

1

2

1

1

3

2

Derbyshire

3

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

Devon and Cornwall

2

1

3

1

1

1

10

1

7

2

Dorset

2

1

1

1

2

2

Durham

1

1

1

3

4

1

1

Essex

2

2

4

2

1

1

2

4

Gloucestershire

2

1

3

1

2

1

1

Greater Manchester

1

7

6

1

9

6

5

3

5

Hampshire

1

1

1

1

1

2

4

2

Hertfordshire

2

1

3

2

1

3

Humberside

1

5

1

2

1

1

1

1

Kent

1

1

1

2

1

2

3

Lancashire

3

1

2

3

3

2

1

2

1

Leicestershire

1

3

2

3

4

1

2

Lincolnshire

1

1

2

1

2

1

1

Merseyside

3

3

7

5

7

4

1

9

4

Metropolitan police

5

7

7

7

6

7

7

7

3

5

Norfolk

1

2

2

2

3

2

North Yorkshire

3

2

2

1

1

3

3

2

Northamptonshire

2

1

2

3

2

1

Northumbria

1

2

2

3

3

1

1

1

1

Nottinghamshire

1

3

2

1

3

4

South Yorkshire

3

2

3

1

4

8

5

Staffordshire

2

1

1

1

7

3

1

Suffolk

1

1

1

Surrey

2

1

1

1

2

1

Sussex

4

3

3

3

1

3

Thames Valley

1

5

5

5

3

4

3

4

4

Warwickshire

1

1

1

3

2

2

West Mercia

2

1

1

1

1

3

3

4

2

West Midlands

4

4

6

8

4

5

6

6

5

3

West Yorkshire

1

3

7

5

6

2

10

5

5

Wiltshire

1

1

1

Dyfed-Powys

1

3

1

1

1

Gwent

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

North Wales

1

1

2

1

South Wales

4

1

1

3

4

1

4

2

Total England and Wales

58

68

78

73

77

80

91

92

71

49

1 Includes offences of: Causing death by dangerous driving; Causing death by careless driving when under the influence of drink or drugs; Causing death by driving—unlicensed, disqualified or uninsured drivers; Causing bodily harm by furious driving; Aggravated taking of a vehicle where, owing to the driving of the vehicle, an accident occurs causing the death of any person. 2 The figures given relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. 3 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. 4 Excludes convictions for Cardiff magistrates court for April, July and August 2008. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services in the Ministry of Justice.

Table 3B: The number of persons aged 21 and over found guilty at all courts in England and Wales for causing death or bodily harm through driving1, by police force area, from 1999 to 20082,3,4

Police force area

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Avon and Somerset

4

5

5

11

10

8

6

4

2

4

Bedfordshire

1

4

2

8

6

2

4

1

3

3

Cambridgeshire

4

10

4

5

9

5

3

8

5

7

Cheshire

6

7

3

5

4

3

3

3

2

4

City of London

1

Cleveland

1

3

2

2

3

5

4

1

1

4

Cumbria

2

2

4

5

2

7

4

5

5

2

Derbyshire

3

4

3

3

10

4

4

3

2

2

Devon and Cornwall

4

3

5

2

4

4

10

4

6

8

Dorset

1

4

2

2

3

3

1

1

Durham

2

1

1

4

2

6

8

1

Essex

4

1

8

10

6

3

8

4

6

5

Gloucestershire

4

4

3

1

5

4

2

3

1

Greater Manchester

8

17

14

22

11

14

11

5

7

17

Hampshire

5

9

6

4

7

3

4

5

8

9

Hertfordshire

3

2

7

5

4

3

4

2

4

5

Humberside

7

2

5

2

7

7

10

7

6

5

Kent

8

5

5

10

2

6

9

7

6

10

Lancashire

4

1

6

5

3

9

6

3

10

9

Leicestershire

5

5

6

3

5

7

4

2

11

4

Lincolnshire

5

5

6

4

8

10

2

5

2

9

Merseyside

1

3

8

5

5

10

5

4

5

2

Metropolitan police

23

19

21

24

28

23

25

24

26

24

Norfolk

2

2

2

4

3

2

3

4

3

4

North Yorkshire

1

6

3

4

3

8

10

5

10

4

Northamptonshire

2

5

3

4

2

4

6

7

6

8

Northumbria

5

5

4

6

8

8

7

6

6

4

Nottinghamshire

4

5

5

7

9

5

2

6

3

South Yorkshire

2

5

4

7

5

9

3

3

5

7

Staffordshire

1

2

2

6

7

4

7

5

8

6

Suffolk

1

3

3

1

2

3

4

4

2

Surrey

2

2

2

4

3

2

3

8

2

Sussex

6

4

2

6

3

6

4

12

7

5

Thames Valley

10

11

12

7

11

8

12

17

20

12

Warwickshire

1

6

3

2

2

5

2

4

1

West Mercia

7

4

7

5

4

9

5

4

7

5

West Midlands

6

12

14

7

9

10

10

10

8

6

West Yorkshire

7

8

11

13

11

11

16

15

13

13

Wiltshire

6

3

5

2

5

1

6

1

3

4

Dyfed-Powys

2

6

1

1

2

1

4

2

Gwent

1

4

2

2

4

6

1

4

North Wales

3

1

2

4

1

4

4

4

7

South Wales

11

9

4

9

9

4

3

7

5

4

Total England and Wales

179

202

221

244

240

247

260

212

253

238

1 Includes offences of: Causing death by dangerous driving; Causing death by careless driving when under the influence of drink or drugs; Causing death by careless or inconsiderate driving; Causing bodily harm by furious driving; Aggravated taking of a vehicle where, owing to the driving of the vehicle, an accident occurs causing the death of any person. 2 The figures given relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. 3 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. 4 Excludes convictions for Cardiff magistrates court for April, July and August 2008. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services in the Ministry of Justice.

General Election 2010: Poole

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what discussions he has had with returning officers in Poole on the timing of the general election vote count. (320382)

The acting returning officer for Poole has provided the Ministry of Justice with helpful information on the practical issues surrounding the timing of the count at the next UK parliamentary general election.

This information along with the views received from other key stakeholders, including the Electoral Commission, Association of Electoral Administrators and SOLACE helped to inform the clause that was inserted into the Constitutional Reform and Governance Bill (‘CRaG Bill’), at Commons Report stage on 2 March which amends schedule 1 to the Representation of the People Act 1983 (the Parliamentary Elections Rules) to provide that a returning officer must take reasonable steps to begin counting the votes given on the ballot papers as soon as practicable within four hours of the close of poll. The clause also requires that:

(i) the Electoral Commission must produce guidance on this duty;

(ii) in instances where the count does not begin by 2 am, returning officers to publish and send to the Electoral Commission a statement within 30 days of the poll giving the time that the count began, explaining, why it did not begin before 2 am, and setting out the steps taken to begin the count by 2 am.

(iii) the Electoral Commission to list those constituencies that did not start the count before 2 am in its statutory report on the conduct of the election.

I am also aware that the acting returning officer for Poole has advised the Electoral Commission that he intends to commence the count on the night of the general election poll.

Grimsby

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will set out, with statistical information related as directly as possible to Great Grimsby constituency, the effects of his Department's policies on that constituency since 1997. (320184)

The Ministry of Justice's work spans criminal, civil and family justice, democracy, rights and the constitution. Every year around 9 million people use our services in 900 locations across the United Kingdom, including 650 courts and tribunals and 139 prisons in England and Wales.

The range of the Department's policies and actions is wide and the statistical information relating to it is not normally collected on a constituency basis. Consequently, some of the information requested in the question cannot be provided in the form requested except at a disproportionate cost.

Although data on sentencing for the period is not available for the constituency of Great Grimsby, it is available for Humberside. This shows the total number of offenders sentenced annually was 20,950 in 1997 and 14,569 in 2008, the latest period for which such information is available.

The number of offences brought to justice for the Humberside area increased from 18,497 for the 12 months ending 31 March 2001 (the earliest period since which such data has been compiled) to 26,584 (provisional figures) for the 12 months ending 31 March 2009.

With regard to prosecutions, data is not available for the constituency of Great Grimsby. However, the total number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates' courts in Humberside was 26,798 in 1997 compared to 19,101 in 2008.

The latest data, which covers reoffending in the period 1 October 2008 to 30 September 2009, showed that the three month reoffending rate for offenders on the probation caseload in North East Lincolnshire was 12.53 per cent. After controlling for changes in the characteristics of offenders on the probation caseload, there was an increase in reoffending of 1.26 per cent. compared to the 2007-08 baseline. Data is not available prior to 2007 on this basis.

The number of persons commencing court order supervision by the Probation Service in Humberside was 2,139 in 1997 and 3,450 in 2008.

56,172 civil non-family proceedings were started in the county courts of Humber and South Yorkshire HM Courts Service (HMCS) area in 2008, compared to 61,944 in 1998, the first year for which these figures are available. In respect of family law, there were also 4,803 private law applications and 303 public law applications made in the county or High Courts of this HMCS area in 2008-09, compared to 4,530 and 385 respectively in 2003-04, the first annual period for which these figures are available.

In addition, at a national level:

Local communities are being better engaged in criminal justice – by giving them a say in the types of community payback projects offenders carry out and allowing them to see justice being done, for example through the use of high visibility jackets. Offenders have now worked more than fourteen million hours, with an estimated value to the taxpayer of over £80 million.

Major constitutional reforms have been delivered, including devolution, the Human Rights Act, Freedom of Information, Lords Reform, and a new Supreme Court for the UK.

National Bullying Helpline

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what contact the Prison Service has had with the National Bullying Helpline since 2004; and whether the Prison Service has made any payments to (a) the National Bullying Helpline and (b) HR and Diversity Management Limited in that period. (320135)

The Prison Service has national policies designed to keep prisoners, staff and visitors safe from bullying. These policies do not promote the National Bullying Helpline. Whether prisons locally or offices have ever had any contact with the National Bullying Helpline since 2004 could be known only by contacting each prison and office and asking them to check available information. This would incur disproportionate cost. According to information held centrally, no payments have been made to either the National Bullying Helpline or to HR and Diversity Management Limited.

Prisons: Databases

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) when the Local Inmate Database System was introduced; (320082)

(2) what plans there are for the establishment of the Local Inmate Database System (LIDS); and what plans there are for the future of the national LIDS database.

The Prison Service Local Inmate Database System (LIDS) was introduced in 1989.

LIDS is being replaced by a new case management system, called Prison-NOMIS (Prison-National Offender Management Information System). Prison-NOMIS is a national system with a centralised database. It is on schedule to be deployed to public prisons by summer 2010.

Prisons: Drugs

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) whether he has made an estimate of the incidence of serious organised crime in prison which involves the trafficking of drugs; (320097)

(2) what recent assessment he has made of the level of serious organised crime activity in prisons.

Covert criminal activity is, of its nature, very difficult to quantify.

Prisons have a well established security information reporting framework. Where concerns are identified about a prisoner's potential criminal activity, prisons can draw on a range of measures to identify and disrupt that activity.

NOMS is also fully engaged in action to address serious and organised crime strategically, including the work identified in the Government report ”Extending Our Reach: A Comprehensive Approach to Tackling Serious Organised Crime” to develop a strategy to manage serious organised criminals while in prison.

Prisons: Females

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what arrangements have been made to re-categorise (a) HMP Morton Hall and (b) HMP Foston Hall from semi-open to closed prisons; and if he will make a statement; (320165)

(2) what assessment his Department undertook on the effect on women in prison of the removal of the semi-open category of prison.

On 11 February 2009 the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) announced the re-designation of both HMP Morton Hall and HMP/YOI Drake Hall from semi-open to closed prisons. There are no plans to change this decision.

The re-designation, which took effect on 2 March 2009, allowed NOMS to more effectively provide for the needs of all women prisoners through greater flexibility in the use of the estate. It has also improved closeness to home for some women, supported the placement of indeterminate sentenced women in accordance with their needs, and in general enabled more women to access the resettlement regimes available at these two prisons. There was no requirement to move any of the women out of either prison as a result of the change. Both establishments retained their levels of internal and perimeter security and their resettlement regimes, including their roles as specialist foreign national centres. Women suitable for open conditions are able to go these prisons if such a move meets their resettlement needs.

Prisons: Mobile Phones

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many illicit mobile phones were found in each prison in England and Wales in each of the last 12 months; and how many of those phones were found (a) on staff, (b) on prisoners and (c) in communal areas. (320095)

The Government are committed to reducing the number of mobile phones in prisons. We have already strengthened the law through the Offender Management Act 2007, which made it an offence with a penalty of up to two years’ imprisonment to bring a mobile phone or component into a prison. We are also taking forward legislation through the Crime and Security Bill to criminalise the possession of devices, including mobile telephones within a prison without authorisation.

The National Offender Management Service (NOMS) does not hold centrally disaggregated information on the location or ownership of phones seized. Many phones and component parts are not attributable to individuals. Prisons in England and Wales are instructed to send mobile phones and SIM cards found to a central unit for analysis, it is from this unit’s records that this answer is based. The figures contained in the tables have been drawn from administrative data systems. Although care is taken when processing data, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system. These data are not subject to audit.

The figures understate the actual number of finds, because they do not include items retained by the police for evidential purposes and phones not submitted for other reasons. It is not always appropriate to send phones to the central unit and some phones sent are not interrogated. These have not been included in these figures. NOMS is putting in place new procedures to improve the accuracy of these statistics.

Tackling mobile phones in prison presents substantial and increasing technological challenges, and while the numbers of phones found clearly indicates the scale of the challenge, it is also a reflection of prisons’ increasing success in finding them and better reporting. The following tables show the number of mobile phones and SIM cards that have been received from each of the prisons over the last 12 months.

Mobile phone and sim cards submitted to central unit (February 2009to January 2010)

High Security

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

Belmarsh

1

1

Full Sutton

1

2

Frankland

2

Long Lartin

6

2

1

1

1

2

1

2

3

Manchester

6

6

3

3

8

6

12

15

1

1

5

4

1

2

Wakefield

Woodhill

Whitemoor

1

2

2

1

1

2

1

1

Total

12

11

7

7

8

6

14

20

2

5

5

7

2

4

SeptemberOctoberNovemberDecemberJanuaryTotal

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

Belmarsh

2

1

3

Full Sutton

2

1

1

1

6

Frankland

0

2

Long Lartin

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

13

14

Manchester

5

1

1

6

1

9

12

52

56

Wakefield

0

0

Woodhill

1

1

1

1

2

2

Whitemoor

1

2

1

2

6

11

Total

6

2

3

9

2

2

3

7

11

14

75

94

London

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

Brixton

3

5

25

23

1

1

7

6

3

2

Feltham

14

13

10

12

14

11

10

12

3

2

7

9

Holloway

3

4

1

Latchmere House

1

4

2

1

Pentonville

1

1

17

15

17

10

10

14

15

13

Wandsworth

2

3

8

7

9

12

21

19

4

Wormwood Scrubs

3

4

8

7

14

9

8

12

8

6

5

6

13

11

Total

8

12

30

27

59

57

41

39

49

40

42

43

36

38

SeptemberOctoberNovemberDecemberJanuaryTotal

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

Brixton

2

2

14

12

4

4

2

6

9

9

70

70

Feltham

3

5

8

9

3

2

3

3

4

2

19

80

Holloway

1

1

1

2

2

6

9

Latchmere House

2

2

2

3

5

1

1

18

6

Pentonville

10

11

21

18

16

14

17

19

9

5

133

120

Wandsworth

5

4

3

1

48

50

Wormwood Scrubs

12

15

10

7

14

18

9

9

18

15

122

119

Total

30

34

60

51

39

41

38

39

44

33

476

453

Wales

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

Cardiff

2

3

2

2

1

1

1

1

3

4

3

2

3

3

Swansea

1

2

3

3

4

5

1

1

5

3

Usk/Prescoed

2

1

1

1

1

Parc

1

3

4

4

1

1

1

Total

2

3

3

4

6

5

3

5

11

13

5

3

10

7

SeptemberOctoberNovemberDecemberJanuaryTotal

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

Cardiff

1

1

5

3

1

1

4

6

2

3

28

30

Swansea

6

5

4

4

4

5

11

11

3

3

42

42

Usk/Prescoed

1

1

1

5

4

Parc

1

2

1

1

1

2

5

12

16

Total

8

8

9

8

6

6

17

19

7

11

87

92

South East

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

Albany

1

1

Aylesbury

1

2

2

6

1

2

2

2

12

11

Blantyre House

1

3

2

2

Bronzefield

3

4

3

4

3

4

Bullingdon

1

4

3

2

2

4

5

4

2

1

1

1

Camp Hill

2

2

1

2

3

Canterbury

1

5

1

1

1

1

3

2

3

1

Coldingley

1

1

1

Cookham Wood

2

2

1

2

Dover

3

1

1

1

8

5

Downview

1

2

East Sutton Park

1

1

Elmley

5

15

3

5

5

2

6

6

4

4

1

1

2

Ford

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

Grendon

1

1

18

9

Haslar

Highdown

1

16

14

6

2

5

4

5

4

Huntercombe

1

2

2

4

1

1

2

2

Kingston

1

1

Lewes

Maidstone

3

3

2

2

3

4

3

3

1

3

Parkhurst

1

1

2

6

1

1

2

2

1

2

3

2

1

Reading

2

2

1

2

2

2

4

Rochester

1

1

5

6

3

Send

1

1

2

3

Springhill

19

9

5

3

8

5

8

6

1

1

Standford Hill

2

2

1

1

2

2

16

10

8

4

14

11

6

3

Swaleside

4

4

2

3

4

4

6

7

6

10

10

9

9

8

Winchester

3

2

1

3

1

Total

44

44

47

57

46

36

48

42

44

36

71

66

46

44

SeptemberOctoberNovemberDecemberJanuaryTotal

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

Albany

1

1

Aylesbury

8

7

7

6

6

6

13

14

52

56

Blantyre House

4

2

12

2

Bronzefield

4

4

2

3

15

19

Bullingdon

1

6

3

3

2

2

3

28

22

Camp Hill

1

1

6

6

Canterbury

2

1

1

1

2

1

14

13

Coldingley

3

4

4

5

1

1

1

11

11

Cookham Wood

1

1

4

5

Dover

2

6

4

5

1

9

5

4

2

38

19

Downview

1

1

2

3

East Sutton Park

1

2

2

3

Elmley

4

7

2

2

1

1

4

5

1

2

36

52

Ford

1

1

1

6

8

Grendon

19

10

Haslar

0

0

Highdown

4

3

2

1

1

1

4

4

44

33

Huntercombe

1

1

7

10

Kingston

1

2

1

Lewes

1

1

1

1

Maidstone

5

6

5

9

1

2

5

6

28

38

Parkhurst

10

9

4

6

2

26

30

Reading

1

5

4

12

13

Rochester

1

2

3

1

3

1

1

10

18

Send

1

1

1

1

5

6

Springhill

1

2

1

1

1

1

44

9

Standford Hill

6

5

7

6

18

11

4

2

5

5

89

62

Swaleside

4

5

6

6

6

11

7

5

8

5

72

77

Winchester

2

1

1

1

2

3

10

10

Total

56

53

47

47

48

38

45

39

54

55

596

538

South West

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

Ashfield

1

2

1

6

6

1

1

2

2

Bristol

3

3

10

8

6

6

7

9

3

3

Channings Wood

6

6

6

6

4

4

2

7

3

3

1

2

5

5

Dartmoor

2

8

6

1

1

9

8

3

3

4

5

3

1

Dorchester

1

1

2

3

Eastwood Park

3

2

1

2

4

6

Erlestoke

1

Exeter

3

3

1

4

7

1

1

3

1

1

1

Gloucester

16

12

1

3

1

1

Guys Marsh

3

1

5

4

9

6

9

7

19

15

26

17

Leyhill

1

2

6

8

10

5

Portland

Shepton Mallet

2

3

1

1

3

1

1

1

The Verne

1

3

3

3

1

2

5

4

3

2

3

2

Total

35

28

21

23

18

20

47

47

30

26

43

42

56

42

SeptemberOctoberNovemberDecemberJanuaryTotal

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

Ashfield

1

1

11

13

Bristol

2

2

4

3

1

36

34

Channings Wood

6

2

2

2

3

2

1

33

45

Dartmoor

3

1

3

2

3

1

6

5

3

3

48

36

Dorchester

1

1

1

3

2

8

7

Eastwood Park

1

1

1

1

1

10

13

Erlestoke

1

1

2

1

Exeter

2

4

2

3

1

2

18

22

Gloucester

3

3

2

1

1

1

1

26

21

Guys Marsh

18

17

3

4

9

3

11

13

8

6

120

93

Leyhill

7

8

18

15

12

11

5

4

59

53

Portland

0

0

Shepton Mallet

1

2

8

8

The Verne

2

2

2

2

3

1

1

1

1

2

25

24

Total

32

38

28

27

36

23

37

36

21

18

404

370

East of England

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

Bedford

4

2

1

1

1

Blundeston

5

9

1

1

1

1

2

2

5

1

3

3

3

Bullwood Hall

Chelmsford

3

4

2

1

2

1

3

Edmunds Hill

1

1

3

3

1

3

1

3

2

1

2

1

5

5

Highpoint

16

10

6

3

3

3

5

5

1

1

3

6

2

4

Hollesley Bay

5

3

9

6

3

1

6

5

1

2

3

15

8

Littlehey

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

3

The Mount

1

7

9

7

18

22

15

12

10

14

12

13

Norwich

2

3

1

1

1

4

7

8

2

3

3

1

1

Peterborough

2

2

13

11

1

1

4

9

6

5

6

9

10

12

Warren Hill

Wayland

2

2

3

4

2

1

2

5

3

4

5

7

5

Total

37

35

42

39

21

21

48

61

35

29

28

51

55

51

SeptemberOctoberNovemberDecemberJanuaryTotal

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

Bedford

1

2

2

7

7

Blundeston

1

1

5

3

2

19

30

Bullwood Hall

1

1

1

1

Chelmsford

1

1

2

1

3

3

14

13

Edmunds Hill

4

1

2

1

1

22

19

Highpoint

1

3

1

2

2

2

3

3

43

42

Hollesley Bay

5

4

10

11

11

4

12

8

13

11

92

64

Littlehey

2

6

7

The Mount

8

7

12

11

3

5

5

3

8

8

101

109

Norwich

17

20

Peterborough

13

10

7

10

3

1

9

11

8

11

82

92

Warren Hill

0

0

Wayland

6

6

1

3

5

6

31

41

Total

33

28

43

43

22

17

31

25

40

45

435

445

East Midlands

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

Ashwell

3

5

5

3

2

2

4

4

2

1

2

Fosten Hall

Gartree

1

1

1

9

1

1

Glen Parva

3

4

Leicester

2

3

1

1

3

2

5

4

7

6

7

10

6

5

Lincoln

1

1

2

4

7

2

5

1

2

4

3

1

Lowdham Grange

5

2

Morton Hall

2

2

North Sea Camp

2

1

3

6

3

3

4

4

7

3

1

Nottingham

1

1

1

2

3

5

1

2

3

Onley

1

2

4

1

2

1

1

Ranby

4

3

4

4

1

4

5

3

2

Rye Hill

1

11

9

6

8

8

7

16

24

8

20

21

16

Stocken

5

5

1

1

1

2

2

Sudbury

1

Wellingborough

9

14

5

6

10

11

1

14

13

2

1

11

8

Whatton

Total

27

30

38

43

35

37

20

22

52

61

31

57

47

36

SeptemberOctoberNovemberDecemberJanuaryTotal

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

Ashwell

1

1

15

20

Fosten Hall

0

0

Gartree

10

7

2

1

15

19

Glen Parva

1

2

1

1

5

7

Leicester

2

3

2

1

5

3

2

2

2

2

44

42

Lincoln

3

2

5

4

3

2

3

5

28

32

Lowdham Grange

5

2

Morton Hall

2

2

North Sea Camp

1

5

8

3

3

3

3

2

2

32

35

Nottingham

3

3

1

1

6

10

23

Onley

1

1

3

11

6

Ranby

5

4

21

18

Rye Hill

8

5

7

8

6

10

4

3

5

5

100

116

Stocken

1

1

2

6

8

1

2

17

21

Sudbury

1

1

2

1

Wellingborough

1

10

15

10

6

10

11

10

13

91

100

Whatton

0

0

Total

36

30

33

38

27

24

29

33

23

33

398

444

West Midlands

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

Birmingham

5

9

4

6

2

5

7

4

1

6

6

12

8

Brinsford

1

4

1

1

3

3

2

2

8

7

6

4

Dovegate

3

3

2

1

2

2

3

Drake Hall

Featherstone

15

17

3

5

2

2

4

1

11

18

8

12

1

Hewell

4

5

1

2

10

10

2

7

8

10

9

14

12

12

Shrewsbury

1

2

1

1

1

1

3

2

Stafford

1

1

2

Stoke Heath

4

1

3

4

8

7

4

6

2

3

5

6

Swinfen Hall

3

3

4

2

2

1

1

1

6

5

5

4

2

4

Werrington

1

1

2

3

Total

35

39

15

21

22

21

23

26

38

44

40

51

42

40

SeptemberOctoberNovemberDecemberJanuaryTotal

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

Birmingham

5

9

11

9

10

11

6

9

16

15

86

90

Brinsford

1

1

3

5

4

1

4

2

3

3

36

33

Dovegate

13

14

2

5

6

8

3

4

30

41

Drake Hall

0

0

Featherstone

5

3

2

1

5

2

3

1

52

69

Hewell

13

6

12

8

10

7

1

1

6

6

88

88

Shrewsbury

1

1

1

1

1

9

8

Stafford

2

1

1

1

1

2

7

5

Stoke Heath

4

1

1

3

1

1

2

2

35

33

Swinfen Hall

1

1

1

3

1

3

1

3

27

30

Werrington

3

4

Total

31

21

43

46

31

32

21

29

32

31

373

401

York and Humberside

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

M

S

Askham Grange

Doncaster

1

1

1

1

Everthorpe

7

5

12

11

16

15

9

5

10

11

Hull

4

4

7

6

3

2

7

10

2

1

4

3

1

2

Leeds

4

7

10

11

3

7

4

1

7

7

2

1

2

Lindholme

3

2

5

5

14

8

17

20

11

8

Moorland open

4

2

2

5

1

1

2

1

Moorland closed

4

4

4

3

1

3

2

2

3

3

2

2

New Hall

Northallerton

Wealstun

1

6

7

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

5

Wetherby

1

1

2

2

Wolds

2

1

9

10

5

6

6

4

Total

20

22

32

30

27

32

29

29

49